The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.
Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.
Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.
Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.
Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.
A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.
The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.
A corps of the armed services concerned with animal medicine, the chief interest of which is the care of government-owned working dogs (as in the military police units), working horses (as in state funerals), and working military dolphins (as in undersea exploration and other activities). In the United States Army Veterinary Corps animal medicine overlaps and interconnects with biomedical research using laboratory research animals. A related activity is laboratory animal care. The Corps provides limited care for privately owned animals of military personnel through non-appropriated funds. Military service veterinarians in the United States Army must be graduates of accredited veterinary schools and must have a state license. (Telephone communication with Lt. Col. William Inskeep II, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, October 4, 1994)
Equipment used to prevent contamination of and by patients, especially those with bacterial infections. This includes plastic surgical isolators and isolators used to protect immunocompromised patients.
Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.
Large herbivorous tropical American lizards.
Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.
Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.
The removal of a consumer product from the market place. The reason for the removal can be due a variety of causes, including the discovery of a manufacturing defect, a safety issue with the product's use, or marketing decisions.
Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The species Canis latrans in the family CANIDAE, a smaller relative of WOLVES. It is found in the Western hemisphere from Costa Rica to Alaska.
A genus in the family FELIDAE comprising felines with long legs, ear tufts, and a short tail.
Prudent standard preventive measures to be taken by professional and other health personnel in contact with persons afflicted with a communicable disease, to avoid contracting the disease by contagion or infection. Precautions are especially applicable in the diagnosis and care of AIDS patients.
The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)
A genus in the family FELIDAE comprising one species, Puma concolor. It is a large, long-tailed, feline of uniform color. The names puma, cougar, and mountain lion are used interchangeably for this species. There are more than 20 subspecies.
An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.

Epidemiological field studies of animal populations. (1/378)

Numerous survey designs have been developed for epidemiological field studies of human populations, most of which are also applicable to field studies of animal poulations. Each design has its own advantages and disadvantages. The final design selected for a particular study depends upon such factors as the overall purpose of the study, the geographic dimensions of the study area, the diseases incidence or prevalence and species to be studied as well as the planned use for the data. Population dynamics including the distribution and density of the species to be studied are factors that should also be considered in the initial design of a study. A surveillance system, using mailed questionnaire data and a subsequent survey using direct interviews of validate the data in a statewide study of swine birth defects are used to illustrate some of the techniques that can be applied to domestic animal populations in a fairly large geographic area. The type of data collected, its use and its limitations are also considered.  (+info)

Studies on time-kill kinetics of different classes of antibiotics against veterinary pathogenic bacteria including Pasteurella, Actinobacillus and Escherichia coli. (2/378)

A systematic analysis of the bacteriostatic/bactericidal effect of several antibiotics used in veterinary medicine was carried out by time-kill kinetic analysis using P. haemolytica, P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, and E. coli. The antibiotics tested were enrofloxacin, danofloxacin, erythromycin, tilmicosin, penicillin G, ceftiofur and tetracycline. Unexpectedly, the antibiotics well characterized as bacteriostatic agents against human pathogens such as tetracycline and macrolides, showed bactericidal activity against P. haemolytica and A. pleuropneumoniae. In contrast, tetracycline and erythromycin were bacteriostatic and tilmicosin was bactericidal against P. multocida. In addition, P. multocida was killed by fluoroquinolones at a slower rate than the other bacteria. Spectrum analysis revealed that ceftiofur and tilmicosin were good substrates of the universal efflux pump, AcrA/B, but penicillin and tetracycline were not. The fluoroquinolones were modest substrates for AcrA/B.  (+info)

An antiserum raised against the recombinant cytoplasmic tail of the human CD43 glycoprotein identifies CD43 in many mammalian species. (3/378)

Leukosialin or CD43 is a heavily O-glycosylated transmembrane protein expressed on all cells of the haematopoietic cell lineage with the exception of red blood cells and mature B cells. This antigen has been identified in human, mouse and rat with monoclonal antibodies. Although orthologues of many human and rodent leucocyte cell surface antigens have been described in recent years, CD43, despite its abundance on human and rodent cells, remained uncharacterized in other vertebrate species. The comparison of CD43 amino acid sequences from human, mouse and rat indicated a high level of homology in the cytoplasmic domain. A serum, (p.aCD43cp) raised against the recombinant cytoplasmic tail of the human CD43, was shown not only to recognize human CD43, but it bound to putative CD43 orthologues in many mammalian species. CD43 was found to be expressed in the same leucocyte subpopulations and circumstantial evidence suggested that CD43 is also regulated similarly during leucocyte ontogeny in all species investigated. As CD43+ cells were readily observed in fixed tissues, the p.aCD43cp serum may be used as a reliable reagent for the verification of the haematopoietic origin of infiltrations and, used together with other reagents, for the serological characterization of normal and pathological lymphoid tissues and lymphoid infiltrations in experimental work and in animal disease.  (+info)

Proteoglycan turnover during development of spontaneous osteoarthrosis in guinea pigs. (4/378)

OBJECTIVE: The study was performed to clarify the metabolic background of the variations in proteoglycan concentrations, relating to ageing and the spontaneous development of osteoarthrosis in guinea pigs. METHODS: Six-, 9- and 12-month-old Hartley guinea pigs were injected intraperitoneally with Na2(35)SO4. The incorporation and degradation of various proteoglycans were analyzed in different areas of tibial articular cartilage during the development of osteoarthrosis. RESULTS: Proteoglycan synthesis was most active in the uncalcified cartilage of 6-month animals and highest in the medial compartment with its presumably higher load. The breakdown of proteoglycans decreased with age. The onset of osteoarthrosis was associated with decreased synthesis of large and small proteoglycans, while the rate of degradation remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: During onset of osteoarthrosis the synthesis of large proteoglycans gradually becomes insufficient to compensate for the simultaneous degradation. This differs from findings in more rapidly progressing, experimental secondary osteoarthrosis, where a substantial increase in the rate of degradation is more conspicuous.  (+info)

Development of an ELISA for detection of myxoma virus-specific rabbit antibodies: test evaluation for diagnostic applications on vaccinated and wild rabbit sera. (5/378)

An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and compared with 2 reference diagnostic tests (indirect immunofluorescence [IF] and complement fixation) to detect myxoma virus-specific antibodies in sera from 50 rabbits experimentally vaccinated with an attenuated strain of myxoma virus or with a Shope fibroma virus. The ELISA was highly specific (100% specificity) and sensitive (100%, 21 days after homologous vaccination). In a comparison of the ELISA with the IF test in 128 wild rabbits from France, discrepant results were obtained in only 11 (8.6%) animals, which were positive with the ELISA and negative with the IF test. The higher sensitivity and the good specificity of the ELISA was confirmed in a serologic survey of 118 rabbits from 2 Kerguelen (Indian Ocean) islands, where the prevalence of myxomatosis varied considerably. The ELISA is an alternative serologic test for diagnosis, vaccine evaluation, and seroepidemiologic surveys of myxomatosis.  (+info)

Public health response to a potentially rabid bear cub--Iowa, 1999. (6/378)

On August 27, 1999, a 5-6 month-old black bear cub in a petting zoo in Clermont, Iowa, died after developing acute central nervous system signs; the initial direct fluorescent-antibody (DFA) test results available on August 28 indicated the bear had rabies. On August 29, in response to the positive laboratory report, the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) initiated a campaign to identify and inform persons potentially exposed to the bear's saliva. Within 72 hours, IDPH staff verified contact and exposure information for approximately 350 persons. Subsequent testing found no evidence of rabies virus in brain or spinal cord tissues. This report describes the public health response to this potential rabies outbreak and reviews testing procedures and protocols for rabies.  (+info)

Baroreflex sensitivity predicts the induction of ventricular arrhythmias by cesium chloride in rabbits. (7/378)

Previous studies have shown that the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the genesis of ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with long QT syndrome, and in cesium chloride (Cs)-induced VT in animals. The present study investigated whether baroreflex sensitivity predicts the induction of VT by Cs in the rabbit in vivo. Monophasic action potentials (MAPs) of the left ventricular endocardium were recorded simultaneously with the surface ECG in 27 rabbits. Rabbits were divided into 4 groups based on the Cs-induced ventricular arrhythmias: (1) no ventricular premature contractions (No-VPC group), (2) single or paired VPC (VPC group), (3) monomorphic VT (MVT group), and (4) polymorphic VT (PVT group). Baroreflex sensitivity was significantly lower in the MVT and PVT groups than in the No-VPC and VPC groups. The plasma norepinephrine concentration before Cs injection was significantly higher in the MVT group than in the other 3 groups, and the norepinephrine concentration after Cs injection was significantly higher in the MVT and PVT groups than in the No-VPC and VPC groups. Baroreflex sensitivity was negatively correlated with the norepinephrine concentration before Cs injection. These results suggest that autonomic nervous system dysfunction, as defined by reduced baroreflex sensitivity, and elevated plasma norepinephrine concentrations predict increased susceptibility to Cs-induced VT.  (+info)

In vitro microbiological characterization of novel cyclic homopentapeptides, CP-101,680 and CP-163,234, for animal health use. (8/378)

Two cyclic homopentapeptides, CP-101,680 and CP-163,234 [6a-(3',4'-dichlorophenylamino) analogs of viomycin and capreomycin, respectively], were identified as novel antibacterial agents for the treatment of animal disease, especially for livestock respiratory disease. The in vitro microbiological characterization of both CP-101,680 and CP-163,234 was carried out using their parent compounds, viomycin and capreomycin, as controls. This characterization included antibacterial spectrum, influence of media, inoculum size, pH, EDTA, polymixin B nonapeptide (PMBN), serum, cell-free protein synthesis inhibition, and time-kill kinetics. Our results indicated that the capreomycin analog, CP-163,234, showed slightly improved in vitro potency over the viomycin analog, CP-101,680. Both analogs showed very potent cell-free protein synthesis inhibition activity and were bactericidal against Pasteurella haemolytica, P. multocida and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae at the level of 4 times and 8 times MICs. CP-163,234 was bactericidal at the level of 4x and 8x MIC against E. coli, but re-growth was observed after 24 hours incubation at both concentrations of CP-101,680.  (+info)

GLOBAL - Among the lessons to be learned from the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 in Asia and Europe, the World Organisation for Animal Health is recommending a strengthening of animal disease surveillance worldwide.
Animal Disease Traceability: Frequently Asked Questions Q. What is animal disease traceability? A. Animal disease traceability (ADT), provides the ability to know where diseased and at‐risk animals are located, where theyve been, and when they were there. ADT is very important to ensuring a rapid response when animal disease events take place. Q. Why is ADT important? A. Good traceability helps reduce the number of animals involved in a disease investigation and reduces the time needed to respond. Reducing the number of premises impacted by an animal disease event reduces economic strain on owners and their communities. Good traceability is necessary to assure our international trading partners that food they purchase from us is safe. Q. What animals are included in this rule? A. The rule covers animals in interstate movement (moving across state lines). Cattle, bison, sheep and goats, swine, captive cervids, horses, and poultry are the species affected by the rule. There are some exceptions ...
Animal Disease Traceability: Frequently Asked Questions Q. What is animal disease traceability? A. Animal disease traceability (ADT), provides the ability to know where diseased and at‐risk animals are located, where theyve been, and when they were there. ADT is very important to ensuring a rapid response when animal disease events take place. Q. Why is ADT important? A. Good traceability helps reduce the number of animals involved in a disease investigation and reduces the time needed to respond. Reducing the number of premises impacted by an animal disease event reduces economic strain on owners and their communities. Good traceability is necessary to assure our international trading partners that food they purchase from us is safe. Q. What animals are included in this rule? A. The rule covers animals in interstate movement (moving across state lines). Cattle, bison, sheep and goats, swine, captive cervids, horses, and poultry are the species affected by the rule. There are some exceptions ...
In recent years, as long as the rapid development of aquaculture, the occurrence of aquatic animal diseases increase year by year, which restrict the sustained, steady, and healthy development of aquaculture. So the rapid diagnosis of aquatic animal disease is particularly important for their prevention and control. In the present work, an Android-based aquatic animal disease diagnostic system has been developed in order to provide more convenient and effective aquatic animal disease diagnostic services to ordinary farmers. The designed system includes the part of the man-machine interface (user interface, expert interface), inference engine, the case base, knowledge base and so on. Interactive interface is a visual display interface. Inference engine was written in the Java programming language. Case base and knowledge base were created using SQLite. The results show that ordinary farmers can easily use this system to realize the convenient, fast, and accurate access to the findings of disease
Animal disease traceability or knowing where diseased and at-risk animals are, where theyve been, and when is important to ensuring a rapid response when animal disease events take place. Although animal disease traceability does not prevent disease, an efficient and accurate traceability system reduces the number of animals and response time involved in a disease investigation; which, in turn, reduces the economic impact on owners and affected communities.. The current approach to traceability in the United States is the result of significant discussion and compromise. Federal policy regarding traceability has been amended several times over the past decade based on stakeholder feedback, particularly from the cattle industry. In early 2010, USDA announced a new approach for responding to and controlling animal diseases, referred to as the ADT framework. Key principles of the 2010 framework include ...
Animal disease traceability or knowing where diseased and at-risk animals are, where theyve been, and when is important to ensuring a rapid response when animal disease events take place. Although animal disease traceability does not prevent disease, an efficient and accurate traceability system reduces the number of animals and response time involved in a disease investigation; which, in turn, reduces the economic impact on owners and affected communities.. The current approach to traceability in the United States is the result of significant discussion and compromise. Federal policy regarding traceability has been amended several times over the past decade based on stakeholder feedback, particularly from the cattle industry. In early 2010, USDA announced a new approach for responding to and controlling animal diseases, referred to as the ADT framework. Key principles of the 2010 framework include ...
Hunting Preserves and Animal Disease - Hunting preserves and animal disease are related because preserves spread animal disease. Read about hunting preserves and animal disease at HowStuffWorks.
The proposed conceptual framework clarifies understanding of the key relationships between elements of mitigation and their technical characteristics, an essential precursor to economic analysis. The effectiveness of mitigation is usually measured in terms of prevalence or incidence reduction. But prevalence and incidence are not in themselves of economic interest. They matter because the lower are prevalence or incidence rates the greater the value, or benefits, obtained as outputs from resources committed to production.. Each of the three stages identified has been presented as a distinct phase in the sequential progression of a given pathogen from its first appearance through to its eventual control. In practice, mitigation for a defined pathogen in a target population (e.g. the poultry population of a country or region) can only be attributed to one stage at a time. However, a national or regional strategy for animal health, such as the EUs, will contain a mix of stages according to the ...
GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 13 Aug) - Efforts to free South Cotabato province of major animal diseases have continued to gain ground after the area sustained its clean record during the first six months of the year in terms of animal disease outbreaks.. Dr. Lorna Lamorena, South Cotabato provincial veterinarian, said Tuesday they have not recorded a single animal disease outbreak from January to June this year in any part of the provinces 10 towns and lone city.. She said such clean record has now extended to 18 months after the area was also spared of disease outbreaks in the entire 2012.. We monitored some cases of Surra disease but they did not reach the outbreak level as we immediately contained them, Lamorena said in a media forum.. The official said the confirmed cases of Surra, which is a parasitic disease that affects various farm animals, emerged within areas bordering South Cotabato and Sultan Kudarat provinces.. She said their assessment showed that the disease did not ...
Iowa Ag Secretary also highlighted support for long-term water quality funding in meeting with Gov. Reynolds. Monday, November 27, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey requested an additional $150,000 for the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardships Animal Industry Bureau to provide additional support for preparations for and potentially responding to a foreign animal disease outbreak. Northey also requested continued funding to support the Renewable Fuels Infrastructure Program and the Agriculture Drainage Well Closure Program.. Northey requested an additional $150,000 for the Departments Animal Industry Bureau for foreign animal disease outbreak response preparation. The Department received $100,000 in funding starting this fiscal year to support preparations for a foreign animal disease outbreak and a portion of that funding was used to hire a new Emergency Management Veterinarian. The additional funds would be used to accelerate work on emergency response plans, organize ...
Press Release issued Apr 21, 2017: The motive of this strategic research report entitled Global Veterinary Vaccine Market 2017-2022 is to provide company officials, industry investors, and Veterinary Vaccine industry members with consequential insights to enable them make reliable strategic decisions regarding the opportunities in the global Veterinary Vaccine market.
Brussels, 24 October 2006 The Directorate-General for Research of the European Commission is today holding a media briefing to present current EU-funded research on infectious animal diseases. During thematic briefings in the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut in Germany, European scientists demonstrate ongoing research activities to combat threats posed by animal health crises (avian influenza, foot and mouth and mad cow). With this research the EU has strengthened its knowledge base through research into major animal diseases and is stimulating the competitiveness of the European animal health industry. Briefings conducted by leading animal health scientists and a visit to the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), the German Federal Institute of Animal Health, on the Isle of Riems in Greifswald, Germany will give journalists the opportunity to discuss current developments and new research challenges. During the technical briefing, several EU-funded projects including BSE research (diagnosis and control) ...
Our scientific work includes; Testing in support of statutory animal disease control and eradication programmes such as those for TSEs, brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis; Emergency response capability for epizootic and emerging disease threats; Animal disease surveillance and investigation; Commercial testing services and industry support such as BVD and Cattle Health Scheme testing; Evaluation of the welfare impact of different production systems; and Research to improve the diagnosis and control of animal diseases.
In October 2014 AHA commenced management of a new, Department of Agriculture and Water Resources funded, four year project dedicated to the development of a formal industry-government aquatic emergency animal disease response agreement.. While Australia has long-standing joint industry-government arrangements in place for responses to livestock emergency diseases and emergency plant pests and diseases, until now, theres been nothing formally in place for responding to emergency disease outbreaks affecting aquatic animals and the industries that rely on them.. Aquatic animal industries as well as governments have long recognised this as a significant gap in our national preparedness and response tackle box. Previous work on developing formal industry-Government emergency aquatic animal disease response arrangements focussed on the abalone sector (aquaculture and wild capture). This project aims to build on previous efforts and eventually cover most aquatic animal industries.. An Aquatic Deed ...
Every morning, Dr. Larry Barrett rushes to Orient to catch a boat to work.. Once he passes through security, he boards the Plum Island Ferry for a 20-minute ride to his job as director of the islands animal disease research center.. While director is Dr. Barretts title with the federal lab, he goes by another unofficial title to support the many responsibilities associated with his job.. Larry Barrett is the islands self-proclaimed mayor.. Im the mayor in the sense that Im the face of Plum Island, he said following a recent media tour of the lab.. As director, Dr. Barrett, who holds a doctorate in veterinary medicine from Oklahoma State University, oversees everything from the delivery of rare and highly contagious livestock specimens to the islands 24-hour ferry service schedule.. I may start the day at an operational meeting or we may be talking about special agents like foot-and-mouth disease, he said.. The Plum Island Animal Disease Center, which has been housed on the 840-acre ...
Exotic animal diseases (EADs) are characterized by their capacity to spread global distances, causing impacts on animal health and welfare with significant economic consequences. We offer a critique of current import risk analysis approaches employed in the EAD field, focusing on their capacity to assess complex systems at a policy level. To address the shortcomings identified, we propose a novel method providing a systematic analysis of the likelihood of a disease incursion, developed by reference to the multibarrier system employed for the United Kingdom. We apply the network model to a policy-level risk assessment of classical swine fever (CSF), a notifiable animal disease caused by the CSF virus. In doing so, we document and discuss a sequence of analyses that describe system vulnerabilities and reveal the critical control points (CCPs) for intervention, reducing the likelihood of U.K. pig herds being exposed to the CSF virus. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - How Can Animal Disease Risks be Better Managed?. AU - Carpenter, Tim. AU - Rich, Karl M.. PY - 2012/8/1. Y1 - 2012/8/1. N2 - Livestock farming is imbued with a variety of disease-related risks. The threat of disease, and actions taken (or not taken) to mitigate it, can impact both the broader livestock sector and potentially society at large if the disease is what is termed zoonotic i.e. impacting both animal and human health alike. Understanding the nature of these risks is crucial to improve policymaking and requires multidisciplinary toolkits. In this article we identify various frameworks from economics and epidemiology to analyze the impact of animal disease risks in livestock environments. From this, we examine the policy responses implemented to better manage risk, and conclude by identifying the current gaps in the decision process related to risk and uncertainty, which is a reflection of imperfect knowledge. Recent advances in our modeling frameworks have helped ...
AFP) - South Korea stepped up major quarantine efforts Monday as a highly contagious animal disease threatened the centre of its livestock industry.. The agriculture ministry said more roadblocks and quarantine posts were set up after the foot-and-mouth outbreak hit a state livestock research institute at Cheongyang, 160 kilometres (96 miles) south of Seoul, on Saturday.. via Fears grow as animal disease spreads in S.Korea.. ...
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced the publication of a proposed rule on animal disease traceability Tuesday, Aug. 11. The proposed rule follows the announcement of an animal disease traceability framework from 18 months ago as well as several years of discussions and planning with state livestock health officials, the livestock industry and other…
High quality Natural Fish Meal Fertiliser Improve Animal Disease Resistance Ability from China, Chinas leading Fish Meal Powder product market, With strict quality control Fish Meal Powder factories, Producing high quality Natural Fish Meal Fertiliser Improve Animal Disease Resistance Ability products.
Wildlife Health Australia (Formerly Australian Wildlife Health Network) aims to develop strong partnerships in order to better manage the adverse effects of wildlife diseases on Australias animal health industries, human health, biodiversity, trade and tourism.
United States Veterinary Vaccine Market report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Veterinary Vaccine industry. The United Sta
Find veterinary vaccines market research report which covers the types of veterinary vaccines and the different species for which vaccines are present in the market.
Veterinary vaccines are used for the avoidance of a variety of diseases which affects animals that can be assembled in veterinary vaccines. Because of
Veterinary vaccines are used for the avoidance of a variety of diseases which affects animals that can be assembled in veterinary vaccines. Because of
The recognition, diagnosis and management of an Emergency Animal Disease (EAD) lies at the heart of protecting the health of Australias primary industries and its people. It is an area facing new challenges and opportunities including the emergence of new diseases, evolving surveillance responsibilities and the development of new diagnostic technologies.. This symposium gathers veterinary practitioners, animal health managers, diagnosticians and livestock industry representatives to learn and discuss recent innovations and challenges in EAD surveillance, diagnostics and management. It will also provide some refresher training in EAD preparedness for private and government veterinary practitioners.. ...
This is the first of a series on digital electroencephalography. The present discussion deals with:. 1. Changing electrode montages for display after recording is completed (so-called remontaging). (To read about the principles of forming electrode derivations and montages visit Holliday and Williams, VNN, 1999.). 2. Changing frequency limits after recording is completed.. 1. Changing Electrode Montages After Recording (remontaging).. Veterinary EEG recording typically is performed under certain limitations. Because of the cost of equipment, most veterinary laboratories have had polygraphs with only 6 or 8 EEG channels. By comparison, thirty-two channels are now used in routine recordings from human patients and even more in some specialized studies. In addition to monetary limits, there is an inherent limit on the number of electrodes that can be placed on the head of most veterinary patients, whose calvaria are often smaller even than those of children.. If a larger number of EEG channels ...
Outbreaks of notifiable infectious animal diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease, classical swine fever and avian influenza, have major societal and economic consequences. Fortunately, such animal diseases occur infrequently in the Netherlands. Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) contributes to this status by designing risk-based surveillance systems.
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The Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), is a dynamic and evolving Web resource ever working to adapt to the changing landscape of wildlife disease. Its many products and services provide a gateway to a comprehensive collection of wildlife disease resources, as well as a means for staying abreast of current wildlife disease issues ...
The Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), is a dynamic and evolving Web resource ever working to adapt to the changing landscape of wildlife disease. Its many products and services provide a gateway to a comprehensive collection of wildlife disease resources, as well as a means for staying abreast of current wildlife disease issues ...
The University of Tennessee student chapter of the Wildlife Disease Association met at NIMBioS last week for an introduction to mathematical modeling of wildlife diseases including rabies.. Participants learned about the value of mathematical models for describing and understanding biological phenomena and interacted with a MATLAB model on vaccination for rabies in raccoons. They were also introduced to agent-based modeling of infectious disease with Netlogo. NIMBioS Associate Director of Education & Outreach Suzanne Lenhart and Director Louis Gross led the event with Education & Outreach Coordinator Kelly Sturner assisting.. The chapter is preparing to help host the 62nd International Conference of the Wildlife Disease Association to be held in Knoxville, July 27-Aug. 2, 2013. NIMBioS will give a full day workshop to students on July 28 called Introduction to Population Wildlife Disease Modeling, which will be offered to graduate and advanced undergraduate students attending the ...
How is FORSCOM Animal Disease Eradication Plan abbreviated? FADEP stands for FORSCOM Animal Disease Eradication Plan. FADEP is defined as FORSCOM Animal Disease Eradication Plan very frequently.
AbeBooks.com: Livestock Diseases: Prevention, Control and Compensation Schemes: 204 pages. Dimensions: 10.9in. x 8.0in. x 0.5in.This report is an overview of the management of risk due to livestock diseases, a potentially catastrophic type of risk that can have strong external effects given its links to the food chain and to human health. Animal disease, primarily in farmed livestock, has long been a policy concern for food safety reasons and the high economic losses it can engender. The globalisation of trade and human movement, and sensitivities to food safety, enhance the relevance and complexity of disease control for terrestrial livestock. Outbreaks or even rumours of an outbreak can result in widespread consumer alarm, disruption of trade, and severe effects on incomes, not to mention the human cost of illnesses and deaths arising from animal disease. Table of Content : AcronymsExecutive Summary PART I. OVERVIEW OF LIVESTOCK DISEASE PREVENTIONChapter 1. Economic issues and the roles of
DUBLIN, Feb. 19, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/frs7k2/animalveterinary) has announced the addition of the Concise Analysis of the International Animal/Veterinary Vaccines Market - Global Forecast to 2018 report to their offering. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769). The animal vaccines market studied is segmented by products, animal diseases, and technologies that are involved in developing vaccines for veterinary administration. The global market, by products, is further segmented into seven segments, namely, companion animal vaccines, livestock, poultry, porcine, equine, aquaculture, and other veterinary vaccines. In 2012, livestock vaccines and porcine vaccines were two of the largest segments, accounting for 63% of the market share globally. The livestock vaccines market is further segmented into bovine vaccines and small ruminant vaccines, whereas the companion animal vaccines market is further segmented into ...
NBII Wildlife Disease Information Node 2002 [Indexes and Abstracts]. WDIN is a collaborative project working to develop a Web-based monitoring and reporting system to provide state and federal resource managers, animal disease specialists, veterinary diagnostic laboratories, physicians, public health workers, educators, and the general public with access to data on wildlife diseases, mortality events, and other critical related information. Data are contributed voluntarily, with partners deciding which data they choose to share. The resulting distributed wildlife disease data warehouse can be a valuable resource for all to share and use to enhance the understanding, surveillance, management, control, and prevention of wildlife diseases around the world.. ...
In addition to the standard labelling requirements, labels for veterinary vaccines and antisera should carry the following information, where applicable. [toc] Signal heading The Schedule 4 signal heading is required for all live-virus veterinary vaccines (except poultry vaccines, pigeon pox vaccine and scabby mouth vaccine) and specific antisera products, including canine
Colorado State Animal Disease Traceability Update - Dr. Keith Roehr, Colorado State Veterinarian, from the 2013 NIAA Merging Values and Technology conference, April 15-17, 2013, Louisville, KY, USA.. Dr. Keith Roehr, Colorado State Veterinarian, provides an update on the State of Colorado animal disease traceability system. Dr. Roehr mentions that Colorado needs better traceability and improved program disease management and that electronic tools and flexibility must be applied where it makes sense. The end goal is to help producers.. More presentations at http://www.trufflemedia.com/agmedia/conference/2013-niaa-merging-values-.... ...
The U.S. Department of Agricultures Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will be holding two additional public meetings on the animal disease traceability framework approach. The meetings will take place this month in Salt Lake City, Utah, and next month in Fort Worth, Texas. Additional meetings will be scheduled in the coming weeks.. In May, USDA hosted three public meetings to discuss Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsacks new framework for animal disease traceability. Meetings were held May 11 in Kansas City, Mo.; May 13 in Riverdale, Md.; and May 17 in Denver, Colo. ...
A new initiative was launched today to investigate the health of wildlife disease in Britain.. Launched by a new partnership between the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), Froglife and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and based on the predecessor projects, Garden Bird Health initiative and the Frog Mortality Project; the Garden Wildlife Heath Project launches today.. To find out more about todays launch follow this link to ZSLs website and find out more about the Garden Wildlife Health Project here.. This is an exciting project and we hope that anyone who loves amphibians or reptiles will take part in the project and let others know about it and as the launch says help Nurture the nature in your garden. ...
As the worlds climate warms, parasite-carried wildlife diseases will move north, with animals in cold far-north and high-altitude regions expected to suffer the most dramatic increases, warns a study to be published on Friday in the journal Science.
Journal of Wildlife Diseases publishes work on infectious, parasitic, toxic, nutritional, physiologic, and neoplastic diseases impacting wild animals.
Journal of Wildlife Diseases publishes work on infectious, parasitic, toxic, nutritional, physiologic, and neoplastic diseases impacting wild animals.
Journal of Wildlife Diseases publishes work on infectious, parasitic, toxic, nutritional, physiologic, and neoplastic diseases impacting wild animals.
The scientific program of the 65th annual international Wildlife Disease Association conference begins on Monday, August 1, 2016 and goes through Friday, August 5, 2016. The schedule shown below is subject to change prior to the start of the conference. Please return to this page for the latest program schedule ...
Wildlife diseases are an often-overlooked threat. We give you the short details on seven little-known bacteria, fungi or viruses threatening wild species.
This study investigated anxiety, one aspect of mental wellbeing, in fourth year veterinary students before the final clinical section of their course (intramural rotations (IMR)). It explored the relationship between reported anxiety and mindset: an individuals view on the ability to develop (eg, improve intelligence). Questionnaires were completed by 130 students. Students were mindset typed for ability and personality and rated their anxiety towards IMR. Students with different overall mindsets (strong growth, growth and fixed) were invited to participate in focus groups, to discuss causes of their anxieties. Quantitative results indicated 63.1 per cent of students had strong growth or growth mindsets overall, and that females were more fixed mindset-oriented than males. Females reported significantly greater anxiety than males. A fixed mindset view overall, and of ability, were significantly correlated with increased anxiety, while mindset view of personality was not. Students ...
Automated Frequency Analysis, Automated Event Detection - Topographic Mapping This discussion is concerned with certain unique and valuable procedures that are possible using digital EEG (dEEG).. In dEEG, the continuously varying (analog) voltage changes detected by the electrodes are led into amplifiers, and then into analog-to-digital converters. The converter output consists of numerical values that are stored in a computer and are available for detailed analysis. (There are stringent requirements for the details of the digitization process but these are not discussed here.). Digital EEGs are always recorded using a common reference montage. Thus, activity at each electrode site is referenced to a single electrode. The recordings can then be remontaged as necessary to display the data to better advantage. (Remontaging, a very valuable feature of dEEG, has been discussed earlier.). Specific Uses of Digital EEG:. 1. Analysis of background rhythms (BGR) and special methods of presenting the ...
How is Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (veterinary medicine) abbreviated? OADDL stands for Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (veterinary medicine). OADDL is defined as Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (veterinary medicine) somewhat frequently.
Under project TCP/RAF/8821 (Emergency analysis and control of Rift Valley fever and other vector-borne diseases in eastern Africa), a workshop gathering CVOs of Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, the Sudan, the United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda was held in Kampala from 30 August to 3 September 1999. It provided a most valuable opportunity to gauge the current status of transboundary animal diseases (TADs), especially those which are flood-related. The CVOs participated enthusiastically in presenting and discussing the many problems that beset them, the progress made in resolving them and future challenges. They described the serious weaknesses, which they are seeking to rectify, in TAD control in the region and in preparedness for animal disease emergencies. In common with many meetings concerning the control of transboundary animal diseases in developing countries, the main preoccupations were: insufficient recognition of the major contribution that livestock makes to national economies, food ...
Healthy wildlife and ecosystems have evolved defenses to fend off most diseases before they have devastating impacts.. But when wildlife is stressed, exposure to microbes, parasites, toxins, and other biological and physical agents can cause wildlife diseases. Here is information about diseases found in the Northeast and diseases of concern in Vermont, as well as information on what to do if you find a sick or injured animal.. ...
But when wildlife is stressed, exposure to microbes, parasites, toxins, and other biological and physical agents can cause wildlife diseases. Here is information about diseases found in the Northeast and diseases of concern in Vermont, as well as information on what to do if you find a sick or injured animal.. ...
Wildlife Health Australia (Formerly Australian Wildlife Health Network) aims to develop strong partnerships in order to better manage the adverse effects of wildlife diseases on Australias animal health industries, human health, biodiversity, trade and tourism.
The Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (LADDL), committed to providing the highest quality diagnostic services, is in the process of revising laboratory testing fees to adjust for the rising costs of laboratory supplies and investments in advanced technologies. Fee revisions are scheduled to take effect on April 06, 2020. We value you as a client and hope you feel our services are a great value. If you have questions or concerns, please give us a call ...
THS Director, Rick Speare, gave the opening address at the Australian Wildlife Rehabilitation Conference being held in Townsville 16-20 July. The lecture was titled Adventures in wildlife disease research: from benign curiosities to global epidemics. In this talk Rick discussed an eclectic range of conditions in Australian wildlife that he had investigated over 34 years of research: from strange parasites and diseases in macropods and possums to globally significant work on diseases causing epidemics in wild amphibians. He also highlighted the important role wildlife carers can play in unraveling the mysteries of wildlife diseases. This not only improves the outcomes of rehabilitation of individual animals, but can add significantly to conservation of wildlife. Wildlife carers are the eyes of the wildlife disease surveillance system.. For a researcher interested in new diseases wildlife is the last frontier. The vast and varied Australian fauna gives immense possibilities for pathogens to call ...
Overall 137 programmes have been selected for EU funding to tackle animal diseases that impact on human and animal health as well as trade. The elected programmes were granted the following allocation: Bovine Tuberculosis (about €71 million); Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (about €54 million); Bovine Brucellosis (about €7.4 million), rabies (€25 million); Bluetongue (€1.5 million); Classical Swine Fever (€2.5 million); Salmonellosis (about €16.6 million); Avian influenza (€2.6 million) and African Swine Fever in Sardinia (€1.4 million ...
The American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians was formed in 1979 by a small group of veterinarians with a common interest in free-ranging wildlife. Initially, most members worked for government wildlife management agencies. But, with the rise of conservation biology and a better societal appreciation for what veterinarians can bring to wildlife health and conservation, current AAWV members work at academic institutions, in domestic animal private practice, at zoos and aquaria, and with state/provincial and federal agencies. Members engage in wildlife health research, clinical medicine, teaching, disease surveillance, regulatory work, and administration. https://aawv.net/. ...
Companion Animal Diseases scheduled on December 06-07, 2022 in December 2022 in Kuala Lumpur is for the researchers, scientists, scholars, engineers, academic, scientific and university practitioners to present research activities that might want to attend events, meetings, seminars, congresses, workshops, summit, and symposiums.
Report on the meeting of the task force for monitoring animal disease eradication in the member states - Brussels, 1st March 2012 ...
Research within the College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences is conducted primarily within our Research Institutes, with the majority of veterinary bioscience research being conducted within the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (BAHCM). Additional research in this area is conducted within the Medical Research Council - University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) and Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology (WTCMP), both of which are incorporated into the Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation (IIIs).. Staff within Institutes contribute directly to the world class teaching at our School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM), and our clinical veterinary staff based within the School - who lead clinical teaching as well as clinical services within our animal hospitals - are key contributors to the clinical portfolio within veterinary research.. Staff involved across the spectrum of veterinary bioscience research are listed by unit ...
Dr. Bob Irelans Veterinary Services, based in Lakeland, Florida, is your complete source for pet vaccinations and a wide variety of veterinary services.
Aims to educate veterinary medical students and post-graduate veterinarians in state-of-the-art clinical veterinary medicine. ...
Pastoralists living in the rural study villages near Ruaha National Park face challenges common to pastoralists in other regions of sub-Saharan Africa, including lack of livestock health services, pasture and water scarcity, and limited access to livestock markets (e.g. Lybbert et al. 2004; Mosalagae and Magotsi 2013). Livestock disease was identified as a limiting factor to pastoralist livestock production and herd sustainability at multiple stakeholder levels, but some disease priorities differ among pastoralists, government extension officers, and veterinary officials responsible for disease surveillance and services at broader geographic levels. The combination of disease and decreased access to pasture and water resources represents a significant threat to the pastoralist system in the Ruaha landscape. In the face of climate variability and landscape change, targeted livestock health education for pastoralists and extension officers was identified as a common pathway for improving herd ...
DEPARTMENT OF PHPT TRAINS VETERINARY STAFF FROM THE GREATER HORN OF AFRICA. The Department of Public Health, Pharmaacology and Toxicology won a consultancy to train veterinary staff from the Greater Horn of Africa on Surveillance and Epidemiology of trade-related Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs). The 28 participants attending the training are drawn from six countries including Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Southern Sudan, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. The three-month training will lead to the award of Certificate in Surveillance and Epidemiology of trade-related Transboundary Animal Diseases. The training is being facilitated by African Union- InterAfrican Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) with funding from United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Training started on 24th February 2014 and will end on 23rd May 2014.. Trans-boundary animal diseases threatens food security through serious loss of animal protein and/or loss of draught animal power for cropping, leading to increased ...
A dynamic model of livestock disease and decentralised economic behaviour is constructed as a jointly determined system. By accounting for feedbacks between behavioural choices and disease outcomes, the model captures the endogenous nature of infection risks. Government mandated testing of livestock herds and how private biosecurity incentives are affected by the structure of disease eradication polices are considered. How well disease control policies are targeted affects their effectiveness and may result in farmers substituting government testing and disease surveillance for private biosecurity. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that failing to account for feedbacks between the disease ecology and economic systems may overestimate the effectiveness of government disease control policies.(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
OCALA, Florida- December, 30, 2016- Dr. Timothy Lynch, ACVSMR has been elected to Morris Animal Foundations first Clinical Veterinary Advisory Board. This board will support the Foundation as practicing clinicians focusing on research, and providing a well-rounded scope of the tools needed to continue development in veterinary medicine. Morris Animal Foundation was founded in 1948, and since then it has invested more than $103 million towards 2,500 studies that have impacted animals and veterinary medicine on global level.. Dr. Lynch graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1991, completed an internship at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky 1991-1992; proceeding with a surgical residency at Michigan State University 1992-1995, then becoming Staff Surgeon at Equine Specialty Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 1995-2000. Lynch completed his board certification by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1999. In 2002, Lynch joined Peterson & Smith Equine Hospital to head the ...
Edited by the scientific association Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal (CBPA) in collaboration with institutions, such as Universidade de Brasília (UnB) and Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ). Pesq. Vet. Bras publishes original papers on animal diseases and related subjects divided by the following areas: Livestock Diseases (LD), Small Animal Diseases (SA), Wildlife Medicine (WM) and Animal Morphophysiology (MF).
Edited by the scientific association Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal (CBPA) in collaboration with institutions, such as Universidade de Brasília (UnB) and Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ). Pesq. Vet. Bras publishes original papers on animal diseases and related subjects divided by the following areas: Livestock Diseases (LD), Small Animal Diseases (SA), Wildlife Medicine (WM) and Animal Morphophysiology (MF).
Animal Diseases. USDA Forest Service. pp. 496-499. Retrieved 12 February 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Bruner, ... Long Island "New Duck Disease" is an infectious disease affecting primarily ducklings, with a high mortality rate. In 1956, the ... She isolated and reproduced the cause of the most common life-threatening disease in duck farming in the 1950s and developed ... Price worked for three years as a laboratory technician in the Poultry Disease Research Farm in the Veterinary College at ...
... are a common label for a group of three types of fungus that commonly causes skin disease in animals and humans.[1] These ... Dermatophytes are transmitted by direct contact with infected host (human or animal) or by direct or indirect contact with ... Clinical information such as the appearance of the lesion, site, geographic location, travel history, animal contacts and race ... Dermatophytes are classified as anthropophilic (humans), zoophilic (animals) or geophilic (soil) according to their normal ...
Animal contact diseases: rabies. Note: WH5N1 avian influenza has been identified in this country; it poses a negligible risk as ... Major infectious diseases[edit]. Degree of risk: high *Food or waterborne diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis ... The main source of the disease was the use of syringes used by drug addicts."[23] There are approximately 23,000 addicts in the ...
"Eye Diseases and Information". All Animal Eye Services. Archived from the original (website) on August 5, 2009. Retrieved 19 ... Cottelll, Beverley D.; Barnett, K. C. (1987). "Harada's disease in the Japanese Akita". Journal of Small Animal Practice. 28 (6 ... Immune-mediated endocrine diseases[edit]. In addition to these there are also the immune-mediated endocrine diseases with a ... Autoimmune diseases[edit]. There are many autoimmune diseases that are known to sometimes occur in the Akita. These include, ...
Uzal, Francisco A.; Songer, J. Glenn; Prescott, John F.; Popoff, Michel R. (2016). Clostridial Diseases of Animals. John Wiley ... Hagan and Bruner's Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of Domestic Animals: With Reference to Etiology, Epizootiology, ... Rolfe, Rial D. (2013). Clostridium Difficile: Its Role in Intestinal Disease. Elsevier. ISBN 9781483289052. Markey, Bryan; ... Pattison, Mark (2008). Poultry Diseases. Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN 978-0702028625. Hagan, William Arthur; Bruner, Dorsey ...
"Sendai Virus". Diseases of Research Animals. Burke CW, Mason JN, Surman SL, Jones BG, Dalloneau E, Hurwitz JL, Russell CJ (July ... as well as eliminating infected animals and screening incoming animals, should clear the problem very quickly. Imported animals ... disease causing infection is host restrictive for rodents and the virus does not cause disease in humans or domestic animals, ... but all animals of both strains ultimately succumb to SeV caused disease. If a mouse survives a SeV infection, it develops a ...
... a Centuries-Old Animal Disease, Is Eradicated". The New York Times. "Largest world stock of animal-killing virus destroyed by ... Most animals die six to twelve days after the onset of these clinical signs. The disease is believed to have originated in Asia ... "Exotic animal diseases - Rinderpest". .dpi.qld.gov.au. Archived from the original on March 30, 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-15. " ... "Rinderpest". Disease Facts. Institute for Animal Health. Archived from the original on June 26, 2009. Retrieved 2010-10-15. ...
Diseases of Marine animals. 3. Hamburg: Biologische Anstalt Helgoland. pp. 47-202. Furuya H, Tsuneki K (May 2003). "Biology of ... Hochberg, F.G. (1990). "Diseases caused by protistans and mesozoans". Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) in Kinne, Otto. ...
Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and Animal and Plant Health Agency. "Notifiable diseases in animals". United ... WAHID Interface - OIE World Animal Health Information Database Disease card Animal health aspects of glanders Center for ... In infected animals, the eyelid swells markedly in 1 to 2 days. Glanders has been known since antiquity, with a description by ... It is a notifiable disease in the UK, although it has not been reported there since 1928. The term is from Middle English ...
Animal industry and diseases. Crop insurance and soil conservation. Farm credit and farm security. Food from fresh waters. Food ...
doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800946-8.00024-6. ISBN 978-0-12-800946-8. "Enteric Coronavirus". Diseases of Research Animals. Archived ... "Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV)" (PDF). Division of Animal Resources, University of Illinois, Urbana. Baker, David G. (1998). " ... Significant research efforts have been focused on elucidating the viral pathogenesis of these animal coronaviruses, especially ... Rabbit enteric coronavirus causes acute gastrointestinal disease and diarrhea in young European rabbits. Mortality rates are ...
Animal Diseases in Archaeology. London: Academic Press. King, Christine, and Mansmann, Richard. 1997. Equine Lameness. Equine ... However, bog spavin can be a sign that the horse has joint disease, which is a very significant finding. Usually lameness will ... For this reason it is considered to be of no interest to those studying animal paleopathology (Baker and Brothwell, 1980). A ... Causes include synovitis (inflammation of the lining of the joint capsule), degenerative joint disease, or excessive strain of ...
Clostridial diseases of animals. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 205-220. ISBN 9781118728307. Wood, James, ed. (1907). "Braxy" . The ... Braxy is an infectious disease which causes sudden death in sheep. It is caused by the bacterium Clostridium septicum. Braxy ... Winter, AC (2012). "Chapter 10: Sudden death: Main clostridial diseases". A handbook for the sheep clinician (7th ed.). ... Songer, JG (1998). "Clostridial diseases of small ruminants". Veterinary Research. 29 (3-4): 219-32. PMID 9689739. v t e. ...
"Animal Parasitology". Kansas State University. 5 February 2001. Retrieved 2015-07-23. "Urinary System Diseases, Animals". ... "Dioctophyme renale Infection in Bears (Parasitic Disease Summary)". 22 February 2009. Archived from the original on June 15, ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Homo sapiens diseases - Metazoa". Molecular Medicine. 22 February 2009. Archived from ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Infectious Diseases". Gideon. 22 February 2009. LeBailly, M.; Leuzinger, U.; Bouchet, ...
"Disease of mollusca: bivalvia." Diseases of marine animals. 2. Retrieved from: https://www.intres.com/archive/doma_books/DOMA_ ... Gregarine disease of penaeid shrimp is a common disease caused by Nematopsis spp. that affects shrimp in the United States, ... Gregarine Disease of Penaeid Shrimp. 1996. Accessed from: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/aah-saa/diseases-maladies/gregdpsp- ...
By 1900 leukemia was viewed as a family of diseases as opposed to a single disease. By 1947 Boston pathologist Sidney Farber ... "Sr-90 is known to increase the risk of bone cancer and leukemia in animals, and is presumed to do so in people; from google ( ... With this drug, more than 90% of patients will be able to keep the disease in check for at least five years,[53] so that CML ... The disease is restricted to individuals with Down syndrome or genetic changes similar to those in Down syndrome, develops in a ...
Associated Diseases in Animals". Annual Review of Animal Biosciences. 5 (1): 21-42. doi:10.1146/annurev-animal-022516-022826. ... Subspecies of C. fetus commonly causes reproductive disease in ruminants and gastrointestinal disease in humans. Transmission ... Exposure and Disease". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 58 (11): 1579-1586. doi:10.1093/cid/ciu085. ISSN 1058-4838. PMID 24550377 ... The disease is also referred to more colloquially as "vibriosis", based on the former classification of the bacteria under the ...
Diseases in Antiquity. Springfield: Thomas. With J. Baker. 1980. Animal Diseases in Archaeology. London: Academic Press. 1969 ... His research during this period extended from human remains to animal skeletons; this was very varied and included animal ... "Smut, scab and pox: disease and environmental archaeology," pp273-277. In Bintliff, J.L., Davidson, D.A. and Grant, E.G. (eds ... "Malocclusion and methodology: The problem and relevance of dental malalignment in animals." International Journal of ...
1980). Diseases of Marine Animals (PDF). 1. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-99584-5. Kristiansen A (1964). " ... This results in algal blooms, which can become harmful to other species, and pose a danger to humans and animals, if the ... Cyanobacteria produce a range of toxins known as cyanotoxins that can pose a danger to humans and animals. The cyanobacteria ... There are some groups capable of heterotrophic growth, while others are parasitic, causing diseases in invertebrates or algae ( ...
... communicating infectious diseases to animals; attempting to commit an indictable offence punishable by mandatory life ...
doi:10.1111/j.1399-3054.1991.tb02489.x. Lauckner, G. (1980). Diseases of protozoa. In: Diseases of Marine Animals. Kinne, O. ( ... All species of animals, land plants and most fungi are multicellular, as are many algae, whereas a few organisms are partially ... Cancer in animals (metazoans) has often been described as a loss of multicellularity. There is a discussion about the ... Animals have evolved a considerable diversity of cell types in a multicellular body (100-150 different cell types), compared ...
Durham, Sharon (2010). "Figuring out puzzling animal diseases". Agricultural Research. 58 (4): 12-13. Archived from the ... In the words of early naturalists, they were dangerous, savage animals that feared no other animal and in prime condition could ... The crossbred animals did not demonstrate any form of hybrid vigor, so the practice was abandoned. Wisent-American bison ... The animals are belligerent, unpredictable, and most dangerous. American bison live in river valleys and on prairies and plains ...
The Center of Excellence for Zoonotic and Animal Disease Defense (ZADD), co-led by Texas A&M University and Kansas State ... "Institute for Infections Animal Diseases". "Coastal Hazards Center of Excellence". Homeland Security University Programs. ... researches animal disease threats. The Coastal Hazards Center of Excellence (CHC), co-led by the University of North Carolina ... "Center of Excellence for Zoonotic and Animal Disease Defense". Homeland Security University Programs. Archived from the ...
... mucosal disease and bluetongue". The Veterinary Record. 161 (25): 858-9. PMID 18156595. "Figuring Out Puzzling Animal Diseases ... BMCF is an important disease where reservoir and susceptible animals mix. There is a particular problem with Bali cattle in ... Some animals have neurologic signs, such as ataxia, nystagmus, and head pressing. Animals that become infected with the virus ... The similarity of MCF clinical signs to other enteric diseases, for example blue tongue, mucosal disease and foot and mouth ...
583, 588 Lauckner, G. (1980). "Diseases of protozoa". In: Diseases of Marine Animals. Kinne, O. (ed.). Vol. 1, p. 84, John ... For example, the word "protist pathogen" may be used to denote any disease-causing organism that is not plant, animal, fungal, ... Primordial animals. Protozoa.) [Note: each column of each page of this journal is numbered; there are two columns per page.] ... Animals, in which the different systems of organs are not sharply separated, and whose irregular form and simple organization ...
"African swine fever (ASF) , animal disease". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-12-07. "Iridoviridae-Iridoviridae-dsDNA ... Subramaniam, K (14 January 2020). "A New Family of DNA Viruses Causing Disease in Crustaceans from Diverse Aquatic Biomes". ...
"Parturient paresis , animal disease". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2020-10-11. "Parturient Paresis - an overview , ... Special Issue: Production Diseases of the Transition Cow. 176 (1): 58-69. doi:10.1016/j.tvjl.2007.12.029. PMID 18329301. " ... Food Animal Practice. 4 (2): 351-364. doi:10.1016/s0749-0720(15)31053-7. ISSN 0749-0720. PMID 3264754. Murray, R. D.; Horsfield ... "Fever" is a misnomer, as body temperature during the disease is generally not elevated. Milk fever is more commonly seen in ...
WAHID Interface - OIE World Animal Health Information Database Disease card WikiVet summary of disease and links to key ... The disease is transmitted by infected aerosols in situation of close contact of animals. The long-distance spread is by sick ... Handbook of Animal Diseases in the Tropics, op cit. Peste des Petits Ruminants Archived 2013-02-22 at archive.today reviewed ... "Rinderpest , animal disease". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-12-07. J. Berrada, Observations des premiers cas ...
Animal industry and diseases of animals. *Commodity exchanges. *Crop insurance and soil conservation ... Adulteration of seeds, insect pests, and protection of birds and animals in forest reserves ...
"Proliferative Kidney Disease". Merck Animal Health. Retrieved August 22, 2016.. *^ "Yellowstone River Fish Kill Fact Sheet". ... The 183-mile (295 km) closure resulted from a massive fish kill attributed to proliferative kidney disease, a rare but serious ... salmonid disease. The parasite--Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae-is not harmful to humans or other mammals.[28] Wildlife officials ...
It is commonly found when the ileum is abnormal or has been surgically removed, as in Crohn's disease, or cause a condition ... O'Keefe SJ, Kidd M, Espitalier-Noel G, Owira P (May 1999). "Rarity of colon cancer in Africans is associated with low animal ... particularly in primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease, with varying results partly related to dosage.[ ... "Bile acids in glucose metabolism in health and disease". Journal of Experimental Medicine. 215 (2): 383-396. doi:10.1084/jem. ...
US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "National Select ... US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases" *↑ The Australia Group. "List of Biological ... "Ebola virus disease" , *↑ 2.0 2.1 2.2 M. P. Kiley, E. T. Bowen, G. A. Eddy, M. Isaäcson, K. M. Johnson, J. B. McCormick, F. A. ... US National Institutes of Health (NIH), US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). "Biodefense - NIAID ...
... s have a good nose and can learn to track either animal or human scent. Many Irish Terriers enjoy Lure Coursing, ... In the 1960s and 1970s there were problems with hyperkeratosis, a disease causing corny pads and severe pain. Today it is ... widely known which dogs carried the disease and respectable breeders do not use those bloodlines any more. A health study ...
Not only are house flies a nuisance, but they also carry disease-causing organisms. Flies are not only an irritant to farm ... often dead animals. Within a day, larvae (maggots) hatch from the eggs; they live and feed on dead and decaying organic ...
Diseases of the endocrine system (ICD-10 Chapter IV: Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases - Endocrine diseases, E00- ... but do not offer advantages compared with diets which allow moderate amounts of animal products.[100] There is not enough ... Diabetes was one of the first diseases described.[21] The importance of insulin in the disease was determined in the 1920s.[22] ... two to four times the risk of cardiovascular disease, including ischemic heart disease and stroke; a 20-fold increase in lower ...
They started to test L-735,524 on animals a couple months later and found that it was safe for animals. Consequently, the ... Impairs endothelial function in healthy HIV-negative men and may accelerate atherosclerotic disease.[10] ... It significantly increased life expectancies and decreased noticeable symptoms from infectious diseases that were the result of ... but it can extend the length of a person's life for several years by slowing the progression of the disease. The type that is ...
... while imbalance results in disease. Such disease-inducing imbalances can be adjusted and balanced using traditional herbs, ... Ayurveda stresses the use of plant-based medicines and treatments, with some animal products, and added minerals, including ... A belief that a substance that causes the symptoms of a disease in healthy people cures similar symptoms in sick people.[n 8] ... Treatments for severe diseases such as cancer and HIV infection have well-known, significant side-effects. Even low-risk ...
... s are a family of proteins found in complexes with cadherin cell adhesion molecules of animal cells. The first two ... MacDonald BT, Tamai K, He X (July 2009). "Wnt/β-catenin signaling: components, mechanisms, and diseases". Dev. Cell. 17 (1): 9- ... may help prevent clinical recurrence of the disease after surgery, but much more work is needed before an adequate treatment ... techniques with therapeutics targeting catenin-associated elements of cancer might be most effective in treating the disease. ...
The marsh environment meant that certain diseases, such as schistosomiasis and malaria, were endemic;[12] Maʻdānī agriculture ... was used to shelter animals in bad weather. A raba was a higher-status dwelling, distinguished by a north-facing entrance, ...
... breeders strive to produce animals that can consist on natural types of feed, mainly a good quality hay, which ... The Gotland rabbit is considered a hardy variety that is rarely affected by disease or genetic defects.[4] ... The modern Gotland rabbit originates from these populations, the studbook having been closed since a breeding animal inventory ...
Ohr, HD; Coffer MD & McMillan RT (2003-08-04). "Common Names of Plant Diseases". American Phytopathological Society. பார்த்த ... "Avocado". ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. *↑ "AvoDerm Natural Premium Dog Food". பார்த்த நாள் 2009-01-13. ...
Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases (Philippines) ...
Small animal imagingEdit. PET technology for small animal imaging: A miniature PE tomograph has been constructed that is small ... Infectious diseasesEdit. Imaging infections with molecular imaging technologies can improve diagnosis and treatment follow-up. ... animal diagnosis. Because of cost as well as the marginal utility of detecting cancer metastases in companion animals (the ... Pharmacokinetics: In pre-clinical trials, it is possible to radiolabel a new drug and inject it into animals. Such scans are ...
Research from animals has consistently shown that when a trial is repeatedly exposed to a painful stimulus, the animal's pain ... Volkow ND, Koob GF, McLellan AT (January 2016). "Neurobiologic Advances from the Brain Disease Model of Addiction". N. Engl. J ... In animals, cross-sensitization has been established between the consumption of many different types of drugs of abuse - in ... Researchers believe that there are parallels that can be drawn between these animal trials and persistent pain in people. For ...
In studies of rats, animals fed a diet of 50% sweet pea seeds developed enlarged adrenals relative to control animals fed on ... Pests and diseases[edit]. The sweet pea plant does suffer from some pests, the most common being aphids. These insects suck the ...
Disease models. Animal models and in particular non-human primates are being used to study different aspects of Ebola virus ... "Ebola Virus Disease". SRHD. Retrieved 15 September 2020.. *^ a b c d "Q&A on Transmission, Ebola". Centers for Disease Control ... Other animals. Wild animals. Ebola has a high mortality rate among primates.[241] Frequent outbreaks of Ebola may have resulted ... Animals may become infected when they eat fruit partially eaten by bats carrying the virus.[82] Fruit production, animal ...
... and a number of animals, including the humped bull, were domesticated,"[11] as well as "fowl for fighting".[12] Wheel-made ... with the highest prevalence of both disease and trauma present in the skeletons from Area G (an ossuary located south-east of ... seals engraved with human or animal motifs. A large number of seals have been found at such sites as Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa. ... "Infection, Disease, and Biosocial Processes at the End of the Indus Civilisation". PLoS ONE. 8 (12): e84814. Bibcode:2013PLoSO ...
Amphibians are predatory animals. They mostly eat live invertebrates and animals that do not move too quickly. These include ... The disease is spreading into eastern Panama and threatening all amphibians living there.[27] ... Fish and other animals eat most of their eggs. Male midwife toads carry their eggs on their backs. When they are ready to hatch ... They will swallow the animal whole, but may chew it just a bit for it to go down their throats. The Ranidae family and the ...
The third chimpanzee: the evolution and future of the human animal.. *^ a b Sharman Apt Russell (2006). Hunger an unnatural ... coronary heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease, because they ate mostly lean meats and plants and frequently engaged in ... and women may have procured small game animals for consumption and assisted men in driving herds of large game animals (such as ... may have had their origins in these hypothetical Middle Paleolithic animal cults.[90] Animal worship during the Upper ...
"Animal Diversity Web. University of Michigan. Retrieved 2013-08-21.. *^ a b c d e f g h Estes, R. D. (2004). The Behavior Guide ... Diseases and parasitesEdit. The black wildebeest is particularly susceptible to anthrax, and rare and widely scattered ... The animal is placed in the genus Connochaetes and family Bovida] and was first described by the German zoologist Eberhard ... In some animals, the auditory bullae are highly deformed, and in others, the radius and ulna are fused.[13] ...
This article is about a skin disease common during adolescence. For other acneiform skin diseases, see Acne (disambiguation). ... Other animals[edit]. Acne can occur on cats,[198] dogs,[199] and horses.[200][201] ... Disease Primers. 1: 15033. doi:10.1038/nrdp.2015.33. PMID 27227877.. *^ a b "Frequently Asked Questions: Acne" (PDF). U.S. ... Acne, also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when dead skin cells and oil from the skin clog hair ...
The Wound Man illustrates various injuries that a person might receive through war, accident, or disease: cuts and bruises from ... multiple weapons, rashes and pustules, thorn scratches, and the bites of venomous animals. The figure also includes some ... The illustration acted as an annotated table of contents to guide the reader through various injuries and diseases whose ...
Animal[edit]. A multitude of animal studies have been conducted to help understand hearing loss and fatigue. It is difficult to ... any major damage or loss of these hair cells leads to permanent hearing impairment and other hearing-related diseases.[2] Outer ... Studies[clarification needed] have been done on a variety of animal species, including guinea pigs[13] and dolphins.,[14] rats, ... quantify levels of fatigue in animals as opposed to humans. In the experiment done by Ishii et al., subjects were asked to " ...
In recognition of the basic concepts he has contributed to the study of animal ecology which, with his foundation of the Bureau ... the theory of kin selection to account for altruistic behaviour and the theoretical demonstration of a link between disease ... for his outstanding work on the diversity of animal societies and demonstration of their effects on the evolution of ... For his work on extended oceanographical expeditions; and for his genetic studies in animals and plants. ...
Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11, No. 4, April 2005: Bed Bug Infestations in an Urban Environment, Stephen W. Hwang, ... Animalia. পর্ব:. Arthropoda. শ্রেণী:. Insecta. বর্গ:. Hemiptera. উপবর্গ:. Heteroptera. ...
Abortion may also be induced in animals, in the context of animal husbandry. For example, abortion may be induced in mares that ... Those with certain diseases, and those over the age 35 also run a greater risk. Other causes for abortions can be the infection ... Certain diseases or an accidental trauma can also cause a spontaneous abortion. Putting the woman under trauma or stress to ... abortion may be caused by contagious diseases, such as Brucellosis or Campylobacter. This can often be controlled by ...
This leads to a chronic inflammation of the liver and eventually alcoholic liver disease. ... Several animals (but not all) are affected by alcohol similarly to humans and, once they consume it, will consume it again if ... "The Alcoholics of the Animal World". Smithsonian.. *^ John C. Super, "Alcoholic Beverages" in Encyclopedia of Latin American ... "Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease ...
Human diseaseEdit. Kluyveromyces marxianus is not usually an agent of human disease, although infection in humans can occur in ... into useful biomass for animal feed, food additives or fuel.[5] Certain strains of the fungus can also be used to convert whey ... an Emerging Pathogen in Patients with Oncohematological Diseases?". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 43 (5): 666-667. doi:10.1086/ ...
World Animal Foundation. Retrieved 12 April 2017.. *^ Simon, Matt (16 January 2015). "Absurd Creature of the Week: The ... Coccidians in the genus Aggregata living in the gut cause severe disease to the host. Octopuses have an innate immune system, ... Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 7 (2): 95-106. doi:10.1207/s15327604jaws0702_2. PMID ... Captive animals have been found to be more susceptible to pathogens than wild ones.[106] A gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio ...
The number and ratio of rods to cones varies among species, dependent on whether an animal is primarily diurnal or nocturnal. ... The workers had tracked down patients with rare diseases wiping out classic rod and cone photoreceptor function but preserving ... Human Physiology and Mechanisms of Disease by Arthur C. Guyton (1992) ISBN 0-7216-3299-8 p. 373 ... The receptor could be instrumental in understanding many diseases including major causes of blindness worldwide like glaucoma, ...
Here we review the current state of rodent models for Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, frontotemporal dementia, and ... benefit from more rigorous use of the models and from generation of animals that more faithfully recapitulate human disease. ... Limitations and utility of current models, issues regarding translatability, and future directions for developing animal models ... of adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases have enhanced the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimers disease ...
FAO employs technical experts and operational staff to respond to and prevent the spread of highly contagious animal diseases ... High-impact animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease, peste des petits ruminants, classical or African swine fevers, ... animal power: traction, transport. FAO animal disease emergency response mechanisms. The FAO Emergency Prevention System ( ... Transboundary animal diseases are highly contagious epidemic diseases that can spread extremely rapidly, irrespective of ...
... foot-and-mouth disease, and West Nile virus prompt international agencies to team ... A new international campaign to control outbreaks of animal diseases has begun with a three-day meeting in Japan. One of the ... Bernard Vallat, the director general of the World Organization for Animal Health, says that with diseases such as bird flu ... says he is worried that vigilance will wane when animal disease outbreaks fade from the headlines. ...
... retinal diseases are among the leading causes of irreversible visual impairment and blindness, and appropriate study models, ... In Animal Models for Retinal Diseases, recognized experts in the field highlight valuable techniques as well as animal models ... Vital and easy to use, Animal Models for Retinal Diseases serves to support the important future research of ocular ... the book continues by covering animal models for the research of specific human retinal diseases, e.g., retinal degeneration, ...
Reportable Diseases - Diseases on this list are required to be reported to the Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare. The ... The disease spreads when blood from infected animals is transmitted to other animals by blood-sucking insects or through use of ... Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD, is a fatal disease of the central nervous system in deer and ... Foot and Mouth Disease. Foot and mouth disease is a highly communicable viral disease of cattle, swine, sheep, deer, goats, and ...
4. Animal Models of Heart Failure. Models of heart disease in small animals, particularly rats, have been very useful for the ... Animal models of cardiovascular disease yield important insights into the genetic basis of human cardiovascular diseases and ... 2. Animal Models of Atherothrombotic Disease. 2.1. Mouse Models. Atherosclerosis is a complex multifactorial disease with ... The development of animal models of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including cardiac and atherothrombotic diseases, has provided ...
... disorder of ruminant animals involving distention of the rumen, the first of the four divisions of the stomach, with gas of ... domesticated bovine farm animals that are raised for their meat, milk, or hides or for draft purposes. The animals most often ... livestock farming: Diseases of beef and dairy cattle. Bloat, caused by rapid gas formation in the rumen, or first compartment ... Bloat, also called hoven or ruminal tympany, disorder of ruminant animals involving distention of the rumen, the first of the ...
Get your research on agricultural animal diseases moving faster with fully authenticated and characterized ATCC Genuine ... To prevent the spread of infectious animal diseases, it is the responsibility of the animal husbandry industry to ensure the ... we have compiled a brief collection of microorganisms to support animal disease research. Search for strains by animal:. Bison ... Animal disease outbreaks pose a significant social and economic threat toward human health, the management and veterinary care ...
But when animals and people get together, some disease risks spike. ... home/infectious disease center/ infectious disease a-z list/ animal-to-human diseases at fairs and zoos article ... But when animals and people get together, some disease risks spike.. This year, for the second year in a row, swine flu- ... Diseases from animals may include ringworm, salmonella, rabies, and many others.. Good hygiene is important to stopping the ...
Diagnosing animal diseases early and rapidly is now possible in Lesotho, a country of two million in southern Africa that up ... Lesotho, Better Prepared to Fight Animal Diseases. ×. If you would like to learn more about the IAEAs work, sign up for our ... Diagnosing animal diseases early and rapidly is now possible in Lesotho, a country of two million in southern Africa that up ... Early diagnosis helps curtail the spread of a disease by making it possible to rapidly isolate and treat infected animals and ...
... animal products and veterinary biologics by preventing, controlling and/or eliminating animal diseases, and monitoring and ... Learn more about relevant animal health and disease information related to conditions that APHIS is working to manage. ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service U.S. Department of Agriculture USDA APHIS on Twitter USDA on Facebook USDA APHIS ... By Disease (A-Z):. African swine fever Avian influenza Bovine spongiform encephalopathy Brucellosis Cattle Fever Tick Chronic ...
Each of the links below shows relevant animal health information for that disease, including disease information related to ... animal products and veterinary biologics by preventing, controlling and/or eliminating animal diseases, and monitoring and ... By Disease. By Species. Avian influenza Bovine spongiform encephalopathy Brucellosis Cattle Fever Tick Chronic wasting disease ... Foot-and-mouth disease (pdf 43kb) Johnes New World screwworm Piroplasmosis Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Pseudorabies ...
All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryAnimal DiseasesDisease Models, Animal. All MeSH CategoriesAnalytical, Diagnostic and ... Disease Models, Animal. Naturally-occurring or experimentally-induced animal diseases with pathological processes analogous to ... AnimalDisease Models, AnimalArthritis, ExperimentalDiabetes Mellitus, ExperimentalLiver Cirrhosis, ExperimentalNeoplasms, ... ExperimentalNervous System Autoimmune Disease, ExperimentalEncephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, ExperimentalMyasthenia Gravis, ...
... Home , Standards , Introduction , Task , Process , Conclusion , Evaluation , ... 4. You will visit Internet sites to research the topic of exotic diseases transmitted to humans and native animals by exotic ... How are exotic animals a threat to public health, and Should wild animals be taken in as pets?. ... 1. You will conduct a questionnaire and survey on whether or not wild animals should be taken in as pets? The data will be ...
Africa presents a number of unique challenges in the field of animal health, which distinguishes the continent from many other ... Avian Influenza Market Access Animal Disease Newcastle Disease Rift Valley Fever These keywords were added by machine and not ... A short overview of regional positions on foot-and-mouth disease control in southern Africa, Transboundary animal disease and ... Controlling Animal Disease in Africa. In: Zilberman D., Otte J., Roland-Holst D., Pfeiffer D. (eds) Health and Animal ...
... *This portal gives easy access to resources and information on both terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases:. ... Several emerging diseases and additional important diseases (which are not listed by the OIE). More than 50 wildlife diseases ... The 117 OIE-Listed diseases (criteria for including diseases in the OIE-list are detailed in the OIE Terrestrial and Aquatic ... instructed the OIE Headquarters to establish a single OIE list of notifiable terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases to replace ...
Zoonotic diseases, Federally reportable diseases. Zoonotic diseases. All suspected reportable or immediately notifiable ... Veterinarians who suspect that animals are affected with any foreign animal disease, such as FMD, must report their suspicions ... "This agent/disease can pose a threat to public health. We suggest that you advise the animals owner of potential human health ... Federally reportable diseases. Under Sections 5(1) and (2) of the Health of Animals Act, any owner or veterinarian in Canada ...
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The Plum Island Animal Disease Center is located in Orient Point, NY and is part of the Northeast Area.. The Research Leader is ... Countermeasures to Control and Eradicate Foreign Animal Diseases of Swine * Ecology of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) in ... Plum Island Animal Disease Center. 40550 Route 25. Orient Point, NY 11957. ... The risk and mitigation of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection of pigs through consumption of contaminated feed ...
The journal will consider articles on the biological basis of disease, as well as diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and ... Mycobacterial Diseases of Animals 2012. Guest Editors: Mitchell V. Palmer, Michael D. Welsh, and Jesse M. Hostetter * ... Mycobacterial Diseases of Animals 2012, Mitchell V. Palmer, Michael D. Welsh, and Jesse M. Hostetter Editorial (2 pages), ... Pulmonary Disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Horse: Zoonotic Concerns and Limitations of Antemortem Testing, ...
This page provides information about our tests, organised by animal species. ... offers more than 300 tests for the diagnosis of infectious diseases in animals. ... Diagnostics: testing for animal diseases. Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) offers more than 300 tests for the diagnosis ... WBVR is also the national reference laboratory for notifiable diseases in animals including livestock, fish, shellfish and wild ...
The Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) Rule, which took effect in March 2013, establishes minimum national official ... Animal Disease Traceability. The Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) Rule [Docket No. APHIS-2009-0091], which took effect in ... As stated in the Animal Disease Traceability General Standards:. State, Tribal, and Territory animal health officials and ... for interstate movement of these animals. Also see Animal Disease Traceability: A Guide to Identifying Sheep and Goats for ...
A recent article in Discovery News reports that some experts have come to suspect that the diseases spurring these population ... Researchers list a number of potential factors that might be causing these species to be more susceptible to disease, like ... "It appears that many species are under an immense amount of stress, allowing opportunistic diseases to take hold," Rob Mies, ... Frog populations have seen an increased number of deaths due to a fungal disease. And honeybee populations have also been in ...
... including any and all personal data may be shared with the Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (LADDL) to receive ...
... and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease and other human prion diseases in people, including variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (the human ... Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases ( ... CWD belongs to a family of diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Other TSEs ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People ...
Remember not to handle or feed wild animals, especially those that appear sick; and do not pick up dead animals or animal waste ... To prevent other animal-borne diseases such as hantavirus and West Nile, San Juan Basin Health Department recommends everyone ... If the person has the animal, Wagner sends it to the state lab for testing. Out of 20 animals sent throughout the past two ... be observant of animal behavior and follow general precautions including not feeding or handling wild animals. And keep your ...
... researchers say that animal diseases are sparked and spread by climate change. ... From Bluetongue disease in sheep to Rift Valley Fever in camels, ... Animal diseases intensified by climate change. From Bluetongue ... disease in sheep to Rift Valley Fever in camels, researchers say that animal diseases are sparked and spread by climate change ...
The Communicable Disease Unit works with local Animal Control agencies to ensure that either the animal(s) and/or human(s) ... Animal bite incidents can range from an actual physical bite or a potential exposure to a rabid animal, such as a bat being ... The Communicable Disease Unit will follow-up with individual(s) who are bitten or exposed to determine if treatment is needed ... To report an animal bite or exposure during regular business hours, please call 248-858-1286. If you are bitten or exposed ...
... clinical manifestations and control approaches of transboundary animal diseases (TADs) in this specific region. A must-have for ... Transboundary Animal Diseases in Sahelian Africa and Connected Regions. Editors: Kardjadj, Moustafa, Diallo, Adama, Lancelot, ... Transboundary Animal Diseases in Sahelian Africa and Connected Regions. Editors. * Moustafa Kardjadj ... Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs) Surveillance and Control (Including National Veterinary Services, Regional Approach, ...
Mapping data sources on animal diseases in each European Union (EU) Member State is one of the activities of EFSAs SIGMA1,2 ... The aim of this activity is to identify the central competent authorities responsible for managing the data on animal diseases ... is the central source of data related to outbreaks and surveillance of animal diseases that are reported internationally by the ... avian influenza and lumpy skin disease; and on the corresponding affected animal populations: swine, poultry and bovines, ...
  • Globalization, land encroachment and climate change contribute to outbreaks of such animal diseases - some transmissible to humans - as brucellosis, bovine tuberculosis, parasitic illnesses, anthrax, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and certain strains of influenza viruses. (fao.org)
  • The Rift Valley fever virus spreads widely in animals and has been detected in humans, causing human death. (fao.org)
  • One of the goals is to get earlier and more accurate warnings on diseases, such as bird flu, which could trigger a pandemic in humans. (voanews.com)
  • 4. You will visit Internet sites to research the topic of exotic diseases transmitted to humans and native animals by exotic animals. (teacherweb.com)
  • Are Humans Giving Animals Cancer? (motherjones.com)
  • When zoonotic diseases make the headlines, it's usually because they are being passed from animals to humans. (nature.com)
  • It is a disease of humans, but it can spread beyond us: our close relatives, nonhuman primates, are also at risk of contracting measles. (nature.com)
  • HIV/AIDS is a well-known zoonotic disease, an illness transmitted from animals to humans. (voanews.com)
  • Dr. Natalie Cooper said there may be many more diseases ready to jump from animals to humans. (voanews.com)
  • Investigating diseases in primates gives us a really good model of the kinds of diseases which we might expect to see in humans. (voanews.com)
  • There are a number of things that need to happen before an animal disease spreads among humans. (voanews.com)
  • Researchers expected to find that humans would share diseases with primates with whom they're mostly closely related. (voanews.com)
  • She said once those gaps are filled, scientists can determine how much of a risk monkey diseases pose to humans. (voanews.com)
  • The model could, for example, look at the effect of travel patterns, rates of contact between humans, and poverty on the spread of individual zoonotic diseases. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Symptoms like depression, however, or obesity, are ailments animals can contract on their own (or with some help from humans). (popsci.com)
  • Animals can also get sick with the same infections as humans. (popsci.com)
  • The scaly creatures can cause leprosy in humans, a disease which has otherwise mostly disappeared from Earth. (popsci.com)
  • Says causes high mortality rate in humans By Gabriel Ewepu - Abuja The Federal Government, Friday, raised the alarm over the outbreak of the deadly animal disease in neighbouring Nigeria Republic. (vanguardngr.com)
  • Companion Animal Zoonoses is a comprehensive resource on diseases transmissible between animals and humans. (wiley.com)
  • Presenting detailed prevention and control strategies for zoonotic diseases, the book is an in-depth guide to practical information on the spread of disease between pet animals and humans. (wiley.com)
  • The discussion then moves into clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management, alongside prevention information for both animals and humans. (wiley.com)
  • In a study led by Duke University, researchers used a technique called whole-transcriptome sequencing to screen for blood-borne diseases in wild lemurs, distant primate cousins to humans. (eurekalert.org)
  • The animals were found to carry several strains or species of parasites similar to those that cause Lyme disease and other infections in humans. (eurekalert.org)
  • The majority of emerging infectious diseases that affect humans, including recent outbreaks of SARS, Ebola and bird flu, are zoonotic -- they can spread among wildlife, domestic animals and humans. (eurekalert.org)
  • A disease is any kind of disorder in the structure or function of an organism, including humans, plants, and animals. (prweb.com)
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease affects humans, and chronic wasting disease affects cervids such as whitetailed deer, elk and mule deer. (nwaonline.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control says there is currently no evidence of transmission of chronic disease prions into humans. (nwaonline.com)
  • UNITED NATIONS - The most worrying environmental threats facing the world today range from the rise in diseases transmitted from animals to humans to the increasing accumulation of toxic chemicals in food crops as a result of drought and high temperatures, according to a U.N. report released Friday. (pressherald.com)
  • According to the report, "around 60 per cent of all infectious diseases in humans are zoonotic as are 75 per cent of all emerging infectious diseases. (pressherald.com)
  • In fact the only surprise is that we do not see such outbreaks more often, since we know that infectious agents from animals are being transmitted to humans regularly. (dallasnews.com)
  • The transmission of infectious agents from animals to humans occurs most often when we alter the relationship between the two. (dallasnews.com)
  • For example, when we began domesticating farm animals about 10,000 years ago, humans likely acquired the measles virus from related viruses in cows and the tuberculosis bacteria from related mycobacteria in goats. (dallasnews.com)
  • Environmental changes brought by humans have also increased the risk of disease. (dallasnews.com)
  • The COVID-19 outbreak is a painful reminder of what can happen when we change the relationship between humans and animals. (dallasnews.com)
  • E. Fuller Torrey, MD, is associate director for research at the Stanley Medical Research Institute and co-author of the book Beasts of the Earth: Animals, Humans, and Disease. (dallasnews.com)
  • Recent findings show similarities in microbial infection mechanisms of animals, humans, and plants ( 1 - 3 ). (pnas.org)
  • The potential impacts, dependent on the disease, include illness in humans, domestic animals and wildlife and cost to the economy of billions of dollars through loss of trade, tourism and other costs associated with recovery from a disease outbreak. (www.csiro.au)
  • Zoonotic diseases (i.e., zoonoses) are diseases transmitted between animals and humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Most of the new diseases we humans have faced in the past several decades have come from animals. (pri.org)
  • The more we come into contact with wild animals, the more we risk a so-called disease "spillover" from animals to humans. (pri.org)
  • As people move and wildlife move in response to a changing environment, humans and wildlife and animals will come in contact more regularly. (pri.org)
  • Those bats, a common disease reservoir, then passed the Nipah virus through pigs to humans for the first time in the late 1990s. (pri.org)
  • Here's what's currently known about the transmission of this disease between humans and felines. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • Detection dogs are celebrated for detecting diseases in humans using their powerful sense of smell. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • As Huntington disease is an inherited condition that can be detected decades before any clinical symptoms are seen in humans, a better understanding of the earliest changes in brain cell (neuronal) function, and the molecular pathways underlying those changes, could lead to preventive treatments that delay the onset of symptoms and neurodegeneration. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Susceptibility to autoimmune disease has a genetic basis in humans and animals. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • The list of documented heritable autoimmune disorders in humans and animals is alarming, and continues to grow as we damage and pollute our environment. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • They are being reported with increasing frequency in animals and humans. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • Belay, Ermias D. Chronic Wasting Disease and Potential Transmission to Humans. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Altogether, well over one hundred diseases are capable of being transmitted from animals to humans, although most are rare in North America. (vcahospitals.com)
  • Leptospirosis, known as Weil's disease in people, can cause extremely serious liver and kidney disease but the transmission from dogs to humans is rare. (vcahospitals.com)
  • Humans usually contract this disease from exposure to contaminated water. (vcahospitals.com)
  • Understanding the body's functions requires scientific discoveries from animal research, and because humans and animals share more than 250 common illnesses, testing on animals is extremely beneficial to humans. (brightkite.com)
  • In fact, of the roughly 1,500 diseases now recognized in humans, about 60 percent are due to pathogens that move across species. (psmag.com)
  • A main impetus behind the initiative is the rapid emergence of zoonotic diseases (diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans), as well as a global environment where many factors are increasing the spread of disease. (psmag.com)
  • It is worth mentioning that for Salmonellosis, which is the second most frequently reported zoonotic disease in humans, the number of cases has been steadily decreasing over the past five years with thanks to the Union co-financing. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Moreover, thanks to the eradication programmes, the rabies (a fatal disease transmitted by animals to humans) situation in Member States continues also to improve and the increased level of co-financing (75 per cent) will further assist the Member States in their final efforts to eradicate rabies. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Implemented in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy and Carinthia in Austria, the Bio-Crime project provides a framework for joint actions to stop the spread of zoonoses - diseases transmitted from animals to humans - and illegal trade in animals. (europa.eu)
  • Diseases from animals may include ringworm , salmonella , rabies , and many others. (medicinenet.com)
  • It is far preferable to just have your pet vaccinated against rabies and be cautious around wildlife, especially an animal lying on the ground appearing sick or dead. (durangoherald.com)
  • She cautions that it s important for everyone to be aware of all wildlife that can carry rabies, be observant of animal behavior and follow general precautions including not feeding or handling wild animals. (durangoherald.com)
  • The Communicable Disease Unit works with local Animal Control agencies to ensure that either the animal(s) and/or human(s) involved with an animal bite incident were not exposed to rabies. (oakgov.com)
  • Flu and rabies are well known, but sexually transmitted diseases crop up in animals too. (popsci.com)
  • Although human-animal contact has many benefits, human health problems are associated with these settings, including infectious diseases, exposure to rabies, and injuries. (cdc.gov)
  • However, an inadequate understanding of disease transmission and animal behavior can increase the likelihood of infectious diseases, rabies exposures, injuries, and other health problems among visitors, especially children, in these settings. (cdc.gov)
  • Post-rabies vaccine encephalomyelitis, postinfectious encephalomyelitis, and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are all monophasic, inflammatory, demyelinating diseases that appear to be autoimmune in pathogenesis and induced by prior antigenic stimulation or infection. (whale.to)
  • They cause high rates of death and disease in animals , thereby having serious socio-economic and sometimes public health consequences while constituting a constant threat to the livelihoods of livestock farmers. (fao.org)
  • High-impact animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease , peste des petits ruminants , classical or African swine fevers , while not directly affecting human health, do affect food and nutrition security and livestock production and trade. (fao.org)
  • Animal health and welfare investigators assist state field veterinarians with livestock testing, test poultry for disease and ensure livestock owners comply with testing requirements. (illinois.gov)
  • These officials also inspect livestock markets for proper sanitation, monitor livestock identification and ensure animals are transported properly. (illinois.gov)
  • To prevent the spread of infectious animal diseases, it is the responsibility of the animal husbandry industry to ensure the health and safety of livestock through routine vaccination and medical care. (atcc.org)
  • This means washing hands after touching livestock or other animals, and making sure young children do the same. (medicinenet.com)
  • Nuclear derived techniques have so far shown that Lesotho is free of foot-and-mouth disease, one of the most infectious diseases that kill livestock. (iaea.org)
  • With the help of these techniques, scientists at the Central Veterinary Laboratory have been able to demonstrate that Lesotho is free of foot-and-mouth disease, one of the most infectious diseases that kill livestock. (iaea.org)
  • More than 50 wildlife diseases which may have a serious impact on livestock health and public health and can adversely affect wildlife conservation. (oie.int)
  • WBVR is also the national reference laboratory for notifiable diseases in animals including livestock, fish, shellfish and wild animals. (wur.nl)
  • The Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) Rule [ Docket No. APHIS-2009-0091 ], which took effect in March 2013, establishes minimum national official identification and documentation requirements for the traceability of livestock moving interstate. (avma.org)
  • Livestock species kept as pets are held to the same requirements as production animals of the same species. (avma.org)
  • The ADT Rule specifies approved forms of official identification for each species, but also allows covered livestock to be moved interstate with alternative forms of identification when agreed upon by animal health officials in the shipping and receiving states or Tribes. (avma.org)
  • USDA and livestock industry stakeholders will spend the next year coordinating efforts to improve and advance animal disease traceability. (usda.gov)
  • Scientists estimate that 6 out every 10 infectious human diseases are zoonotic - they start in livestock or wildlife and spread to people. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • and that cause other states and nations to close trade doors to our livestock and animal products, such as avian influenza ​ or tuberculosis. (wi.gov)
  • Remember that even if you are a small scale landowner and only have a single animal, under the Livestock Act 1997 if you buy, sell, agist, loan or borrow any livestock or poultry you must register your property (applies to livestock, including horses) and tag your animals (applies to cattle, sheep and goats). (sa.gov.au)
  • Advances in Animal Disease Diagnosis: Infectious animal diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses threaten the health and well-being of wildlife, livestock and human populations, limit productivity and significantly increase economic losses to each sector. (routledge.com)
  • Brandon Depenbusch, the vice president of cattle operations at Innovative Livestock Services Inc. near Great Bend, was closely involved in the 2018 pilot project to test an animal disease identification system in Kansas. (k-state.edu)
  • The district is yet to contain the prevailing Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) due to uncontrolled livestock movement, slaughter and sell of different animal products. (newvision.co.ug)
  • He says the disease may kill animals and affect livestock business in Lyantonde if nothing is done to control the movement. (newvision.co.ug)
  • Rapid urbanization in India has led to expansion of peri-urban fringes, where intensive, industry-style livestock rearing has led to emerging vulnerabilities at the human-animal-environment. (ilri.org)
  • Fifty researchers from Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia benefited from meat inspection training (44) and laboratory diagnosis (6) to tackle parasitic pork borne diseases by the International Livestock Research Institute ( ILRI ) and German partners from the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) and. (ilri.org)
  • Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne viral zoonotic disease that affects sheep, goats, cattle and camels causing devastating losses, especially among pastoral communities that rely on livestock for their livelihoods. (ilri.org)
  • Continuing changes to livestock production systems in Kenya and elsewhere to satisfy increased demand for livestock products affect the risk of zoonoses and other infectious diseases. (ilri.org)
  • The Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, ADFCA, on Sunday launched the 9th vaccination campaign against diseases which affect animals for the year 2017-2018, as part of its protective campaigns offered to livestock breeders in Abu Dhabi, Al Ain and Al Dhafra. (emirates247.com)
  • The goal is to protect animals from contracting diseases by decreasing the outbreak of infections, increasing the immunity of animals, reducing the need to use veterinary medicines, eradicate the diseases in the long term, maintain animal resources, and increase the economic return of livestock breeders. (emirates247.com)
  • He further called on livestock breeders to co-operate with the veterinary manpower of the ADFCA by arranging for the necessary workers, preparing the animals for the process of vaccination, and numbering before the veterinary doctor's visit to the farm, which decreases the exhaustion of animals and helps officials to offer the best services. (emirates247.com)
  • The initiative will improve the sustainability of UK farming by ultimately reducing the cost of treating diseases and the loss of affected livestock. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • A growing number of livestock, such as cows and pigs, are fueling new animal epidemics and posing more severe problems in developing countries, as it threatens their food security. (health24.com)
  • These diseases quickly cross national borders, negatively impacting a country's economic stability and public health by reducing exports, food quality and quantity, and the availability of livestock products and animal power. (dhs.gov)
  • Transboundary animal diseases represent a grave threat to the U.S. livestock industry due to their ability to disrupt both the export and domestic commerce of animals and animal products. (dhs.gov)
  • During the summer of 2017, Bench to Shop participants learned about developing human and animal vaccines and diagnostics, selecting personal protective equipment for different biosafety levels, establishing laboratory best practices, and collecting blood samples from livestock. (dhs.gov)
  • While the spread of a zoonotic disease is influenced by factors in the disease itself - such as how it moves from animal to human hosts - environmental factors also play an important role - for instance, by affecting opportunity for contact. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The team says the model could be fine-tuned to look at various factors influencing zoonotic disease spread within human populations. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • J. Scott Weese, DVM, DVSc, DipACVIM , is a zoonotic disease microbiologist at the Ontario Veterinary College and Chief of Infection Control at the Ontario Veterinary College Teaching Hospital. (wiley.com)
  • These updated 2011 guidelines provide new information on the risks associated with amphibians and with animals in day camp settings, as well as the protective role of zoonotic disease education. (cdc.gov)
  • World Zoonoses Day is marked annually on 6 July to commemorate the day in 1885 when Louis Pasteur successfully administered the first vaccine against a zoonotic disease when he treated a young boy who had been. (ilri.org)
  • What is a zoonotic disease? (vcahospitals.com)
  • Zoonotic disease or zoonoses are terms used to describe an infection or disease that can be transmitted from an animal to a human being. (vcahospitals.com)
  • How great is the risk of contracting a zoonotic disease from my dog? (vcahospitals.com)
  • Worse, equine encephalitis virus , a pathogen listed as a global priority by the Global Early Warning System for Major Animal Diseases, Including Zoonoses, has spread globally. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • Covering the complete range of companion animal zoonoses, each topic begins with information on etiology, geographic distribution, epidemiology, and pathophysiology. (wiley.com)
  • Companion Animal Zoonoses is an essential reference for practicing veterinarians, public health veterinarians, and veterinary students. (wiley.com)
  • These diseases - called "zoonotic" or "zoonoses" diseases - include Ebola, bird flu, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Rift Valley fever, West Nile virus and Zika virus, it said. (pressherald.com)
  • EU - The EU has earmarked more than €199 million to support programmes to eradicate, control and monitor animal diseases and zoonoses, aiming to further strengthen the protection of human and animal health in 2013. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Such trade endangers human and animal health by facilitating the spread of zoonoses and poses economic and public safety threats. (europa.eu)
  • Educational programmes for children aged 11-13 on the risks and prevention of zoonoses and human-animal interaction were another element of the project. (europa.eu)
  • The project demonstrated that more than 30 % of children in the two regions lack knowledge of zoonoses and correct human-animal interaction. (europa.eu)
  • During an animal disease outbreak, consumers may be in danger of consuming infectious goods. (fao.org)
  • They are using the newly delivered equipment to verify if the country is also free of peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious, widely spread disease that can kill thousands of sheep and goats per year, as well as avian influenza, a current outbreak in the region that has led Lesotho to ban chicken imports from neighbouring South Africa. (iaea.org)
  • Peacocks are dying in droves in Pakistan's Thar Desert region in an outbreak scientists believe is linked to Newcastle disease. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • Animals that social distance during an outbreak are the ones most likely to stay alive. (scientificamerican.com)
  • It was the first US outbreak of the disease. (umn.edu)
  • The diagnostic skills and knowledge of scientists at CSIRO's Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (ACDP) form an important component of Australia's preparedness to deal with an emergency animal disease outbreak. (www.csiro.au)
  • At a July 2003 workshop in Denver, Colo., experts from industry, government and academia examined the potential impacts an outbreak of an animal disease, such as hoof and mouth disease, might have on the entire U.S. food system. (farmfoundation.org)
  • A major outbreak of an animal or plant disease could cost billions of dollars in lost earnings. (sa.gov.au)
  • The estimated impact of this outbreak was an immediate expense of $1.6 billion US and the country has not recovered disease free status. (gov.mb.ca)
  • The cost to contain this outbreak was near $2.4 billion US, however Holland has regained its disease free status. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Risk and Time Periods There are four time periods that contribute to the overall final cost of a Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) outbreak. (gov.mb.ca)
  • In the case of disease outbreak, knowing the movements of a given group of cattle - and w hat herds they may have interacted with - i s a big advantage to keeping the entire industry from facing a shutdown. (k-state.edu)
  • That's because, five years ago, this village suffered an outbreak of flu-like disease that killed hundreds of birds. (pbs.org)
  • So the objective of this exercise is to track every diseased animal, particularly chickens, so as to contain an outbreak before it becomes a pandemic. (pbs.org)
  • A disease outbreak can have catastrophic consequences for a business, as well as a huge knock-on effect on global markets. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Additionally, 9 CFR Part 55 , Control of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), establishes official identification requirement for the CWD Herd Certification Program. (avma.org)
  • The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission at its monthly meeting Thursfay in Little Rock said there is no link between a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease reported Wednesday in Fayetteville and chronic wasting disease in Newton County. (nwaonline.com)
  • An elk killed in October near Jasper was confirmed to have chronic wasting disease in February, and a whitetailed deer found dead in February near Ponca was confirmed to have CWD earlier this month. (nwaonline.com)
  • The timing couldn't be worse but the chances that this has anything do with discovery of chronic wasting disease in our state are astronomically small," Beaupre said. (nwaonline.com)
  • They say to refrain from eating any parts of any animal known be infected with chronic wasting disease. (nwaonline.com)
  • In other states where CWD exists, people continue to eat deer that are known to be infected with chronic wasting disease, and there has been no change in the rates of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease infection, Beaupre said. (nwaonline.com)
  • The Game and Fish Commission is attempting to kill 300 deer in Newton County to test for the prevalence of chronic wasting disease. (nwaonline.com)
  • Two regulations are intended to discourage the spread of chronic wasting disease. (nwaonline.com)
  • High-fence hunting areas usually contain whitetailed deer imported from other states that have chronic wasting disease. (nwaonline.com)
  • The Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) is FAO's corporate centre for the planning and delivery of veterinary assistance to FAO member countries responding to the threat of transboundary animal health crises. (fao.org)
  • The world's veterinary officers are warning that trans-border animal health crises - which used to occur every two decades or so - have recently been happening every year. (voanews.com)
  • The Chief Veterinary Officer for the Food and Agriculture Organization, Joseph Domenech, says he is worried that vigilance will wane when animal disease outbreaks fade from the headlines. (voanews.com)
  • Animal disease outbreaks pose a significant social and economic threat toward human health, the management and veterinary care of farm animals and fish, and the production of animal-based products such as meat, milk, eggs, leather, and wool. (atcc.org)
  • To keep diseases under control and be able to respond rapidly to any possible outbreaks, we need to be able to do our own diagnoses," said Gerard Mahloane, acting Director General of Veterinary Services at Lesotho's Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security. (iaea.org)
  • Veterinary Services protects and improves the health, quality, and marketability of our nation's animals, animal products and veterinary biologics by preventing, controlling and/or eliminating animal diseases, and monitoring and promoting animal health and productivity. (usda.gov)
  • In addition to the description of TADs in Sahelian Africa and connected regions, several issues regarding the burden of TADs, the role of national/regional/international veterinary organizations in the surveillance process, animal mobility, one health and TADs in the dromedary are discussed. (springer.com)
  • This work will be of general interest to researchers, veterinarians, veterinary public health officers, and students engaged in the surveillance and control of animal infectious diseases, included those of zoonotic nature and that are prevalent in the Sahel. (springer.com)
  • Dr Moustafa Kardjadj, DVM, MVS, PhD , is a senior scientist at SPA (Santé et Production Animal) research laboratory of ENSV (The Algerian Veterinary School) and an Assistant Professor of statistics / director of studies and diploma of ESSAIA (The Algerian Food Science School). (springer.com)
  • Dr Adama Diallo, DVM, PhD , is a senior scientist of ASTRE (Animals, Health, Territories, Risks & Environment) research unit of CIRAD (The French agricultural research and international cooperation organization) working currently in Senegal as the advisor of the Director of the Senegal national veterinary laboratory LNERV (Laboratoire National d'Elevage et de Recherches Vétérinaires). (springer.com)
  • The National Veterinary Institute, also under the Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation, is the central source of data related to outbreaks and surveillance of animal diseases that are reported internationally by the Board of Agriculture. (europa.eu)
  • If you have a veterinarian listed when dead animals are submitted to the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, the information is shared with the veterinarian and he or she can assist you with dealing with the problem. (ct.gov)
  • Veterinarians provide essential services, and thus, the Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (LADDL) testing services remain vital for the support of the veterinary community. (lsu.edu)
  • It is an ideal book for all small animal practitioners and veterinary students. (wiley-vch.de)
  • ARS is organizing a Middle East Regional Gap Analysis workshop to be held in Amman, Jordan in July to foster relationships between participating nations, and disseminate scientific information and veterinary medical countermeasures to protect animals and people in the Middle-East. (usda.gov)
  • Learn about animal diseases and how veterinary professionals make a diagnosis. (edu.au)
  • This report has been endorsed by CDC, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, the American Association of Extension Veterinarians, and the American Veterinary Medical Association. (cdc.gov)
  • Guidelines to reduce risk for disease from animals in health-care and veterinary facilities and from service animals (e.g., guide dogs) have been developed ( 2--6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Particularly useful to veterinary surgeons and meat inspectors within the abattoir and lamb producers who will be receiving condemnation data from these establishments, this well-illustrated report focuses on sheep anatomy, diseases, and other conditions. (geometry.net)
  • The full colour photographs make this another invaluable tool for all those for whom knowledge of porcine anatomy, diseases and other conditions is required, including veterinary surgeons and meat inspectors within the abattoir, and also producers who will be receiving condemnation data from these establishments. (geometry.net)
  • High Risk Period-1 (HRP1) is the time between when a disease like foot and mouth enters the disease free country and when the veterinary authority identifies it as present. (gov.mb.ca)
  • The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) through trade negotiation and import controls is largely to credit with the prevention of entry of FAD to Canada (P$). The length of HRP1 or the early detection system has many components, veterinary practitioners, farmers the CFIA reportable disease system. (gov.mb.ca)
  • The EDFZ contains an equine population or subpopulation with a specific health status with respect to certain equine diseases for which freedom is declared by the Veterinary Authority. (oie.int)
  • In order to contain the disease, the Lyantonde Resident District Commissioner, Sulaiman Tiguragara Matojo, says the district veterinary department has closed several cattle markets in the three affected sub-counties. (newvision.co.ug)
  • KCBS) - KCBS' Jeff Bell talks to Dr. Jack Aldridge, Director of Veterinary Services at The San Francisco SPCA about this disease in pets. (cbslocal.com)
  • Recognising the differences between what is normal and what is abnormal about an animal or group of animals forms the basic foundation for good animal husbandry and veterinary medicine. (edu.au)
  • Other joint activities included epidemiological surveillance of confiscated animals and operations involving veterinary services, police and customs targeting illegal trade in pets. (europa.eu)
  • I authorize that all information provided on this application, including any and all personal data may be shared with the Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (LADDL) to receive feedback. (lsu.edu)
  • He is a former head of the virology section in Cirad in Montpellier, France, and a former head of the Animal Production and Health Laboratory at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria. (springer.com)
  • It also includes the 'Country Card', which depicts the central competent authorities responsible for the data on animal diseases (data on outbreaks, surveillance activities and laboratory results) and on animal populations (bovines, swine, poultry) in Sweden. (europa.eu)
  • This 'Country Card' summarises the information related to the central competent authorities responsible for the data on animal diseases (data on outbreaks, surveillance activities and laboratory results) and on animal populations (bovines, swine, poultry). (europa.eu)
  • The lobster's response to disease -seen in both field and laboratory experiments-is one we have become all too familiar with this year: social distancing. (scientificamerican.com)
  • When a disease event occurs, good records provide essential information needed to complete an investigative history for you, your veterinarian, the diagnostic laboratory personnel, and the State Veterinarian. (ct.gov)
  • Section 22-26f(e) of the Connecticut General Statutes provides the State Veterinarian the authority to issue a list of reportable animal and avian diseases and reportable laboratory findings to veterinarians licensed in the state and to diagnostic laboratories that conduct tests on Connecticut animals and birds. (ct.gov)
  • The Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (LADDL), committed to providing the highest quality diagnostic services, is in the process of revising laboratory testing fees to adjust for the rising costs of laboratory supplies and investments in advanced technologies. (lsu.edu)
  • If there is a need for conclusive identification of a disease or condition, an accurate laboratory diagnosis should be obtained. (edu.au)
  • In addition we are fortunate to have the national FAD diagnostics service laboratory, the laboratory able to confirm foot and mouth or hog cholera here in Winnipeg at the National Centre for Human and Animal Health on Arlington Street. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Of crucial importance to the early warning system is the penetration of veterinarians into rural food animal practice, suitable diagnostic laboratory support in Provincial or commercial laboratories and live animal inspection at slaughter facilities. (gov.mb.ca)
  • It is designed to foster TAD research expertise in various biosafety level environments through classroom and practical training in biosafety, containment, research laboratory, animal handling and regulatory compliance. (dhs.gov)
  • Transboundary animal diseases are highly contagious epidemic diseases that can spread extremely rapidly, irrespective of national borders. (fao.org)
  • Measles is a highly contagious, airborne disease caused by Measles morbillivirus . (nature.com)
  • Prevention Period (P$) is the time during normal industry operations when other countries in the world have highly contagious diseases and we don't. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs) are highly contagious with high morbidity and mortality. (dhs.gov)
  • 3. You will interact with media tools to gather details and complete a timeline of contagious diseases. (teacherweb.com)
  • Although living in groups makes it easier for animals to capture prey, stay warm and avoid predators, it also leads to outbreaks of contagious diseases. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act is a series of Acts of Parliament of the United Kingdom to deal with the possibility of the accrual of economic harm or intra-species contamination. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts 1878 to 1886 was the collective title of the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts 1878 and 1884, the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Transfer of Parts of Districts Act 1884 and the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act 1886. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis of BSE is difficult because there are no live animal tests. (illinois.gov)
  • Early diagnosis helps curtail the spread of a disease by making it possible to rapidly isolate and treat infected animals and patients earlier. (iaea.org)
  • Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) offers more than 300 tests for the diagnosis of infectious diseases in animals. (wur.nl)
  • can supply clues about the disease or problem that is occurring, which narrows the possibilities, costs, and time for diagnosis and development of a treatment plan. (ct.gov)
  • Quality assured diagnostic tests are critical to the success of surveillance programs and to the accurate diagnosis and control of disease outbreaks. (www.csiro.au)
  • This course will help you understand the principles of disease, diagnosis, and how to determine an appropriate course of action to help animals in need. (edu.au)
  • It is particularly important, especially in the case of infectious diseases that the final diagnosis rests on adequate aetiological evidence. (edu.au)
  • In most cases disease investigations are carried out by professionals (In some countries it may be prescribed who can or should carry out an investigation to give a a diagnosis). (edu.au)
  • An early diagnosis can mean the difference between life and death for animal cancer patients. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • Pathogen de-tection is an important step for the diagnosis and successful treatment of animal diseases as well as control management in farm and field conditions. (routledge.com)
  • New advances in diagnostics and vaccine design using genomics have developed powerful new methods that have also set the stage for the enhanced diagnosis, surveillance, and control of infectious diseases. (routledge.com)
  • This book will explore some key opportunities in the context of animal health, such as the detection of new microorganisms and the development of improved diagnosis of emerging or re-emerging diseases and other clinical conditions, viz. (routledge.com)
  • Echocardiograms may be recommended following the auscultation results, or for breeds susceptible to adult-onset cardiac diseases requiring an echo for an accurate diagnosis. (ofa.org)
  • Understand the diagnosis of animal illness including common diseases. (edu.au)
  • Study this course for a foundation that allows systematically investigation and diagnosis of health disorders in animals. (edu.au)
  • Affecting over a hundred million individuals worldwide, retinal diseases are among the leading causes of irreversible visual impairment and blindness, and appropriate study models, especially animal models, are essential to furthering our understanding of the etiology, pathology, and progression of these endemic diseases. (springer.com)
  • Surveillance ensures freedom from eradicated diseases, early detection of new emerging diseases, and the resurgence of endemic diseases. (ct.gov)
  • The initiative, Combating Endemic Diseases of Farmed Animals for Sustainability (CEDFAS), is also backed by the Scottish Executive and some individual projects have additional funding from Defra and industrial partners. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Several models have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including atherothrombotic and cardiac diseases, and the same pathology have been successfully recreated in different species, including small and big animal models of disease. (hindawi.com)
  • To protect these resources, ATCC has compiled a collection of microbial species commonly associated with agricultural animal diseases. (atcc.org)
  • This page provides information about our tests, organised by animal species. (wur.nl)
  • The identification and documentation requirements for each kind of animal covered by the Rule are summarized in the USDA's ADT Rule Summary of General Requirements by Species and outlined briefly below. (avma.org)
  • It appears that many species are under an immense amount of stress, allowing opportunistic diseases to take hold," Rob Mies, executive director of the Organization for Bat Conservation, told Discovery News . (motherjones.com)
  • In addition to lobsters, animals as diverse as monkeys, fishes, insects and birds detect and distance themselves from sick members of their species. (scientificamerican.com)
  • No matter what the species, large or small, disease is the common threat to all. (ct.gov)
  • And we think that these species are very, very likely to transfer diseases across to us," she said. (voanews.com)
  • As they do, Cooper said, they're encountering new species of animals and possibly new diseases as well. (voanews.com)
  • If an infectious disease wipes out a lemur population it could be a huge blow to the species. (eurekalert.org)
  • WHO said officials shouldn't name diseases after geographic locations, animal species, or peoples' names. (ksl.com)
  • The anatomy and physiology of marine species has many unique aspects, with organs and systems not found in land animals. (animalplanet.com)
  • Zoonotic skin diseases including ringworm, caused by the fungus Microsporum canis and scabies, caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, Cheyletiella mites, and harvest mites ( Trombicula species) are transmitted relatively easily to people through direct physical contact. (vcahospitals.com)
  • These manmade factors, the writers say, have produced a 'global mixing bowl' where 'microbes have great possibilities to create new niches, cross species boundaries, travel worldwide very quickly and establish new beachheads in populations of people and animals while also invading environments where they are being uniquely maintained in nature outside of living hosts. (psmag.com)
  • List of aquarium diseases List of dog diseases List of feline diseases List of honey bee diseases list of cow diseases Foot-and-mouth disease Lists of plant diseases This article includes a species-related list of lists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reportable Diseases - Diseases on this list are required to be reported to the Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare. (illinois.gov)
  • Veterinarians play an important role in animal disease surveillance and in reporting reportable diseases and high mortality and morbidity events. (ct.gov)
  • The Reportable Disease Record form and the list of Connecticut Reportable Diseases, which is a composite of state, federal, and international reportable disease lists, is available at www.ct.gov/doag/cwp/view.asp?a=1367&q=259102. (ct.gov)
  • Resolutions passed by the International Committee and recommendations issued by the Regional Commissions instructed the OIE Headquarters to establish a single OIE list of notifiable terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases to replace the former Lists A and List B . (oie.int)
  • All suspected reportable or immediately notifiable diseases are reported to the CFIA, OMAFRA, and OMH, as appropriate. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Notifiable diseases are animal diseases that are a national threat, and by law must be reported. (sa.gov.au)
  • Bluetongue is a notifiable disease of ruminants and therefore of wild deer. (alternativevet.org)
  • However, as this is a notifiable disease, if the AVMC were to treat cases we would need specific permission from DEFRA. (alternativevet.org)
  • State veterinarians also test swine in areas surrounding quarantined herds to locate additional infected animals. (illinois.gov)
  • The ADT Rule references existing regulations on transporting all swine (including pet swine), and there are no changes in the requirements (9 CFR part 71.19 and, if applicable, part 85 ) for interstate movement of these animals. (avma.org)
  • and on the corresponding affected animal populations: swine, poultry and bovines, respectively. (europa.eu)
  • Resolution 5 would commit AVMA support to comprehensive disease surveillance of the U.S. swine herd. (avma.org)
  • The two major foreign animal diseases of pigs are foot and mouth (FMD) currently sweeping Britain and Hog Cholera (Classical Swine Fever). (gov.mb.ca)
  • The year of 1997 marked a period of major upswing in serious disease in world swine production areas of the globe. (gov.mb.ca)
  • The long period of swine fever controls in East Anglia, as a direct consequence of the disease, about 50,000 pigs that normally would have been marketed were slaughtered on farms where swine fever was found. (gov.mb.ca)
  • This particularly applies to infectious diseases like bird flu, Q fever and swine fever. (government.nl)
  • In a statement published on Friday, WHO criticized disease names like Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome and swine flu, which can be stigmatizing. (ksl.com)
  • CWD belongs to a family of diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). (cdc.gov)
  • The Illinois Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare is responsible for detection and eradication of certain animal diseases. (illinois.gov)
  • With a viral infection like measles, you worry about susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and just the health and welfare of the animals," Timmel says. (nature.com)
  • The carefully controlled use of random-source dogs and cats contributes greatly to improving the health and welfare of both animals and human beings. (avma.org)
  • The initiative, led by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), is supporting 10 projects across the UK that will employ cutting-edge bioscience to study the diseases and which will contribute to improved animal health and welfare, as well as reduced economic losses. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Tansey, K. E., Cameron, D. & Hill, M. J. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease is concentrated in specific macrophage and microglial transcriptional networks. (nature.com)
  • However, genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in cardiovascular pathophysiology, making difficult to match a particular disease, with a single experimental model. (hindawi.com)
  • We're not talking about diseases that we induce for experimental purposes through genetic modification, from cancer to rats with Alzheimer's --that's a different story entirely. (popsci.com)
  • DURHAM, N.C. -- Advances in genetic sequencing are uncovering emerging diseases in wildlife that other diagnostic tests can't detect. (eurekalert.org)
  • With advances in high-throughput sequencing, the ability to read genetic code rapidly, Larsen was able to look at all the gene readouts, or RNA transcripts, that were present in each animal -- an alphabet soup containing billions of nucleotide bases. (eurekalert.org)
  • Discuss types of genetic inheritance, and give examples of genetic diseases affecting horses, dogs, and cats. (edu.au)
  • This Review discusses the prevalent dietary and inflammation-based genetic animal models described in recent years. (nih.gov)
  • Cancer is not only a genetic or inflammatory disease - it's also a metabolic disease. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • After more than a decade of research on the pre-symptomatic phase of Huntington disease, markers are being developed to facilitate assessment of interventional therapy in individuals carrying the genetic mutation for Huntington disease, before they become ill. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Autoimmune diseases are increasingly prevalent in dogs and have genetic and environmental triggers. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • Both genetic and environmental factors can cause or "trigger" immune dysfunction, leading to either immune deficiency - or immune stimulation, also called autoimmune disease. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • The resultant autoimmune diseases reflect the sum of the genetic and environmental factors involved. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • Many congenital and adult-onset or developmental cardiac diseases may have a genetic component, however the exact modes of inheritance have not been precisely determined for all cardiovascular malformations. (ofa.org)
  • Examples of genetic diseases affecting horses, dogs, and cats. (edu.au)
  • However, there are also diseases that are caused by dysfunctions within the organism's body, such as autoimmune diseases. (prweb.com)
  • Many animal diseases are caused by external factors including viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, proteins, prions, and infections while other diseases are caused by dysfunctions within the animal's body, such as autoimmune diseases. (prweb.com)
  • Some dogs may also have other autoimmune diseases. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • AbstractAnimal models of autoimmune disease have been of vital importance in the advancement of our understanding of central pathological processes that underlie disease causation. (brightkite.com)
  • The immune response to myelin basic protein and pathological changes of demyelination in SAE suggest that this disease is the human homologue of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). (whale.to)
  • Monophasic autoimmune inflammatory diseases of the CNS and PNS. (whale.to)
  • The campaign, which continues until the end of May 2018, will vaccinate over 3 million cattle against aphthous fever, crystalline inflammation and PPR, in line with the national plan for animal health 2015-2025 and ADFCA's strategic plan 2016-2020. (emirates247.com)
  • How are exotic animals a threat to public health, and Should wild animals be taken in as pets? (teacherweb.com)
  • Many of the diseases listed are foreign or exotic to the U.S. others are not. (ct.gov)
  • The end result is that new or exotic diseases often go undetected. (eurekalert.org)
  • Wet markets in China, in which cages of exotic animals are piled atop each other thereby allowing the animals to exchange infectious agents, are particularly problematic. (dallasnews.com)
  • Closer to home the thriving trade in exotic animals has led to salmonella disease from pet iguanas and monkey pox from pet prairie dogs. (dallasnews.com)
  • Despite Australia's strict quarantine procedures, there is a risk that an exotic animal disease could be introduced. (www.csiro.au)
  • Despite Australia's strict quarantine procedures, there is still a risk that an exotic (foreign) animal disease could be introduced into Australia. (www.csiro.au)
  • ACDP plays an integral role in investigating exotic and emergency disease incidents, allowing such diseases to be ruled out or to ensure rapid implementation of control strategies. (www.csiro.au)
  • Exotic pests and diseases may also put at risk the state's reputation for producing premium food and wine, and risk trade overseas and locally. (sa.gov.au)
  • The Act also includes provisions on emerging serious animal diseases, which mean exotic or very rare animal diseases that are comparable to an animal disease to be combated in terms of their harmful effects but have not been designated as an animal disease to be combated or an animal disease to be reported. (mmm.fi)
  • Frog populations have seen an increased number of deaths due to a fungal disease. (motherjones.com)
  • The aim of this activity is to identify the central competent authorities responsible for managing the data on animal diseases and animal populations in each Member State. (europa.eu)
  • The Swedish Board of Agriculture, under the Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation is the central source of data related to animal populations in Sweden. (europa.eu)
  • The recent outbreaks of measles in areas where experts had considered the disease to be eradicated are a reminder of the precautions needed to keep nonhuman populations protected too. (nature.com)
  • Vaccinating lab animal populations is not always feasible, depending on the kind of research for which they are being used. (nature.com)
  • Viruses like avian flu, Ebola and Marburg often fester in animals before moving into human populations. (pbs.org)
  • Deadly viruses often fester inside animals in before they move into human populations. (pbs.org)
  • Good hygiene is important to stopping the spread of animal-to-human diseases. (medicinenet.com)
  • Naturally-occurring or experimentally-induced animal diseases with pathological processes analogous to human diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Bernard Vallat, the director general of the World Organization for Animal Health, says that with diseases such as bird flu posing a potential threat to the whole planet, it is vital to ensure early detection and a rapid response. (voanews.com)
  • To African countries facing the threat of animal disease outbreaks, the help of the IAEA and FAO in equipping their laboratories and training their scientists in the use of these techniques and the corresponding biosafety measures has been critical. (iaea.org)
  • This agent/disease can pose a threat to public health. (uoguelph.ca)
  • CDC and other federal health agencies can ban trade in animals that pose a health threat. (umn.edu)
  • The USDA first suggests increasing the awareness of diseases that are emerging overseas, and preparing for the possibility that those pathogens may pose a threat to U.S. animal health, public health or trade. (fiercepharma.com)
  • Joy Kabatsi, the state minister for animal husbandry, issued a directive restraining further movement of animals and their products fearing severe consequences. (newvision.co.ug)
  • Vincent Bamulangaki Sempijja, the Minister of Agriculture, Animal Husbandry and Fisheries, says government will continue vaccinating animals to contain FMD spread. (newvision.co.ug)
  • Jan 21, 2005 (CIDRAP News) The next infectious disease to enter the United States might cross the border taped to a traveler's leg or tucked snugly under a tourist's hat. (umn.edu)
  • During 1996--2010, approximately 150 human infectious disease outbreaks involving animals in public settings have been reported to CDC (CDC, unpublished data, 2010). (cdc.gov)
  • Much of the early research linking climate change and infectious disease looks at the expansion of habitats for disease hosts, like bats. (pri.org)
  • Climate change and infectious disease transmission both depend on so many variables, and Martín said his research alone can't predict whether more people would actually get sick from the Hendra virus in a warmer world. (pri.org)
  • This increased the opportunity for viruses, bacteria and other pathogenic agents to pass from wild and domestic animals through the environment to cause diseases in people, the report said. (pressherald.com)
  • The frequent and widespread outbreaks of avian influenza, foot-and-mouth disease, and West Nile virus have prompted international agencies such as the World Organization for Animal Health and the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization to team up with donor nations and farmers to combat the outbreaks. (voanews.com)
  • Foot and mouth disease swept through Taiwan (Taipei China) in March 1997 with immediate ramifications on Pacific Rim trade in pork. (gov.mb.ca)
  • In the second stage, vaccinations will be given to cows, sheep and goats against foot-and-mouth disease, as well as against crystalline inflammation in goats. (emirates247.com)
  • The third stage will see the second dose of vaccination being given against PPR, while the fourth stage includes the second dose of vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease. (emirates247.com)
  • It is fitting that the first chapter describes foot-and-mouth disease virus, which was the first animal virus to be described by Loeffler and Frosch, who worked in Griefswald-Insel Riems, where Mettenleiter is currently the president of the Friedrich-Loeffler Institut. (cdc.gov)
  • Mettenleiter is a coauthor for a chapter about herpesviruses, whereas Sobrino is a coauthor for one on foot-and-mouth disease virus. (cdc.gov)
  • To improve the management and biosecurity of poultry hatcheries and parent flocks, ultimately increasing productivity and profitability, and reducing the risk of disease occurrence and spread. (fao.org)
  • The disease is spread through direct contact with an infected animal. (illinois.gov)
  • Recent cases highlight the need to practice health safety to protect yourself from the spread of disease during animal encounters. (medicinenet.com)
  • From Bluetongue disease in sheep to Rift Valley Fever in camels, researchers say that animal diseases are sparked and spread by climate change. (cms.int)
  • Social animals stay apart , changing behaviors such as grooming to stop the spread of diseases that could kill them. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Scientists have developed a computer model that predicts outbreaks of zoonotic diseases - those that spread from animals to people - based on changes in climate, population growth, and land practices. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This model is a major improvement in our understanding of the spread of diseases from animals to people. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The researchers hope that using the model, decision-makers will be able to assess the effect that planned changes on land use - such as converting grassland to agriculture - could have on spread of zoonotic diseases. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These included a new form of the protozoa responsible for babesiosis, a disease spread by bites from infected ticks, and a new kind of Borrelia closely related to the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • We do not monitor for what are known as "production diseases" that are relatively comm​on, do not threaten human health or spread to other farms, or have trade implications. (wi.gov)
  • Scientists, including climatologists and epidemiologists on Fair's team at Los Alamos, are beginning to model how changes to the climate will impact the spread of infectious diseases. (pri.org)
  • Although limited to just 16 confirmed cases, the necessary and widespread measures taken by the UK government to prevent the spread of the disease are expected to have far reaching consequences. (gov.mb.ca)
  • This campaign precedes the season that witnesses the appearance and spread of the most common and dangerous diseases among animals. (emirates247.com)
  • It has also helped decrease seasonal diseases that can infect animals and limited their spread. (emirates247.com)
  • The research will generate better scientific understanding of the behaviour and spread of the diseases which can then be used to improve their management and control. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) - a very common viral disease of pigs which, although it was identified in the UK only in 1999, has now spread across the country. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Under the act, animal diseases are divided into diseases that spread easily, dangerous animal diseases, animal diseases to be controlled, animal diseases to be reported and other animal diseases. (mmm.fi)
  • Diseases that spread easily, dangerous animal diseases and animal diseases to be controlled are all called animal diseases to be combated. (mmm.fi)
  • BRUSSELS -- In a further step toward fighting the spread of mad-cow disease crisis, the European Union's special beef-management committee gave more details about its plan to buy up and destroy old cows that either test positive for the disease or aren't tested at all. (wsj.com)
  • Simple hygiene and common sense will drastically reduce, if not eliminate, the risk of zoonotic spread of disease from dog to people. (vcahospitals.com)
  • While they wait for additional information about potential animal vaccines, they are taking extra precautions with the people who interact with the primates: anyone who didn't receive the full vaccination protocol (Israel only implemented a two-dose vaccination policy in the 1990s) or who has insufficient measles antibodies must be vaccinated, she says. (nature.com)
  • Wild animals do not have vaccines, but they can prevent disease by how they live and act . (scientificamerican.com)
  • The agency is also stockpiling vaccines made by Ceva Animal Health and Merck ($MRK)-owned Harrisvaccines, and in June of this year it awarded a third contract to Zoetis ($ZTS), which will make more than 68 million doses of its vaccine against the H5N1 strain of avian flu for the stockpile over the next two years. (fiercepharma.com)
  • The following paragraphs summarize how the department works toward eradication of animal diseases. (illinois.gov)
  • The control and eradication of these diseases was not easy or inexpensive. (ct.gov)
  • The FAO Emergency Prevention System (EMPRES) Animal Health develops strategies for intervention and improved management. (fao.org)
  • FAO has mobilized over US$ 445 million to combat influenza and emerging disease threats through prevention, surveillance, and control. (fao.org)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • Whether animal vaccination is routine or not, prevention is key. (nature.com)
  • In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said these cuddly, adorable creatures are harbingers of a deadly form of salmonella . (popsci.com)
  • The diseases discussed here are the ones that we primarily focus our surveillance and prevention efforts on. (wi.gov)
  • FWS also enforces the rules of other agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (umn.edu)
  • Other important recommendations are that venues prohibit food in animal areas and include transition areas between animal areas and nonanimal areas, visitors receive information about disease risk and prevention procedures, and animals be properly cared for and managed. (cdc.gov)
  • The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • Transnational organised crime requires a coordinated transnational response and the key feature of the Bio-Crime project is its emphasis on transregional development of best practices and innovative solutions, in particular in the areas of disease prevention programmes for public officials and police, early education for children, crime prevention, cross-border responses and better access to public services. (europa.eu)
  • Bio-Crime organised a series of 18-day theoretical and practical training courses on animal disease risks and prevention and animal handling for more than 1 000 Italian and Austrian officials and police officers. (europa.eu)
  • The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service issued a similar order regarding Asian birds. (umn.edu)
  • In the spring, the agency's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) formed three agreements with overseas governments to boost vaccine access and coordinate responses to emerging pathogens. (fiercepharma.com)
  • While mosquitoes and ticks, those pesky harbingers of West Nile, dengue fever, cholera, Lyme disease , and Kyasanur fever (among other assorted viral, fungal, and bacterial pathogens) are universally hated, it's hard to believe the Earth's more cuddly creatures could breed evil. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • Plants expressing human Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, nematode CED-9, or baculovirus Op-IAP transgenes conferred heritable resistance to several necrotrophic fungal pathogens, suggesting that disease development required host-cell death pathways. (pnas.org)
  • The book contains 22 chapters and is structured in three parts, i- general features and commonalities, ii- viral diseases, iii- bacterial diseases. (springer.com)
  • Active and passive surveillance for disease involves owners, veterinarians, state and federal animal health officials, and diagnostic laboratories. (ct.gov)
  • For more information on the U.S. status for each reportable disease go to https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/monitoring-and-surveillance/sa_nahss/status-reportable-disease-us. (ct.gov)
  • The Disease BioPortal is operated and maintained by the Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance (CADMS) at the University of California, Davis and is supported through a consortium of national and international institutions, agencies, and organizations. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The allocation of financing will assist national authorities to control and eradicate these diseases, fund vaccination and carry out surveillance programmes in order to detect early outbreaks. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Other TSEs include bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease and other human prion diseases in people, including variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (the human form of "mad cow disease") in people. (cdc.gov)
  • He said Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease is often linked to the consumption of beef infected with mad cow disease, the bovine form of spongieform encephalthy. (nwaonline.com)
  • Primarily designed as a sourcebook and revision guide for students undertaking examinations in red meat inspection, this reference pairs detailed explanations with photographs and contains sections for bovine anatomy and physiology and disease conditions. (geometry.net)
  • Bovine TB - this economically damaging disease is on the rise with 700 herds failing a bovine TB test in the UK each year. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Bovine mastitis - affects over one million cattle a year, causing the animals pain and distress and costing UK farming over £200M. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • But we always need to also be on the lookout for newly emerging diseases and old diseases that re-emerge. (wi.gov)
  • That's true in markets like the one in Wuhan, but also out in the wild, where deforestation and land use changes have been linked to outbreaks of new emerging diseases. (pri.org)
  • The USDA wants to improve the response to emerging diseases like the recent pathogenic avian flu. (fiercepharma.com)
  • Rapid response to emerging diseases can prevent or limit the negative impact to animal health, the economy, food security, and public health," the USDA says in the proposed response plan. (fiercepharma.com)
  • The USDA has launched several new initiatives of late aimed at improving the nation's response to emerging diseases. (fiercepharma.com)
  • Across the river from Portland in Clark County, Washington, for example, rates have dropped to 78%, per the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC). (nature.com)
  • Also see Animal Disease Traceability: A Guide to Identifying Sheep and Goats for Interstate Movement (APHIS-VS factsheet). (avma.org)
  • Animal models of adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases have enhanced the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (nature.com)
  • Extra-synaptic NMDARs have also been shown to be involved in other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, and in damage caused by traumatic brain injury and some forms of stroke . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Under contingency plan A, we will reduce the number of personnel in each LADDL section to ensure social (physical) distancing while maintaining uninterrupted testing services for diagnosing diseases of public or herd health importance, regulatory diseases, and foreign animal diseases. (lsu.edu)
  • foreign animal diseases are those that are not found in the United States, so may be particularly threatening to our animals. (wi.gov)
  • The development and evaluation of rapid diagnostic methods is critical for the detection and effective treatment of agricultural animal pathogens. (atcc.org)
  • A study in PLoS Pathogens showed that tuberculosis-causing bacteria among four badgers and 26 cows in Ireland were almost indistinguishable from each other, showing a link between the two animals. (popsci.com)
  • Finally, as most bioterrorism agents are zoonotic, protocols were developed to investigate the origin and ability to cause disease of zoonotic pathogens, to protect the public against attacks. (europa.eu)
  • State veterinarians perform epidemiological investigations, develop plans to eradicate disease in infected herds, and monitor and test animals. (illinois.gov)
  • What does the Agriculture Department do to help eradicate animal disease in Illinois? (illinois.gov)
  • Not only did the various restrictions placed on the pig sector detrimentally effect output for the five months it took to eradicate the disease, but the disruption to the UK breeding program is expected to affect national pig meat production for up to two years. (gov.mb.ca)
  • This book primarily focuses on the African Sahel region, shedding new light on the epidemiology, socio-economics, clinical manifestations and control approaches of transboundary animal diseases (TADs) in this specific region. (springer.com)
  • The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) funded two such programs, Texas A&M University's Bench to Shop program and Kansas State University's Transboundary Animal Disease Fellowship , to train the next generation of animal health experts. (dhs.gov)
  • Also see Animal Disease Traceability Requirements for Cattle and Bison Moving Interstate (APHIS-VS factsheet). (avma.org)
  • CWD does not appear to naturally infect cattle or other domesticated animals. (cdc.gov)
  • Having information on the movement of cattle herds would mean that only a small segment of animals would need to be isolated. (k-state.edu)
  • We believe CattleTrace can help to reduce the risk that animal disease poses to the U.S. cattle supply, while also protecting our industry ' s access to important export markets, which can quickly be compromised in the event of an animal health issue. (k-state.edu)
  • As leaders in the cattle industry, we are excited to see Tyson Fresh Meats ' commitment to animal health and disease traceability in the United States, " said Depenbusch, who now is chair of the U.S. CattleTrace board of directors. (k-state.edu)
  • Lyantonde district authorities challenged the minister's order to close cattle markets, saying the district is free from the disease. (newvision.co.ug)
  • Gerald Byamugisha says he could not look after his family because the cattle markets are closed and animal movement restricted. (newvision.co.ug)
  • The book would have been improved by including a chapter on paramyxoviruses, of which rinderpest virus of cattle and Newcastle disease virus of birds are 2 important examples. (cdc.gov)
  • The plan provides for the testing for diseases such as Salmonella pullorum at poultry- producing facilities and to inspect these facilities for proper sanitation. (illinois.gov)
  • Certain infectious organisms, such as the bacteria Salmonella and Campylobacter and the protozoan disease caused by Giardia, can cause severe gastroenteritis. (vcahospitals.com)
  • For more information about living with our smaller wildlife, visit: sjbhd.org/en/common-disease-in-our-region. (durangoherald.com)
  • We also come into contact with animals at county fairs and petting zoos, and we can encounter wildlife when out hiking, camping, or clearing woodland. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • NASPHV recommends that local and state public health, agricultural, environmental, and wildlife agencies use these recommendations to establish their own guidelines or regulations for reducing the risk for disease from human-animal contact in public settings. (cdc.gov)
  • And so, anytime you increase that wildlife-human interface, that's sort of an emerging disease hot spot. (pri.org)
  • A new international campaign to control outbreaks of animal diseases has begun with a three-day meeting in Japan. (voanews.com)
  • To prevent other animal-borne diseases such as hantavirus and West Nile, San Juan Basin Health Department recommends everyone help control the presence of rodents and mosquitoes around their home. (durangoherald.com)
  • Dr Diallo is a recognized expert in vaccine and diagnostic tests development for the control of animal diseases. (springer.com)
  • If you own animals or birds of any kind, you are an essential partner in early animal disease discovery, reporting, and disease control. (ct.gov)
  • We hope it can be used to help communities prepare and respond to disease outbreaks, as well as to make decisions about environmental change factors that may be within their control. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Martha Fulford, MD , FRCPC, is an infectious diseases physician at McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, and medical coordinator for the Waterloo Wellington Infection Control Network. (wiley.com)
  • The first step in disease recognition and control is being able to recognise when an animal or group of animals is unwell. (edu.au)
  • These events have served to remind pork producers everywhere of the importance of foreign animal disease control to the assurance of access to foreign markets. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Working closely with UK pig farmers, and with support from the British Pig Executive, this project will identify why the disease occurs and work on ways to control it. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The diseases are all high priorities for the industry and new approaches to their control will improve animal welfare, improve economic sustainability and help reduce the environmental impact of the food production industry. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Farmers, vets and the government work together to control these diseases. (government.nl)
  • Animal models to control the serious neurological complications after vaccination against whooping cough are not available. (whale.to)
  • In 1892, the local authorities were not making sufficient use of powers to combat animal diseases so the Act introduced central control over the slaughter of infected animals and the payment of compensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of the ADT Rule is to improve disease traceability, enhance disease response, and minimize losses. (avma.org)
  • Tyson Fresh M eats , a subsidiary of Tyson Foods Inc. , is backing U.S. Cat t leTrace , a system that uses ear tags with ultrahigh frequency technologies to establish a national animal disease traceability system. (k-state.edu)
  • The disease spreads when blood from infected animals is transmitted to other animals by blood-sucking insects or through use of contaminated hypodermic needles or surgical instruments. (illinois.gov)
  • Scientists think CWD spreads between animals through contact with contaminated body fluids and tissue or indirectly through exposure to CWD in the environment, such as in drinking water or food. (cdc.gov)
  • The model brings together changes in the host's distribution pattern as the environment changes with the mechanisms of how the disease spreads from animals to people. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Routine disease investigations are based on clinical, pathological and epidemiological evidence. (edu.au)
  • Identify and discuss miscelaneous non pathological factors that affect animal health, including allergies, dehydration and age. (edu.au)
  • A disease antibody which is also known as an immunoglobulin is typically a large protein and is produced by the immune system to recognize and neutralize foreign objects that might do harm on the body, for example, a bacteria or a virus. (prweb.com)
  • Activities in stamping out the disease include tracing all animal movements, placing herds under quarantine and slaughter, disposal and compensation for producers. (gov.mb.ca)