Fixation and immobility of a joint.
Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.
A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)
An articulation between the condyle of the mandible and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.
Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
Abnormally small jaw.
In anatomy, 'axis' is a term used to describe a real or imaginary line around which something rotates or along which it aligns, such as the second cervical vertebra, also known as the axis bone, which provides the pivot point for the rotation of the head.
One of the three ossicles of the middle ear. It transmits sound vibrations from the INCUS to the internal ear (Ear, Internal see LABYRINTH).
The point of articulation between the OCCIPITAL BONE and the CERVICAL ATLAS.
A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.
A union between adjacent bones or parts of a single bone formed by osseous material, such as ossified connecting cartilage or fibrous tissue. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.
Inflammation of the joints of the SPINE, the intervertebral articulations.
The first cervical vertebra.
Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.
The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.
Act of striking a part with short, sharp blows as an aid in diagnosing the condition beneath the sound obtained.
The stable placement of surgically induced fractures of the mandible or maxilla through the use of elastics, wire ligatures, arch bars, or other splints. It is used often in the cosmetic surgery of retrognathism and prognathism. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p636)
The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)

The human T cell leukemia virus type I-tax gene is responsible for the development of both inflammatory polyarthropathy resembling rheumatoid arthritis and noninflammatory ankylotic arthropathy in transgenic mice. (1/85)

We previously reported that inflammatory arthropathy resembling rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops among transgenic mice carrying the long terminal repeat (LTR)-env-pX-LTR region of human T cell leukemia virus type I (LTR-pX-Tg mice). Because four genes are encoded in this region, we produced transgenic mice that only express the tax gene to examine its role in the development of arthritis. Transgenic mice were produced by constructing DNAs that express the tax gene alone under the control of either its own LTR or CD4 enhancer/promoter and by microinjecting them into C3H/HeN-fertilized ova. We produced seven transgenic mice carrying the LTR-tax gene and nine mice carrying the CD4-tax and found that one of the LTR-tax-Tg mice and five of CD4-tax-Tg mice developed RA-like inflammatory arthropathy similar to LTR-pX-Tg mice, indicating that the tax gene is arthritogenic. On the other hand, the other two LTR-tax-Tg mice had ankylotic changes caused by new bone formation without inflammation. In these ankylotic mice, tax mRNA, inflammatory cytokine mRNA, and autoantibody levels except for TGF-beta1 level were lower than those in LTR-pX- or CD4-tax-Tg mice. These results show that Tax is responsible for the development of inflammatory arthropathy resembling RA and that this protein also causes ankylotic arthropathy.  (+info)

Total knee arthroplasty in bony ankylosis in gross flexion. (2/85)

Between June 1993 and December 1994, we performed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on 27 knees in 24 patients with spontaneous bony ankylosis in severe flexion. The mean age at operation was 43.5 years (30 to 60). No patient had preoperative pain. Three were unable to walk and 21 could manage less than five blocks. The mean duration of the ankylosis was 18.7 years (13 to 25) and its mean position was 105 degree flexion (75 to 135). The preoperative Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Score of 60 points was improved to 87 at the final follow-up three to five years later. All knees were free from pain. The mean range of active flexion in 24 knees was 97 degrees (78 to 115) and the mean arc of movement 91 degrees (78 to 98). The mean fixed flexion deformity was 6 degrees (0 to 25) and the extension lag 8 degrees (0 to 25). Angular deformity was corrected to between 0 degrees and 10 degrees of valgus. Four patients were able to walk one block and 20 five to seven blocks. Thirteen knees (48%) showed some necrosis at the skin edge; one knee required arthrodesis and another resection arthroplasty. One had a recurrence of tuberculous infection requiring arthrodesis. One patient had a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. To date no prosthesis has required revision for loosening. Radiolucency of 1 mm or less about the tibial prosthesis was observed at follow-up in four of the 24 knees. Our results have shown that one-stage TKA and skeletal traction after operation can achieve correction of severe flexion deformity of the knee with marked improvement in the function and quality of life.  (+info)

Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: the Egyptian experience. (3/85)

This is a review of 204 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis treated according to a definitive protocol in the Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Department of the Alexandria University Hospital during the period 1990-1996 with a follow-up varying from 1.5 to 7 years. A history of trauma was confirmed in 98% of cases. Patients were grouped into: (1) Those with ankylosis not associated with facial deformities. The management involves release of the ankylosed joint(s) and reconstruction of the condyle ramus unit(s) (CRUs) using costochondral graft(s) (CCGs). (2) Those with mandibular ankylosis complicated by facial bone deformities, either asymmetric or bird face. The treatment consists of release of the ankylosis, reconstruction of the CRUs, and correction of jaw deformities--all performed simultaneously. Respiratory embarrassment was an important presenting symptom in the second group, all of whom complained of night snoring, eight of whom had obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In this latter group, respiratory obstruction improved dramatically after surgical intervention. The degree of mouth opening, monitored as the interincisal distance (IID) improved from a range of 0-12 mm to over 30 mm in 62% of patients and to 20-30 mm in 29% of patients. However, reankylosis was still around 8% and was attributed to lack of patient compliance in 75% and to iatrogenic factors in 25% of patients. CCGs resorption, whether partial or complete, occurred in 27% of patients, resulting in retarded growth, relapse of deformities and night snoring.  (+info)

A recessive mutation leading to vertebral ankylosis in zebrafish is associated with amino acid alterations in the homologue of the human membrane-associated guanylate kinase DLG3. (4/85)

We describe the characterization of the zebrafish homologue of the human gene DLG3. The zebrafish dlg3 gene encodes a membrane-associated guanylate kinase containing a single PDZ domain. This gene was cloned using a gene-trap construct inserted in the gene's first intron. The insertion co-segregates with a viable mutation called humpback (hmp), which leads to formation of ankylotic vertebrae in adult fishes. Insertion and mutation have both been mapped to chromosome 12, in a segment which is syntenic with region p12 to q12 of human chromosome 17. The hmp mutant phenotype, however, appears to be due to two point mutations in the guanylate kinase domain rather than to the transgene insertion itself. The results of this study are discussed in the light of the possible function of the guanylate kinase domain.  (+info)

Evidence for digenic inheritance in some cases of Antley-Bixler syndrome? (5/85)

The Antley-Bixler syndrome has been thought to be caused by an autosomal recessive gene. However, patients with this phenotype have been reported with a new dominant mutation at the FGFR2 locus as well as in the offspring of mothers taking the antifungal agent fluconazole during early pregnancy. In addition to the craniosynostosis and joint ankylosis which are the clinical hallmarks of the condition, many patients, especially females, have genital abnormalities. We now report abnormalities of steroid biogenesis in seven of 16 patients with an Antley-Bixler phenotype. Additionally, we identify FGFR2 mutations in seven of these 16 patients, including one patient with abnormal steroidogenesis. These findings, suggesting that some cases of Antley-Bixler syndrome are the outcome of two distinct genetic events, allow a hypothesis to be formulated under which we may explain all the differing and seemingly contradictory circumstances in which the Antley-Bixler phenotype has been recognised.  (+info)

Persistence of deciduous molars in subjects with agenesis of the second premolars. (6/85)

The purpose of the present study was to investigate persistent primary second molars in a group of young people in their late twenties with agenesis of one or two second premolars. In 1982-83 it was decided, in connection with the orthodontic evaluation of 25 patients, to allow 35 primary molars (one or two in each patient) to remain in situ. All patients had mixed dentitions and agenesis of one or two premolars. The primary teeth were generally in good condition, although root resorption and infra-occlusion (compensated by occlusal composite onlays) occurred. In 1997, 18 of the 25 patients with a total of 26 retained primary molars were reexamined, comprising a clinical examination for exfoliation, extraction, loosening, and ankylosis, and a radiographic examination for root resorption, tooth morphology (crown and root), and alveolar bone contour. The examination showed that the degree of root resorption was unaltered in 20 of the 26 primary molars. In the permanent dentitions, where these primary molars persisted, there were no morphological deviations. Three of the six remaining primary molars had been extracted and three showed extensive resorption. In three of the 26 primary molars the infra-occlusion had worsened. The present study shows that persistence of primary second molars in subjects with agenesis of one or two premolars, and normal morphology of the permanent dentition can be an acceptable, semi-permanent solution for the patient. Whether this could also be an acceptable long-term solution will be shown by follow-up studies.  (+info)

Hay-Wells syndrome is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the SAM domain of p63. (7/85)

Hay-Wells syndrome, also known as ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (AEC) syndrome (OMIM 106260), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital ectodermal dysplasia, including alopecia, scalp infections, dystrophic nails, hypodontia, ankyloblepharon and cleft lip and/or cleft palate. This constellation of clinical signs is unique, but some overlap can be recognized with other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, for example ectrodactyly--ectodermal dysplasia--cleft lip/palate (EEC; OMIM 604292), limb--mammary syndrome (LMS; OMIM 603543), acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth syndrome (ADULT; OMIM 103285) and recessive cleft lip/palate--ectodermal dysplasia (CLPED1; OMIM 225060). We have recently demonstrated that heterozygous mutations in the p63 gene are the major cause of EEC syndrome. Linkage studies suggest that the related LMS and ADULT syndromes are also caused by mutations in the p63 gene. Thus, it appears that p63 gene mutations have highly pleiotropic effects. We have analysed p63 in AEC syndrome patients and identified missense mutations in eight families. All mutations give rise to amino acid substitutions in the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and are predicted to affect protein--protein interactions. In contrast, the vast majority of the mutations found in EEC syndrome are amino acid substitutions in the DNA-binding domain. Thus, a clear genotype--phenotype correlation can be recognized for EEC and AEC syndromes.  (+info)

The management of local complications of total hip replacement by the McKee-Farrar technique. (8/85)

One thousand and forty-two McKee-Farrar prostheses of the present design inserted in Norwich from January 1965 to December 1972 have been reviewed retrospectively to determine the incidence of complications needing revision. Of prostheses implanted for more than two years, 6-6 per cent needed revision for loosening (cup 3-5 per cent; stem 2-2 per cent; both components 0-9 per cent). Of the total number, 2-3 per cent became infected and 1-9 per cent dislocated. Most dislocations needed only a single closed reduction but 0-8 per cent were revised. The outcome of revision operations was also assessed. Of revisions for loosening, 40 per cent needed no further operation but 23 per cent required excision; pelvic fracture or bone destruction around the components made success unlikely. Revisions for dislocation were disappointing. Of all revisions 17 per cent became infected. Excision arthroplasty is better than a series of failed revisions in an elderly patient.  (+info)

Ankylosis is a medical term that refers to the abnormal joining or fusion of bones, typically in a joint. This can occur as a result of various conditions such as injury, infection, or inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. The fusion of bones can restrict movement and cause stiffness in the affected joint. In some cases, ankylosis can lead to deformity and disability if not treated promptly and effectively.

There are different types of ankylosis depending on the location and extent of bone fusion. For instance, when it affects the spine, it is called "ankylosing spondylitis," which is a chronic inflammatory disease that can cause stiffness and pain in the joints between the vertebrae.

Treatment for ankylosis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, physical therapy or surgery may be necessary to restore mobility and function to the affected joint.

Tooth ankylosis is a dental condition where the tooth becomes abnormally fused to the alveolar bone, which is the part of the jawbone that contains the tooth sockets. This fusion typically occurs through the cementum of the root surface and the adjacent alveolar bone, resulting in the loss of the periodontal ligament (PLD) space that normally separates the tooth from the bone.

Ankylosis can affect both primary (deciduous or baby) teeth and permanent teeth. In primary teeth, ankylosis may lead to early exfoliation or premature loss of the tooth due to the lack of PDL resorption, which is necessary for natural tooth shedding. In permanent teeth, ankylosis can result in infraocclusion, where the affected tooth fails to erupt fully and remains at a lower level than the surrounding teeth.

The causes of tooth ankylosis include trauma, infection, developmental disorders, or previous orthodontic treatment. It is essential to diagnose and manage this condition promptly, as it can lead to complications such as malocclusion, dental crowding, or periodontal issues if left untreated. Treatment options may include extraction of the affected tooth, surgical separation from the bone, or orthodontic treatment to correct any resulting occlusal discrepancies.

Phosphate transport proteins are membrane-bound proteins responsible for the active transport of phosphate ions across cell membranes. They play a crucial role in maintaining appropriate phosphate concentrations within cells and between intracellular compartments, which is essential for various biological processes such as energy metabolism, signal transduction, and bone formation.

These proteins utilize the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis or other sources to move phosphate ions against their concentration gradient, thereby facilitating cellular uptake of phosphate even when extracellular concentrations are low. Phosphate transport proteins can be classified based on their structure, function, and localization into different types, including sodium-dependent and sodium-independent transporters, secondary active transporters, and channels.

Dysregulation of phosphate transport proteins has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as renal Fanconi syndrome, tumoral calcinosis, and hypophosphatemic rickets. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate transport protein function is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these disorders.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) refer to a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the muscles that control jaw movement. The TMJ is the hinge joint that connects the lower jaw (mandible) to the skull (temporal bone) in front of the ear. It allows for movements required for activities such as eating, speaking, and yawning.

TMD can result from various causes, including:

1. Muscle tension or spasm due to clenching or grinding teeth (bruxism), stress, or jaw misalignment
2. Dislocation or injury of the TMJ disc, which is a small piece of cartilage that acts as a cushion between the bones in the joint
3. Arthritis or other degenerative conditions affecting the TMJ
4. Bite problems (malocclusion) leading to abnormal stress on the TMJ and its surrounding muscles
5. Stress, which can exacerbate existing TMD symptoms by causing muscle tension

Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders may include:
- Pain or tenderness in the jaw, face, neck, or shoulders
- Limited jaw movement or locking of the jaw
- Clicking, popping, or grating sounds when moving the jaw
- Headaches, earaches, or dizziness
- Difficulty chewing or biting
- Swelling on the side of the face

Treatment for TMD varies depending on the severity and cause of the condition. It may include self-care measures (like eating soft foods, avoiding extreme jaw movements, and applying heat or cold packs), physical therapy, medications (such as muscle relaxants, pain relievers, or anti-inflammatory drugs), dental work (including bite adjustments or orthodontic treatment), or even surgery in severe cases.

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articulation between the mandible (lower jaw) and the temporal bone of the skull. It's a complex joint that involves the movement of two bones, several muscles, and various ligaments. The TMJ allows for movements like rotation and translation, enabling us to open and close our mouth, chew, speak, and yawn. Dysfunction in this joint can lead to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), which can cause pain, discomfort, and limited jaw movement.

Tooth replantation is a dental procedure that involves the replanting and reattachment of a tooth that has been avulsed or knocked out due to trauma. The primary goal of this emergency procedure is to preserve the natural tooth and its periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue, allowing for potential reattachment and function.

The steps involved in tooth replantation include:

1. Locating the avulsed tooth: Carefully handle the knocked-out tooth by holding it by the crown (the chewing surface), avoiding touching the root area to prevent further damage to the periodontal ligament fibers.
2. Rinsing the tooth: Gently rinse the tooth with saline solution, sterile water, or milk to remove any debris or dirt, but avoid using alcohol or scrubbing the tooth as it may cause more damage to the PDL.
3. Replanting the tooth: As soon as possible, reposition the tooth back into its socket in the correct orientation and alignment. Apply gentle pressure to seat it in place while ensuring that it is facing the right direction. Ideally, this should be done within 30 minutes of avulsion for better prognosis.
4. Stabilizing the tooth: Use a splint or a wire to secure the replanted tooth to the adjacent teeth, providing stability and support during the healing process. This helps maintain the alignment and position of the replanted tooth.
5. Seeking professional dental care: Immediately consult with a dentist or endodontist for further evaluation, additional treatment, and follow-up care. The dentist will assess the success of the replantation and determine if any root canal therapy or other treatments are necessary to ensure long-term survival of the tooth.

The success of tooth replantation depends on several factors, including the timeliness of the procedure, the condition of the avulsed tooth, and the patient's overall oral health. Prompt action and professional care can significantly increase the likelihood of a successful outcome and preserve the natural tooth for years to come.

Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the integrity and function of a joint. The term is derived from two Greek words: "arthro" meaning joint, and "plasty" meaning to mold or form. There are several types of arthroplasty, but most involve resurfacing the damaged joint cartilage with artificial materials such as metal, plastic, or ceramic.

The goal of arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore function in a joint that has been damaged by arthritis, injury, or other conditions. The most common types of arthroplasty are total joint replacement (TJR) and partial joint replacement (PJR).

In TJR, the surgeon removes the damaged ends of the bones in the joint and replaces them with artificial components called prostheses. These prostheses can be made of metal, plastic, or ceramic materials, and are designed to mimic the natural movement and function of the joint.

In PJR, only one side of the joint is resurfaced, typically because the damage is less extensive. This procedure is less invasive than TJR and may be recommended for younger patients who are still active or have a higher risk of complications from a full joint replacement.

Other types of arthroplasty include osteotomy, in which the surgeon cuts and reshapes the bone to realign the joint; arthrodesis, in which the surgeon fuses two bones together to create a stable joint; and resurfacing, in which the damaged cartilage is removed and replaced with a smooth, artificial surface.

Arthroplasty is typically recommended for patients who have tried other treatments, such as physical therapy, medication, or injections, but have not found relief from their symptoms. While arthroplasty can be highly effective in relieving pain and improving mobility, it is not without risks, including infection, blood clots, and implant failure. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of arthroplasty with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right treatment option for them.

Micrognathism is a medical term that refers to a condition where the lower jaw (mandible) is abnormally small or underdeveloped. This can result in various dental and skeletal problems, including an improper bite (malocclusion), difficulty speaking, chewing, or swallowing, and sleep apnea. Micrognathism may be congenital or acquired later in life due to trauma, disease, or surgical removal of part of the jaw. Treatment options depend on the severity of the condition and can include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both.

In medical terms, "axis" is used to describe a line or lines along which a structure or body part can move or around which it is oriented. It is often used in anatomical context to refer to specific axes of movement or alignment for various parts of the body. For example:

* The axial skeleton, also known as the upright skeleton, includes the skull, vertebral column, and chest cage.
* In neurology, the term "axis" is used to describe the second cervical vertebra (C2), which is also called the axis because it serves as a pivot point for head movement.
* The term "longitudinal axis" is used to describe an imaginary line that runs from the head to the foot, passing through the center of the body.
* In imaging studies such as X-rays or MRIs, the term "axis" may be used to describe a specific orientation or alignment for the image.

Overall, the term "axis" is used in medicine to describe lines or planes that serve as reference points for movement, alignment, or orientation of various body structures and parts.

The stapes is the smallest bone in the human body, which is a part of the middle ear. It is also known as the "stirrup" because of its U-shaped structure. The stapes connects the inner ear to the middle ear, transmitting sound vibrations from the ear drum to the inner ear. More specifically, it is the third bone in the series of three bones (the ossicles) that conduct sound waves from the air to the fluid-filled inner ear.

The Atlanto-Occipital Joint, also known as the AO joint or the craniocervical joint, is the articulation between the occiput (the base of the skull) and the atlas (the first cervical vertebra). This joint allows for movements such as nodding your head "yes" and tilting your head from side to side. It is a crucial joint in maintaining the alignment and stability of the head and neck.

Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of inflammatory arthritis that primarily affects the spine, although other joints can also be involved. It causes swelling in the spinal joints (vertebrae) that can lead to stiffness and pain. Over time, some of these joints may grow together, causing new bone formation and resulting in a rigid spine. This fusion of the spine is called ankylosis.

The condition typically begins in the sacroiliac joints, where the spine connects to the pelvis. From there, it can spread up the spine and potentially involve other areas of the body such as the eyes, heart, lungs, and gastrointestinal system.

Ankylosing spondylitis has a strong genetic link, with most people carrying the HLA-B27 gene. However, not everyone with this gene will develop the condition. It primarily affects males more often than females and tends to start in early adulthood.

Treatment usually involves a combination of medication, physical therapy, and exercise to help manage pain, maintain mobility, and prevent deformity. In severe cases, surgery may be considered.

Synostosis is a medical term that refers to the abnormal or physiological fusion of adjacent bones. It's derived from two Greek words, "syn" meaning together and "osteon" meaning bone. In a normal physiological process, synostosis occurs during growth and development, where the growth of certain bones is stopped by the fusion of neighboring bones at specific sites known as sutures or fontanelles.

However, abnormal synostosis can occur due to various reasons such as injuries, infections, or genetic conditions. This can lead to restricted movement and growth disturbances in the affected area. Common examples include craniosynostosis, where the skull bones fuse prematurely, and syndactyly, where fingers or toes are fused together. Treatment for abnormal synostosis may involve surgery to correct the fusion and prevent further complications.

Facial asymmetry refers to a condition in which the facial features are not identical or proportionate on both sides of a vertical line drawn down the middle of the face. This can include differences in the size, shape, or positioning of facial features such as the eyes, ears, nose, cheeks, and jaw. Facial asymmetry can be mild and barely noticeable, or it can be more severe and affect a person's appearance and/or functionality of the mouth and jaw.

Facial asymmetry can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life due to various factors such as injury, surgery, growth disorders, nerve damage, or tumors. In some cases, facial asymmetry may not cause any medical problems and may only be of cosmetic concern. However, in other cases, it may indicate an underlying medical condition that requires treatment.

Depending on the severity and cause of the facial asymmetry, treatment options may include cosmetic procedures such as fillers or surgery, orthodontic treatment, physical therapy, or medication to address any underlying conditions.

Spondylarthritis is a term used to describe a group of interrelated inflammatory diseases that primarily affect the spine and sacroiliac joints (where the spine connects to the pelvis), but can also involve other joints, ligaments, tendons, and entheses (sites where tendons or ligaments attach to bones). These conditions share common genetic, clinical, and imaging features.

The most common forms of spondylarthritis include:

1. Ankylosing spondylitis - a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the spine and sacroiliac joints, causing pain and stiffness. In some cases, it can lead to fusion of the spine's vertebrae.
2. Psoriatic arthritis - a form of arthritis that occurs in people with psoriasis, an autoimmune skin condition. It can cause inflammation in the joints, tendons, and entheses.
3. Reactive arthritis - a type of arthritis that develops as a reaction to an infection in another part of the body, often the urinary or gastrointestinal tract.
4. Enteropathic arthritis - a form of arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
5. Undifferentiated spondylarthritis - when a patient presents with features of spondylarthritis but does not meet the criteria for any specific subtype.

Common symptoms of spondylarthritis include:

- Back pain and stiffness, often worse in the morning or after periods of inactivity
- Peripheral joint pain and swelling
- Enthesitis (inflammation at tendon or ligament insertion points)
- Dactylitis (swelling of an entire finger or toe)
- Fatigue
- Uveitis (inflammation of the eye)
- Skin rashes, such as psoriasis
- Inflammatory bowel disease symptoms

Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies. Treatment often includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologic agents, and lifestyle modifications to manage symptoms and prevent joint damage.

The Cervical Atlas, also known as C1 or the atlas vertebra, is the uppermost and most superior of the seven cervical vertebrae in the human spine. It plays a crucial role in supporting and facilitating the movement of the head, as it articulates with both the occipital bone (forming the joint called the atlanto-occipital joint) and the axis (or C2) vertebra (forming the atlantoaxial joint). The unique structure of the cervical atlas lacks a body, instead having an anterior and posterior arch with two lateral masses that form the facet joints for articulation with the axis. This arrangement allows for a wide range of motion in the neck, including flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation.

In medical terms, toes are the digits located at the end of the foot. Humans typically have five toes on each foot, consisting of the big toe (hallux), second toe, third toe, fourth toe, and little toe (fifth toe). The bones of the toes are called phalanges, with the exception of the big toe, which has a different bone structure and is composed of a proximal phalanx, distal phalanx, and sometimes a sesamoid bone.

Toes play an essential role in maintaining balance and assisting in locomotion by helping to push off the ground during walking or running. They also contribute to the overall stability and posture of the body. Various medical conditions can affect toes, such as ingrown toenails, bunions, hammertoes, and neuromas, which may require specific treatments or interventions to alleviate pain, restore function, or improve appearance.

The mandibular condyle is a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the human body. It is a rounded eminence at the end of the mandible (lower jawbone) that articulates with the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone in the skull, allowing for movements such as opening and closing the mouth, chewing, speaking, and swallowing. The mandibular condyle has both a fibrocartilaginous articular surface and a synovial joint capsule surrounding it, which provides protection and lubrication during these movements.

In medical terms, percussion is a diagnostic procedure in which the edge of a solid object (usually the finger or a small rubber hammer) is used to quickly and sharply strike the surface of the body, producing a sound that can help determine the size, shape, and density of underlying organs and structures. The resulting sound waves travel through the body and are interpreted by the practitioner to make assessments about the condition of the patient's internal organs.

Percussion is often used in conjunction with other diagnostic techniques, such as auscultation (listening to bodily sounds) and palpation (feeling the body for abnormalities), to help form a complete picture of a patient's health. It is commonly used to assess the size and position of the lungs, heart, liver, spleen, and other organs, as well as to identify any fluid or air accumulations in the body.

Percussion is a valuable tool in physical examinations and can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about patient care. However, it requires practice and skill to perform accurately, and should be used in conjunction with other diagnostic techniques for best results.

Jaw fixation techniques, also known as maxillomandibular fixation (MMF), are procedures used in dental and oral surgery to hold the jaw in a specific position. This is typically done by wiring the upper and lower teeth together or using elastic bands and other devices to keep the jaws aligned. The technique is often used after surgical procedures on the jaw, such as corrective jaw surgery (orthognathic surgery) or fracture repair, to help promote proper healing and alignment of the bones. It may also be used in the management of temporomandibular joint disorders or other conditions affecting the jaw. The duration of jaw fixation can vary depending on the specific procedure and individual patient needs, but it typically lasts several weeks.

Arthrodesis is a surgical procedure to fuse together the bones of a joint, in order to restrict its movement and provide stability. This procedure is typically performed when a joint has been severely damaged by injury, arthritis, or other conditions, and non-surgical treatments have failed to relieve symptoms such as pain and instability.

During the surgery, the cartilage that normally cushions the ends of the bones is removed, and the bones are realigned and held in place with hardware such as plates, screws, or rods. Over time, the bones grow together, forming a solid fusion that restricts joint motion.

Arthrodesis can be performed on various joints throughout the body, including the spine, wrist, ankle, and knee. While this procedure can provide significant pain relief and improve function, it does limit the range of motion in the fused joint, which may impact mobility and daily activities. Therefore, arthrodesis is typically considered a last resort when other treatments have failed.

This leads to progressive ankylosis of almost all joints. Evidence for ankylosis found in the fossil record is studied by ... Ankylosis is a stiffness of a joint due to abnormal adhesion and rigidity of the bones of the joint, which may be the result of ... "Ankylosis" is also used as an anatomical term, bones being said to ankylose (or anchylose) when, from being originally distinct ... When inflammation has caused the joint-ends of the bones to be fused together, the ankylosis is termed osseous or complete and ...
Trauma is believed to be the cause of ankylosis, causing cell death on the root surface. Ankylosis may happen once the injured ... This gene can then be transferred from parents to offsprings and lead to ankylosis of teeth. Ankylosis of deciduous teeth may ... However, root resorption does not necessarily lead to tooth ankylosis and the causes of tooth ankylosis remain uncertain to a ... It is current under the investigation of its probability being used as a prevention of tooth ankylosis. Since ankylosis may ...
Tempormandiubular joint ankylosis (TMJ ankylosis) which is ankylosis of the mandible, affects children around the ages of 4-14 ... Fibrous ankylosis's prognosis differs depending on the joint affected. Tempormandiubular joint ankylosis (TMJ ankylosis) is a ... Fibrous ankylosis was thought to be a precursor progress into bony ankylosis in which osseous bone tissue fusing the affected ... If the fibrous ankylosis's damage on affected joint continued, then the disease would progress to bony ankylosis, where the ...
... within joints can cause ankylosis. Radioulnar synostosis is one of the more common failures of separation of parts ...
Haroon N (June 2015). "Ankylosis in ankylosing spondylitis: current concepts". Clinical Rheumatology. 34 (6): 1003-7. doi: ...
E]xtensive 'neoplastic' ankylosis of caudals," possibly due to physical trauma as well as the fusion of chevrons to centra. ... Abscesses Amputations Ankylosis Asymmetrically sized body parts. Avulsion injuries Block vertebrae Broken teeth Bone spurs Co- ...
Pickerill, H.P. (1918). "Arthroplasty of Temporo-Mandibular Joint for Ankylosis". Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine ...
Progressive ankylosis protein homolog (ANK ilosis H omolog) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ANKH gene. This gene ... "Entrez Gene: ANKH ankylosis, progressive homolog (mouse)". GeneReviews/NCBI/NIH/UW entry on Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia Human ... Mutation at the mouse 'progressive ankylosis' (ank) locus causes a generalized, progressive form of arthritis accompanied by ... 2001). "Heterozygous mutations in ANKH, the human ortholog of the mouse progressive ankylosis gene, result in craniometaphyseal ...
TNFRSF10B Stapes ankylosis with broad thumb and toes; 184460; NOG STAR syndrome; 300707; FAM58A Stargardt disease 3; 600110; ...
An autosomal dominant inherited syndrome with congenital stapes ankylosis. Laryngoscope 100: April 1990, 380-384 (Articles with ...
Akhulgo assault, 1839 / V. M. Mukhanov // Ankylosis - Bank. - M .: Great Russian Encyclopedia, 2005. - P. 580. - (Great Russian ...
"Autosomal dominant stapes ankylosis with broad thumbs and toes, hyperopia, and skeletal anomalies is caused by heterozygous ... "Characterization of a stapes ankylosis family with a NOG mutation". Otology & Neurotology. 24 (2): 210-5. doi:10.1097/00129492- ...
In Italian "anchilosi" (ankylosis), not used in a technical sense. Dorsi, Fabrizio; Rausa, Giuseppe (2000). Storia dell'opera ...
In cricoarytenoid joint ankylosis where there is failed arytenoid adduction. The main purpose of this combination is stretching ...
Type III includes hypoglossia with glossopalatine ankylosis and hypomelia or hypodactyly. Type IV involves fused inter-oral ...
Complete bony ankylosis occurs as the disease progresses over the years. Radiological findings may show anterior deformities in ... In Scheuermann's disease, however, it is very rare for adults to develop ankylosis in their adult life. The largest series of ... MRI is used to visualize the extent of the intervertebral ankylosis. Radiographs collected soon after birth are used for ... The narrowing progresses until the disc space is eliminated, resulting in bony ankylosis, or stiffness in the joints, and ...
If this condition is not treated, the joint space will completely narrow, causing ankylosis. At the advanced stage of ankylosis ...
He originated the osteotomy for joint ankylosis, performing a femoral osteotomy between the greater and lesser trochanters; in ... Medical Examiner, Philadelphia, 1838; 1: 365-368 Barton JR (March 2007). "On the treatment of ankylosis by the formation of ...
This led to ankylosis (an abnormal rigidity of the skeletal joints). By 1882, he could not stand or walk. Although unable to ...
"Prosthetic replacement of elbow in postburn bony ankylosis: Long-term results". International Orthopaedics. 33 (4): 1001-7. doi ...
The Progressive Ankylosis (Ank) Family All functionally characterized members of the MOP superfamily catalyze efflux of their ... of the mouse progressive ankylosis (ank) gene. The ANK protein spans the cell membrane and shuttles inorganic pyrophosphate ( ... the human ortholog of the mouse progressive ankylosis gene, result in craniometaphyseal dysplasia". Nature Genetics. 28 (1): 37 ...
Matsson L, Andreasen J, Cvek M, Granath L (1982). "Ankylosis of experimentally reimplanted teeth related to extra-alveolar ... 3. Variation of occurrence of ankylosis of reimplanted teeth with duration of extra-alveolar period and storage environment". ... In growing children, this can cause bone development problems because the replacement resorption (also termed ankylosis) ... "The role of the necrotic periodontal membrane in cementum resorption and ankylosis". Endodontics & Dental Traumatology. 1 (3): ...
"Ankylosis of Primary Molars - A future Periodontal threat to the First Permanent Molars?". American Journal of Orthodontics and ...
Medically, this class includes people with arthritis and osteoporosis, or ankylosis of the knee. In practice, this means ... The class includes people with arthritis and osteoporosis, or ankylosis of the knee. Internationally, governance for this sport ...
... he studied ankylosis of the stapes. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in March 1842. Austrian otologist Adam ...
He developed ankylosis of the joints, and failing health hindered his work after 1895. He died in 1912, at the age of 74. Lecoq ...
Acute osteomyelitis Ankylosis of the TMJ (fibrous or bony) Condylar fracture or other trauma. Gaucher disease which is caused ... Fibrous ankylosis: usually results due to trauma and infection Treatment - trismus appliances in conjunction with physical ... True bony ankylosis: can result from trauma to chin, infections and from prolonged immobilization following condylar fracture ... Treatment - several surgical procedures are used to treat bony ankylosis, e.g.: Gap arthroplasty using interpositional ...
Medically, this class includes people with contracture/ankylosis in joints of one limb and limited function in another limb. It ... Medically, this class includes people with arthritis and osteoporosis, or ankylosis of the knee. In practice, this means ...
When the fracture is intracapsular there is a higher rate of late-term osteoarthritis and the potential for ankylosis although ... Pediatric condylar fractures have higher rates of ankylosis and the potential for growth disturbance., Rarely, mandibular ... owing to the remaining growth potential and possibility of ankylosis of the joint. Early mobilization is often recommended as ...
Medically, this class includes people with contracture/ankylosis in joints of one limb and limited function in another limb. It ... Medically, this class includes people with arthritis and osteoporsis, or ankylosis of the knee. In practice, this means minimal ...
This leads to progressive ankylosis of almost all joints. Evidence for ankylosis found in the fossil record is studied by ... Ankylosis is a stiffness of a joint due to abnormal adhesion and rigidity of the bones of the joint, which may be the result of ... "Ankylosis" is also used as an anatomical term, bones being said to ankylose (or anchylose) when, from being originally distinct ... When inflammation has caused the joint-ends of the bones to be fused together, the ankylosis is termed osseous or complete and ...
Ankylosis definition, abnormal adhesion of the bones of a joint. See more. ... ankylosis. in a sentence. *. Results may be considered favorable even with elbow ankylosis. ... In the average instance, because of arthritis which persists for a considerable length of time, more or less ankylosis results. ... Chronic arthritis with destruction of articular surfaces and ankylosis, is seldom observed. ...
History of Ankylosis. Ankylosis has a long history, which includes these events:. *Early in the second century CE, the ... Symptoms of Ankylosis. Early symptoms and signs of ankylosis are usually stiffness and pain in your hips and lower back, ... Physical Effects of Ankylosis. In severe ankylosis, you form new bone as your body attempts to heal. This new bone formation ... Risk Factors for Ankylosis. Certain factors can put you at a higher risk for developing ankylosis, including the following. ...
At day 28, bony ankylosis showed increased biological process related to new bone formation, while fibrous ankylosis was ... At day 14, bony ankylosis showed upregulated DEGs, such as TLR8, SYK, NFKBIA, PTPRC, CD86, ITGAM, and ITGAL, indicating a ... CONCLUSIONS:This study provides a differential gene expression profile between TMJ fibrous and bony ankylosis. Further study of ... Here, we performed comprehensive differential molecular profiling between TMJ fibrous and bony ankylosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: ...
Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD ... Intra-articular (true) ankylosis must be distinguished from extra-articular (false) ankylosis, which may be caused by ... When ankylosis leads to arrest of condylar growth, facial asymmetry is common (see Condylar Hyperplasia Mandibular Condylar ... Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) most often results from trauma or infection, but it may be congenital or a ...
Are you suffering from TMJ ankylosis? Find out by undergoing a TMJ evaluation with our top-rated Northridge dentist. Contact ... TMJ Ankylosis. What Is TMJ Ankylosis?. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a medical condition that involves the fusion ... Can TMJ ankylosis go away on its own?. Unfortunately, TMJ ankylosis is a permanent condition that cannot go away on its own. ... Is TMJ ankylosis a form of arthritis?. No, TMJ ankylosis is not a form of arthritis. While rheumatoid arthritis can contribute ...
EVALUATION OF ANKYLOSIS OR LIMITATION OF MOTION OF SINGLE OR MULTIPLE DIGITS OF THE HAND ...
Ankylosis (disease). SNOMED CT: Ankylosis of joint (111227009); Ankylosis (36504009); Frozen joint (36504009); Fusion of joint ... Temporo mandibular joint ankylosis.. Vasconcelos BC, Porto GG, Bessa-Nogueira RV. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol 2008 Jan-Feb;74(1):34 ... Idiopathic ankylosis-resorption: diagnosis and treatment.. Gault P. Int Orthod 2013 Sep;11(3):262-77. Epub 2013 Jul 20 doi: ... Temporo mandibular joint ankylosis.. Vasconcelos BC, Porto GG, Bessa-Nogueira RV. Braz J Otorhinolaryngol 2008 Jan-Feb;74(1):34 ...
Ankylosis can be defined as a fusion of the articular surfaces of the jaw to the skull, resulting in severe problems for its ... The aim of the study was to report a case of a child with bilateral ankylosis, treated according to this protocol with success ... Temporomandibular joint ankylosis in children: case report. Rev. cir. traumatol. buco-maxilo-fac. [online]. 2016, vol.16, n.3, ...
Ankylosis causes the soft tissue ligament to disappear. The soft tissue ligament is called the "periodontal ligament" or " ... Ankylosis causes the soft tissue ligament to disappear. The soft tissue ligament is called the "periodontal ligament" or " ...
... such stress could lead to TMJ ankylosis. To our knowledge, 12 cases of TMJ ankylosis after MDO have been described in studies ... Here, we aimed to report on cases with TMJ ankylosis-a rare but devastating complication of MDO. In total, we described 3 ... MDO was performed at least twice in each case, and the 3 patients developed subsequent TMJ ankylosis. They all presented with ... Thus, TMJ health should be carefully monitored during and after MDO to avoid TMJ ankylosis, and alternative treatments such as ...
72 FR 13003, Mar. 20, 2007, as amended at 73 FR 54708, 54712, Sept. 23, 2008; 73 FR 69554, Nov. 19, 2008; 74 FR 18467, Apr. 23, 2009; 77 FR 6467, Feb. 8, 2012; 79 FR 45103, Aug. 4, 2014; 82 FR 36085, Aug. 3, 2017; 82 FR 50807, Nov. 2, 2017; 83 FR 15073, Apr. 9, 2018; 83 FR 15323, Apr. 10, 2018; 83 FR 32601, July 13, 2018; 83 FR 54259, Oct. 29, 2018; 84 FR 28234, June 18, 2019; 85 FR 76467, Nov. 30, 2020; 85 FR 85523, Dec. 29, 2020; 86 FR 8143, Feb. 4, 2021; 86 FR 54088, 54097, Sept. 30, 2021 ...
Ankylosis. This rare condition includes tooth roots bonding to the jaw bone. It means there may not be as much opportunity to ...
Role of the progressive ankylosis gene in cartilage mineralization. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2006 Mar;18(2):181-6. doi: 10.1097/01. ... the human ortholog of the mouse progressive ankylosis gene, result in craniometaphyseal dysplasia. Nat Genet. 2001 May;28(1):37 ...
... because it may lead to joint ankylosis. Recurrence of deformities following stretching is common, and surgery is often ...
Management of temporomandibular ankylosis - compromise or individualization - a literature review Katarzyna Sporniak-Tutak, ... Management of temporomandibular ankylosis - compromise or individualization - a literature review Katarzyna Sporniak-Tutak, ...
Ankylosis of Tooth. *Cleft Lip and Palate. *Dental Crowding. *Grinding of Teeth ...
Ankylosis in the cervical spine at several levels due to long-standing juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (also known as juvenile ... The view of the left wrist shows boney ankylosis involving the lateral 4 carpal bones with sparing of the pisiform. Erosions ...
Ankylosis Spondylitis. Ankylosis Spondylitis is defined as a chronic and generally progressive inflammatory arthritic disease ...
Northwestern China The impaired nomad: A bioarchaeological study on an Early Iron Age case of knee ankylosis from the ... The impaired nomad: A bioarchaeological study on an Early Iron Age case of knee ankylosis from the Jiaerkenjiaga Cemetery, ...
Ankylosis Spondylitis. Ankylosis Spondylitis is defined as a chronic and generally progressive inflammatory arthritic disease ...
Nitin Bhola and his team surgically released the bony bilateral TMJ Ankylosis and reconstructed the region with Patient- ... "The patient has TMJ Ankylosis, i.e., her lower jaw is fused with the upper jaw. We generally have a normal mouth opening of 2.5 ... Nitin Bhola and his team surgically released the bony bilateral TMJ Ankylosis and reconstructed the region with Patient- ... LUCID Implants assists surgeons to perform complex facial reconstruction surgery-bilateral TMJ Ankylosis - for a 26-year-old ...
Next message: Ankylosis Spondilitis * Messages sorted by: [ date ] [ thread ] [ subject ] [ author ] My niece has just been ...
Radiographs confirm ankylosis and severe osteoporosis. This signals the third (atrophic) stage. Note that atrophy can also ...
57] have found in a histological study of 26 secondarily retained molars interradicular ankylosis in 81% of the cases. It was ... This causes a decomposition of the normal structure of the periodontal membrane and the condition may result in ankylosis ( ... The correct explanation for this phenomenon is meanwhile that the affected tooth due to ankylosis in the periodontal membrane ... 4] found that denervation performed experimentally led to dentoalveolar ankylosis with decreased width of the periodontal space ...
Over time, a person may develop ankylosis in the spine. This means that new bone growth occurs in the spine, causing sections ...
Ankylosis of Knee Joint. Pre-War Case." The form is stamped "Former War Case" and across the top is written in red "Please give ... "Complete bony ankylosis" means that the bones of his knee had fused together into an inflexible whole. The effect of his ... Complete bony ankylosis R knee. Very obvious wasting Quadriceps extensor : no obvious shortening. Marked varicosity of veins on ... "Ankylosis of knee joint". This occurred as a result of gunshot penetrating the limb on 6th October 1880, in Afghanistan, while ...
Temporo-mandibular ankylosis]. Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac Chir Orale 2016;117(4): 245-255. DOI: 10.1016/j.revsto.2016.07.001. ... Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of 14 cases. Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2003;32(1): 24-29. DOI: 10.1054/ijom. ... Temporomandibular ankylosis. A report of 15 cases. J Maxillofac Surg 1983;11(1):37-41. DOI: 10.1016/S0301-0503(83)80009-5. ... Qudah MA, Qudeimat MA, Al-Maaita J. Treatment of TMJ ankylosis in Jordanian children-a comparison of two surgical techniques. J ...
Ankylosis - Right 0 - Normal 4657 1 - Questionable 9 2 - Minimal 10 3 - Moderate 10 4 - Severe 10 Blank 2217 677 Ankylosis - ... ITEM DESCRIPTION & CODES Counts HANES I Data Source 661 Ankylosis - Right 0 - Normal 4640 Data From X-Ray 1 - Questionable 24 ... ITEM DESCRIPTION & CODES Counts HANES I Data Source 670 Ankylosis - Left 0 - Normal 4672 Data From X-Ray 1 - Questionable 7 ... Ankylosis - Right 0 - Normal 4665 1 - Questionable 7 2 - Minimal 9 3 - Moderate 5 4 - Severe 10 Blank 2217 Tape Control Loc. ...
  • The symptoms of temporomandibular joint ankylosis may vary from person to person. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Auriculocondylar syndrome (ARCND), also known as 'question-mark ear syndrome' or 'dysgnathia complex,' is a craniofacial malformation syndrome characterized by highly variable mandibular anomalies, including mild to severe micrognathia, often with temporomandibular joint ankylosis, cleft palate, and a distinctive ear malformation that consists of separation of the lobule from the external ear, giving the appearance of a question mark. (nih.gov)
  • Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) management involves many surgical treatment modalities depending on the experience of the operator. (thejcdp.com)
  • Kaban LB, Perrott DH, Fisher K. A protocol for management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. (thejcdp.com)
  • Kaban LB. A protocol for management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in children. (thejcdp.com)
  • Here, we performed comprehensive differential molecular profiling between TMJ fibrous and bony ankylosis. (medscimonit.com)
  • Six sheep were used and a bilateral different degree of TMJ trauma was performed to induce fibrous ankylosis in one side and bony ankylosis in the other side. (medscimonit.com)
  • At day 28, bony ankylosis showed increased biological process related to new bone formation, while fibrous ankylosis was characterized by a prolonged immune and inflammatory reaction. (medscimonit.com)
  • This study provides a differential gene expression profile between TMJ fibrous and bony ankylosis. (medscimonit.com)
  • Further study of these key genes may provide new ideas for future treatment of TMJ bony ankylosis. (medscimonit.com)
  • In most cases of true ankylosis, x-rays of the joint show loss of normal bony architecture. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In bony ankylosis, the actual bone of the jaw fuses with the skull bone, preventing any movement of the joint. (drkevingropp.com)
  • However, physical therapy may actually be harmful in patients with conditions of bony fusion such as diastrophic dysplasia, because it may lead to joint ankylosis. (medscape.com)
  • Bony fusion was observed in 5 (41.7 %) patients, and fibrous ankylosis in the other patients at last follow-up. (nih.gov)
  • Other forms of arthritis may sometimes also lead to ankylosis, including rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis Osteoarthritis usually confers osteophyte formation, which may eventually fuse across joints. (wikipedia.org)
  • This leads to progressive ankylosis of almost all joints. (wikipedia.org)
  • the presence of of limbs, ankylosis of joints, or amputations. (cdc.gov)
  • The most-common problems are toenail cracks, sole overgrowth, trauma, osteomyelitis, ankylosis of the joints and osteoarthritis. (theconversation.com)
  • This can lead to the ankylosis of vertebral joints due to bone growth on the joint caused by wear and tear. (ottobock.com)
  • This type of ankylosis occurs when fibrous tissue forms within the joint, restricting its movement. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Fibro-osseous ankylosis involves the formation of both fibrous tissue and bone within the joint, leading to reduced mobility. (drkevingropp.com)
  • however, if the periodontal ligament survives, the degree and timeliness of root resorption is improved and ankylosis is decreased. (medscape.com)
  • The aim of the study was to report a case of a child with bilateral ankylosis, treated according to this protocol with success in the goal to restore jaw function despite the possibility of future additional procedures for completion of the case. (bvsalud.org)
  • Some individuals are born with congenital anomalies or abnormalities in the TMJ, which can predispose them to develop ankylosis later in life. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Over time, a person may develop ankylosis in the spine. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Many of the prescription medications for ankylosing spondylitis and ankylosis patients do more harm than good, and can potentially damage organs like your kidneys and liver. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • Conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and other autoimmune or inflammatory disorders can affect the TMJ and increase the likelihood of ankylosis. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Ankylosis is a stiffness of a joint due to abnormal adhesion and rigidity of the bones of the joint, which may be the result of injury or disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the structures outside the joint are affected, the term "false ankylosis" has been used in contradistinction to "true ankylosis", in which the disease is within the joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • When inflammation has caused the joint-ends of the bones to be fused together, the ankylosis is termed osseous or complete and is an instance of synostosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthrodesis is the intentional creation of ankylosis in a joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • The affected joint was very much enlarged, with little or no mobility, the condition being practically the same as true ankylosis . (dictionary.com)
  • The type of traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis depends on the degree of severity of TMJ trauma. (medscimonit.com)
  • Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a severely disabling disease characterized by a progressive limitation of mouth opening due to craniomandibular fusion [1,2]. (medscimonit.com)
  • Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint is immobility or fusion of the joint. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a medical condition that involves the fusion or immobilization of the temporomandibular joint, which is the joint that connects your jawbone (mandible) to your skull. (drkevingropp.com)
  • This is the most common type of TMJ ankylosis and occurs as a result of trauma or injury to the jaw joint. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Chronic inflammation in the joint can lead to the development of ankylosis over time. (drkevingropp.com)
  • This type of ankylosis is characterized by the presence of myofibroblasts, which are contractile cells involved in wound healing, within the joint. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Infections in the temporomandibular joint area, such as tuberculosis or osteomyelitis, can cause inflammation and damage to the joint, increasing the risk of ankylosis. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Some individuals may be born with structural abnormalities or genetic predispositions that make them more susceptible to temporomandibular joint problems, including ankylosis. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Keeping in mind individuals are looking for pain and anti-inflammatory relief, many have found the marijuana for ankylosis strains below to work well. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • The drug, however, also shows beneficial effects in treating rheumatoid arthritis, which might make it effective for ankylosis as well. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • AS can lead to ankylosis of the spine and significant disability. (nih.gov)
  • Body position, postural fatigue, and whole body vibration may all be operative in the development of spine and supporting structure disorders such as displacement of intervertebral disc, ankylosis of the spine, and vertebrogenic pain syndrome. (cdc.gov)
  • Ankylosis Ankylosis is the cessation of eruption after tooth emergence. (dentalcare.com)
  • This results in fusion between bone and tooth (i.e., ankylosis). (vin.com)
  • Chronic arthritis with destruction of articular surfaces and ankylosis , is seldom observed. (dictionary.com)
  • Ankylosis can be defined as a fusion of the articular surfaces of the jaw to the skull, resulting in severe problems for its sufferers. (bvsalud.org)
  • Results may be considered favorable even with elbow ankylosis . (dictionary.com)
  • Nature of Injury: G.S.W. elbow, ankylosis Percent of disability: 30 Source: New Zealand. (aucklandmuseum.com)
  • TMJ ankylosis is a serious condition leading to feeding difficulties and growth impairment, and could result in worse consequences in cases with micrognathia who already have limited growth potential. (univ-lille.fr)
  • They all presented with TMJ ankylosis and micrognathia in our Department. (univ-lille.fr)
  • CONCLUSIONS: MDO leads to a certain amount of stress on the TMJ, and in cases with congenital TMJ deformation, such stress could lead to TMJ ankylosis. (univ-lille.fr)
  • Evidence for ankylosis found in the fossil record is studied by paleopathologists, specialists in ancient disease and injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • A common cause of TMJ ankylosis, trauma, or injury to the jaw or face can occur due to various factors, such as a car accident, sports injury, or a fall. (drkevingropp.com)
  • 7 While ankylosis can occur at any age, it is most common in children 8 to 9 years of age. (dentalcare.com)
  • Intra-articular (true) ankylosis must be distinguished from extra-articular (false) ankylosis, which may be caused by enlargement of the coronoid process, depressed fracture of the zygomatic arch, or scarring resulting from surgery, irradiation, or infection. (msdmanuals.com)
  • New Feature Article: Treatment Options in the Case of Ankylosis After Traumatic Dental Injuries in Growing Individuals. (dentaltraumaguide.org)
  • Noma-a gangrenous disease still widespread among malnourished children living on the borders of the Sahara desert-can cause ankylosis of the maxilla and mandible, impairing the ability to speak and eat. (wikipedia.org)
  • When ankylosis occurs, it restricts or prevents the normal movement of the jaw, leading to significant functional and sometimes cosmetic problems. (drkevingropp.com)
  • More and more ankylosis patients are choosing medical weed to relieve their symptoms, and they are experiencing excellent results, including improved movement, less pain and reduced need for other medicines. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • What Side Effects and Symptoms of Ankylosis Can Medical Marijuana Treat? (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • Medical marijuana is an ideal solution for patients who are suffering from symptoms of ankylosis who cannot find any sense of relief from prescription opiates. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • Different natural cannabinoids provide various benefits to ankylosis patients. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • Patients who are suffering from ankylosis should check to make sure it is within their state's listed guidelines of approved conditions, and should then contact our service accordingly. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • METHODS: We retrospectively enrolled 3 patients who presented with TMJ ankylosis following MDO at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the University Hospital of Lille, France. (univ-lille.fr)
  • MDO was performed at least twice in each case, and the 3 patients developed subsequent TMJ ankylosis. (univ-lille.fr)
  • To our knowledge, 12 cases of TMJ ankylosis after MDO have been described in studies involving 309 patients while it is not reported in other publications. (univ-lille.fr)
  • Fractures or dislocations of the jaw can lead to the development of scar tissue and ankylosis. (drkevingropp.com)
  • This is a severe form of ankylosis and often requires surgical intervention. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Outcomes of surgical management of TMJ ankylosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (thejcdp.com)
  • Ankylosis" is also used as an anatomical term, bones being said to ankylose (or anchylose) when, from being originally distinct, they coalesce, or become so joined that no motion can take place between them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subjects must be kept in slings until union of bones has become established, and as a rule there will then exist marked ankylosis . (dictionary.com)
  • Decoronation as an approach to treat ankylosis in growing children. (bvsalud.org)
  • TMJ ankylosis can develop in individuals of all ages, from children to adults, and it can affect both men and women. (drkevingropp.com)
  • Treatment may include a condylectomy if the ankylosis is intra-articular or an ostectomy of part of the ramus if the coronoid process and zygomatic arch are also affected. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In the average instance, because of arthritis which persists for a considerable length of time, more or less ankylosis results. (dictionary.com)
  • Today, researchers are studying the effectiveness of medical marijuana and ankylosis treatment and are seeing good results. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • While it's a relatively rare condition, there are several factors and risk factors that can increase the likelihood of developing TMJ ankylosis. (drkevingropp.com)
  • When ankylosis is diagnosed in a child, certain factors are even more important to evaluate prior to making the treatment decision. (speareducation.com)
  • Here, we aimed to report on cases with TMJ ankylosis-a rare but devastating complication of MDO. (univ-lille.fr)
  • In total, we described 3 syndromic cases with TMJ ankylosis that developed after MDO and reviewed the associated literature. (univ-lille.fr)
  • Medical marijuana serves as an exceptional medicine for many conditions - however, regarding how it relieves ankylosis, it serves as a muscle relaxer to put the body at ease. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • 4 ] found that denervation performed experimentally led to dentoalveolar ankylosis with decreased width of the periodontal space. (hindawi.com)
  • While medical marijuana for ankylosis won't cure you, it can provide you with a better quality of life without harsh side effects. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • In short, ankylosis is a form of healing of root surface resorption, which from a clinical standpoint may be undesirable. (vin.com)
  • Some people may be predisposed to developing TMJ ankylosis due to genetics. (drkevingropp.com)