Animal Fins: Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.Fin Whale: The species Balaenoptera physalus, in the family Balaenopteridae, characterized by a large, strongly curved, dorsal fin. It is the second largest of the WHALES, highly migratory, but rarely seen near the shore.Animal Structures: Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Perciformes: The most diversified of all fish orders and the largest vertebrate order. It includes many of the commonly known fish such as porgies, croakers, sunfishes, dolphin fish, mackerels, TUNA, etc.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Animals, LaboratoryAmputeesAnimal Rights: The moral and ethical bases of the protection of animals from cruelty and abuse. The rights are extended to domestic animals, laboratory animals, and wild animals.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Animal Care Committees: Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Sunscreening Agents: Chemical or physical agents that protect the skin from sunburn and erythema by absorbing or blocking ultraviolet radiation.Extreme Heat: High temperature weather exceeding the average and of several weeks duration. Extreme heat is a dangerous situation that can bring on health emergencies in susceptible people.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Sunburn: An injury to the skin causing erythema, tenderness, and sometimes blistering and resulting from excessive exposure to the sun. The reaction is produced by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.PaintingsArtPhotography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Posters as Topic: Single or multi-sheet notices made to attract attention to events, activities, causes, goods, or services. They are for display, usually in a public place and are chiefly pictorial.SculptureChromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.Byzantium: An ancient city, the site of modern Istanbul. From the 4th to 15th centuries the empire extended from southeastern Europe to western Asia, reaching its greatest extent under Justinian (527-565). By about 1000 A.D. it comprised the southern Balkans, Greece, Asia Minor, and parts of southern Italy. The capture of Constantinople in 1453 marked the formal end of the Byzantine Empire. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Unedited FootageVideo Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Suggestion: The uncritical acceptance of an idea or plan of action.Food Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.NewsNewspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Totiviridae: A family of RNA viruses that infect fungi and protozoa. There are three genera: TOTIVIRUS; GIARDIAVIRUS; and LEISHMANIAVIRUS.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)TailLife Support Systems: Systems that provide all or most of the items necessary for maintaining life and health. Provisions are made for the supplying of oxygen, food, water, temperature and pressure control, disposition of carbon dioxide and body waste. The milieu may be a spacecraft, a submarine, or the surface of the moon. In medical care, usually under hospital conditions, LIFE SUPPORT CARE is available. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)Tuna: Common name for various species of large, vigorous ocean fishes in the family Scombridae.Dolphins: Mammals of the families Delphinidae (ocean dolphins), Iniidae, Lipotidae, Pontoporiidae, and Platanistidae (all river dolphins). Among the most well-known species are the BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHIN and the KILLER WHALE (a dolphin). The common name dolphin is applied to small cetaceans having a beaklike snout and a slender, streamlined body, whereas PORPOISES are small cetaceans with a blunt snout and rather stocky body. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp978-9)Microbubbles: Small encapsulated gas bubbles (diameters of micrometers) that can be used as CONTRAST MEDIA, and in other diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Upon exposure to sufficiently intense ultrasound, microbubbles will cavitate, rupture, disappear, release gas content. Such characteristics of the microbubbles can be used to enhance diagnostic tests, dissolve blood clots, and deliver drugs or genes for therapy.Bottle-Nosed Dolphin: The species Tursiops truncatus, in the family Delphinidae, characterized by a bottle-shaped beak and slightly hooked broad dorsal fin.APUD Cells: Cells with the capacity to take up and decarboxylate the amine precursors DIHYDROXYPHENYLALANINE or 5-HYDROXYTRYPTOPHAN. This is a property of endocrine cells of neural and non-neural origin. APUDOMA is a general term collectively applied to tumors associated with APUD cells.Library AssociationsDictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Methanosarcinales: An order of anaerobic methanogens in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. There are two families: METHANOSARCINACEAE and Methanosaetaceae.Methanosarcinaceae: A family of anaerobic METHANOSARCINALES whose cells are mesophilic or thermophilic and appear as irregular spheroid bodies or sheathed rods. These methanogens are found in any anaerobic environment including aquatic sediments, anaerobic sewage digesters and gastrointestinal tracts. There are four genera: METHANOSARCINA, Methanolobus, Methanothrix, and Methanococcoides.

Genetics of species differences in sailfin and shortfin mollies. (1/139)

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Small RNAs have a big impact on regeneration. (2/139)

A number of lower vertebrates including urodele amphibians and teleost fish are remarkably adept at repairing and regenerating damaged tissues and organs. Freshwater planarians are even more amazing, capable of regenerating entire body plans from small amputated fragments. In contrast, mammalian regenerative capacity is quite limited but of intense interest, especially related to human health and disease. For those organisms capable of robust regeneration, a common theme is the use of stem cells to replace complex tissues. Key questions remain as to the origin of these cells, whether there are pools of such cells that migrate to injured regions or whether they are generated on site. Beyond their origin, how are the genetic pathways that enable differentiation into multiple cell types and tissues regulated? microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that have recently been shown to play important roles in controlling stem cell self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. Some of these are thought to be required to maintain "stemness". Here, we summarize recent work on the role of miRNAs in stem cells and their roles during regeneration.  (+info)

Pathological study on the scuticociliatosis affecting farmed Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in Japan. (3/139)

Pathological findings associated with scuticociliatosis in farmed Japanese flounder in Japan are described. Ten moribund fishes, farmed in Tottori Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, showed cutaneous ulcers, darkened skin, fin and tail rot, exophthalmia and alterations in swimming behaviour. Histopathologically, severe epidermal degeneration and necrosis, hyperplasia of branchial epithelium, myositis, myelitis, encephalitis associated with heavy accumulation of scuticociliates in the periorbital cavity and optic nerve fiber were observed. Moreover, masses of ciliates were found to feed on the host tissues such as skeletal muscles, gills and brain, causing severe degenerative changes associated with abundant neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration. These findings suggest that the present scuticociliate, Miamiensis avidus, is a highly invasive and destructive pathogen infecting Japanese flounder and capable of developing systemic fatal infection.  (+info)

Zebrafish sp7:EGFP: a transgenic for studying otic vesicle formation, skeletogenesis, and bone regeneration. (4/139)

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Entraining in trout: a behavioural and hydrodynamic analysis. (5/139)

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Limb regeneration is impaired in an adult zebrafish model of diabetes mellitus. (6/139)

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Zebrafish fin immune responses during high mortality infections with viral haemorrhagic septicemia rhabdovirus. A proteomic and transcriptomic approach. (7/139)

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Male mate choice scales female ornament allometry in a cichlid fish. (8/139)

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  • Here, we show that dlx5a is an early marker of apical ectodermal cells of the pectoral fin buds and of the median fin fold, but also of cleithrum precursor cells during pectoral girdle development. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Using morpholino-mediated knock down, we demonstrate that disrupted dlx5a/6a function results in pectoral fin agenesis associated with misexpression of bmp4, fgf8a, and1 and msx genes. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Our results demonstrate that the dlx5a/6a genes are essential for the induction of pectoral fin outgrowth, but are not required during median fin fold specification. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • The data indicate distinct requirements for dlx5a/6a during median and pectoral fin development suggesting that initiation of unpaired and paired fin formation are not directed through the same molecular mechanisms. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • During courtship, the female cichlid, Pelvicachromis taeniatus, displays a large and visually arresting purple pelvic fin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The researchers found that males clearly preferred females with a larger pelvic fin and that pelvic fins grew in a more disproportionate way than other fins on female fish. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moving fins can provide thrust Cavitation can be a problem with high power applications, resulting in damage to propellers or turbines, as well as noise and loss of power. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fins typically function as foils that produce lift or thrust, or provide the ability to steer or stabilize motion while traveling in water, air, or other fluid media. (wikipedia.org)
  • Turbines and propellers (and sometimes fans and pumps) use a number of rotating fins, also called foils, wings, arms or blades. (wikipedia.org)
  • A fin is a thin component or appendage attached to a larger body or structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The scaling relationship between the size of an appendage or organ and that of the body as a whole is tightly regulated during animal development. (nih.gov)
  • Further, somatic transgenesis experiments indicate that kcnk5b acts locally within the mesenchyme of fins and barbels to specify appendage size. (nih.gov)
  • The first component is the dermal fin rays known as lepidotrichia , and the endoskeletal base with associated muscles for movement is the second. (wikipedia.org)
  • The larval development and formation of the skeleton that support the median fins in adults result in pterygiophores. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wildlife biologists often use the distinctive nicks and wear patterns which develop on the dorsal fins of large cetaceans to identify individuals in the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • We propose that early median fin fold establishment results from the medial convergence of dlx5a-expressing cells at the lateral edges of the neural keel. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • In contrast, the median fin fold presents defects in mesenchymal cell migration and actinotrichia formation, whereas the initial specification seems to occur normally. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • That extinct animal actually had large, strong and mobile hind fins and an enlarged pelvis, suggesting that limbs in the front and rear evolved simultaneously. (washingtonpost.com)
  • That went against the "front-wheel-drive" hypothesis that held limbs first evolved from front fins, while back fins stayed small , maybe even after fish transitioned to land. (washingtonpost.com)
  • In the Late Devonian period about 350 million years ago, the first vertebrates to adapt to land were amphibians, and it is believed that their ancestors were primitive, now-extinct fish with fin-like limbs and belonging to the class Sarcopterygii. (titech.ac.jp)
  • In my lab, we have been studying the developmental mechanisms responsible for the evolution of fins and limbs. (titech.ac.jp)
  • Through research using catshark embryos, Tanaka's team revealed that the balance of the anterior (thumb side) and posterior fields in fin buds shifted as evolution progressed from fins to limbs. (titech.ac.jp)
  • Regeneration epidermises of salamander limbs or teleost fins are known to express markers of developmental signaling pathways, including many secreted factors [ 8 , 14 ]. (prolekare.cz)
  • As scientists learn more about the genes that shape animal musculoskeletal systems, they're uncovering clues about how our own limbs developed - and may someday regenerate. (sciencefriday.com)
  • Meanwhile, researchers at the University of California-Irvine are wrapped up in another question about limbs - namely, if other animals can regenerate their limbs, why can't we? (sciencefriday.com)
  • The limbs had evolved from fins. (gopetsamerica.com)
  • Lobe-fins transformed into limbs during the Devonian period, facilitating the water-to-land transition in tetrapods. (sciencemag.org)
  • We traced the evolution of well-articulated skeletons across the fins-to-limbs transition, using a network-based approach to quantify and compare topological features of fins and limbs. (sciencemag.org)
  • We show that the topological arrangement of bones in pectoral and pelvic appendages evolved in parallel during the fins-to-limbs transition, occupying overlapping regions of the morphospace, following a directional trend, and decreasing their disparity over time. (sciencemag.org)
  • We identify the presence of digits as the morphological novelty triggering topological changes that discriminated limbs from fins. (sciencemag.org)
  • The evolution of tetrapod limbs from fish fins is heralded as one of the most important vertebrate morphological and functional transitions ( 1 - 8 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Establishing what makes an appendage a fin or a limb is key to properly characterizing the fins-to-limbs transition ( 3 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Developmental and paleontological studies place the distinction between fins and limbs in the most distal region, which bears the carpals/tarsals and digits in limbs and the radials and dermal lepidotrichia in fins ( 3 , 10 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • The distinction between fins and limbs blurs when we look at the lobe-fins of transitional tetrapodomorphs, such as Panderichthys or Tiktaalik ( 11 - 14 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Both sarcopterygian fins and limbs share a division of the appendicular skeleton into three endoskeletal domains ( 15 ), of which the most distal domain differs most between sarcopterygian fishes (i.e., branching radial bones) and tetrapods (i.e., autopod with a mesopod and digits). (sciencemag.org)
  • Fin whales have an incompliant aorta, which, we hypothesize, represents an adaptation to large, depth-induced variations in arterial transmural pressures. (biologists.org)
  • In comparison to the aorta of a terrestrial mammal, fin whales ( Balaenoptera physalus Linnaeus 1758) are reported to have an unusually compliant aortic arch coupled to an unusually incompliant aorta ( Shadwick and Gosline, 1994 ). (biologists.org)
  • The call of fin whales ( Balaenoptera physalus ) recorded in the Atlantic Ocean and played back at 10 times normal speed. (britannica.com)
  • Washington, DC-The Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) commends Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Johnny Isakson (R-GA) for introducing Tuesday the Scientific Assistance for Very Endangered (SAVE) Right Whales Act (S.2453) to help protect this highly imperiled. (awionline.org)
  • Baleen whales are some of the world's largest animals. (seaworld.org)
  • To address this need, we founded the National Marine Life Center to build a marine animal hospital within the stranding hotspot to give ailing sea turtles, seals, dolphins, porpoises and small whales the best chance for survival and return to the wild. (nmlc.org)
  • The fin whale is the second longest of all of the baleen whales, and has the typical rorqual body form, which is long, slender and streamlined. (npolar.no)
  • Fin whales produce a tall columnar blow that can be six metres high. (npolar.no)
  • Additionally, fin whales have "chevrons", which are light strips of brownish-grey that start just behind the blowhole and run back on the body in the shape of broad "V"s. (npolar.no)
  • But, some fin whales tend to remain in the north even in the winter, and there are no definitive wintering grounds known. (npolar.no)
  • However, some of the fin whales that spend the summer in the North Atlantic winter as far south as the Gulf of Mexico in the west and the coast of Spain in the east. (npolar.no)
  • In the northeast Atlantic there are thought to be 25,000-30,000 fin whales. (npolar.no)
  • Fin whales are loosely social, and are usually found in small flexible groups, although they can be seen singly and sometimes form large groups in areas with very high productivity. (npolar.no)
  • The sounds made by fin whales are quite simple, mostly consisting of groans and grunts or pulsed high-frequency sounds. (npolar.no)
  • Fin whales are fast swimmers, cruising at up to 15 km per hour and they are capable of burst swimming for short periods at speeds up to 28 kilometers per hour. (npolar.no)
  • Killer whales are the only known natural predator of fin whales. (npolar.no)
  • Fin whales are born on the wintering grounds and accompany their mothers to higher latitudes during their first migration. (npolar.no)
  • Northern hemisphere fin whales mate from December through to February. (npolar.no)
  • Fins whales reach sexual maturity sometime between the ages of six and eight. (npolar.no)
  • Fin whales were not harvested in the early history of commercial whaling, because their rapid swimming speeds meant that they could out-run whaling ships. (npolar.no)
  • But, when steam-powered vessels and explosive harpoons were developed late in the 1800s fin whales became prime targets because of their large size. (npolar.no)
  • Fin whales are sleek, fast swimmers. (nammco.no)
  • Summer distribution of fin whales in the North Atlantic, showing sightings and effort from all North Atlantic Sightings surveys, 1987 - 2015, as well as 2007 CODA and SNESSA surveys. (nammco.no)
  • Over 50,000 fin whales in the North Atlantic (NAMMCO 2011ac). (nammco.no)
  • Some fin whales have a pale grey chevron on each side behind the head and there may be a dark stripe running up and back from the eye, and a light stripe arching down to where the flipper joins the body. (nammco.no)
  • Why fin whales have this asymmetrical pigmentation, rare among mammals, is not known, although it has been speculated that it may have something to do with their feeding strategy. (nammco.no)
  • Despite a two-year hiatus, Iceland's whaling kingpin has decided to resume hunting endangered fin whales this summer. (onegreenplanet.org)
  • Fins and flippers are aquatically adapted appendages and typically aren't very useful in such an environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Feet, Fins, & Flippers 5K Thank Yous! (nmlc.org)
  • Thank you to everyone who participated in the adventure that became NMLC's first VIRTUAL Feet, Fins, & Flippers 5K! (nmlc.org)
  • With 303 participants from 25 states and 4 countries, as well as with the wonderful sponsors below, this year's Feet, Fins, & Flippers 5K was our most successful to date. (nmlc.org)
  • Another signaling pathway under the control of the so-called Wnt5b protein then turns down these genes, impairs cell growth and inhibits fin regeneration. (livescience.com)
  • Here, we performed a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen for epithelial signaling deficiencies during the regeneration of amputated adult zebrafish fins, from which we identified several new mutants. (prolekare.cz)
  • One gene identified from this screen disrupts a specific component of the extracellular matrix material Laminin, Laminin beta 1a, a factor that we find to be dispensable in uninjured adult animals but required for all stages fin regeneration. (prolekare.cz)
  • Interestingly, fgf20a and igf2b ligand genes are induced within hours of fin amputation in mesenchymal cells, and perturbation of Fgf signaling via a mutation in the fgf20a ligand gene, or of Igf signaling by receptor inhibition, disrupts formation of the regeneration epidermis and subsequent bone regeneration [ 20 , 21 ]. (prolekare.cz)
  • Because there's so much regeneration everywhere in the animal world. (sciencefriday.com)
  • Zebrafish therefore are a favored animal model to study the cellular and molecular principles of organ regeneration. (innovations-report.com)
  • The 'Planet in Peril' crew traveled with Knights to Taiwan's southern port city of Kaohsiung, which is considered one of the world's main hubs for shark fins. (cnn.com)
  • The world's fin dealers congregate at Alibaba.com , a publicly traded Chinese company partly owned by Yahoo that lists about 300 sellers. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • The fin whale is found in all of the world's major oceans. (npolar.no)
  • Veterinary and medical scientists wonder if warm-blooded animals that evolved from these simpler creatures, might still have untapped regenerative powers hidden in their genes. (livescience.com)
  • To compare the relative importance of Hox genes during fin versus limb morphogenesis, we cloned zebrafish (Danio rerio) HoxD and HoxA complex genes and analysed their expression during fin development. (nih.gov)
  • Whole mount in situ hybridization revealed specific expression of these genes in the eye and Fin buds. (nih.gov)
  • They are primarily killed for their fins alone, to fuel the growing demand for shark fin soup, which is an Asia delicacy. (miami.edu)
  • Not only does this work provide important information on one probable route of human exposure to BMAA, it may lead to a lowering of the demand for shark fin soup and consumption of shark products, which will aid ocean conservation efforts," added Hammerschlag. (miami.edu)
  • Will this effect the demand for shark fin soup and other shark fin products worldwide? (miami.edu)
  • However, as the demand for shark fin continues to rise, so too does the price, and shark fins have become a hot commodity. (greenpeace.org)
  • Which raises the question: does bird watching or being around animals in nature (that we can't touch) help humans emotionally too? (pawmanefin.com)
  • As director of the department of comparative medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the 52-year-old scientist, who holds doctorates in veterinary medicine and in pathology, studies the way similar diseases attack humans and animals. (baltimoresun.com)
  • A new study by University of Miami (UM) scientists in the journal Marine Drugs has discovered high concentrations of BMAA in shark fins, a neurotoxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases in humans including Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig Disease (ALS). (miami.edu)
  • The concentrations of BMAA in the samples are a cause for concern, not only in shark fin soup, but also in dietary supplements and other forms ingested by humans," says study co-author Prof. Deborah Mash, Director of the University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank. (miami.edu)
  • We often hear about the biggest animals that would easily tower over humans twice, thrice, and some even ten times. (boredpanda.com)
  • Dolphins, with their charmingly playful personalities, breathtaking acrobatic abilities, and affinity for humans, are among the most sought-after animals for viewing by humans. (crunchyroll.com)
  • The main material of the fin consists of an array of similar bony elements (lepidotrichia) interconnected by soft tissue. (biologists.org)
  • While their conservation becomes an ever more pressing concern, a major obstacle that hampers regulation is the mislabelling and/or misidentification of dried products or carcasses that have had fins removed. (springer.com)
  • This entry was posted in Marine Affairs & Policy and tagged Alzheimers , BMAA , Dr. Deborah Mash , Dr. Neil Hammerschlag , Lou Gehrig Disease , Miami Brain Endowment Bank , R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program , Shark Fin Soup by RSMAS . (miami.edu)
  • Help Marine Animals when you shop on Amazon! (nmlc.org)
  • The National Marine Life Center is an independent, non-profit 501(c)(3) marine animal hospital and science and education center. (nmlc.org)
  • The National Marine Life Center is building a new Marine Animal Hospital and Discovery Center. (nmlc.org)
  • Each year hundreds of helpless marine animals, all federally protected and most endangered, beach on our shores, alive and in desperate need of medical care. (nmlc.org)
  • The center draws salt water, the very lifeblood of any marine animal facility, directly from Cape Cod Canal through its new life support building. (nmlc.org)
  • With unique insight gained through marine animal care, we learn science lessons from our patients that tell us about the health of the oceans. (nmlc.org)
  • Knowledge treating marine animals has improved human medical treatment for ailments such as middle ear infections and pediatric joint injuries. (nmlc.org)
  • Designed from stem to stern as a model green facility, the National Marine Life Center will meet the medical and rehabilitative needs of stranded marine animals in Cape Cod and the northeast region, while we model through example the key lessons of ocean conservation. (nmlc.org)
  • This sea animal is notorious among marine biologists as a dolphin that has a problem with us. (listverse.com)
  • Although we've been fascinated by these animals for thousands of years, it wasn't until approximately the 1940's that research in the field of marine mammals really began. (crunchyroll.com)
  • It's easy to spot fin rot because it slowly eats away your bettas fins so that it becomes shorter and uglier. (hubpages.com)
  • when my female Betta approaches his nest he gets aggressive and nips their fins when will he embracei have a male red Betta (3inch in length) and 3 female bettas (1.5 inch) in a tank filled with 10 litres of water and height of about 12cms. (hubpages.com)
  • Following pectoral fin amputation, BT clusters regenerate after the initiation of revascularization, but concomitantly with a second wave of angiogenesis. (biologists.org)
  • However, upon amputation the tissue beneath the wound initiates a massive bout of retinoic acid synthesis that is required to mobilize cell division in the fin stump. (innovations-report.com)
  • An environment-friendly propulsion system mimicking undulating fins of stingray had been built. (scientific.net)
  • Finally, we draw a conclusion that the generated propulsion force of the biomimetic propulsor is gradually increase with the obliquity of the fin ray from 0 degree till a certain angle and then gradually decrease with the obliquity of the fin ray from the certain angle till 90 degree. (scientific.net)
  • The latter portion of the fin whale's scientific name, physalus , was once used in reference to all rorquals. (britannica.com)
  • It was not before 1978 that some of the fin whale's organs - its penis, trachea and aortic arch - reached Stralsund through scientific exchange. (meeresmuseum.de)