Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Waste Products: Debris resulting from a process that is of no further use to the system producing it. The concept includes materials discharged from or stored in a system in inert form as a by-product of vital activities. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Zearalenone: (S-(E))-3,4,5,6,8,10-Hexahydro-14,16-dihydroxy-3-methyl-1H-2-benzoxacyclotetradecin-1,7(8H)-dione. One of a group of compounds known under the general designation of resorcylic acid lactones. Cis, trans, dextro and levo forms have been isolated from the fungus Gibberella zeae (formerly Fusarium graminearum). They have estrogenic activity, cause toxicity in livestock as feed contaminant, and have been used as anabolic or estrogen substitutes.Pyrantel Tartrate: Broad spectrum anthelmintic for livestock.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Mycotoxicosis: Poisoning caused by the ingestion of mycotoxins (toxins of fungal origin).Endo-1,3(4)-beta-Glucanase: An endocellulase with specificity for the hydrolysis of 1,3- or 1,4-linkages in beta-D-glucans. This enzyme specifically acts on sites where reducing glucose residues are substituted at the 3 position.Aflatoxin M1: A 4-hydroxylated metabolite of AFLATOXIN B1, one of the MYCOTOXINS from ASPERGILLUS tainted food. It is associated with LIVER damage and cancer resulting from its P450 activation to the epoxide which alkylates DNA. Toxicity depends on the balance of liver enzymes that activate it (CYTOCHROME P-450) and others that detoxify it (GLUTATHIONE S TRANSFERASE) (Pharmac Ther 50.443 1991). Primates & rat are sensitive while mouse and hamster are tolerant (Canc Res 29.236 1969).6-Phytase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate and water to 1L-myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5-pentakisphosphate and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.26.Doxylamine: Histamine H1 antagonist with pronounced sedative properties. It is used in allergies and as an antitussive, antiemetic, and hypnotic. Doxylamine has also been administered in veterinary applications and was formerly used in PARKINSONISM.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Jatropha: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE. Members contain jatrophone and other diterpenes.Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Pyrantel: A depolarizing neuromuscular-blocking agent, that causes persistent nicotinic activation resulting in spastic paralysis of susceptible nematodes. It is a drug of second-choice after benzimidazoles for treatment of ascariasis, hookworm, and pinworm infections, being effective after a single dose. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, p920)Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Trichothecenes: Usually 12,13-epoxytrichothecenes, produced by Fusaria, Stachybotrys, Trichoderma and other fungi, and some higher plants. They may contaminate food or feed grains, induce emesis and hemorrhage in lungs and brain, and damage bone marrow due to protein and DNA synthesis inhibition.Consumer Product SafetyMycotoxins: Toxic compounds produced by FUNGI.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Dioxins: Chlorinated hydrocarbons containing heteroatoms that are present as contaminants of herbicides. Dioxins are carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic. They have been banned from use by the FDA.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Fusarium: A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Salmonella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Tuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Trypanosomiasis, Bovine: Infection in cattle caused by various species of trypanosomes.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Rhipicephalus: A genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, widespread in Africa. Members of the genus include many important vectors of animal and human pathogens.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Housing, AnimalPlant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Brucellosis, Bovine: A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Buffaloes: Ruminants of the family Bovidae consisting of Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer. This concept is differentiated from BISON, which refers to Bison bison and Bison bonasus.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Silage: Fodder converted into succulent feed for livestock through processes of anaerobic fermentation (as in a silo).Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Theileriasis: Infection of cattle, sheep, or goats with protozoa of the genus THEILERIA. This infection results in an acute or chronic febrile condition.Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Neospora: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: A multifactorial disease of CATTLE resulting from complex interactions between environmental factors, host factors, and pathogens. The environmental factors act as stressors adversely affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM and other host defenses and enhancing transmission of infecting agents.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseDietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Enzootic Bovine Leukosis: A lymphoid neoplastic disease in cattle caused by the bovine leukemia virus. Enzootic bovine leukosis may take the form of lymphosarcoma, malignant lymphoma, or leukemia but the presence of malignant cells in the blood is not a consistent finding.Monensin: An antiprotozoal agent produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis. It exerts its effect during the development of first-generation trophozoites into first-generation schizonts within the intestinal epithelial cells. It does not interfere with hosts' development of acquired immunity to the majority of coccidial species. Monensin is a sodium and proton selective ionophore and is widely used as such in biochemical studies.Bison: A genus of the family Bovidae having two species: B. bison and B. bonasus. This concept is differentiated from BUFFALOES, which refers to Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer.Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Abomasum: The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease: Acute disease of cattle caused by the bovine viral diarrhea viruses (DIARRHEA VIRUSES, BOVINE VIRAL). Often mouth ulcerations are the only sign but fever, diarrhea, drop in milk yield, and loss of appetite are also seen. Severity of clinical disease varies and is strain dependent. Outbreaks are characterized by low morbidity and high mortality.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Tylosin: Macrolide antibiotic obtained from cultures of Streptomyces fradiae. The drug is effective against many microorganisms in animals but not in humans.Animal Identification Systems: Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Anaplasmosis: A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Leukemia Virus, Bovine: The type species of DELTARETROVIRUS that causes a form of bovine lymphosarcoma (ENZOOTIC BOVINE LEUKOSIS) or persistent lymphocytosis.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Babesia bovis: A species of protozoa that is a cause of bovine babesiosis. Ticks of the genera Boophilus, Rhipicephalus, and IXODES are the chief vectors.Trypanosoma congolense: A species of Trypanosome hemoflagellates that is carried by tsetse flies and causes severe anemia in cattle. These parasites are also found in horses, sheep, goats, and camels.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Bluetongue: A reovirus infection, chiefly of sheep, characterized by a swollen blue tongue, catarrhal inflammation of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and often by inflammation of sensitive laminae of the feet and coronet.Brucella abortus: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected.Diarrhea Viruses, Bovine Viral: A group of viruses in the genus PESTIVIRUS, causing diarrhea, fever, oral ulcerations, hemorrhagic syndrome, and various necrotic lesions among cattle and other domestic animals. The two species (genotypes), BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 , exhibit antigenic and pathological differences. The historical designation, BVDV, consisted of both (then unrecognized) genotypes.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Methane: The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Theileria: A genus of tick-borne protozoa parasitic in the lymphocytes, erythrocytes, and endothelial cells of mammals. Its organisms multiply asexually and then invade erythrocytes, where they undergo no further reproduction until ingested by a transmitting tick.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.
  • Industrial production facilities will be required to have a PIN, but they will be allowed to use "Group Lot ID numbers" to move thousands of animals through at one time. (backwoodshome.com)
  • Dr. Bernadette Dunham, director of the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine, told JAVMA , 'The combination of the 1997 and the 2008 BSE rules further protects the U.S. cattle population from the already low risk of BSE. (avma.org)
  • Many comments questioned the need for these additional controls, given the high compliance with the FDA's 1997 feed rule and the low prevalence of BSE in this country. (avma.org)
  • To prevent BSE spread among cattle, the Government of Canada banned most proteins, including SRM , from cattle feed in 1997. (gc.ca)
  • Since 1997, feed made from mammals has been banned from cattle rations. (southcoasttoday.com)
  • Chittock said it's still necessary to include rations of hay for roughage. (sfgate.com)
  • KANGAROO products could be banned from Australian cattle rations under proposals to tighten up feed legislation. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Manage your animals and plots, inseminations, health events, feed rations, milk production, fattening, heat detection and stress levels through a completely visual environment especially designed to make your job easier. (appbrain.com)
  • In cattle under thirty months of age (UTM), including calves and uncertified, term fetuses, the distal ileum is defined as SRM . (gc.ca)
  • Honor ® Show Ambassadors Dave Allan, Bob May and Kirk Stierwalt have fed numerous animals that have competed in champion drives, and offer vast experience in planning a careful feeding and nutrition plan to capitalize on an animal's potential. (purinamills.com)
  • John Clifford, deputy administrator for USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, said that federal scientists conducted two final tests on the animal's brain sample. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • Customers can buy their cereal-grain seeds - including barley, wheat, corn and oats - from him, or wherever is convenient. (sfgate.com)
  • Some have completely eliminated feeding grain to their animals, while others are supplementing the fodder with corn or barley. (sfgate.com)
  • Dairy farmers who have recently moved to the sprout-feeding system - some are buying Fodder Solution units, while others are improvising and building their own - are finding that it takes two pounds of fodder to replace one pound of grain to maintain a cow's milk production, Daley said. (sfgate.com)
  • Common supplements include corn and grain byproducts, such as soybean hulls, corn gluten feed and distiller's grains. (purdue.edu)
  • Many ranchers are responding to the call from U.S. consumers by shifting from traditional, factory-farmed, grain-fed methods of raising cattle to a free-range, all-grass diet. (mercola.com)
  • Aflatoxins can infect animals through grain-based feeds. (care2.com)
  • After the 2018 Farm Bill legalized hemp production in the U.S., interest has grown in industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity, including as feed for animals. (k-state.edu)
  • Technavio has published a new market research report on the global animal feed antioxidants market from 2018-2022. (businesswire.com)
  • LONDON--( BUSINESS WIRE )--The global animal feed antioxidants market is expected to grow at a CAGR of close to 5% during the period 2018-2022, according to a new market research study by Technavio . (businesswire.com)
  • Soybean meal is the main source of poultry feeds, especially Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa regions are having a higher number of poultry farms and poultry production which is the big market for soybean meal market. (openpr.com)
  • WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. makers of pet food and all other animal feed will be prevented from using certain materials from cattle at the greatest risk for spreading mad cow disease under a rule that regulators finalized on Wednesday. (reuters.com)
  • Commission Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs lays down food safety criteria for certain important foodborne bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes . (europa.eu)
  • Domestic animals continue to make important contributions to global food supply and, as a result, animal feeds have become an increasingly critical component of the integrated food chain. (fao.org)
  • However, these studies do not account for the competition between food and feed. (wur.nl)
  • It also prompted the USDA impose more safeguards, including a ban on sick or crippled cattle from use in human food. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • The Cattle Feed offered by us has Food Hygiene Certificate from Veterinary Department of India. (exportersindia.com)
  • A statement was added to specify that the purpose of a new section of the rule is to prohibit use of certain cattle-origin materials in the food or feed of all animals to further reduce the risk of the spread of BSE within the United States. (avma.org)
  • For animals, it's not just the water they drink, but also the water it takes to grow all of the food they will eat over their lifetime. (cspinet.org)
  • They are cultivated for both human and animal food, in addition to being grown as ornamentals. (wisegeek.org)
  • Andrew Speedy of the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization said testing was begun as soon as BSE was found in Swiss cattle. (swissinfo.ch)
  • The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Preventive Controls for Animal Foods rule is discussed in this video. (psu.edu)
  • Several approaches have been taken toward enhancing growth and feed utilization in food animals. (google.com)
  • Historically, flaxseed has been used for food and feed for animals for several thousand years in Europe, Asia and Africa, and more recently in Canada and the United States. (ndsu.edu)
  • Commenting on wider food and feed safety, MEPs express concern about recent contamination cases, e.g. with dioxin, and call on EU Member States to enforce existing rules and strengthen them, if necessary. (thepigsite.com)
  • According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caution: Federal law restricts medicated feed containing this veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. (drugs.com)
  • Obviously, this is now more complicated for the producer with the start of the new Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD). (cattletoday.com)
  • In the years after variant CJD was first reported in 1996, 195 patients across 11 countries - including at least two cases reported in the United States - have been diagnosed, according to the CDC. (cnn.com)
  • Honor ® Show Chow ® Grand 4-T-Fyer™ concentrate is a blended supplement that can be mixed with corn, oats, barley and beet pulp to provide a high quality ration for show cattle. (purinamills.com)
  • Cattle raised in conventional Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs), on the other hand, are shipped to giant feed lots and fed corn to fatten them up , and when consumed, this has an impact on your health as well. (mercola.com)
  • In the definition of 'cattle materials prohibited in animal feed' the rule now includes the entire carcass of BSE-positive cattle. (avma.org)
  • In its December 2005 response to the proposed rule, the AVMA had said the proposal achieved a proper balance between BSE risk reduction and negative impacts on the environment (such as carcass disposal) and animal disease surveillance activities. (avma.org)
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether the significant markers for feed intake and growth in our population of animals adversely affected steer carcass traits. (usda.gov)
  • The eight most significant markers for dry matter intake and average daily gain were analyzed with carcass traits, including hot carcass weight (HCW), yield grade (YG), marbling score (MB), longissimus muscle area (LMA), adjusted fat thickness (AFT), lean color (LC), lean texture (LT), lean firmness (LF), slice shear force (SSF) and Warner Bratzler shear force (WBS). (usda.gov)
  • If you remove the distal ileum from a UTM animal as a service to your client, please provide a signed note stating that the remaining carcass is free of SRM . (gc.ca)
  • The rule was further revised to require renderers to develop and maintain written procedures for determining the age of dead cattle and for removing their brains and spinal cords. (avma.org)
  • and 3) mass balance for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Data from six commercial feedlots (representing 6,366 head of cattle) suggest that 33% of excreted N (65 g/hd/d) and 91% of excreted P (32 g/hd/d) are harvested as manure on average and that current standard estimates published by ASAE (2005) and NRCS (1992a) overestimate harvested manure N and P. Additionally, significant variation was observed among feedlots. (unl.edu)
  • There seems to be this myth that because there is nitrogen present in animal manure that either that nitrogen was created by the animal or the composting of the manure - it wasn't. (rabble.ca)
  • The appropriate amount of Aureomycin-containing feed supplement may be mixed in the cattle's daily ration or administered as a top-dress. (drugs.com)
  • If the Aureomycin-containing feed supplement is administered as a top-dress, it must be spread uniformly on top of the ration and sufficient space must be provided so that all cattle can eat at the same time. (drugs.com)
  • A variety of management options exist when local, national, regional or international authorities face decisions on transboundary plant pests and animal diseases. (fao.org)
  • Table 46 shows the range of phytosanitary measures used to manage transboundary plant pests and animal diseases. (fao.org)
  • Quarantine is the first line of defence against transboundary plant pests and animal diseases, and countries allocate considerable resources for implementing effective border and import quarantine policies and programmes to prevent introduction. (fao.org)
  • Selecting a quality show feed involves more than simply evaluating the ingredient list. (purinamills.com)
  • When you select a high-quality feeding program, you often get much more than just feed. (purinamills.com)
  • I have additional experience in broiler litter nutrient analysis, management concerns, disease monitoring and recognition, air and water quality issues, and antibiotic, probiotic, and coccidiostat use in feeds. (forensisgroup.com)
  • It is then important to examine what makes dairy quality-efficient: The quality and the quantity of dairy produce are directly influenced by the quality of their cattle feed. (exportersindia.com)
  • Regulatory bodies have been implementing several feed testing regulations to manufacture safe feed of high quality using Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), Good Agriculture Practices (GAP), and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point signify (HACCP) systems. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • We have experienced team including more than 50 workers and 7 sales,who can provide quality control,after-sale service,packing and loading service for every customers. (brakesband.com)
  • Bushel weight or other quality characteristics may be more useful in assessing feeding value than relying on variety alone. (ndsu.edu)