Infection with roundworms of the genus ANISAKIS. Human infection results from the consumption of fish harboring roundworm larvae. The worms may cause acute NAUSEA; VOMITING; or penetrate into the wall of the DIGESTIVE TRACT where they give rise to EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA in the STOMACH; INTESTINES; or the OMENTUM.
A genus of nematodes of the superfamily ASCARIDOIDEA. Its organisms are found in the stomachs of marine animals and birds. Human infection occurs by ingestion of raw fish that contain larvae.
Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.
A superfamily of polymyarian nematode worms. An important characteristic of this group is the presence of three prominent lips around the mouth of the organism.
The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.
The fold of peritoneum by which the COLON is attached to the posterior ABDOMINAL WALL.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.
Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).

Acute intestinal anisakiasis in Spain: a fourth-stage Anisakis simplex larva. (1/52)

A case of acute intestinal anisakiasis has been reported; a nematode larva being found in the submucosa of the ileum of a woman in Jaen (Spain). The source of infection was the ingestion of raw Engraulis encrasicholus. On the basis of its morphology, the worm has been identified as a fourth-stage larva of Anisakis simplex. In Spain, this is the ninth report of human anisakiasis and also probably the first case of anisakiasis caused by a fourth-stage larva of A. simplex.  (+info)

Purification and cloning of an apoptosis-inducing protein derived from fish infected with Anisakis simplex, a causative nematode of human anisakiasis. (2/52)

While investigating the effect of marine products on cell growth, we found that visceral extracts of Chub mackerel, an ocean fish, had a powerful and dose-dependent apoptosis-inducing effect on a variety of mammalian tumor cells. This activity was strikingly dependent on infection of the C. mackerel with the larval nematode, Anisakis simplex. After purification of the protein responsible for the apoptosis-inducing activity, we cloned the corresponding gene and found it to be a flavoprotein. This protein, termed apoptosis-inducing protein (AIP), was also found to possess an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (C-terminal KDEL sequence) and H2O2-producing activity, indicating that we had isolated a novel reticuloplasimin with potent apoptosis-inducing activity. AIP was induced in fish only after infection with larval nematode and was localized to capsules that formed around larvae to prevent their migration to host tissues. Our results suggest that AIP may function to impede nematode infection.  (+info)

Apoptosis-inducing protein, AIP, from parasite-infected fish induces apoptosis in mammalian cells by two different molecular mechanisms. (3/52)

AIP (apoptosis-inducing protein) is a protein purified and cloned from Chub mackerel infected with the larval nematode, Anisakis simplex, which induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. AIP has shown structural and functional homology to L-amino acid oxidase (LAO) which oxidizes several L-amino acids including L-lysine and AIP-induced apoptosis has been suggested to be mediated by H2O2 generated by LAO activity of AIP. In this study, we confirmed that recombinant AIP generated enough H2O2 in culture medium to induce rapid apoptosis in cells and this apoptosis was clearly inhibited by co-cultivation with antioxidants such as catalase and N-acetyl-cysteine. Surprisingly, however, we found that AIP still could induce H2O2-independent apoptosis more slowly than H2O2-dependent one in HL-60 cells even in the presence of antioxidants. In addition, the HL-60-derived cell line HP100-1, which is a H2O2-resistant variant, underwent apoptosis on treatment with AIP with a similar delayed time course. The latter apoptosis was completely blocked by addition of L-lysine to the culture medium, which is the best substrate of AIP as LAO, indicating that decreased concentration of L-lysine in the culture medium by AIP-treatment induced apoptosis. We also showed that the both apoptosis by AIP were associated with the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of caspase-9, and overexpressed Bcl-2 could inhibit both of the AIP-induced apoptosis. These results indicate that AIP induces apoptosis in cells by two distinct mechanisms; one rapid and mediated by H2O2, the other delayed and mediated by deprivation of L-lysine, both of which utilize caspase-9/cytochrome c system.  (+info)

A human case of gastric infection by Pseudoterranova decipiens larva. (4/52)

We report a case of gastric pseudoterranoviasis proven by gastrofiberscopy on Dec. 13, 1994. The 34-year-old male patient, residing in Chungju-shi, was admitted to Konkuk University Hospital complaining of prickling epigastric pain. The symptoms suddenly attacked him two days after eating raw marine fish at Chonan-shi. By the gastrofiberscopic examination, a long white-yellowish nematode was found from the fundus region of stomach. The worm was 34.50 x 0.84 mm in size, and was identified as a 3rd stage larva of Pseudoterranova decipiens judging from the position of the intestinal cecum. This is the 12th confirmed case of human pseudoterranoviasis in Korea.  (+info)

Human infection by Pseudoterranova decipiens (Nematoda, Anisakidae) in Chile: report of seven cases. (5/52)

From 1997 to 1999, we identified seven human cases of infection by fourth stage larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens in Chile. All identified larvae were coughed up by the patients. Subjects were 10-55 years old; five were female. Some patients complained of coughing, expectoration, pharyngeal pain, nausea or anal and nasal pruritus. Larvae of three patients were coughed up from 36 h to 7 days after having eaten raw (cebiche or sushi) or lightly fried fish. P. decipiens has a marine life cycle. Infective third stage larva develop to adult stage in pinniped mammals. The nematode eggs are voided with the host faeces and develop and hatch releasing third stage larvae. Some crustaceans and fish act as hosts of third stage larvae. Man is an accidental host for third or fourth stage larvae.  (+info)

Interleukin-4 production in BALB/c mice immunized with Anisakis simplex. (6/52)

We investigated the interleukin (IL-4) levels in BALB/c mice immunized with Anisakis extract in single or multiple doses and in mice orally infected with a larva. From animals immunized maximum responses were obtained with the multiple doses with an only IL-4 peak. Conversely, in the mice inoculated with a larva per os, the IL-4 levels showed two peaks of different rates.  (+info)

Evaluation by ELISA of anisakis simplex larval antigen purified by affinity chromatography. (7/52)

In order to improve the specificity and sensitivity of the techniques for the human anisakidosis diagnosis, a method of affinity chromatography for the purification of species-specific antigens from Anisakis simplex third-stage larvae (L3) has been developed. New Zealand rabbits were immunized with A. simplex or Ascaris suum antigens or inoculated with Toxocara canis embryonated eggs. The IgG specific antibodies were isolated by means of protein A-Sepharose CL-4B beads columns. IgG anti-A. simplex and -A. suum were coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. For the purification of the larval A. simplex antigens, these were loaded into the anti-A. simplex column and bound antigens eluted. For the elimination of the epitopes responsible for the cross-reactions, the A. simplex specific proteins were loaded into the anti-A. suum column. To prove the specificity of the isolated proteins, immunochemical analyses by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were carried out. Further, we studied the different responses by ELISA to the different antigenic preparations of A. simplex used, observing their capability of discriminating among the different antisera raised in rabbits (anti-A. simplex, anti-A. suum, anti-T. canis). The discriminatory capability with the anti-T. canis antisera was good using the larval A. simplex crude extract (CE) antigen. When larval A. simplex CE antigen was loaded into a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B coupled to IgG from rabbits immunized with A. simplex CE antigen, its capability for discriminate between A. simplex and A. suum was improved, increasing in the case of T. canis. The best results were obtained using larval A. simplex CE antigen loaded into a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B coupled to IgG from rabbits immunized with adult A. suum CE antigen. When we compared the different serum dilution and antigenic concentration, we selected the working serum dilution of (1/4)00 and 1 microg/ml of antigenic concentration.  (+info)

A case of acute gastric anisakiasis provoking severe clinical problems by multiple infection. (8/52)

Acute gastric anisakiasis with multiple anisakid larvae infection is reported. A 68-year-old woman residing in Busan, Korea, had epigastric pain with severe vomiting about 5 hours after eating raw anchovies. Four nematode larvae penetrating the gastric mucosae in the great curvature of the middle body and fundus were found and removed during gastro-endoscopic examination. Another one thread-like moving larva was found in the great curvature of upper body on the following day. On the basis of their morphology, the worms were identified as the 3rd stage larvae of Anisakis simplex. This case is acute gastric anisakiasis provoking severe clinical problems by the multiple infection and the greatest number of anisakid larvae found in a patient in Korea.  (+info)

Anisakiasis is a gastrointestinal disease caused by the accidental consumption and infection with larvae of nematode parasites belonging to the genus Anisakis. The life cycle of these parasites typically involves marine animals such as fish and squid, which serve as intermediate or paratenic hosts. Human infections usually occur when people eat raw or undercooked seafood that contains infective larvae.

After ingestion, the larvae can penetrate the gastrointestinal mucosa, causing an inflammatory reaction and potentially leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. In some cases, the larvae may invade deeper tissues, resulting in more severe complications like allergic reactions, intestinal obstruction, or perforation.

Diagnosis of anisakiasis is often based on clinical presentation, epidemiological data, and detection of parasite larvae in biopsy samples, stool specimens, or vomitus. Treatment typically involves endoscopic removal of the larvae, supportive care for symptoms, and sometimes anti-parasitic medication. Preventive measures include thoroughly cooking seafood, freezing it at temperatures below -20°C (-4°F) for at least 7 days, or practicing proper hygiene during food preparation to minimize the risk of infection.

Anisakis is a genus of parasitic nematode (roundworm) that can infect marine mammals, fish, and squid. Humans can become accidentally infected when they consume raw or undercooked seafood that contains Anisakis larvae. This type of infection is known as "anisakiasis" or "herring worm disease."

The infection can cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In some cases, the larvae may penetrate the wall of the gastrointestinal tract, leading to more severe symptoms such as allergic reactions, eosinophilic granulomas, or intestinal obstruction.

Preventing anisakiasis involves cooking or freezing fish and seafood thoroughly before consumption. Freezing fish at -20°C (-4°F) for at least 7 days can kill the larvae, making it safe to eat raw. Proper handling and storage of seafood can also help reduce the risk of infection.

Nematode infections, also known as roundworm infections, are caused by various species of nematodes or roundworms. These parasitic worms can infect humans and animals, leading to a range of health problems depending on the specific type of nematode and the location of the infection within the body.

Common forms of nematode infections include:

1. Ascariasis: Caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, this infection occurs when people ingest the parasite's eggs through contaminated food or water. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the worms may obstruct the intestines or migrate to other organs, leading to potentially life-threatening complications.
2. Hookworm infections: These are caused by Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. The larvae penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet, and migrate to the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and protein loss.
3. Trichuriasis: Also known as whipworm infection, this is caused by Trichuris trichiura. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal prolapse in severe cases.
4. Strongyloidiasis: Caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, this infection occurs when the larvae penetrate the skin, usually through contaminated soil, and migrate to the lungs and then the small intestine. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. In immunocompromised individuals, strongyloidiasis can lead to disseminated disease, which is potentially fatal.
5. Toxocariasis: This infection is caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, found in dogs and cats, respectively. Humans become infected through ingestion of contaminated soil or undercooked meat. Symptoms include fever, cough, abdominal pain, and vision loss in severe cases.
6. Enterobiasis: Also known as pinworm infection, this is caused by Enterobius vermicularis. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing perianal itching and restlessness, especially at night.

Preventive measures include:

1. Proper hand hygiene: Wash hands with soap and water after using the toilet, changing diapers, handling pets or their feces, and before preparing or eating food.
2. Personal hygiene: Keep fingernails short and clean, avoid biting nails, and wear shoes in public areas, especially where soil may be contaminated with human or animal feces.
3. Food safety: Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, cook meat properly, and avoid consuming raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or fish.
4. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean surfaces that come into contact with food, such as countertops, cutting boards, and utensils. Dispose of trash properly and maintain a clean living environment.
5. Pet care: Keep pets healthy and regularly deworm them as recommended by a veterinarian. Pick up pet feces promptly to prevent contamination of the environment.
6. Public health measures: Implement public health interventions, such as regular waste disposal, sewage treatment, and vector control, to reduce the transmission of parasitic infections.

Ascaridoidea is a superfamily of parasitic nematode roundworms that includes several medically important genera such as Ascaris, Toxocara, and Baylisascaris. These worms have a complex life cycle involving intermediate hosts like insects or mammals, and definitive hosts such as humans or other animals.

In humans, the most common species of Ascaridoidea are Ascaris lumbricoides (also known as "human roundworm") and Toxocara canis (dog roundworm) or Toxocara cati (cat roundworm). Infection with these parasites typically occurs through ingestion of contaminated food, water, or soil.

Ascaris lumbricoides infection, known as ascariasis, can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Severe infections may lead to intestinal obstruction, malnutrition, or impaired growth in children.

Toxocara infection, also called toxocariasis, can result in visceral larva migrans (VLM) or ocular larva migrans (OLM), depending on the organs affected. VLM may cause fever, cough, wheezing, and hepatomegaly, while OLM can lead to vision loss or eye inflammation.

Preventive measures include proper hygiene practices, such as handwashing, cooking food thoroughly, and avoiding contact with contaminated soil or feces. In some cases, medication may be necessary to treat these infections.

Food parasitology is not a commonly used term in medical or scientific communities. However, it generally refers to the study of parasites that are transmitted through food, including parasitic protozoa, helminths (worms), and arthropods (e.g., tapeworms, roundworms, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, etc.). Food parasitology involves understanding the life cycles, epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these foodborne parasites. It is an important field within medical and veterinary parasitology, as well as food safety and public health.

The mesocolon is a peritoneal fold that attaches the colon to the posterior abdominal wall. It contains blood vessels, lymphatics, and nerves that supply the colon. The mesocolon allows for the mobility and flexibility of the colon within the abdominal cavity. There are several parts of the mesocolon, including the mesentery of the ascending colon (right mesocolon), the transverse mesocolon, and the mesentery of the descending and sigmoid colon (left mesocolon).

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, known as an antigen. They are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens, neutralizing or marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

Helminths are parasitic worms that can infect humans and animals. They include roundworms, tapeworms, and flukes, among others. Helminth infections can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type of worm and the location of the infection.

Antibodies to helminths are produced by the immune system in response to an infection with one of these parasitic worms. These antibodies can be detected in the blood and serve as evidence of a current or past infection. They may also play a role in protecting against future infections with the same type of worm.

There are several different classes of antibodies, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Antibodies to helminths are typically of the IgE class, which are associated with allergic reactions and the defense against parasites. IgE antibodies can bind to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators that help to protect against the worm.

In addition to IgE, other classes of antibodies may also be produced in response to a helminth infection. For example, IgG antibodies may be produced later in the course of the infection and can provide long-term immunity to reinfection. IgA antibodies may also be produced and can help to prevent the attachment and entry of the worm into the body.

Overall, the production of antibodies to helminths is an important part of the immune response to these parasitic worms. However, in some cases, the presence of these antibodies may also be associated with allergic reactions or other immunological disorders.

Medical definitions typically do not include general food items like seafood. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Seafood is a category of food that comes from aquatic animals (both saltwater and freshwater) including fish, shellfish, crustaceans, and echinoderms. It is an essential source of protein, vitamins, and minerals in many diets around the world. Some common examples of seafood are salmon, shrimp, lobster, clams, oysters, and squid.

If you're looking for a medical aspect related to seafood, it is worth noting that some people may have allergies to certain types of seafood, which can cause mild to severe reactions. In such cases, avoiding the specific allergen is crucial to prevent adverse health effects.

Stomach diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the stomach, a muscular sac located in the upper part of the abdomen and is responsible for storing and digesting food. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, indigestion, loss of appetite, and bloating. Some common stomach diseases include:

1. Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining that can cause pain, irritation, and ulcers.
2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): A condition where stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing heartburn and damage to the esophageal lining.
3. Peptic ulcers: Open sores that develop on the lining of the stomach or duodenum, often caused by bacterial infections or long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. Stomach cancer: Abnormal growth of cancerous cells in the stomach, which can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
5. Gastroparesis: A condition where the stomach muscles are weakened or paralyzed, leading to difficulty digesting food and emptying the stomach.
6. Functional dyspepsia: A chronic disorder characterized by symptoms such as pain, bloating, and fullness in the upper abdomen, without any identifiable cause.
7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: A condition where eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, accumulate in the esophagus, causing inflammation and difficulty swallowing.
8. Stomal stenosis: Narrowing of the opening between the stomach and small intestine, often caused by scar tissue or surgical complications.
9. Hiatal hernia: A condition where a portion of the stomach protrudes through the diaphragm into the chest cavity, causing symptoms such as heartburn and difficulty swallowing.

These are just a few examples of stomach diseases, and there are many other conditions that can affect the stomach. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing these conditions and preventing complications.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

Colonic diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the colon, also known as the large intestine or large bowel. The colon is the final segment of the digestive system, responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes, and storing and eliminating waste products.

Some common colonic diseases include:

1. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): This includes conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause inflammation and irritation in the lining of the digestive tract.
2. Diverticular disease: This occurs when small pouches called diverticula form in the walls of the colon, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements.
3. Colorectal cancer: This is a type of cancer that develops in the colon or rectum, often starting as benign polyps that grow and become malignant over time.
4. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): This is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements, but without any underlying structural or inflammatory causes.
5. Constipation: This is a common condition characterized by infrequent bowel movements, difficulty passing stools, or both.
6. Infectious colitis: This occurs when the colon becomes infected with bacteria, viruses, or parasites, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Treatment for colonic diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

"Anisakiasis". www.cdc.gov. CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2020-11-25. Retrieved 2023-04-10. (Articles with ... Eating undercooked or raw fish with Anisakis typica can lead to cases of anisakiasis, a parasitic disease that can result in ...
Anisakiasis is a zoonotic disease caused by the ingestion of larval nematodes in raw seafood dishes such as ceviche. The Latin ... Sakanari, J. A.; McKerrow, J. H. (July 1989). "Anisakiasis". Clinical Microbiology Reviews. American Society for Microbiology. ...
The symptoms of anisakiasis include abdominal pain and distention, diarrhea and nausea, faeces with high proportions of blood ... "Anisakiasis FAQs". Center for Disease Control. 2019-04-11. Retrieved 1 June 2019. (Articles with short description, Short ... the human disease caused by infection of Anisakid nematodes such as Contracaecum is called anisakiasis (or anisakidosis) which ...
Eating raw or undercooked black scabbardfish could result in a parasitic infection known as anisakiasis, and the only way this ... "Parasites - Anisakiasis". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on 25 September 2012. ... The only reliable treatment for a human affected with anisakiasis is the removal of the nematodes through endoscopy, or surgery ...
"Parasites - Anisakiasis". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 2, 2010. Archived from the original on September ... a roundworm which can cause anisakiasis Diphyllobothrium, a tapeworm which can cause diphyllobothriasis For these reasons, EU ...
Anisakiasis occurs when a parasitic worm, such as A. simplex, latches onto and penetrates the stomach or intestinal lining of a ... Intestinal anisakiasis can be detected approximately one week after ingestion. Similar to the gastric form, the terminal ileum ... 95% of global anisakiasis cases come from Japan. The worm is often removed during the gastrointestinal endoscopy, which ... Ectopic anisakiasis occurs when the larvae bores through the gastrointestinal lining entirely, and travels to the surrounding ...
... Dujardin, 1845 CDC page on Anisakiasis Endoscopy video of Anisakiasis Sushi, nemotodes and allergies in Canada ( ... 2009 For Anisakiasis: WrongDiagnosis: "Symptoms of Anisakiasis" Retrieved on April 14, 2009 For Diphyllobothrium: MedlinePlus ... Anisakiasis was first recognized in the 1960s. During the 1970s, about 10 cases per year were reported in the literature. The ... Anisakiasis can be easily prevented by adequate cooking at temperatures greater than 60 °C[citation needed] or freezing. The ...
Other conditions that may present similarly include: scrombroidosis and anisakiasis. In a person who died from anaphylaxis, ...
Raw salmon flesh may contain Anisakis nematodes, marine parasites that cause anisakiasis. Before the availability of ...
Raw salmon flesh may contain Anisakis nematodes, marine parasites that cause anisakiasis. Before the availability of ...
Raw salmon flesh may contain marine parasites such as Anisakis nematodes, that cause anisakiasis. Before the availability of ...
Anisakiasis is demonstrated by Barium X-rays as bowel wall oedema, thickening, ulceration, or stricture due to inflammation. ...
The Anisakidae are a family of intestinal nematodes (roundworms). The larvae of these worms can cause anisakiasis when ingested ...
... eating this dish made from raw untreated squid poses some risk of contracting anisakiasis, since the parasite when present in ...
... causing a condition called anisakiasis. Symptoms include severe abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. In addition, there can be ...
... causing a condition called anisakiasis. Symptoms from consuming live nematodes include severe abdominal pain, nausea, and ...
The larvae of these worms cause anisakiasis when ingested by humans in raw or insufficiently cooked fish, but do not reproduce ...
... and anisakiasis. Coronary stenting, a common procedure used in coronary artery disease patients has also been found to be a ...
... anisakiasis is a disease caused by the accidental ingestion of larval nematodes in the family Anisakidae, primarily Anisakis ...
2009 For Anisakiasis: WrongDiagnosis: Symptoms of Anisakiasis Retrieved on April 14, 2009 For Diphyllobothrium: MedlinePlus > ...
2009 For Anisakiasis: WrongDiagnosis: Symptoms of Anisakiasis Retrieved on April 14, 2009 For Diphyllobothrium: MedlinePlus > ...
2009 For Anisakiasis: WrongDiagnosis: Symptoms of Anisakiasis Retrieved on April 14, 2009 For Diphyllobothrium: MedlinePlus > ...
2009 For Anisakiasis: WrongDiagnosis: Symptoms of Anisakiasis Retrieved on April 14, 2009 For Diphyllobothrium: MedlinePlus > ...
... responsible for the human disease Anisakiasis ToL (2002) Tree of Life Web Project (ToL) (2002): Nematoda. Version of 2002-JAN- ...
... anisakiasis MeSH C06.405.469.452.146 - balantidiasis MeSH C06.405.469.452.250 - blastocystis infections MeSH C06.405.469.452. ...
2009 For Anisakiasis: WrongDiagnosis: Symptoms of Anisakiasis Retrieved on April 14, 2009 For Diphyllobothrium: MedlinePlus > ...
... and dracontiasis 126 Ancylostomiasis and necatoriasis 127 Other intestinal helminthiases 127.0 Ascariasis 127.1 Anisakiasis ...
"Anisakiasis". Archived from the original on 2009-10-09. Retrieved 2009-01-01. https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/ ...
... sporadic Aniridia type 2 Anisakiasis Ankle defects short stature Ankyloblepharon ectodermal defects cleft lip palate ...
... anisakiasis MeSH C03.335.508.700.100.070 - ascariasis MeSH C03.335.508.700.100.080 - ascaridiasis MeSH C03.335.508.700.100.850 ...
Education and information about anisakiasis including frequently asked questions, biology and publications. ... Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused by anisakid nematodes (worms) that can invade the stomach wall or intestine of humans ...
A multiple dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for anisakiasis was strongly po … ... Pulmonary anisakiasis presenting as eosinophilic pleural effusion Respirology. 2005 Mar;10(2):261-2. doi: 10.1111/j.1440- ... A multiple dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for anisakiasis was strongly positive for both the serum and pleural fluid. ... Screening with a serological test is useful in the diagnosis of this condition; human pulmonary anisakiasis. ...
Anisakiasis - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical Professional ... Prevention of Anisakiasis Proper freezing conditions are key to preventing anisakiasis in sushi. Anisakis larvae are destroyed ... Symptoms and Signs of Anisakiasis Symptoms of gastric anisakiasis typically include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting within ... Anisakiasis is infection with larvae of worms of the Anisakis simplex complex and the other anisakid species, Pseudoterranova ...
"Anisakiasis". www.cdc.gov. CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2020-11-25. Retrieved 2023-04-10. (Articles with ... Eating undercooked or raw fish with Anisakis typica can lead to cases of anisakiasis, a parasitic disease that can result in ...
Analysis of Ani s 7 and Ani s 1 allergens as biomarkers of sensitization and allergy severity in human anisakiasis. ...
Anisakiasis: Approximately 20,000 cases of anisakiasis are reported annually worldwide; over 90% are from Japan and most others ... Anisakiasis has been reported to be associated with allergy reactions in some individuals. [9] ...
Kita R, Hashida H, Uryuhara K, Kaihara S. Hepatic anisakiasis mimicking metastatic liver tumour. Int J Surg Case Rep. 2019;60: ... Parasites: Anisakiasis. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/anisakiasis/index.html. Last accessed April 25, 2023. ...
Categories: Anisakiasis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 2 ...
Anisakiasis Infrequent; Asia, N. Wide reservoir in marine Avoid eating None -- Europe, Latin fish and squid; difficult ...
Chung Y.B., Lee J. (2014). Clinical characteristics of gastroallergic anisakiasis and diagnostic implications of immunologic ...
Anisakiasis. *Toxocara canis / T. cati *Visceral larva migrans / Toxocariasis. *Baylisascaris. *Dioctophyme renale * ...
Anisakiasis. *Ascariasis (Intestinal roundworm infection). *Angiostrongyliasis (Rat lungworm). *Anthrax. *Antibiotic resistance ...
Anisakiasis / Anisakid 1 Botulism 1 Coronavirus / COVID 1 Giardiasis 1 Monkey Pox 1 ...
Anisakiasis / Anisakid 1 Brucellosis 1 Conflict 1 Distemper 1 Giardiasis 1 Mental Health 1 ...
Anisakiasis Anisakis‬. ‪Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infection‬. ‪Argentine hemorrhagic fever Junin virus‬. ‪Ascariasis‬. ‪ ...
Anisakiasis. Code System Preferred Concept Name. Anisakiasis [127.1]. Concept Status. Published. Concept Status Date. 12/17/ ...
Anisakiasis Whats New Last Posted: Feb 27, 2023 * Anisakis Sensitization in the Croatian fish processing workers: Behavioral ...
Anisakiasis in Italy. Analysis of hospital discharge records in the decade 2005-2015. XXX SoIPA meeting, Milano 26-29 giugno. p ... Cavallero S, Martini A, Migliara G, De Vito C, Iavicoli S, DAmelio S. (2018) Anisakiasis in Italy: Analysis of hospital ...
Anisakis, a roundworm which can cause anisakiasis Diphyllobothrium, a tapeworm which can cause diphyllobothriasis ...
Smith JW, Wootten R. Anisakis and anisakiasis. Adv Parasitol. 1978;16:93-163. ...
Foodborne illnesses including anisakiasis, salmonella, and other parasites are a significant risk with raw fish, including ... Another potential concern of eating piranha is anisakiasis contamination. This parasite can make its way into a fish and then ...
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Humans are incidental hosts through ingestion of undercooked infected fish, leading to anisakiasis. ...
Anisakiasis, caused by a type of roundworm found in fish, is a common one. Symptoms typically include abdominal pain, nausea, ...
Analysis of Ani s 7 and Ani s 1 allergens as biomarkers of sensitization and allergy severity in human anisakiasis - Artículo ...
For instance, anisakiasis is a raw-fish-based invasion of worms in the human gastrointestinal tract. Shellfish poisoning, ...
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  • Furthermore, we performed molecular identification insights into the pathogenesis of various anisakiasis of anisakid larvae isolated from infected patients to forms are needed. (cdc.gov)
  • Anisakiasis is infection with larvae of worms of the Anisakis simplex complex and the other anisakid species, Pseudoterranova decipiens complex and Contracecum osculatum complex. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused by anisakid nematodes (worms) that can invade the stomach wall or intestine of humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Molecular identification of anisakiasis and determine the degree of discrepancy larvae revealed that most (88.4%) patients were infected between foodborne statistics and actual incidence. (cdc.gov)
  • Foodborne illnesses including anisakiasis, salmonella, and other parasites are a significant risk with raw fish, including piranha. (fishmasters.com)
  • Anisakiasis: Annually, fewer than 10 cases occur in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • human pulmonary anisakiasis. (nih.gov)
  • Analysis of Ani s 7 and Ani s 1 allergens as biomarkers of sensitization and allergy severity in human anisakiasis. (bvsalud.org)
  • 2011). Anisakiasis in human is recovery of infectious larva from the abdomen. (bvsalud.org)
  • thus, anisakiasis is common in Japan and other cultures where raw fish is traditionally consumed. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Humans are incidental hosts through ingestion of undercooked infected fish, leading to anisakiasis. (wormbase.org)
  • Anisakiasis, caused by a type of roundworm found in fish, is a common one. (didyouknowthisabout.com)
  • Using data from 2018-2019 health insurance claims, we estimated the average annual incidence of anisakiasis claim data ( 8 ) to estimate the national incidence of in Japan to be 19,737 cases. (cdc.gov)
  • clarify the causative agent and adduce reasons for the A high incidence of anisakiasis in Japan. (cdc.gov)
  • In response to the large number of annual cases, that list the name of the disease or injury on a service the government of Japan added anisakiasis under basis. (cdc.gov)
  • This is the third case of anisakiasis recorded in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. (nii.ac.jp)
  • 1999, when food poisoning statistics included a case of institutions first submit health insurance claims to a anisakiasis ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • However, the data revealed a male-biased investigation into anisakiasis incidence has been con- sex ratio and a workforce-biased distribution for per- ducted since the 2012 amendment. (cdc.gov)
  • Treatment of presumptive anisakiasis with albendazole 400 mg orally twice a day for 6 to 21 days may be effective, but data are limited. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Endoscopic examination with biopsy forceps has facilitated the diagnosis of gastric anisakiasis. (nih.gov)
  • Symptoms of gastric anisakiasis typically include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting within hours of ingesting the larvae. (msdmanuals.com)
  • however, we incidentally detected asymptomatic gastric anisakiasis cases during esophagogastroduodenoscopy. (bvsalud.org)
  • The factors associated with developing acute abdominal symptoms induced by gastric anisakiasis remain unclear. (bvsalud.org)
  • Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the clinical factors associated with abdominal symptoms of gastric anisakiasis by comparing symptomatic and asymptomatic cases. (bvsalud.org)
  • METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study involving 264 patients diagnosed with gastric anisakiasis at nine hospitals in Japan between October 2015 and October 2021. (bvsalud.org)
  • How can I prevent anisakiasis? (cdc.gov)
  • Proper freezing conditions prevent anisakiasis in sushi. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Intestinal anisakiasis. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Intestinal anisakiasis refers to the accidental infection of humans by a marine nematode as a result of eating raw fish which contains larval stages of the nematode sub-family Anisakinae. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Dive into the research topics of 'Intestinal anisakiasis. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Intestinal anisakiasis in Japan : infected fish, sero-immunological diagnosis, and prevention / H. Ishikura, K. Kikuchi (eds. (edu.au)
  • Anisakiasis is a parasitic infection that can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. (schoolofsushi.com)
  • Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused by anisakid nematodes (worms) that can invade the stomach wall or intestine of humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Anisakiasis, or herring worm disease, is a parasitic disease caused by nematodes (worms) that attach to the wall of the esophagus, stomach, or intestine. (cdc.gov)
  • 12. A case of hepatic anisakiasis caused by Pseudoterranova decipiens mimicking metastatic liver cancer. (nih.gov)
  • Molecular identification of anisakiasis and determine the degree of discrepancy larvae revealed that most (88.4%) patients were infected between foodborne statistics and actual incidence. (cdc.gov)
  • Anisakiasis can be diagnosed by seeing the parasite during upper endoscopy, and patients may cough up larvae and bring them in for analysis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • was brought to our attention, and we wish to address some details regarding the morphologic diagnosis of anisakiasis. (cdc.gov)
  • Anisakiasis is a zoonotic disease caused by the ingestion of larval nematodes in raw seafood dishes such as sushi, sashimi, ceviche, and pickled herring. (nih.gov)
  • Proper freezing conditions are key to preventing anisakiasis in sushi. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In response to the large number of annual cases, that list the name of the disease or injury on a service the government of Japan added anisakiasis under basis. (cdc.gov)
  • Raw fish can contain harmful bacteria and parasites that can cause infections and illnesses, such as listeria, salmonella, and anisakiasis. (schoolofsushi.com)
  • [1] They are infective to humans and cause anisakiasis . (wikipedia.org)
  • Using data from 2018-2019 health insurance claims, we estimated the average annual incidence of anisakiasis claim data ( 8 ) to estimate the national incidence of in Japan to be 19,737 cases. (cdc.gov)
  • With the increase in popularity of eating lightly cooked or raw fish dishes, the number of cases of anisakiasis may be expected to increase. (nih.gov)
  • 1. Anisakiasis mimics cancer recurrence: two cases of extragastrointestinal anisakiasis suspected to be recurrence of gynecological cancer on PET-CT and molecular biological investigation. (nih.gov)
  • The treatment for anisakiasis may require removal of the worm from the body by endoscopy or surgery. (cdc.gov)
  • Surgery is often necessary for treatment of invasive anisakiasis. (nih.gov)
  • Treatment of presumptive anisakiasis with albendazole 400 mg orally twice a day for 6 to 21 days may be effective, but data are limited. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It has been suggested that this section be split out into another article titled Anisakiasis . (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999, when food poisoning statistics included a case of institutions first submit health insurance claims to a anisakiasis ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • For anisakiasis, the The number of patients with anisakiasis regis- discrepancy between food poisoning statistics and tered in the target database was 991 in 2018 and 766 the actual incidence is unclear because no nationwide in 2019. (cdc.gov)
  • Reported and estimated number of patients with 2015/final_en/final_en.html). (cdc.gov)