Noise, Transportation: Noise associated with transportation, particularly aircraft and automobiles.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.Tinnitus: A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.Hyperacusis: An abnormally disproportionate increase in the sensation of loudness in response to auditory stimuli of normal volume. COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; FACIAL NERVE DISEASES; STAPES SURGERY; and other disorders may be associated with this condition.Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: An acquired disorder characterized by recurrent symptoms, referable to multiple organ systems, occurring in response to demonstrable exposure to many chemically unrelated compounds at doses below those established in the general population to cause harmful effects. (Cullen MR. The worker with multiple chemical sensitivities: an overview. Occup Med 1987;2(4):655-61)Environmental Illness: A polysymptomatic condition believed by clinical ecologists to result from immune dysregulation induced by common foods, allergens, and chemicals, resulting in various physical and mental disorders. The medical community has remained largely skeptical of the existence of this "disease", given the plethora of symptoms attributed to environmental illness, the lack of reproducible laboratory abnormalities, and the use of unproven therapies to treat the condition. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Loudness Perception: The perceived attribute of a sound which corresponds to the physical attribute of intensity.Energy-Generating Resources: Materials or phenomena which can provide energy directly or via conversion.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.City Planning: Comprehensive planning for the physical development of the city.Psychoacoustics: The science pertaining to the interrelationship of psychologic phenomena and the individual's response to the physical properties of sound.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Sulfur Dioxide: A highly toxic, colorless, nonflammable gas. It is used as a pharmaceutical aid and antioxidant. It is also an environmental air pollutant.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Atmosphere Exposure Chambers: Experimental devices used in inhalation studies in which a person or animal is either partially or completely immersed in a chemically controlled atmosphere.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.SwedenEnvironmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Electricity: The physical effects involving the presence of electric charges at rest and in motion.Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Europe, EasternEmotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Vehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Toluene: A widely used industrial solvent.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.GermanyPetroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Respiratory Tract DiseasesCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.EuropeHealth Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
  • Omaha Cosmetic Dentist - Dr. Brian Zuerlein offers cosmetic and restorative dentistry services, including implants, crowns and bridges, and snoring therapy for Omaha patients. (zuerleindental.com)
  • An anti-snoring mouthpiece comes in two pieced and is set into person's upper and lower jaws thus setting them into the right place. (ruffordcraftcentre.org.uk)
  • Snoring was once considered a simple annoyance for bed partners, but there is a growing awareness in the medical community that the grunts and snorts of noisy sleepers can also be a sign of sleep apnea. (npr.org)
  • Kline says, "If you have snoring accompanied by excessive daytime sleepiness, witnessed pauses in breathing during sleep, gasping during sleep, or the presence of other health disorders, a visit to the doctor is recommended. (popsci.com)
  • Did you know you could die from excessive snoring? (co.ke)
  • What may seem like only snoring and a minor social annoyance, research shows that excessive snoring can be hazardous to your health. (co.ke)
  • Not so long ago, the snoring would easily be overlooked by the unenlightened doctor, and the snorer would mistakenly be referred to a psychiatrist or neurologist in the belief that the excessive sleepiness had a psychological cause or might indicate brain disease. (jimhorne.co.uk)
  • Although it is not necessary to be overweight in general for you to be a snorer, snoring induced lack of sleep will surely lead to excessive weight gain. (snoring-aid.com)
  • If you or someone you love is struggling with snoring or other sleep apnea symptoms, please contact Evolution Dental today online or at 403-208-9965 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Kendra Schick. (evolutiondental.ca)
  • If any of the symptoms listed above, alone or combined with snoring, persist for more than a few weeks, you should consider getting a sleep apnea evaluation with Dr. Schick. (evolutiondental.ca)
  • If you snore or have been diagnosed with mild to moderate sleep apnea, please call our practice at 02 9412 4488 to see if a dental appliance like SomnoMed is an appropriate treatment for you. (chatswooddentalassociates.com.au)
  • For primary snoring or mild to moderate sleep apnea, an oral appliance that fits into the mouth like a retainer may be prescribed. (marshalltribune.com)
  • The finding is significant because 90 million Americans snore, according to the National Sleep Foundation . (emaxhealth.com)
  • Around 37 million Americans snore on a regular basis according to the National Sleep Center. (marshalltribune.com)
  • So instead of kicking your snoring bed partner out of the room or spending sleepless nights elbowing him or her, seek out medical treatment for the snorer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Snoring shouldn't be taken lightly and getting the cause treated could be life changing for the snorer & those close to the snorer. (metafilter.com)
  • Whether you are the snorer or the person to the snoring partner, one cannot ignore the unparalleled rattling feeling. (asonor.com)
  • If you are a snorer and conscious about sharing room during vacation, this post will brief you about all the ways, snoring solutions, anti-snoring products to keep in mind while on vacation. (asonor.com)
  • Here's a wake-up call for snorers: Snoring may put you at a greater risk than those who are overweight, smoke or have high cholesterol to have thickening or abnormalities in the carotid artery, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The study reveals changes in the carotid artery with snorers - even for those without sleep apnea - likely due to the trauma and subsequent inflammation caused by the vibrations of snoring. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This fact shows that snoring is not uncommon - but very few snorers take matters in their hands. (asonor.com)
  • If you snore or are excessively tired throughout the day - or your partner reports pauses in your breathing while you sleep, seek a referral to a sleep physician. (chatswooddentalassociates.com.au)
  • We have known for some time that sleep apnea, which causes pauses in the breathing of sleeping patients, has been linked to cardiovascular diseases and other health problems, but the new study shows us that the risk for these diseases may actually begin long before snoring becomes sleep apnea. (atlantaent.com)
  • Sleep apnea isn't just an annoyance: It's also been tied to higher risks for heart disease, heart failure and stroke. (hon.ch)
  • Klein says, "While there is no guarantee of success with any surgery, and there are risks, these options may offer an option to eliminate snoring-without other concurrent treatment options. (popsci.com)
  • Following are some of the serious health risks related to snoring. (snoring-aid.com)
  • However, clinical researches show that heart-related risks can be reduced if you treat your sleep apnea with an anti snoring mouth guard. (snoring-aid.com)
  • You know, the Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, made a pretty bold statement by saying there are more health risks associated with snoring and OSA than smoking and obesity. (honeygusto.com)
  • Researchers at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have found that snoring puts you at a greater risk of future health problems than those that are obese, smoke or have high cholesterol. (atlantaent.com)
  • In all, 54 patients completed the snore outcomes survey regarding their snoring habits, as well as underwent a carotid artery duplex ultrasound to measure the intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It is important to get rid of your snoring habits to relieve those who sleep with you and to address the health issues that come with it. (selfgrowth.com)
  • If you want to temporarily get rid of your snoring habits and have a restful sleep, try to sleep on your side. (selfgrowth.com)
  • It is important to find a permanent solution to get rid of your snoring habits. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Losing weight can be very helpful to get rid of your snoring habits and at the same time it is good for your overall health. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Gerry Restrivera writes informative articles on various subjects including Get Rid of Your Snoring Habits Once and For All. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Soon, the size or snoring habits of the passengers next to you might not be your prime annoyance on those long, cramped flights - instead, you could be overhearing their cell phone conversations. (psmag.com)
  • A new study from the USA reports that short sleep duration combined with frequent snoring reported prior to cancer diagnosis may influence subsequent breast cancer survival. (sleeppro.com)