Dictionaries, MedicalAnisometropia: A condition of an inequality of refractive power of the two eyes.Retinoscopy: An objective determination of the refractive state of the eye (NEARSIGHTEDNESS; FARSIGHTEDNESS; ASTIGMATISM). By using a RETINOSCOPE, the amount of correction and the power of lens needed can be determined.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Amblyopia: A nonspecific term referring to impaired vision. Major subcategories include stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia and toxic amblyopia. Stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia is a developmental disorder of the visual cortex. A discrepancy between visual information received by the visual cortex from each eye results in abnormal cortical development. STRABISMUS and REFRACTIVE ERRORS may cause this condition. Toxic amblyopia is a disorder of the OPTIC NERVE which is associated with ALCOHOLISM, tobacco SMOKING, and other toxins and as an adverse effect of the use of some medications.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)Astigmatism: Unequal curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye. Thus a point source of light cannot be brought to a point focus on the retina but is spread over a more or less diffuse area. This results from the radius of curvature in one plane being longer or shorter than the radius at right angles to it. (Dorland, 27th ed)Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Hyperopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the eye parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus behind the retina, as a result of the eyeball being too short from front to back. It is also called farsightedness because the near point is more distant than it is in emmetropia with an equal amplitude of accommodation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anterior Chamber: The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)Myopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.Biometry: The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BaltimoreLos AngelesVisual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Exotropia: A form of ocular misalignment where the visual axes diverge inappropriately. For example, medial rectus muscle weakness may produce this condition as the affected eye will deviate laterally upon attempted forward gaze. An exotropia occurs due to the relatively unopposed force exerted on the eye by the lateral rectus muscle, which pulls the eye in an outward direction.Classification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Scotoma: A localized defect in the visual field bordered by an area of normal vision. This occurs with a variety of EYE DISEASES (e.g., RETINAL DISEASES and GLAUCOMA); OPTIC NERVE DISEASES, and other conditions.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Vision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Convergence, Ocular: The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.Depth Perception: Perception of three-dimensionality.Esotropia: A form of ocular misalignment characterized by an excessive convergence of the visual axes, resulting in a "cross-eye" appearance. An example of this condition occurs when paralysis of the lateral rectus muscle causes an abnormal inward deviation of one eye on attempted gaze.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Lymphoma, T-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors representing malignant transformations of T-lymphocytes.Lymphoma, B-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors generally expressing one or more B-cell antigens or representing malignant transformations of B-lymphocytes.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse: Malignant lymphoma composed of large B lymphoid cells whose nuclear size can exceed normal macrophage nuclei, or more than twice the size of a normal lymphocyte. The pattern is predominantly diffuse. Most of these lymphomas represent the malignant counterpart of B-lymphocytes at midstage in the process of differentiation.Lymphoma, Follicular: Malignant lymphoma in which the lymphomatous cells are clustered into identifiable nodules within the LYMPH NODES. The nodules resemble to some extent the GERMINAL CENTER of lymph node follicles and most likely represent neoplastic proliferation of lymph node-derived follicular center B-LYMPHOCYTES.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous: A group of lymphomas exhibiting clonal expansion of malignant T-lymphocytes arrested at varying stages of differentiation as well as malignant infiltration of the skin. MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES; SEZARY SYNDROME; LYMPHOMATOID PAPULOSIS; and PRIMARY CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMA are the best characterized of these disorders.Burkitt Lymphoma: A form of undifferentiated malignant LYMPHOMA usually found in central Africa, but also reported in other parts of the world. It is commonly manifested as a large osteolytic lesion in the jaw or as an abdominal mass. B-cell antigens are expressed on the immature cells that make up the tumor in virtually all cases of Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN) has been isolated from Burkitt lymphoma cases in Africa and it is implicated as the causative agent in these cases; however, most non-African cases are EBV-negative.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral: A group of malignant lymphomas thought to derive from peripheral T-lymphocytes in lymph nodes and other nonlymphoid sites. They include a broad spectrum of lymphocyte morphology, but in all instances express T-cell markers admixed with epithelioid histiocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. Although markedly similar to large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, LARGE-CELL, IMMUNOBLASTIC), this group's unique features warrant separate treatment.Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone: Extranodal lymphoma of lymphoid tissue associated with mucosa that is in contact with exogenous antigens. Many of the sites of these lymphomas, such as the stomach, salivary gland, and thyroid, are normally devoid of lymphoid tissue. They acquire mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type as a result of an immunologically mediated disorder.Optometry: The professional practice of primary eye and vision care that includes the measurement of visual refractive power and the correction of visual defects with lenses or glasses.Cathode Ray Tube: A vacuum tube equipped with an electron emitting CATHODE and a fluorescent screen which emits visible light when excited by the cathode ray. Cathode ray tubes are used as imaging devises for TELEVISIONS; COMPUTER TERMINALS; TEXT TELECOMMUNICATION DEVICES; oscilloscopes; and other DATA DISPLAY devices.Asepsis: The prevention of access by infecting organisms to the locus of potential infection.Quackery: The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Hospices: Facilities or services which are especially devoted to providing palliative and supportive care to the patient with a terminal illness and to the patient's family.Natural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Lobomycosis: A chronic, fungal, subcutaneous infection endemic in rural regions in South America and Central America. The causal organism is Lacazia labol.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)EncyclopediasMolecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Gene Ontology: Sets of structured vocabularies used for describing and categorizing genes, and gene products by their molecular function, involvement in biological processes, and cellular location. These vocabularies and their associations to genes and gene products (Gene Ontology annotations) are generated and curated by the Gene Ontology Consortium.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.Glucuronates: Derivatives of GLUCURONIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the 6-carboxy glucose structure.Chromatography, Paper: An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).Cyanides: Inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE containing the -CN radical. The concept also includes isocyanides. It is distinguished from NITRILES, which denotes organic compounds containing the -CN radical.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Acholeplasma: A genus of gram-negative organisms including saprophytic and parasitic or pathogenic species.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.Desert Climate: A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Tonometry, Ocular: Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Keratoconus: A noninflammatory, usually bilateral protrusion of the cornea, the apex being displaced downward and nasally. It occurs most commonly in females at about puberty. The cause is unknown but hereditary factors may play a role. The -conus refers to the cone shape of the corneal protrusion. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.

The role of optical defocus in regulating refractive development in infant monkeys. (1/126)

Early in life, the two eyes of infant primates normally grow in a coordinated manner toward the ideal refractive state. We investigated the extent to which lens-induced changes in the effective focus of the eye affected refractive development in infant rhesus monkeys. The main finding was that spectacle lenses could predictably alter the growth of one or both eyes resulting in appropriate compensating refractive changes in both the hyperopic and myopic directions. Although the effective operating range of the emmetropization process in young monkeys is somewhat limited, the results demonstrate that emmetropization in this higher primate, as in a number of other species, is an active process that is regulated by optical defocus associated with the eye's effective refractive state.  (+info)

The therapy of amblyopia: an analysis of the results of amblyopia therapy utilizing the pooled data of published studies. (2/126)

CONTEXT: Although the treatment of amblyopia with occlusion has changed little over the past 3 centuries, there is little agreement about which regimes are most effective and for what reasons. OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of occlusion therapy in patients with anisometropic, strabismic, and strabismic-anisometropic amblyopia employing the raw data from 961 patients reported in 23 studies published between 1965 and 1994. DESIGN: Analysis of the published literature on amblyopia therapy results during the above interval, utilizing primary data obtained from the authors of these articles or tables published in the articles detailing individual patient outcomes. PARTICIPANTS: 961 amblyopic patients, participants in 23 studies, undergoing patching therapy for amblyopia from 1965 to 1994 with anisometropia, strabismus, or anisometropia-strabismus. MAIN OUTCOMES: In the pooled data set, success of occlusion therapy was defined as visual acuity of 20/40 at the end of treatment. RESULTS: Success by the 20/40 criteria was achieved in 512 of 689 (74.3%) patients. By category, 312 of 402 (77.6%) were successful in strabismic amblyopia, 44 of 75 (58.7%) in strabismic-anisometropic amblyopia, and 72 of 108 (66.7%) in anisometropic amblyopia. Success was not related to the duration of occlusion therapy, type of occlusion used, accompanying refractive error, patient's sex, or eye. Univariate analyses showed that success was related to the age at which therapy was initiated; the type of amblyopia; the depth of visual loss before treatment for the anisometropic patients and the strabismic patients, but not for the anisometropic-strabismic patients; and the difference in spherical equivalents between eyes, for the anisometropic patients. Logistic/linear regression revealed that 3 were independent predictors of a successful outcome of amblyopia therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Factors that appear most closely related to a successful outcome are age, type of amblyopia, and depth of visual loss before treatment. These may be related to factors, as yet undetermined in the pathogenesis of amblyopia. With present emphasis on the value of screening and prevention and the development of new screening tools, such a look at the results of amblyopia therapy in a large population seems indicated.  (+info)

Amblyopia and visual acuity in children with Down's syndrome. (3/126)

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Amblyopia in people with Down's syndrome has not been well investigated. This study was designed to determine the prevalence and associated conditions of amblyopia in a group of home reared children with Down's syndrome. METHODS: All children in the study group underwent an evaluation of visual acuity. In addition, previous ophthalmological records were reviewed, and a subgroup of children was examined. For the purposes of this study, amblyopia was defined quantitatively as a difference of two Snellen acuity lines between eyes or if unilateral central steady maintained (CSM) vision and a clear fixation preference was observed. A high refractive error was defined as a spherical equivalent more than 3 dioptres and astigmatism more than 1.75 dioptres. Anisometropia was defined as a difference of at least 1.5 dioptres of sphere and/or 1.0 dioptre of cylinder between eyes. 68 children with Down's syndrome between the ages of 5 and 19 years were enrolled in the final study group. RESULTS: Amblyopia was observed in 15 (22%) of 68 patients. An additional 16 (24%) patients had bilateral vision less than 20/50. Strabismus, high refractive errors, and anisometropia were the conditions most commonly associated with decreased vision and amblyopia CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the prevalence of amblyopia is higher than previously reported. Fully 46% of these children with Down's syndrome had evidence of substantial visual deficits. These patients may be at higher risk for visual impairment and should be carefully examined for ophthalmological problems.  (+info)

The association between anisometropia, amblyopia, and binocularity in the absence of strabismus. (4/126)

PURPOSE: First, to determine if thresholds exist for the development of amblyopia and subnormal binocularity with various types of anisometropia and to confirm or refute existing guidelines for its treatment or observation. Second, to delineate any association between the degree or type of anisometropia and the depth of amblyopia and severity of binocular sensory abnormalities. METHODS: Four hundred eleven (411) patients with various levels of anisometropia, no previous therapy, and no other ocular pathology were evaluated. The effect of anisometropia (both corrected and uncorrected) on monocular acuity and binocular function was examined. RESULTS: Spherical myopic anisometropia (SMA) of > 2 diopters (D) or spherical hypermetropic anisometropia (SHA) of > 1 D results in a statistically significant increase in the incidence of amblyopia and decrease in binocular function when compared to non anisometropic patients. Increasing levels of SMA and SHA beyond these thresholds were also associated with increasing depth (and in the case of SHA, incidence as well) of amblyopia. Cylindrical myopic anisometropia (CMA) or cylindrical hyperopic anisometropia (CHA) of > 1.5 D results in a statistically significant increase in amblyopia and decrease in binocular function. A clinically significant increase in amblyopia occurs with > 1 D of CMA or CHA. Increasing levels of CMA and CHA beyond > 1 D were also associated with an increased incidence (and in the case of SMA, depth as well) of amblyopia. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides guidelines for the treatment or observation of anisometropia and confirms and characterizes the association between the type and degree of anisometropia and the incidence and severity of amblyopia and subnormal binocularity.  (+info)

Factors limiting contrast sensitivity in experimentally amblyopic macaque monkeys. (5/126)

Contrast detection is impaired in amblyopes. To understand the contrast processing deficit in amblyopia, we studied the effects of masking noise on contrast threshold in amblyopic macaque monkeys. Amblyopia developed as a result of either experimentally induced strabismus or anisometropia. We used random spatiotemporal broadband noise of varying contrast power to mask the detection of sinusoidal grating patches. We compared masking in the amblyopic and non-amblyopic eyes. From the masking functions, we calculated equivalent noise contrast (the noise power at which detection threshold was elevated by square root of 2) and signal-to-noise ratio (the ratio of threshold contrast to noise contrast at high noise power). The relation between contrast threshold and masking noise level was similar for amblyopic and non-amblyopic eyes. Although in most cases there was some elevation in equivalent noise for amblyopic compared to fellow eyes, signal-to-noise ratio showed greater variation with the extent of amblyopia. These results support the idea that the contrast detection deficit in amblyopia is a cortical deficit.  (+info)

Outcome in refractive accommodative esotropia. (6/126)

AIM: To examine outcome among children with refractive accommodative esotropia. METHODS: Children with accommodative esotropia associated with hyperopia were included in the study. The features studied were ocular alignment, amblyopia, and the response to treatment, binocular single vision, requirement for surgery, and the change in refraction with age. RESULTS: 103 children with refractive accommodative esotropia were identified. Mean follow up was 4.5 years (range 2-9.5 years). 41 children (39.8%) were fully accommodative (no manifest deviation with full hyperopic correction). The remaining 62 children (60.2%) were partially accommodative. At presentation 61.2% of children were amblyopic in one eye decreasing to 15.5% at the most recent examination. Stereopsis was demonstrated in 89.3% of children at the most recent examination. Mean cycloplegic refraction (dioptres, spherical equivalent) remained stable throughout the follow up period. The mean change in refraction per year was 0.005 dioptres (D) in right eyes (95% CL -0. 0098 to 0.02) and 0.001 D in left eyes (95% CL -0.018 to 0.021). No patients were able to discard their glasses and maintain alignment. CONCLUSIONS: Most children with refractive accommodative esotropia have an excellent outcome in terms of visual acuity and binocular single vision. Current management strategies for this condition result in a marked reduction in the prevalence of amblyopia compared with the prevalence at presentation. The degree of hyperopia, however, remains unchanged with poor prospects for discontinuing glasses wear. The possibility that long term full time glasses wear impedes emmetropisation must be considered. It is also conceivable, however, that these children may behave differently with normal and be predestined to remain hyperopic.  (+info)

The role of anisometropia in the development of accommodative esotropia. (7/126)

PURPOSE: To determine if anisometropia increases the risk for the development of accommodative esotropia in hypermetropia. METHODS: Records of all new patients with a refractive error of > or = +2.00 (mean spherical equivalent [SE] of both eyes) over a 42-month period were reviewed. Three hundred forty-five (345) patients were thus analyzed to determine the effect of anisometropia (> or = 1 diopter [D]) on the relative risk of developing esodeviation and of requiring surgical correction once esodeviation was present (uncontrolled deviation). RESULTS: Anisometropia (> or = 1 D) increased the relative risk of developing accommodative esodeviation to 1.68 (P < .05). Anisometropia (> or = 1 D) increased the relative risk for esodeviation to 7.8 (P < .05) in patients with a mean SE of < 3 D and to 1.49 (P < .05) in patients with SE of > or = 3 D. This difference was significant (P = .016). In patients with esotropia and anisometropia (> or = 1 D), the relative risk for an uncontrolled deviation was 1.72 (P < .05) compared with nonanisometropic esotropic patients. Uncontrolled esodeviation was present in 33% of anisometropic patients versus 0% of nonanisometropic patients with a mean hypermetropic SE of < 3 D (P = .003); however, anisometropia did not increase the relative risk of uncontrolled esotropia in patients with SE of > or = 3 D. Although amblyopia and anisometropia were closely associated, anisometropia increased the relative risk of esodeviation to 2.14 (P < .05) even in the absence of amblyopia. CONCLUSIONS: Anisometropia (> 1 D) is a significant risk factor for the development of accommodative esodeviation, especially in patients with lower overall hypermetropia (< 3 D). Anisometropia also increases the risk that an accommodative esodeviation will not be fully eliminated with hypermetropic correction.  (+info)

Contour integration deficits in anisometropic amblyopia. (8/126)

PURPOSE: Previous retrospective studies have found that integration of orientation information along contours defined by Gabor patches is abnormal in strabismic, but not in anisometropic, amblyopia. This study was conducted to reexamine the question of whether anisometropic amblyopes have contour integration deficits prospectively in an untreated sample, to isolate the effects of the disease from the effects of prior treatment-factors that may have confounded the results in previous retrospective studies. METHODS: Contour detection thresholds, optotype acuity, and stereoacuity were measured in a group of 19 newly diagnosed anisometropic amblyopes before initiation of occlusion therapy. Contour detection thresholds were measured using a card-based procedure. RESULTS: Significant interocular differences in contour detection thresholds were present in 14 of the 19 patients with anisometropic amblyopia. CONCLUSIONS: Contour integration deficits are a common, but not universal, finding in untreated anisometropic amblyopia. Differences in the prevalence of contour integration deficits between the present study and that of another study may lie in differences in treatment history and/or in the sensitivity of the two different contour integration tasks.  (+info)

*Anisometropia

In a study performed on 53 children who had amblyopia due to anisometropia, surgical correction of the anisometropia followed ... Secondly, different criteria have been employed to define anisometropia, and the boundary between anisometropia and isometropia ... of subjects aged 6 to 18 have anisometropia. For those with large degrees of anisometropia, spectacle correction may cause the ... Anisometropia follows a U-shape distribution according to age: it is frequent in infants aged only a few weeks, is more rare in ...

*Ocular dominance

Vincent SJ, Collins MJ, Read SA, Carney LG, Yap MK (2011). "Interocular symmetry in myopic anisometropia". Optom Vis Sci. 88 ( ...

*Four prism dioptre reflex test

Anisometropia in a patient can lead to a microtropia. If left untreated at a young age foveal suppression occurs and the ... anisometropia and poorer stereopsis. Eccentric fixation utilises an abnormal retinal correspondence point and not the fovea, no ...

*Suppression (eye)

The scene simply disappears for the suppressed eye." Suppression is frequent in children with anisometropia or strabismus or ...

*Aniseikonia

For some patients the removal was only performed on one eye, resulting in the anisometropia / aniseikonia. Today, this is ... Aniseikonia can occur naturally or be induced by the correction of a refractive error, usually anisometropia (having ... One cause of significant anisometropia and subsequent aniseikonia has been aphakia. Aphakic patients do not have a crystalline ...

*Near-sightedness

"Axial lengths and refractive errors in kittens reared with an optically induced anisometropia". Investigate Ophthalmology and ...

*Marcus Gunn phenomenon

This condition has been associated with amblyopia (in 54% of cases), anisometropia (26%), and strabismus (56%). It has been ...

*Diplopia

Abscess Anisometropia Botulism Brain tumor Cancer Damaged third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves, which control eye movements. ...

*Hypertropia

Refractive errors such as hyperopia and Anisometropia may be associated abnormalities found in patients with vertical ...

*Optical power

Anisometropia is the condition in which one eye has a different refractive power than the other eye. Lens clock Lensmeter Plate ...

*Aspheric lens

... anisometropia). Not related to the optical quality, they may give a thinner lens, and also distort the viewer's eyes less as ...

*Eye disease

Anisometropia - the lenses of the two eyes have different focal lengths (H52.4) Presbyopia - a condition that occurs with ...

*Pediatric ophthalmology

... anisometropia) or one of the eye is misaligned for a long period of time (Strabismus). The management of amblyopia involves ...

*ICD-10 Chapter VII: Diseases of the eye, adnexa

Anisometropia and aniseikonia (H52.4) Presbyopia (H52.5) Disorders of accommodation (H52.6) Other disorders of refraction ( ...

*List of ICD-9 codes 360-389: diseases of the sense organs

Anisometropia and aniseikonia (367.31) Anisometropia (367.32) Aniseikonia (367.4) Presbyopia (367.9) Refractive errors, unspec ...

*Binocular vision

... amblyogenic anisometropia, constant unilateral esotropia or exotropia, amblyogenic bilateral isometropia, amblyogenic ...

*Refractive surgery

... anisometropia, anisometric amblyopia or accommodative esotropia. Interventions on young children may require general ...

*List of MeSH codes (C11)

... anisometropia MeSH C11.744.212 --- astigmatism MeSH C11.744.479 --- hyperopia MeSH C11.744.636 --- myopia MeSH C11.744.636.500 ...
Results The overall prevalence of SE and cylindrical anisometropia ≥1.0 D were 2.7% and 3.0%, for the overall sample and in children of European-Caucasian ethnicity, 3.2%, 1.9%; East-Asian 1.7%, 5.2%; South-Asian 2.5%, 3.6%; Middle-Eastern ethnicities 2.2%, 3.3%, respectively. Anisometropia prevalence was lower or similar to that in the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study, Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Strabismus, Amblyopia and Refractive error in Singapore study. Risk (OR) of anisometropic amblyopia with ≥1.0 D of SE and cylindrical anisometropia was 12.4 (CI 4.0 to 38.4) and 6.5 (CI 2.3 to 18.7), respectively. We found an increasing risk of anisometropia with higher myopia ≥−1.0 D, OR 61.6 (CI 21.3 to 308), hyperopia , +2.0 D, OR 13.6 (CI 2.9 to 63.6) and astigmatism ≥1.5 D, OR 30.0 (CI 14.5 to 58.1).. ...
Results Asymmetry of axial length, corneal power, vitreous chamber depth, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness and lens power were significantly more among participants who were anisometropic than those who were non-anisometropic. The correlation of anisometropia with axial length asymmetry was 0.735, 0.273 with corneal power, 0.183 with anterior chamber depth and 0.311 with lens power (p,0.001). In a multiple linear regression model, anisometropia was found to have significant associations with axial length asymmetry (standard coefficient (SC)=0.905), corneal power asymmetry (SC=0.350), lens power asymmetry (SC=0.454), nuclear opacity asymmetry (SC=0.074) and age (SC=0.28) (R2=85.1%). According to the linear regression model, corneal power had the strongest association with anisoastigmatism.. ...
Comparison of perceptual eye positions among patients with different degrees of anisometropia.. The aim of this study is to compare the perceptual eye positions (PEPs) among patients with different degrees of anisometropia.A total of 157 patients were recruited into this retrospective study. A detailed ophthalmic examination was conducted on each patient. The degree of refractive errors in the presence of astigmatism was converted into the degree of spherical equivalent (SE). Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the interocular SE difference: severe anisometropia group with interocular SE difference ≥2.50D, mild anisometropia group with interocular SE difference ≥1.00D and ,2.50D, and non-anisometropia group with interocular SE difference ,1.00D. The vertical and horizontal PEP were measured by a computer-controlled perceptual examination evaluation system. The results obtained from the 3 groups were compared and analyzed.A total of 157 patients were enrolled including 32 ...
Groups 1 and 2 showed a significant difference in development of refractive error (Fig 1). Group 1 SEQ was best fit with a bi-linear spline model: y1=0.09-4.47*Age when Age≤1.3 years; y2=-5.61-0.17*(Age-1.3) when Age,1.3 years. Before the age of 1.3 years, the rate of myopic shift was -4.5D/year; after 1.3 years, the rate slowed to -0.2D/year. Group 2 SEQ was best fit with a linear model: y=1.66+0.007*Age; i.e., there was little change in refraction with age. In Group 1, by 12 months of age, most children (73%) were myopic and 36% had high myopia (≤-5D). In Group 2, most had low hyperopia and 87% maintained hyperopia at the final visit. Anisometropia was significantly larger in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P=0.029) initally and increased about two times faster than in Group 2 (0.27 vs 0.12 D/year) (Fig 2).. ...
A List with 0 English Anagrams of ANISOMETROPIAS -- FindTheWord.info is a search engine for English words. FindTheWord.info searches for partial words (both crossword solver and part of word), help with cheating in Scrabble and Wordfeud, finds anagrams, palindromes, and words in word, and much more.The dictionary used contains more than 589,000 English words.
A recent study on a follow-up in older adults showed a high rate of anisometropia, or differing levels of visual abnormalities between eyes, which may contribute to falls in elderly.
Looking for online definition of anisometropia in the Medical Dictionary? anisometropia explanation free. What is anisometropia? Meaning of anisometropia medical term. What does anisometropia mean?
Unilateral photorefractive keratectomy for myopic anisometropia improves contrast sensitivity | Juha M. Holopainen; Jukka A.O. Moilanen; Heikki Saaren-Seppälä; Eija T. Vesti; Timo M.T. Tervo | download | BookSC. Download books for free. Find books
This study will evaluate the effectiveness of refractive correction alone for the treatment of previously untreated strabismic or combined-mechanism amblyopia in children 3 to ,7 years old with visual acuity of 20/40 to 20/400.. A recently completed PEDIG study (ATS5) found that in 3 to , 7-year-old children with previously untreated anisometropic amblyopia, refractive correction alone improved visual acuity by 2 or more lines in 77% of the patients and amblyopia resolved in at least one third of the patients. These results supported previous observations from retrospective and pilot studies as well as Stewart et als prospective report on 18 children with anisometropic amblyopia whose visual acuity improved after treatment with spectacle correction only.. Improvement in amblyopic eye visual acuity from treatment with optimum refractive correction in cases of anisometropic amblyopia is plausible because the refractive correction treats the underlying amblyogenic condition (i.e., uncorrected ...
Question - Diagnosed with anisometropia of amblyopia. What treatment should be done?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Amblyopia, Ask an Ophthalmologist
Between February 2001 and October 2002, 55 subjects with anisometropic myopia were recruited from patients who attended clinics for refractive errors and itchy eye. All subjects included in this study underwent a complete ophthalmic examination and ascertainment of ocular and hand dominance. In this study, a diagnosis of anisometropic myopia was made if an individual had a spherical equivalent of less than −0.5 diopters (D) in one eye and no more than 0 D in the other eye, and a difference in spherical equivalent of at least 0.5 D between the two eyes. The following inclusion criteria were required: orthophoria determined by the cover test, and an optimum distance correction giving an equal vision of better than 20/22 (6/6.7) in the two eyes (i.e., the absence of amblyopia). Because anisometropia is associated with amblyopia, 17 only nonamblyopic subjects were included in the study to avoid any effect of amblyopia on ocular dominance. 6 Subjects were not eligible and were excluded from the ...
Parents of children with anisometropia ≥ 2.00D were also more likely to have developmental concerns (OR= 2.61; 95% CI: 1.07 - 6.34).Table 5Association of significant refractive errors with parental report of Refractive Errors Physicians Locations Was this helpful? The odds of parental concerns about development significantly increased in children older than 36 months with hyperopia ≥ 3.00D, astigmatism ≥ 1.50D, or anisometropia ≥ 2.00D.ConclusionsParental concerns about general developmental problems Normal Refractive Error In Children It is possible to have astigmatism in combination with myopia or hyperopia.. PreviousNormal Vision Development in Babies and ChildrenNextChildhood Eye Diseases and Conditions Leer en Español: Errores Refractivos en los Niños Due to the potential consequences of uncorrected refractive errors, children whose parents have expressed concerns regarding development should be referred for an eye examination with cycloplegic refraction to rule out significant ...
Objective To investigate the binocular accommodative function and the corelationship with development of myopia in patients with IXT.Methods Forty patients aged 8 to 15 years with IXT and 40 normal controls were recruited for a prospective case control study. Accommodative responses MEM and FCC and PRA/NRAwere tested using refractor and MEM. Results The mean accommodative responsein the dominant eyes in patients and normal control group were +0.67±0.39 D, +0.58±0.73 D.The mean accommodative responsein the nondominant eyes in patients and normal control group were +0.71±0.42 D, +0.57±0.72 D.The mean accommodative response in the dominant and nondominant eyes showed an accommodative lag. The accommodative response was symmetric in patientsand normal control group between dominant and nondominant eyes(P=0.33, P=0.81). There was no difference between the dominant eyes in patients and normal controls(t=0.461, P=0.65). The mean accommodative responsein patients with IXT and normal control group were +0.06
Background/Aims Amblyopia is a common condition which can affect up to 5% of the general population. The health-related quality of life (HRQoL) implications of amblyopia and/or its treatment have been explored in the literature. Methods A systematic literature search was undertaken (16th-30th January 2007) to identify the HRQoL implications of amblyopia and/or its treatment. Results A total of 25 papers were included in the literature review. The HRQoL implications of amblyopia related specifically to amblyopia treatment, rather than the condition itself. These included the impact upon family life; social interactions; difficulties undertaking daily activities; and feelings and behaviour. The identified studies adopted a number of methodologies. The study populations included; children with the condition; parents of children with amblyopia; and adults who had undertaken amblyopia treatment as a child. Some studies developed their own measures of HRQoL, and others determined HRQoL through proxy ...
To determine the efficacy and stability of therapy, the charts for 64 amblyopes with strabismus and /or anisometropia who had been treated by direct occlusion were reviewed. For patients aged 7 years or less (N=39), 90% showed some acuity gain, with 69% achieving at least a doubling of acuity. Fifty-four percent obtained 20/40 or better after an average treatment period of 3.8 months. Some reduction in visual acuity (VA) subsequently occurred for 75% of those patients followed. For patients aged eight years or more (N=26), 77% showed some acuity gain with 31% (8/260 improving at least 0.3 log units. Twenty-seven percent obtained 20/40 (6/12) or better after an average treatment period of 4.2 months, although no patients older than 10 years (N=13) achieved 20/40 . Loss of some of the acuity gain subsequently occurred for 67% of those followed. These findings indicate that VA can be improved by patching therapy in most patients older than 7 years, but the acuity improvement is somewhat less than ...
The best treatment for lazy eye can be found at Soundview Eye Center. If you woule like to schedule an appointment (631) 536-5113.
Little is known about the effectiveness of occlusion therapy in hospital settings. A retrospective analysis was conducted to assess modalities, outcome and hospital costs of children treated for amblyopia with patching in a UK clinic ...
Andrade, Eric Pinheiro et al. Dysfunction in the fellow eyes of strabismic and anisometropic amblyopic children assessed by visually evoked potentials. Arq. Bras. Oftalmol., Oct 2016, vol.79, no.5, p.294-298. ISSN 0004- ...
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Looking for online definition of anisometropic amblyopia in the Medical Dictionary? anisometropic amblyopia explanation free. What is anisometropic amblyopia? Meaning of anisometropic amblyopia medical term. What does anisometropic amblyopia mean?
Prerequisite: VT/Visual Dysfunctions VT - 1. This course supplements the core VT/Visual Dysfunctions (VT I) course with testing and therapy activities to diagnose and treat patients with strabismus and amblyopia.. For whatever reasons, strabismus and amblyopia have a reputation for being difficult to understand and treat. The approach of the OEP Clinical Curriculum stems from the understanding of Chaos and Complexity Theory which states, "That which appears to be complex, most often can be explained very simply. That which appears so simple, most often is actually very complex." You will learn how specific disruptions or "thwarting" experiences occurring at critical times in normal infant development can result in strabismus or amblyopia. How and why do amblyopia and strabismus develop? What percentage of strabismus and amblyopia are functionally related? How can the development of amblyopia or strabismus be beneficial to the person at a specified point in time and why is this behavior not ...
amblyopia - MedHelps amblyopia Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for amblyopia. Find amblyopia information, treatments for amblyopia and amblyopia symptoms.
These lovely fine motor skills activity cards are perfect for encouraging the childrens use of their hands, building their fine motor skills while being fun at the same time!
Many people make the mistake of saying that a person who has a crossed or turned eye has a "lazy eye," but amblyopia and strabismus are not the same condition. Some of the confusion may be due to the fact that an eye turn can cause lazy eye. In other words, amblyopia can result from a constant unilateral strabismus (i.e., an eye that turns or deviates all of the time). Alternating or intermittent strabismus (an eye turn which occurs only some of the time) rarely causes amblyopia.. While a deviating eye (strabismus) can be easily spotted by the layman, amblyopia without strabismus or associated with a small deviation usually can be not noticed by either you or your pediatrician. Only an eye doctor comfortable in examining young children and infants can detect this type of amblyopia. This is why early infant and pre-school eye examinations are so necessary.. Due to misunderstanding or misuse of the terms for different visual conditions (i.e., deviating eyes vs. lazy eye), many people are ...
The value of near visual activities while patching for amblyopia is controversial. Some pediatric eye care providers currently recommend that the child perform near visual tasks while wearing a patch over the sound eye, while other pediatric eye care providers do not prescribe any specific visual tasks to be performed while the patch is worn.. In previous randomized studies of patching doses for amblyopia conducted by the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, near visual activities were incorporated into the prescribed treatment regimes. Although different doses of patching, combined with near visual activities, were successful in improving visual acuity in most children, it is unclear whether concurrent near visual activities enhanced the effect of patching.. This study is designed as an efficacy study, making effort to maximize adherence to treatment group assignments.. The study has been designed as a simple trial that, other than the type of amblyopia therapy being determined through ...
Make an Upcycled Magazine Bangle from Arty Crafty Kids for a beautiful bracelet to wear, while working on fine motor skills at the same time! Plus, you can get a head start on making a Mothers Day present moms will love.. Practice weaving with this Cereal Box Weaving Loom from Pink and Green Mama. This is great for fine motor skills, plus practicing patterns "Over, Under, Over, Under….". Print this free printable and let your child do the Earth Q-tip Painting from Totschooling.. Use eye droppers to make this Earth Day Coffee Filter Craft from JDaniel4s Mom. This is a perfect pinching activity to work on strengthening little hands.. Make Paper Bead Bracelets out of recycle magazines from Handmade Kids Art.. ...
Homeschool activities for fine motor skills can be lots of fun. Use the My Little Home School 4 in 1 dino-themed activity to practice fine motor skills.
Present making and wrapping can be a fun and rewarding way to work on fine motor skills. Gather your materials and make extravagant packaging for hand made gifts this year. We had a great time sneaking in fine motor skills while wrapping out hand made ornaments this year!
Patching is the standard treatment for amblyopia. An opaque, adhesive patch is worn over the stronger eye for weeks to months. This therapy forces the child to use the eye with amblyopia. Patching stimulates vision in the weaker eye and helps the part of the brain that manages vision develop more completely. Generally, the patch is prescribed for the entire day while awake except for an hour to shower or bathe. The patch is prescribed for a total period equal to about one week for every year of the childs age. For example, a five-year-old child with amblyopia will have to wear the patch for about five weeks. During this time, the vision of both eyes are frequently tested, and so the actual period may be shorter or longer by one or two weeks. Compliance with wearing the eye patch is a significant problem in the treatment of amblyopia. This may be a result of the inherent discomfort of having to see with an eye with poor vision or from the discomfort of the eye patch itself. Poor compliance may ...
About Amblyopia Amblyopia is reduced vision in an eye that has not received adequate use during early childhood. What causes Amblyopia? Amblyopia, also
A childs eyes needs regular, equal use to develop normal vision. Poor vision in an eye that did not get enough use during childhood is called amblyopia ("lazy eye"). Treatment during early childhood can usually reverse amblyopia. Treatment after childhood is rarely helpful. A child with amblyopia who does not get treatment will probably have poor vision for the rest of his or her life.. Amblyopia is caused by any condition that affects normal use of the eyes and visual development. In many cases, the conditions associated with amblyopia may be inherited. Children in a family with a history of amblyopia or misaligned eyes should be checked by an Ophthalmologist early in life. There are 3 major causes of amblyopia in children - strabismus (turned eye), unequal focus due to refractive error or cloudiness caused by lens or corneal opacity.. Success in the treatment of amblyopia also depends upon how severe the amblyopia is and how old the child is when treatment is begun. If the problem is detected ...
Refractive amblyopia happens when there is a large or unequal amount of refractive error (glasses strength) between a childs eyes. The brain learns how to see well from the eye that has less need for glasses and does NOT learn to see well from the eye that has a greater need for glasses. The vision problem may be invisible because the child does not complain of blurry vision. The child sees well with the better seeing eye. Additionally, the amblyopic eye may not look any different from the normal seeing eye. Therefore, parents and pediatricians may not think there is a problem because the childs eyes look normal. For these reasons, this kind of amblyopia in children may not be found until the child has a vision test. This kind of amblyopia can affect one or both eyes and can be best helped if the problem is found early.. ...
Amblyopia: Reduced vision, usually in one eye, that is not due to disease or injury, and is largely not correctable. Possible causes for this condition include strabismus (lazy eye/eye turn), anisometropia (a large difference in the prescriptions for each eye), or any condition that affects visual development-especially in young children.. Astigmatism: A condition that causes blurred vision due either to the irregular shape of the cornea, the clear front cover of the eye, or sometimes the curvature of the lens inside the eye.. Blepharitis: An inflammation of the eyelids and eyelashes causing red, irritated, itchy eyelids and the formation of dandruff like scales on eyelashes.. Cataract: A cloudy or opaque area in the normally clear lens of the eye. Cataracts begin developing in early childhood and progress slowly throughout our lives. Eventually they will affect vision and are typically treated by removing the lens and replacing it with an artificial one. Other forms of cataracts include toxic, ...
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Find the best amblyopia doctors in Delhi NCR. Get guidance from medical experts to select amblyopia specialist in Delhi NCR from trusted hospitals - credihealth.com
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Fine motor skills worksheets help young children develop the hand muscles needed for writing. Use our fine motor worksheets to prepare your child for writing. (Page 19)
One of the easiest ways of training fine motor skills is letting your child play with different materials but it is one of the least used one.. It is a good idea to set a set up a play bench for your child with different materials on it. Different containers can be placed on the bench with different materials in them. Children will love to move water from container to container. It is not only fun but it is also a great training in motor skills.. A sand bucket is also a good way of presenting different challenges to yoru child. With addition of some water, children can already start to imagine and create sand castles.. These are some of the simplest ways to develop motor skills in your child. But there are also endless possible ways of doing that. In short, any kind of play in which your child has to exercise control over fingers and hands is an excellent starting point for this ...
The target refraction was emmetropia in the dominant eye and in the nondominant eye it was either approximately -1.5D (Blended Vision, 25 patients) or emmetropia (Emmetropic Vision, 25 patients). As a third group we considered phakic eyes (30 patients). Three months after surgery, stereopsis was tested using the Stereo Fly Test (Precision Vision), which was positioned at a distance of 16inches. Analogue to logMAR-values for visual acuity, we calculated the logartihm of the minimum angle of stereopsis (logMAS) and compared the median values of all groups. Furthermore patients answered question from a Quality of Vision questionnaire related to depth perception ...
Explore Ana Mas board Psicomotricidade on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Gardens, Fine motor skills and Preschool classroom.
One of our favorite fine motor skills activities for hand strengthening, Milk a Cow is perfect for a preschool or homeschool unit about the farm!
Young children need loads of practice with scissors before they are totally competant when cutting. Here are some good sites with lots of printables and also lots of tips for helping children with those fine motor skills ...
A collection of fun, compact and colorful toys that will amuse and stimulate baby at home and on the go., Ages General 0 - 6, Developmental Skills Fine Motor Skills
Our pencil control worksheets are specially designed to help your children improve their fine motor skills. Simply trace the lines to complete the fun themed images!
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Help kids learn activities for daily living and enhance their fine motor skills with these fun fish. Teaches buttoning, zipping, colors and more.
I felt so much better after reading this. I am so stressed out at the moment with my sons fine motor skills. He is been going to OT since he is 3 years
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It is surprising what you can use for fine motor skill practise if you open your mind a little. Both of these activities were found in the local DIY superstore when I went to buy play sand. B enjoyed them because we bought them from "the Builders shop" and so they are grown-up things really but he was allowed to play with them, wow ...
Learning and playing so often go hand in hand for preschoolers. Here are some ways to sneak in fine motor skills practice during your outside playtime.
Bookmark or pin this huge list of Easter Basket Ideas for babies, toddlers and preschoolers that promote fine motor skills development.
Fine motor skills require the use of fingers to perform activities such as cutting, drawing and picking up small objects. They require finger strength and...
(HealthDay)-A home-based binocular falling-blocks video game does not improve visual outcomes more than placebo for children and adults with unilateral amblyopia, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in JAMA Ophthalmology.
If you need to manage your amblyopia condition, schedule an appointment with our optometrist at Eye To Eye to know your options. Call (410) 376-7070 today.
View details of top amblyopia hospitals in Kolkata. Get guidance from medical experts to select best amblyopia hospital in Kolkata
Toric group included 142 eyes (mean age: 74.5+6.8 years) and control group included 117 eyes (mean age: 76.1+6.1 years). Subjective cylindrical power (D) of toric/control group was -0.58+0.41/ -1.04+0.66 (AT3), -0.59+0.41 /-1.82+0.72 (AT4), and -0.66+0.45/-2..53+0.91 (AT5). Uncorrected LogMAR VA was 0.00+0.11/0.11+0.16(AT3), -0.01+0.13/0.24+0.25(AT4) , and 0.01+0.12/0.30+0.19(AT5). Both cylindrical power and VA showed preferable results in the toric group and the difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant ...
The best of real moms buzz about How to predict and prevent strabismus and amblyopia in toddler. Trustworthy opinions from US moms on toddler
The term lazy eye is misleading because the eye is not actually lazy. In fact, it is a developmental problem in the nerve connecting the eye to the brain, affecting the brains ability to use both eyes together. It is not a problem in the eye itself, but in the brain which actively ignores the visual input from the misaligned eye, leading to amblyopia in that eye ...
Lazy eye (amblyopia) - Comprehensive overview covers symptoms, causes, treatment of reduced vision caused by abnormal visual development early in life
In kids, amblyopia causes reduced vision that should be treated early on. A visit to an eye clinic will give you access the right treatment options.
Amblyopia is a condition in which one of your childs eyes has poorer vision that the other. WebMD explains symptoms and treatment.
... is a sight disorder involving reduced vision in an eye which otherwise appears normal, or out of proportion to problems associated to the structure of the eye. There is much more impact on, or damage to, vision in the eye affected than is predicted. This is the forum for discussing anything related to this health condition
IlluminEyes Vision Care: Test for Amblyopia; Get a comprehensive eye exam in Nashua, NH and nearby areas. Call (603) 598-1620 for appointment.
... interferes with the way the eye and the brain work together. The result is poor vision. Treatment may involve glasses, patches, eye drops, or surgery.
... interferes with the way the eye and the brain work together. The result is poor vision. Treatment may involve glasses, patches, eye drops, or surgery.
CONCLUSIONS: It maybe difficult to distinguish, at population level, between the lives of peoplewith amblyopia and those without, in terms of several important outcomes. Apressing need exists for further concerted research on what it means to haveamblyopia and, specifically, how this varies with severity and how it changeswith treatment, so that screening programmes can best serve those who have themost to gain from early identification ...
Researchers have identified a genetic signature found exclusively in the nerve cells that supply, or innervate, the muscles of an organisms outermost extremities: the hands and feet. The findings suggest that the evolution of the extremities may be related to the emergence of fine motor control, such as grasping -- one of biologys most essential adaptations.
Lacing activity for preschoolers Homemade lacing cards for kids Fine motor activities are so important for not just pencil grasp but for day to day Car lacing
Baking and making gingerbread cookies are part of the holiday celebrations and lend themselves to all sorts of sensory experiences. Make some gingerbread scented play dough together with your children. Then, let them have fun with the play dough on our gingerbread man and gingerbread girl play dough mats. ...
As children grow, the muscles in their hands and arms develop normally through crawling and exploring the world around them. These muscles are needed to grasp and control a pencil properly as they learn to write. Sometimes these muscles need some help. While there are many different ways to hold a pencil... some grasps can be quite tiring for little hands and may be off-putting while they are learning. ...
Finishing this gouache hasnt been a priority for me. Rather, its something Ive done between everything else: refining my online presence and strategy going forward; developing a range of new work in new media; consulting with my bookeeper, accountant and business mentor about the financial side of my career as I re-establish; closing my final enamel studio; emptying the storage unit associated with my enamel studio; re-connecting with collectors and friends; and looking at what other changes to make as I build the foundations for the next stage of my art and life. ...
感冒时由由于人体抵抗力不足而使得感冒病毒伺机发作3从而出现发烧 咳嗽 打喷嚏 流鼻涕 浑身乏力等一系列感冒症状》感冒了3用药缓解症状是常识3但是药三分毒3因此有些人却必须除外3比如婴幼儿》摘自 此处 长期服用某些激素类药3会使儿童发育迟缓3可引起骨质疏松而发生骨折3抑制蛋白质 ...
Whenever we get the chance, I pull out some old recycling papers and the scissors and let him cut until his hand is too tired to cut any more. Then we switch hands ...
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Explore the best ways to enhance the development of your babys fine motor skills with Pampers, by using tried and tested methods such as playing catch.
Center for Conductive Education. Our programs help improve gross and fine motor skills, balance, mobility and independence. These concentrated sessions provide time for clients to learn new skills, repeat, and reinforce these skills on a daily basis.
Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of the visual system that is caused by abnormal binocular visual experience during early childhood, typically due to anisometropia or strabismus [1]. Amblyopia causes a range of monocular deficits in the affected eye including impaired visual acuity [1], contrast sensitivity [2], motion perception [3, 4] and excessive crowding [5] (see [6] for a recent review). Patients with amblyopia also experience impaired binocular vision. In particular, the fellow eye often suppresses the amblyopic eye when both eyes are open, and stereopsis is commonly impaired or absent [7]. Stronger interocular suppression has been associated with poorer stereopsis and monocular visual acuity in patients [8-11], as well as poorer amblyopic eye contrast sensitivity in animal models of amblyopia [12, 13].. In children, the visual acuity deficit associated with amblyopia can be treated monocularly by optically correcting any significant refractive error and then occluding ...
One of the most common causes of amblyopia is strabismus, or wandering of one or both eyes either inward (called esotropia), outward (called exotropia), up (hypertropia), or down (hypotropia).. When eyes are misaligned, the straight or straighter eye may become dominant. The vision strength (acuity) of the straight eye stays normal because the eye and its connection to the brain are working normally. The misaligned or weaker eye, though, does not focus properly and the brain suppresses or ignores its signal, eventually leading to amblyopia.. Not all kids with amblyopia will have crossed or wandering eyes - in fact many have eyes that are perfectly straight. If so, amblyopia is usually the result of an anatomical or structural problem that interferes with or blocks vision, such as a droopy eyelid or a cataract.. Another cause of amblyopia is severe far-sightedness (hyperopia), near-sightedness (myopia), or astigmatism (a form of blurry vision). These vision problems ("refractive errors") cause ...
Improve fine motor skills, such as grasping and hand-eye coordination, with toys specially designed fine motor skills toys at Melissa & Doug. Melissa & Doug
Improve fine motor skills, such as grasping and hand-eye coordination, with toys specially designed fine motor skills toys at Melissa & Doug. Melissa & Doug
Bremer D L, et al: Cycloplegic refraction in esotropic children: Cyclopentolate versus atropine. Ophthalmology 1981:88:1031. 47. Rubin S E . Wagner RS: Ocular torticollis. Surv Ophthalmol 1986:30:366. 48. Simons K: A comparison of the Frisby, Random-Dot E. TNO. and Randot circles stereotests in screening and office use. Arch Ophthalmol 1981:99:446. 49. Simons K. Elhatton K: Artifacts in fusion and stereopsis testing based on red/green dichoptic image separation. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabis- mus 1994:31:290. The height at which bifocals arc set depends on the patients age, but the ultimate goal is for the child to spontaneously use the bifocal for near. In general, bifocals bisect the pupil in younger children and may be set at the level of the lower limbus or lower lid in older (school-age) children. , induced prisms in anisometropia). A N O M A LO U S HEAD P O ST U R E Anomalous head posture may not be immediately obvious to the examiner and requires a systematic evaluation. Old photographs ...
Stereopsis in normal observers is most sensitive when the objects presented to the two eyes are the same size. People with different refractive errors in the two eyes (anisometropes) usually have one eye longer than the other, so the retinal images differ in size for equal-sized objects. We asked whether stereopsis is best in anisometropes when the retinal images or objects are the same. We measured stereo sensitivity for different object size ratios. Observers discriminated the orientation of a disparity-defined corrugation. Disparity noise was added to determine coherence thresholds. Threshold was best when object sizes were the same despite the differing eye lengths. Two mechanisms could account for this result. First, the retina may expand in proportion to eye length such that the number of cones sampling a given visual angle in the two eyes remains unchanged; this is the receptor hypothesis. Second, post-receptoral mechanisms may adjust for the differences in retinal-image size; this is the ...
lenses does not spoil your appearance, what is more, it will help to emphasize.As you know, the eyes - a mirror of the soul, and they can be made even brighter and more attractive.. next quite important advantage is that the contact lenses are a much better fit for certain medical defects of vision.For example, they are more effective in anisometropia, a large difference between the eye sight, which can reach more than 2 diopters of myopia and hyperopia of high degree.Therefore, ophthalmologists are much more likely to recommend them for use.. course, in this case, there are some disadvantages.However, you need to know that they frequently exaggerate.Many argue that the contact lenses bring only temporary relief, and in a few years their use vision deteriorates significantly.Furthermore, this extraneous element, and, no matter how secure it may be, is a source of irritation, which can lead to increased risks of allergies and infectious diseases.It is also often said that to replace contact ...
LOCKRIDGE - Lockridge Lions Club is offering free vision screening to children from 9-10 a.m. Tuesday at Lockridge City Hall.. Screenings are in conjunction with Iowa KidSight, under the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.. The vision screening provide instant photographs of a childs eyes to determine the presence of eye disorders, including far- and near-sightedness, astigmatism, anisometropia (unequal refractive power), stabismus (misaligned eyes), and medial opacities (cataracts.. The screening is approximately 85 to 90 percent effective in detecting problems that can cause reduced vision.. No physical contact is made with a child, and no eye drops are used during the vision screening.. As of the 2015-16 school year, children entering kindergarten must provide proof of screening.. Participating in the KidSight screening is voluntary. Children between the age of 6 months through kindergartners will be screened. Older children can be ...
Fine motor skill is the coordination of small muscle movements which occur in body parts such as the fingers, usually in coordination with the eyes. In relation to motor skills of hands and fingers, the term dexterity is commonly used. When applied to the theory of human aptitude, this is called "manual dexterity". The high level of manual dexterity that humans exhibit can be attributed to the manner in which manual tasks are controlled by the nervous system. ...
Explore bugsly sols board Figura-Fondo on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Preschool activities, Coloring and Fine motor skills.
Inspired by the successful therapeutic app Dexteria, Binary Labs has created a new fine motor skills app for kids to help them build handwriting readiness.
Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) March 09, 2014 -- Toddlers like to flutter from activity to activity. Fun fine motor skills activities for tots and easy preschool
Easy precision in grasp, release, and rotation in fine motor skills for kids. Precision is so important in dexterity in many skills like handwriting, cutting with scissors, and everything done with the hands!
Explore Janine Scrivenss board Classic story boards on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Toddler activities, Fine motor skills and Free stencils.
Ambyopia or lazy eye treatment procedures at Sanjeevan are developed to help the entire visual apparatus gain enough strength to treat Amblyopia.
Amblyopia is the medical term used when the vision of one eye is reduced because it fails to work properly with the brain. It is the most common cause of visual impairment among children, affecting an estimated 2% to 5% of all children. Amblyopia is commonly referred to as Lazy Eye.
The eye doctor amblyopia strabismus binocular instrument -- CIBA Vision and synoptophore or software to compare the main advantages,First, the same as the main shortcomings of visual training:1, the operation is complex, both parents or medical staff to help debugging, bu
This page has the readings that support your learning and implementation of the VT/Strabismus & Amblyopia Course (VT 2). These readings include a number of resources to help you get the most you can from your OEP Clinical Curriculum experience. ...
Lazy eye (amblyopia) is decreased vision that results from abnormal visual development in infancy and early childhood. Although lazy eye usually affects only one eye, it can affect both eyes. Lazy eye is the leading cause of decreased vision among children. Left untreated, vision loss may range from mild to severe.
Define hereditary amblyopia with quadriplegia. hereditary amblyopia with quadriplegia synonyms, hereditary amblyopia with quadriplegia pronunciation, hereditary amblyopia with quadriplegia translation, English dictionary definition of hereditary amblyopia with quadriplegia. n. Dimness of vision, especially when occurring in one eye without apparent physical defect or disease. Also called lazy eye . am′bly·o′pic adj.
Contact lenses  Toric contact lenses Soft lenses [SL] Rigid gas permeable lenses [RGP] RGP do not conform to the asymmetry of corneal surface but replaces it totally and also provides F. Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. Laser Sub-Epithelial Keratomileusis• LASEK can treat mild to moderate myopia and hyperopia +/- astigmatism.• Can be performed as an outpt with topical anesthesia• The corneal epithelium is incompletely incised using a PowerPoint Presentation Wave Aberration: Astigmatism Wave Aberration: Coma Wave Aberration: ... , PowerPoint PPT presentation , free to view GPS Error - The accuracy of GPS signals was intentionally degraded by For a small fee you can get the industrys best online privacy or publicly promote your presentations and slide shows with top rankings. Refractive Error In Children Ppt Anisometropia• Difference in refractive power between 2 eyes• refractive correction often leads to ...
By age 3, an optometrist should reassess a childs visual system to confirm the absence of any eye disease, as well as monitor the continued growth and efficiency of visual skill development. This is also the examination where eye muscle problems such as crossed-eyes (strabismus) and lazy eye (amblyopia) are carefully assessed.. Amblyopia, or lazy eye, is the loss or lack of development of vision in an eye that is healthy. Amblyopia can be caused by crossed-eyes (strabismus), unequal refractive error, farsightedness or nearsightedness, or a physical obstruction like a cataract. The brain "learns" to see with the good eye only, and the other eye grows weaker from disuse. It is estimated that 2 - 4% of all children have amblyopia. Amblyopia is responsible for more cases of vision loss in children than all other ocular diseases and traumas combined. If detected and treated at an early age, amblyopia will often resolve completely.. ...
INTRODUCTION. The National Education Department has emphasised the need for the early identification of "barriers to learning" which prevents learners from achieving success in the classroom1. Approximately 7.3% of learners in the Gauteng school system can be identified as having intrinsic impairments in the form of deficits in internal performance components (for example low muscle tone) or client factors and performance skills (such as in-hand manipulation) which interfere with their learning2. Occupational therapists are concerned with the assessment and remediation of a number of these performance skills in the pre-school years including bilateral fine motor skills or co-ordination3. These skills present as the ability to manipulate the various tools and materials required to perform in school-related tasks such as cutting with scissors and writing and are needed for participation in other daily activities4.. Children show the most improvement in more complex bilateral fine-motor control in ...
The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the spherical equivalent visual acuity (VA) and uncorrected astigmatism. On 108 emmetropic eyes, the spherical equivalent VA was measured for cross cylindrical lens (CC lens)-induced astigmatic eyes and the VA-astigmatism relation determined. On 158 astigmatic eyes, the spherical equivalent VA and corrected astigmatism were measured and the measured values were compared with the calculated values from the VA-astigmatism relation by correlation coefficient analysis. Subsequent to that, the relationship between spherical equivalent VA and uncorrected astigmatism was made. The relationship was fitted for an exponential equation. Correlation coefficient between calculated values by equation and measured values for astigmatic eyes was 0.991 (p,0.01). The relationship between the spherical equivalent VA and the uncorrected astigmatism was decided as follows (spherical equivalent VA / uncorrected astigmatism): 1.0 / 0.25 D, 0.9 / 0.50 ...
Behavioral studies have reported reduced spatial attention in amblyopia, a developmental disorder of spatial vision. However, the neural populations in the visual cortex linked with these behavioral spatial attention deficits have not been identified. Here, we use functional MRI-informed electroencephalography source imaging to measure the effect of attention on neural population activity in the visual cortex of human adult strabismic amblyopes who were stereoblind. We show that compared with controls, the modulatory effects of selective visual attention on the input from the amblyopic eye are substantially reduced in the primary visual cortex (V1) as well as in extrastriate visual areas hV4 and hMT+. Degraded attentional modulation is also found in the normal-acuity fellow eye in areas hV4 and hMT+ but not in V1. These results provide electrophysiological evidence that abnormal binocular input during a developmental critical period may impact cortical connections between the visual cortex and ...

Anisometropia - WikipediaAnisometropia - Wikipedia

In a study performed on 53 children who had amblyopia due to anisometropia, surgical correction of the anisometropia followed ... Secondly, different criteria have been employed to define anisometropia, and the boundary between anisometropia and isometropia ... of subjects aged 6 to 18 have anisometropia. For those with large degrees of anisometropia, spectacle correction may cause the ... Anisometropia follows a U-shape distribution according to age: it is frequent in infants aged only a few weeks, is more rare in ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anisometropia

Anisometropia | definition of anisometropia by Medical dictionaryAnisometropia | definition of anisometropia by Medical dictionary

... anisometropia explanation free. What is anisometropia? Meaning of anisometropia medical term. What does anisometropia mean? ... Looking for online definition of anisometropia in the Medical Dictionary? ... compound myopic anisometropia See anisomyopia.. mixed anisometropia See antimetropia.. simple anisometropia Anisometropia in ... anisometropia. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia. anisometropia. [an-i″so-mĕ-tro´pe-ah] inequality in the ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anisometropia

Risk Factors for Persistence of Infantile Anisometropia | IOVS | ARVO JournalsRisk Factors for Persistence of Infantile Anisometropia | IOVS | ARVO Journals

Non-hyperopic anisometropia is significantly higher and is more often associated with amblyopia than hyperopic anisometropia. ... Marked infantile anisometropia at the first visit was a significant risk factor for marked anisometropia that persisted through ... Children with non-hyperopic anisometropia had 5.97±4.77D anisometropia at the first visit, which is significantly higher than ... Eight had marked anisometropia (≥3D). Risk factors evaluated were: initial amount of anisometropia; presence/absence of ...
more infohttps://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2364841

Amblyopia more common and severe in young children with higher-magnitude anisometropia - American Academy of OphthalmologyAmblyopia more common and severe in young children with higher-magnitude anisometropia - American Academy of Ophthalmology

This retrospective observational study found that young children with higher magnitudes of anisometropia had a higher ... Of those with anisometropia, 640 (65.7 percent) had amblyopia, which the authors defined as a two-line difference in verbal ... The authors found that more than 80 percent of children with less than 2 D of anisometropia had no or only mild amblyopia, but ... The studys authors also found that low-magnitude anisometropia in children younger than age three might not predispose them to ...
more infohttps://www.aao.org/editors-choice/amblyopia-more-common-severe-in-young-children-wit

All biometric components are important in anisometropia, not just axial length | British Journal of OphthalmologyAll biometric components are important in anisometropia, not just axial length | British Journal of Ophthalmology

... lens power and anterior chamber depth are related to anisometropia as well. More than 10% of changes in anisometropia can be ... The correlation of anisometropia with axial length asymmetry was 0.735, 0.273 with corneal power, 0.183 with anterior chamber ... Background No study to date has looked into the relationship between ocular biometrics with anisometropia exclusively; ... Conclusions Axial length asymmetry has the strongest correlation with anisometropia; nonetheless, other components of ocular ...
more infohttp://bjo.bmj.com/content/early/2013/10/11/bjophthalmol-2013-303939

Prevalence of anisometropia and its association with refractive error and amblyopia in preschool children | British Journal of...Prevalence of anisometropia and its association with refractive error and amblyopia in preschool children | British Journal of...

... anisometropia was uncommon with inter-ethnic differences in cylindrical anisometropia prevalence. We also quantified the rising ... Anisometropia prevalence was lower or similar to that in the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study, Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye ... Risk (OR) of anisometropic amblyopia with ≥1.0 D of SE and cylindrical anisometropia was 12.4 (CI 4.0 to 38.4) and 6.5 (CI 2.3 ... Anisometropia was defined by the spherical equivalent (SE) difference, and plus cylinder difference for any cylindrical axis ...
more infohttp://bjo.bmj.com/content/early/2013/04/22/bjophthalmol-2012-302637

GMS | 104th DOG Annual Meeting | Pediatric excimer laser refractive surgery - PRK and LASEK for high myopic anisometropia and...GMS | 104th DOG Annual Meeting | Pediatric excimer laser refractive surgery - PRK and LASEK for high myopic anisometropia and...

PRK and LASEK, are effective and safe methods to reduce high myopic anisometropia in children aged 4 to 15 years and to improve ... Group 2: Thirty two patients aged 4 to 7 years (mean, 5.35 years) with high myopic anisometropia and amblyopia had performed ... Pediatric excimer laser refractive surgery - PRK and LASEK for high myopic anisometropia and amblyopia: Results of 11-year ... for high myopic anisometropia and contact lens intolerance in 58 children treated from January 1995 in the categories of ...
more infohttp://www.egms.de/static/en/meetings/dog2006/06dog720.shtml

Associations between Anisometropia, Amblyopia, and Reduced Stereoacuity in a School-Aged Population with a High Prevalence of...Associations between Anisometropia, Amblyopia, and Reduced Stereoacuity in a School-Aged Population with a High Prevalence of...

SE hyperopic anisometropia (SHA); (3) SE myopic anisometropia (SMA); and (4) cylinder anisometropia (CA). As summarized in ... Subjects in one group all had at least 2.00 D of anisometropia; in other group all had at least 1.00 D of anisometropia; no ... Subjects in one group all had at least 2.00 D of anisometropia; in other group all had at least 1.00 D of anisometropia; no ... In addition to examining anisometropia calculated as interocular differences in sphere and cylinder, we examined anisometropia ...
more infohttps://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2125647

Amblyopia from anisometropia without strabismus].

 | DIAL.pr - BOREALAmblyopia from anisometropia without strabismus]. | DIAL.pr - BOREAL

Yüksel, Demet ; Spiritus, M ; Vandelannoitte, S ; Hoffmann, D. [Amblyopia from anisometropia without strabismus].. In: Bulletin ... In all cases, anisometropia was totally corrected by prescribing glasses. Anisometropic amblyopia was considered to be present ... Amblyopia was present in 86% of the patients and was found with all types of anisometropia. It was more severe in ... Amblyopia ; Sensory Deprivation ; Strabismus ; Visual Acuity ; Anisometropia ; Child ; Child, Preschool ; Eyeglasses ; Follow- ...
more infohttps://dial.uclouvain.be/pr/boreal/object/boreal:145539

Monofixation Syndrome Clinical Presentation: History, Physical, CausesMonofixation Syndrome Clinical Presentation: History, Physical, Causes

Adult patients who have no microtropia, uncorrected mild anisometropia (meridional or hyperopic anisometropia), subnormal ... Anisometropia. Blurred image on one macula due to uncorrected refractive error leads to unilateral suppression scotoma and mild ... Adults with subnormal stereovision, mild anisometropia, and subtle asymmetry in best-corrected vision may have undiagnosed ... Tomac S. Monofixation syndrome and anisometropia. Ophthalmology. 2002 Jan. 109(1):3-4. [Medline]. ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1199953-clinical

I HAD A LYMPHOMA/14 | HubPagesI HAD A LYMPHOMA/14 | HubPages

Anisometropia - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment. by medicalcontent. 1. *. Personality Disorders. Four Primary Forms of ...
more infohttps://hubpages.com/health/I-HAD-A-LYMPHOMA14

Bifocal Contact LensesBifocal Contact Lenses

Hyperopia/Anisometropia+presbyopia=Ugghh! Started by Frustrated, 11-14-2012 09:49 AM ...
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StrabismusStrabismus

4.2.2 Anisometropia and astigmatism. Anisometropia and astigmatism are potent causes of amblyopia in childhood which may be ... In spherical anisometropia a minimum difference of 1.25 DS may be significant. (10,11,12) Unilateral high myopia may also cause ... For instance, anisometropia of greater than 4.00 D is likely to need correction at any age, whereas correction of 1.50 to 2.00 ... Hypermetropic anisometropia appears more likely to cause amblyopia than anisomyopia. The need to correct the refractive error ...
more infohttp://www.mrcophth.com/focus1/Strabismus.htm

Current Issue : RETINACurrent Issue : RETINA

ASYMMETRIC DIABETIC RETINOPATHY PROGRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH AXIAL ANISOMETROPIA. Kim, Dong Yoon; Song, Ji Ho; Kim, Yoon Jeon; ... In patients with axial anisometropia, longer eye had a lower degree of diabetic retinopathy progression than shorter eye. This ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/retinajournal/Pages/currenttoc.aspx

Most Popular Articles : Optometry and Vision ScienceMost Popular Articles : Optometry and Vision Science

Refractive Changes in Amblyopic Children with High Anisometropia. Shih, Min-Hsiu; Chen, Wan-Ju; Huang, Fu-Chin ...
more infohttp://journals.lww.com/optvissci/pages/viewallmostpopulararticles.aspx

Clinical Ophthalmology | Volume 4 - Dove Press Open Access PublisherClinical Ophthalmology | Volume 4 - Dove Press Open Access Publisher

Multifocal visual evoked potentials in amblyopia due to anisometropia MM Moschos, I Margetis, S Tsapakis, et al ...
more infohttps://www.dovepress.com/clinical-ophthalmology-archive9-v221

Ocular dominance - WikipediaOcular dominance - Wikipedia

Vincent SJ, Collins MJ, Read SA, Carney LG, Yap MK (2011). "Interocular symmetry in myopic anisometropia". Optom Vis Sci. 88 ( ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocular_dominance

eyes facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about eyeseyes facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about eyes

anisometropia. keratitis an inflamed condition of the cornea.. keratoplasty the surgical process of corneal grafting.. ... anisometropia a defect of the eyesight in which each eye has a different power to refract light. Cf. isometropia . - ...
more infohttp://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/anatomy-and-physiology/anatomy-and-physiology/eyes

opia | Define -opia at Dictionary.comopia | Define -opia at Dictionary.com

A visual condition or defect of a specified kind:anisometropia.. Show More. ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/-opia

Eyes Definition, Prefix, Suffix, Ologies and Isms, Eyes Information and MeaningEyes Definition, Prefix, Suffix, Ologies and Isms, Eyes Information and Meaning

anisometropia. keratitis an inflamed condition of the cornea. keratoplasty the surgical process of corneal grafting. keratotomy ... anisometropia a defect of the eyesight in which each eye has a different power to refract light. Cf. isometropia . - ...
more infohttp://www.faqs.org/ologies-isms/Eas-Fin/Eyes.html

Increasing Patching for Amblyopia in Children 3 to | 8 Years Old - Study Results - ClinicalTrials.govIncreasing Patching for Amblyopia in Children 3 to | 8 Years Old - Study Results - ClinicalTrials.gov

Strabismus and Anisometropia 26 36 62 [1]. Amblyopia associated with strabismus (comitant or incomitant), anisometropia, or ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT00945100?sect=Xn015&view=results

Ocular Response Analyzer Assessment of Intraocular Pressure and Corneal Biomechanical Properties in Myopic and Anisometropic...Ocular Response Analyzer Assessment of Intraocular Pressure and Corneal Biomechanical Properties in Myopic and Anisometropic...

Normal ocular health other than myopia or anisometropia. *In good general health with no history of prematurity or cardiac or ... Anisometropia. Refractive Errors. Eye Diseases. Atropine. Adjuvants, Anesthesia. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents. Bronchodilator Agents ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00658502?recr=Open&cond=%22Refractive+Errors%22&rank=18
  • More specifically, for patients with esotropia who undergo strabismus surgery, anisometropia may be one of the risk factors for developing consecutive exotropia and poor binocular function may be a risk factor for anisometropia to develop or increase. (wikipedia.org)
  • In certain types of anisometropia, the visual cortex of the brain will not use both eyes together (binocular vision), and will instead suppress the central vision of one of the eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Secondly, different criteria have been employed to define anisometropia, and the boundary between anisometropia and isometropia depend on their definition. (wikipedia.org)
  • nonetheless, other components of ocular biometrics such as corneal power, lens opacity, lens power and anterior chamber depth are related to anisometropia as well. (bmj.com)
  • More than 10% of changes in anisometropia can be explained with changes in factors other than asymmetry of ocular biometrics and lens opacity. (bmj.com)
  • Notwithstanding research performed on the biomechanical, structural and optical characteristics of anisometropic eyes, the underlying reasons for anisometropia are still poorly understood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anisometropia was defined by the spherical equivalent (SE) difference, and plus cylinder difference for any cylindrical axis between eyes. (bmj.com)
  • Anisometropia was calculated in clinical notation (spherical equivalent and cylinder) and in two forms of vector notation that take into account interocular differences in both axis and cylinder magnitude. (arvojournals.org)
  • Adults with subnormal stereovision, mild anisometropia, and subtle asymmetry in best-corrected vision may have undiagnosed monofixation syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • For those with large degrees of anisometropia, spectacle correction may cause the person to experience a difference in image magnification between the two eyes (aniseikonia) which could also prevent the development of good binocular vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there are indications that anisometropia influences the long-term outcome of a surgical correction of an inward squint, and vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outcome evaluated was persistence of anisometropia through the last visit. (arvojournals.org)
  • Anisometropia follows a U-shape distribution according to age: it is frequent in infants aged only a few weeks, is more rare in young children, comparatively more frequent in teenagers and young adults, and more prevalent after presbyopia sets in, progressively increasing into old age. (wikipedia.org)
  • To conduct the study, the authors identified 974 children with anisometropia greater than 1 D in one meridian and complete data among 199,079 children up to age 72 months screened through a statewide preschool vision photoscreening program over a nine-year period. (aao.org)
  • Fifty non-strabismic children with primary anisometropia were reviewed retrospectively. (uclouvain.be)
  • Anisometropia is the condition in which the two eyes have unequal refractive power. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally a difference in power of two diopters or more is the accepted threshold to label the condition anisometropia. (wikipedia.org)
  • One study estimated that 6% of those between the ages of 6 and 18 have anisometropia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In all cases, anisometropia was totally corrected by prescribing glasses. (uclouvain.be)