Ethics Committees: Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.Committee Membership: The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.Advisory Committees: Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Professional Staff Committees: Committees of professional personnel who have responsibility for determining policies, procedures, and controls related to professional matters in health facilities.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Animal Care Committees: Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).Ethical Review: A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee: An advisory group composed primarily of staff physicians and the pharmacist which serves as the communication link between the medical staff and the pharmacy department.Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees: Committees established to review interim data and efficacy outcomes in clinical trials. The findings of these committees are used in deciding whether a trial should be continued as designed, changed, or terminated. Government regulations regarding federally-funded research involving human subjects (the "Common Rule") require (45 CFR 46.111) that research ethics committees reviewing large-scale clinical trials monitor the data collected using a mechanism such as a data monitoring committee. FDA regulations (21 CFR 50.24) require that such committees be established to monitor studies conducted in emergency settings.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Human Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.United StatesEthics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Great BritainConflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Multicenter Studies as Topic: Works about controlled studies which are planned and carried out by several cooperating institutions to assess certain variables and outcomes in specific patient populations, for example, a multicenter study of congenital anomalies in children.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Institute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Therapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Consensus: General agreement or collective opinion; the judgment arrived at by most of those concerned.American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Antifungal Agents: Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Consent Forms: Documents describing a medical treatment or research project, including proposed procedures, risks, and alternatives, that are to be signed by an individual, or the individual's proxy, to indicate his/her understanding of the document and a willingness to undergo the treatment or to participate in the research.European Union: The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Candida: A genus of yeast-like mitosporic Saccharomycetales fungi characterized by producing yeast cells, mycelia, pseudomycelia, and blastophores. It is commonly part of the normal flora of the skin, mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina, but can cause a variety of infections, including CANDIDIASIS; ONYCHOMYCOSIS; vulvovaginal candidiasis (CANDIDIASIS, VULVOVAGINAL), and thrush (see CANDIDIASIS, ORAL). (From Dorland, 28th ed)Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Animals, LaboratoryResearch Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Fluconazole: Triazole antifungal agent that is used to treat oropharyngeal CANDIDIASIS and cryptococcal MENINGITIS in AIDS.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Group Structure: The informal or formal organization of a group of people based on a network of personal relationships which is influenced by the size and composition, etc., of the group.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.EuropeAcademies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Formularies, Hospital: Formularies concerned with pharmaceuticals prescribed in hospitals.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Hospital Administration: Management of the internal organization of the hospital.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Itraconazole: A triazole antifungal agent that inhibits cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes required for ERGOSTEROL synthesis.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines: Combined vaccines consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and an acellular form of PERTUSSIS VACCINE. At least five different purified antigens of B. pertussis have been used in various combinations in these vaccines.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Awards and PrizesAuthorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Organization and Administration: The planning and managing of programs, services, and resources.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Mumps Vaccine: Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Annual Reports as Topic: Annual statements reviewing the status of the administrative and operational functions and accomplishments of an institution or organization.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hepatitis A Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with hepatitis A virus (HEPATOVIRUS).International Agencies: International organizations which provide health-related or other cooperative services.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Pharmacy Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the receiving, storing, and distribution of pharmaceutical supplies.JapanPersonal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Drug Storage: The process of keeping pharmaceutical products in an appropriate location.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Rimantadine: An RNA synthesis inhibitor that is used as an antiviral agent in the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.EnglandPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Health Systems Agencies: Health planning and resources development agencies which function in each health service area of the United States (PL 93-641).Zoology: The study of animals - their morphology, growth, distribution, classification, and behavior.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.TriazolesHelsinki Declaration: An international agreement of the World Medical Association which offers guidelines for conducting experiments using human subjects. It was adopted in 1962 and revised by the 18th World Medical Assembly at Helsinki, Finland in 1964. Subsequent revisions were made in 1975, 1983, 1989, and 1996. (From Encyclopedia of Bioethics, rev ed, 1995)National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.

Animal experiments: conference report.(1/47)

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Best practices for animal care committees and animal use oversight. (2/47)

Regulatory authorities around the world with oversight responsibility for the welfare of research animals have placed heavily reliance on local oversight committees. These animal care committees (ACCs) are part of an institutional animal welfare team that includes the institutional administration, principal investigators, attending veterinarian and animal care staff, as well as regulatory organizations and authorities. As a key component of this team, most ACCs function as an agent of the institution to ensure regulatory animal welfare compliance. Although regulatory testing involving animals presents some unique circumstances, the focus of all animal care committees is to minimize animal pain and distress. Federal requirements are often couched within a regulatory framework that is performance based and therefore very flexible. Thus, it is important for ACCs to establish very simple and specific institutional requirements and procedures and to work at promoting a broad understanding of them within their respective institutions. Experience suggests that ambiguity at the local level results in many unintended side effects and confusion. There are many "best practices" that can help the ACC promote institutional compliance and good animal welfare. These practices, although not universally appropriate for all institutions or activities, include ACC coordinator or administrator, designated protocol reviewer, alternate or duel ACC members, generic protocols and standard operating procedures, centralized controls and animal care facilities, conducting pilot studies, and ensuring the most humane endpoints.  (+info)

Ethical issues concerning animal research outside the laboratory. (3/47)

Unique ethical issues can be associated with research outside the customary laboratory setting. Protocols involving wild animals must consider that any infringement on the wild nature of the species can be disruptive and may involve pain, fear, anxiety, and frustration, all of which constitute ethical harm that must be balanced with anticipated benefit. Agricultural and companion animal research, however, take place in a human-engineered environment and involves domesticated species adapted to human contact. Special animal welfare issues can be related to agricultural production goals that fail to deal adequately with moral concerns. Human/companion animal relationships, on the other hand, present unique moral obligations to animal owners. Other factors may present additional ethical issues when research is performed outside the laboratory. These factors include a required sensitivity to the environment of wild animals and an awareness that this outside research may to quite public and, therefore, vulnerable to community perception. The institutional animal care and use committee(IACUC) has the responsibility to ensure that research in outside settings is ethical and properly implemented. This responsibility requires that IACUC members have knowledge of the needs of a wide range of species and that a process is in place to allow effective monitoring of research in remote locations. Finally, and most important, there must be a sensitivity to the unique ethical considerations outlined here. Armed with these strengths, the IACUC will be effective in what may be unfamiliar surroundings and will have a significant opportunity to cause improvements in animal welfare.  (+info)

Agricultural (nonbiomedical) animal research outside the laboratory: a review of guidelines for institutional animal care and use committees. (4/47)

Challenges and published guidelines associated with appropriate care and use of farm animals in agricultural research conducted outside the laboratory are briefly reviewed. The Animal Welfare Act (Title 9 of the 2000 Code of Federal Regulations), which regulates the care and use of agricultural animals in biomedical research, does not include livestock and poultry used in agricultural research. Farm animal research funded (and thereby regulated) by the US Public Health Service is further discussed in the National Research Council's 1996 Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. However, neither of these guidelines adequately addresses the unique attributes of research and teaching designed to improve production agriculture. That information is contained in the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Agricultural Research and Teaching (the Ag Guide), published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies in 1999. The Ag Guide provides excellent general recommendations for agricultural animal research. It serves as an invaluable resource for institutional animal care and use committees, which attempt to balance the welfare of farm animals and the needs of those working to improve animal agriculture.  (+info)

Does the Animal Welfare Act apply to free-ranging animals? (5/47)

Despite the long-standing role that institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) have played in reviewing and approving studies at academic institutions, compliance with the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) is not always complete for government natural resource agencies that use free-ranging animals in research and management studies. Even at universities, IACUCs face uncertainties about what activities are covered and about how to judge proposed research on free-ranging animals. One reason for much of the confusion is the AWA vaguely worded exemption for "field studies." In particular, fish are problematic because of the AWA exclusion of poikilothermic animals. However, most university IACUCs review studies on all animals, and the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) has published the "IRAC Principles," which extend coverage to all vertebrates used by federal researchers. Despite this extended coverage, many scientists working on wild animals continue to view compliance with the AWA with little enthusiasm. IACUCs, IACUC veterinarians, wildlife veterinarians, and fish and wildlife biologists must learn to work together to comply with the law and to protect the privilege of using free-ranging animals in research.  (+info)

Opportunistic research and sampling combined with fisheries and wildlife management actions or crisis response. (6/47)

Currently most of the activities of state, federal, first nation, and private conservation agencies, including management of and field research on free-ranging wildlife, are not regulated under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and thus not subject to National Institutes of Health guidelines or routine institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) review. However, every day thousands of fish and wildlife management activities occur across North America that provide an opportunity to take observations, measurements, biological specimens, or samples that may have research value. Most of these opportunities are secondary to ongoing and often mandated wildlife management or conservation actions. Strange as it may seem to the academic and research community, the full research potentials of these opportunities are rarely utilized. IACUCs and research institutions should strive to facilitate such research, which by its very nature is often more opportunistic than designed. They can do this by ensuring that their policies do not unnecessarily impede the rapid research responses needed, or over burden researchers with inappropriate reporting requirements designed for laboratory research. The most prominent reasons for failures to utilize wildlife research opportunities include lack of the following: personnel and expertise to collect and use the information; preparation for inevitable (or predictable) events (e.g., oil spills); resources to preserve and curate specimens; a mandate to conduct research; and recognition of the value in data or sample collection. IACUC support of open protocols and generic sampling plans can go a long way toward improving the development of useful knowledge from animals that will otherwise be lost. Opportunities to sample wildlife are categorized generally as dead sampling (road kill surveys, harvest sampling, lethal collection, and "die-offs"); live sampling (handling for marking, relocation or restocking; and captures for field or biological studies); and crisis response (e.g., population salvage operations or oil spills). Examples of the many unique situations in each category serve to illustrate how valuable research and sampling can be accomplished opportunistically. Several unique limitations of sample collection situation are described. It is recommended that IACUCs have mechanisms in place to facilitate good research in all of these circumstances.  (+info)

Fish research and the institutional animal care and use committee. (7/47)

Fish represent the most diverse group of animals in the vertebrate phylum. The more than 25,000 species are characterized by an array of anatomical, biochemical, physiological, and behavioral repertoires. For this reason, it is difficult to develop a comprehensive guideline on the care and use of fishes. Institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) meet the challenge of ensuring adequate fish welfare using guidelines (Animal Welfare Act [AWA] and Public Health Service [PHS] Policy and their guides) derived mainly from the care and use of mammalian species, which may not be optimal for regulating fish research, teaching, or extension activities. Discussion focuses on various issues that often confront IACUCs in meeting regulatory requirements while assuring proper fish welfare. Issues include questions concerning animal tracking and inventory, utilization of fisheries bycatch, facility inspections in remote locations, and euthanasia. Common sense solutions appropriate for field and laboratory fish activities are suggested, which should help investigators, IACUCs, and regulatory agencies meet PHS and AWA objectives.  (+info)

Surgical implantation of transmitters into fish. (8/47)

Although the Animal Welfare Act does not cover poikilotherms, individual institutions and policies and legal requirements other than the Animal Welfare Act (e.g., the US Public Health Service and the Interagency Research Animal Committee's Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training) require the review of projects involving fish by institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs). IACUCs may, however, lack the knowledge and experience to evaluate fish projects judiciously, especially when the projects are in field settings. Surgeries involving implantation of transmitters and other instruments into the coelom, which now comprise a very common research tool in the study of free-ranging fishes, are examples of surgeries that use a broad spectrum of surgical and anesthetic techniques, some of which would not be considered acceptable for similar work on mammals. IACUCs should apply the standards they would expect to be used for surgeries on homeotherms to surgeries on fish. Surgeons should be carefully trained and experienced. Surgical instruments and transmitters should be sterile. Regulations and laws on the use of drugs in animals should be followed, particularly those concerned with anesthetics and antibiotics used on free-ranging fish. Exceptions to surgical procedures should be made only when circumstances are extreme enough to warrant the use of less than optimal procedures.  (+info)

*Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee

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*Manitoba municipal elections, 1995

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*Hot plate test

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*Regulation of science

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*Raquel C. Bono

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*Tail flick test

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*IMRAD

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*Lawrence Finsen

5 (1989) Issue 4. "Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees: A New Set of Clothes for the Emperor?", Journal of Medicine ... "Animal Rights, Animal Liberation: Seminal Ideas in the Movement to Extend Moral Consideration to Nonhuman Animals," Studies in ... The Animal Rights Movement in America: From Compassion to Respect. Twayne Publishers, 1994. "Comment on James Nelson's 'Animals ... 2 (1986) Issue 1. List of animal rights advocates Rollin, Bernard E. "Ethics, animal welfare and ACUCs," in John P. Gluck, Tony ...

*Animal testing regulations

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*Institutional review board

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*Peter Skewes

Skewes served as chair of the university's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Skewes also serves on the editorial ... Skewes began teaching animal and veterinary science at Clemson University in 1985; there, he studies animal welfare issues and ... Brutzman, Anna (7 May 2011). "Clemson officials: Lab animal investigations prompted change". Independent Mail. Retrieved 3 ... in Animal Physiology from Virginia Tech in 1985. He was the 1985 recipient of the Graduate Student Research Manuscript Award ...

*Ebola vaccine

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*Designated Member Review

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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) oversees the Universitys animal care and use program and is responsible for reviewing all animal care applications using vertebrate animals, ensuring compliance with federal animal welfare regulations, inspecting animal facilities and investigator laboratories, investigating animal concerns, and overseeing training and educational programs. Continue Here. • NIH/PHS Animal Welfare Assurance Number:D16-00256 (A3410-01 ...
Tarleton State Universitys Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) oversees all aspects of Tarleton animal care and use programs for teaching, testing, and research. The IACUC reviews all animal use protocols, ensures compliance with federal regulations, inspects animal facility and laboratories, and oversees training and educational programs. the IACUC serves as a resource to faculty, investigators, technicians, students, staff, and administrators and provides guidance for all animal use procedures with the highest scientific, human, and ethical principles.. The IACUC is composed a a chair person, a veterinarian, research scientists, non-scientists, and community representatives.. The IACUC makes semiannual inspections of all facilities, laboratories, and farms where animals are housed or utilized.. The IACUC is scheduled to meet monthly and reviews all properly submitted proposals at that time. ...
The Grinnell College Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is charged with the development, implementation, and continuing review and evaluation of mechanisms necessary to ensure humane care and treatment of research animals at Grinnell College. Research animals are defined as vertebrate animals used for research or teaching.
The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke oversees the universitys animal care and use program and reviews protocols involving vertebrate animals to insure that they are in compliance with federal animal and welfare regulations. The committee is also responsible for investigating animal facilities, addressing animal concerns, and managing training programs involving animals used on the university campus.
The mission of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is to assure that all research and activities at the University of Puget Sound involving live vertebrate animals is conducted in accord with the highest scientific, humane, and ethical principles.. To fulfill its mission, the IACUC will meet the following goals:. ...
The University of Montana (UM) Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) requires that a Wildlife Animal Use Protocol be submitted for any study conducted on free-living wild animals in their natural habitat that involves procedures that may harm or materially alter the behavior of the animals under study (i.e., trapping/capture, physical/chemical restraint, and/or invasive procedures causing stress, including removal from nest and habitat for short durations ...
Please note that custom antibody production in any species, although it occurs off-campus, still requires prior approval of an animal care and use protocol. The animals, although housed at the vendors site, officially belong to EINSTEIN while they are used to produce antibody for your experimental use. All orders for custom antibody production must be placed with approval from the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Approved vendors include: ...
2017 - 2018 Committee Members. Oversees and reviews all classroom and research projects involving the use of living vertebrate animals to ensure the humane care and use of animals in accordance with the Health Research Extension Act of 1985. Public law 99-158.. Chair:. Norm Garrison, faculty, Biology. Faculty/Staff:. Tamara Hatch, Office of Sponsored Programs Administration. Chris Lantz, Biology. Marcella Mullenax, Environmental Health Coordinator. Melanie Shoup-Knox, Psychology. Carolyn Strong, Research Integrity. K.T. Vaughan, Libraries & Educational Technologies. Institutional Official:. Dr. Heather ...
Federal legislation requires all suppliers of research animals to hold a license issued by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Class A breeders breed or acquire animals solely for research. Class B breeders dont breed animals; like brokers, they acquire and re-sell them for research. The major legislation regulating the care and use of research animals is the Animal Welfare Act, which imposes restrictions on any experiment calculated to cause pain. Provisions of the Act are administered by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Their regulations are discussed in detail. To receive NIH support, an institution must submit an animal welfare assurance documenting its procedures for complying with federal regulations and appoint an institutional official with the authority to sign this assurance. It must also appoint an institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC). The IACUC reviews research protocols to ensure ...
Faculty are expected to obtain IACUC approval for these activities regardless of where the animals are maintained and/or the project is carried out. However, if a project is to be done at a site or in cooperation with an institution that has its own Animal Care and Use Committee, a copy of that committees approved form may be submitted to the IACUC.. IACUC approval is not required when all procedures are being carried out on tissues obtained from a slaughterhouse or from animals euthanized for another purpose. If, however, animals are procured and euthanized/slaughtered to obtain tissues for a particular project, that project must be approved by the IACUC.. ...
In his challenging article, Steneck (1997) criticized the creation of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) system established by the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act. He saw the IACUC review ...
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All animals were treated according to the ARVO Statement for the Use of Animals in Ophthalmic and Vision Research and standards set forth by the Baylor College of Medicine Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Protocols were approved by the Baylor College of Medicine Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Fourteen pigmented Dutch Belted rabbits weighing between 2 and 3 kg underwent filtration surgery in the right eye performed by a single surgeon (BJF) according to an established protocol with minor modifications during a 1-year period from August 2011 to August 2012. 45 Topical anesthetic (proparacaine 0.5%) was applied to the right eye of awake animals and the IOP recorded with a Tonopen (Reichert Technologies, Depew, NY). At least two measurements were taken, and the average of all recordings was documented as the IOP. Because significant rotation of the globe is common in anesthetized rabbits, the 12 oclock position of the limbus was identified with a marking pen prior to ...
It is important to minimize the 3 Ts: time, trash and trauma. Time is kept to a minimum by planning ahead, organizing equipment, and mastering the procedure to be performed. Trash is avoided by keeping instruments sterile, using proper aseptic technique, and wearing appropriate protective gear. Trauma is minimized by using gentle tissue handling techniques, using sharp instruments, keeping tissues moist with sterile saline, and placing sutures and staples to achieve tissue apposition while avoiding excessive tension. A subcuticular skin suture pattern will often preclude the chewing and premature removal of sutures by the animal.. Animals should be kept warm using an external heat source, particularly for procedures of any significant length (i.e., longer than 30 minutes). A circulating water blanket is the safest choice. Great care must be taken to prevent overheating or burning the animal when using other modalities. Some heating pads for rodents come with a rectal temperature probe that acts ...
Rodents with hanta virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and leptospirosis usually do not exhibit signs of disease. The disease agents are typically shed in the urine of infected animals and people acquire the infection by inhalation, oral ingestion and direct contact with contaminated urine or feces. These are occasionally transmitted from bite wounds and Leptospira can infect people through abraded skin. These diseases often initially appear as a mild flu-like illness in people but may progress to severe disease. LCMV infection is considered hazardous to the unborn fetus. Please refer to the WSU Hantavirus guidelines (http://www.iacuc.wsu.edu/documents/forms/pdf/Zoonoses_19.pdf) if working with wild rodents or in rodent-infested areas and buildings. Salmonellosis and campylobacterosis are acquired by contact and accidental ingestion of fecal material from infected rodents. Animals infected with these diseases may have diarrhea but some may show no symptoms of disease. Any animal ...
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has set forth federal regulations governing the care and use of laboratory animals in biomedical research that are more extensive than those covering human subjects. The federal law called the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) sets high standards of care for lab animals with regard to their housing, feeding, cleanliness, ventilation and medical needs. It also requires the use of anesthesia or analgesic drugs for potentially painful procedures and during post-operative care. Most importantly, research institutions are required - by law - to establish an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) to oversee all work with animals. The IACUCs require researchers to justify their need for animals; select the most appropriate species and use the fewest number of animals possible to answer a specific question. All IACUCs include at least one veterinarian and one community representative, unaffiliated with the institution. These committees have the authority to ...
MSU is responsible for managing and administering awards, both Federal and non-Federal, in a manner so as to ensure that funding is expended and associated programs are implemented in full accordance with U.S. statutory and public policy requirements, including but not limited to: those protecting public welfare, the environment, and prohibiting discrimination. MSU has established a number of programs to ensure compliance with policies and procedures such as the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP), Office of Research Compliance (ORC), Institutional Review Board (IRB), Technology Transfer Office (TTO), Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), Radiation Safety Committee (RSC), Office of Legal Counsel, and MSU Biosafety Committee. This section expands upon the requirements for research projects that entail the use of human and animal subjects, impacts to the environment, and/or potentially involve conflicts of interest. The OSP Electronic Proposal Clearance Form (ePCF) requires the ...
The Research Compliance Office coordinates and monitors Middleburys research programs to ensure compliance with applicable regulations, statutes, and institutional policies. We do this through compliance committees, reports to federal agencies, and training programs.. Committee Descriptions. Our compliance committees include faculty, staff, and community members, and we thoroughly review all research conducted with vertebrate animals, human subjects, and recombinant DNA.. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) oversees and evaluates all aspects of Middleburys animal care and use program, and upholds our commitment to the highest level of care and humane handling of animals to foster meaningful scientific research and teaching.. The Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) oversees research that involves recombinant DNA (rDNA).. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) oversees all research involving human subjects to ensure the rights and welfare of participants. ...
Yet one thing wrong with the proposed policy is that the Steering Committee is not required, at least not explicitly required in the draft, to have public representatives. The policy says it will be composed of "federal employees." This raises the worry that public input and concerns over chimera research will not be adequately considered and addressed, and the public will not have a say in the direction of research.. We already have a model for public involvement in animal research. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) must have a non-scientist member and a non-affiliated member that represent the interests and concerns of the public. Rebecca Dresser says their role is to, "serve as reminders that animal research and education activities must be defensible to the broader society whose support is necessary to continue these activities . . . Once nonscientists become part of the committee, investigators and other committee members must explain and justify scientific practices ...
The use of animal tissue in the manufacture of cell therapy products requires that the tissue be sourced in a controlled and documented manner and from animals bred and raised in captivity in countries or geographic regions that have appropriate national health status, disease prevention, and control systems. In addition, the care and use of animals should be approved by a certified institutional animal care and use committee. Donor animals must have documented lineage, be obtained from closed herds or colonies, and be under health maintenance and monitoring programs. The facility for housing these animals should be USDA certified (large vertebrate animals) or Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International (AAALAC) certified (small vertebrate animals) and should meet the recommendations stated in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (National Research Council, 1996), which can be obtained from the AAALAC. Such facility should be staffed with ...
Research involving Human Subjects, Animals, Recombinant DNA, Toxins, or Infectious Agents Federal regulations require that principal investigators planning to use human subjects; animal subjects; or recombinant DNA, toxins, or infectious agents as part of their research projects must have their protocols reviewed and approved by federally mandated and regulated compliance committees. In accordance with this mandate, NDSU has established three committees to review and approve human, animal, and biosafety research and to set institutional policies and procedures involving these regulated areas. Human subject research is reviewed by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Animal research, teaching, testing, or exhibition projects are reviewed by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). And research using recombinant DNA, infectious agents, human blood, bodily fluids or tissues is reviewed by the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC). When a grant is awarded, before release of grant ...
Radiosynthesis of [14C]Dasatinib. [14C]Dasatinib ([14C]BMS-354825) was synthesized at Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (Princeton, NJ) (Allentoff et al., 2008). The specific activity was 31.9 μCi/mg, and the radioactive purity was 98.7%.. Animal Welfare. Before study initiation, the protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee at Covance Laboratories Inc. (Madison, WI).. Test Animals, Housing, and Randomization. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (Harlan, Indianapolis, IN), approximately 8 to 9 days postpartum, were used for the lacteal secretion study. The rats weighed 287 to 351 g. Female Sprague-Dawley rats on gestation day 18 were used for the maternal and fetal tissue distribution study. The rats weighed 258 to 355 g. For all the studies, the animals were acclimated for at least 3 days before dose administration. During acclimation and the testing period, the animals were housed in individual polycarbonate shoe box cages. Certified Rodent Diet no. 8728CM (Harlan Teklad, ...
This Chemical Hygiene Plan has been developed by Environmental Health and Safety in collaboration with the Laboratory Safety Committees. It describes in detail the policies, practices, procedures, equipment, and facilities used by Boston Universitys Charles River Campus (CRC) and Medical Campus (BUMC) to ensure that all persons who work with chemicals at this institution do so in a safe manner and in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and municipal regulations and University guidelines. Please see the roles & responsibilities section of the CHP for details on the designation of authority and responsibility for implementation of the CHP.. In addition to the Laboratory Safety Committee, several other committees have authority to regulate certain aspects of work in laboratories. These committees may include the Radiation Safety Committee, the Institutional Biosafety Committee, the Laser Safety Committee, and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. This document does not ...
Notice of NIH Policy to All Applicants: Meeting rosters are provided for information purposes only. Applicant investigators and institutional officials must not communicate directly with study section members about an application before or after the review. Failure to observe this policy will create a serious breach of integrity in the peer review process, and may lead to actions outlined in NOT-OD-14-073 and NOT-OD-15-106, including removal of the application from immediate review. ...
Notice of NIH Policy to All Applicants: Meeting rosters are provided for information purposes only. Applicant investigators and institutional officials must not communicate directly with study section members about an application before or after the review. Failure to observe this policy will create a serious breach of integrity in the peer review process, and may lead to actions outlined in NOT-OD-14-073 and NOT-OD-15-106, including removal of the application from immediate review. ...
Alice R. Goepfert, M.D., professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologys Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, has been named associate dean for Graduate Medical Education in the School of Medicine and Designated Institutional Official for UAB Hospital ...
Alice R. Goepfert, M.D., professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologys Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, has been named associate dean for Graduate Medical Education in the School of Medicine and Designated Institutional Official for UAB Hospital ...
MSMR is a member organization that focuses on the use of animals in biomedical research, teaching and testing - a critically important, and often controversial issue underlying medical progress. We also take an active interest in life science education, and in other crucially important topics in biomedicine, such as the work of the oversight committees charged with protecting humans (Institutional Review Boards and Institutional Biosafety Committees) and animals (Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees) in research studies.. We provide materials and experiences to classroom teachers and their students, sponsor professional development training for the research community, and engage in public outreach and legislative monitoring regarding issues important to our members.. Our Mission: We promote and enhance biomedical research, including the humane care and use of animals, for the improved health and well-being of people, animals and the environment.. In fulfilling our mission, we foster a ...
Slice Preparation. All experiments were carried out in accordance with the Guide for Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, 1996) and were approved by the University of Texas Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Slices used in this study were prepared from male Sprague-Dawley rats (postnatal days 21-33). Rats were anesthetized with halothane, decapitated, and the brain was rapidly removed and placed in an ice-cold choline-based, oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) containing 110 mM choline Cl, 25 mM NaHCO3, 1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 2.5 mM KCl, 25 mM dextrose, 7 mM MgSO4, 0.5 mM CaCl2, 11.6 mM sodium ascorbate, and 3.1 mM sodium pyruvate, bubbled with 95% O2/5% CO2 (all chemicals obtained from Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO). Horizontal midbrain slices (210 μm) were prepared using a vibrating slicer (VT1000S; Leica, Wetzlar, Germany). The slices were then maintained at 32°C before electrophysiological recordings for a minimum of 60 min in aCSF ...
Subjects. The procedures were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of the Ponce School of Medicine in compliance with National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals (Publication number DHHS NIH 86-23). Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 270-300 gm were transported from the Ponce School of Medicine colony to a satellite facility where they were individually housed in transparent polyethylene cages inside a negative-pressure Biobubble (Colorado Clean Room, Ft. Collins, CO). Rats were maintained on a 12 hr light/dark schedule with ad libitum access to water. Food was restricted to 10-15 gm of standard laboratory rat chow per day until rats reached 85% of their original weight. They were then trained to press a bar for food on a variable interval schedule of reinforcement (VI-60), in a standard operant chamber (Coulborn Instruments, Allentown, PA). This was done to maintain a constant level of activity against which freezing can be ...
Subjects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (Charles River, Wilmington, MA) weighing 200 to 300 g were used in all experiments. Animals were group-housed in Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care-approved facilities at Abbott Laboratories (Abbott Park, IL) in a temperature-regulated environment with lights on between 7:00 AM and 8:00 PM. Food and water were available ad libitum except during testing. All animal handling and experimental protocols were approved by an institutional animal care and use committee. All experiments were performed during the light cycle.. Acute Thermal Nociception. The response to acute thermal stimulation was determined using a commercially available paw thermal stimulator (UARDG; University of California, San Diego, CA). Rats were placed individually in Plexiglas cubicles mounted on a glass surface maintained at 30°C and allowed a 30-min habituation period. A thermal stimulus, in the form of radiant heat emitted from a focused projection bulb, ...
Animal care guidelines according to the ARVO Statement for the Use of Animals in Ophthalmic and Vision Research were followed. All procedures were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee (St. Vincents Animal Ethics Committee protocol No. 060/09). Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J mice and Nox2 knockout mice (Nox2 KO) on a C57BL/6J background were supplied by Mary Dinauer (Department of Pediatrics, Washington University of School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO), 12 and bred at the EMSU mouse facility (Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia). The Nox2 genotype was confirmed with conventional genotyping (see Supplementary Fig. S2; Nox2 WT forward primer, 5′AAGAGAAACTCCTCTGCTGTGAA-3′; reverse primer, 5′CGCACTGGAACCCCTGAGAAAGG-3′; Nox2 KO forward primer, 5′AAGAGAAACTCCTCTGCTGTGAA-3′; reverse primer, GTTCTAATTCCATCAGAAGCTTATCG-3′; Sigma-Aldrich, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia). The OIR was induced by exposing 7-day-old neonatal mice (P7) and their mothers to 75% oxygen for 5 days (74.91 ...
Animals. Male BALB/c mice (10 weeks old) were purchased from Vital River Laboratory Animal Technology. Mice were housed in a temperature-controlled room under a 12 h light/dark cycle, given free access to water, and fed ad libitum on a standard chow. All animal care and procedures were in accordance with the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidelines. After being housed for 2 to 3 weeks, mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation at 4 h intervals ,24 h with one mouse at each time point for each group. These experiments were done three times. Prostate tissue was dissected, rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen, homogenized in Trizol reagent (Invitrogen), and stored at −80°C until RNA extraction. Total RNA for real-time PCR was extracted according to the manufacturers protocol (Invitrogen).. Reagents. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was from Sigma-Aldrich. Per1 (N-20), AR (N-20), prostate-specific antigen (PSA; C-19), myc (9E10), and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (H-250) antibodies were from ...
Introduction Before advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) methods allowed for three-dimensional (3D) interrogation of myocardial strain, one-dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) strain analysis was the standard. The aim of this study was to investigate the incremental value of CMR-based 3D strain and to test the hypothesis that 3D strain is superior to 1D or 2D strain analysis in the assessment of viability using a porcine model of infarction. Method All animal studies complied with the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and conformed to Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. MI was induced in twenty young farm pigs with weights from twenty five to thirty five kilograms. An Angioplasty balloon was inserted into the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and inflated to a location just distal to the second diagonal branch of the LAD. After One hundred and fifty minutes, the occlusion of the artery was terminated. All surviving animals progressed to ...
Clenbuterol, a beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist, is used therapeutically to treat respiratory conditions in the horse. However, by virtue of its mechanism of action it has been suggested that clenbuterol may also have repartitioning affects in horses and as such the potential to affect performance. Clenbuterol decreases the percent fat and increases fat-free mass following high dose administration in combination with intense exercise in horses. In the current study, microarray analysis and real-time PCR were used to study the temporal effects of low and high dose chronic clenbuterol administration on differential gene expression of several skeletal muscle myosin heavy chains, genes involved in lipid metabolism and the β2-adrenergic receptor. The effect of clenbuterol administration on differential gene expression has not been previously reported in the horse, therefore the primary objective of the current study was to describe clenbuterol-induced temporal changes in gene expression following chronic
Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 12, Harlan Laboratories) 220-245 g at embryonic day (E)2 were allowed to acclimate to the animal facility for 2 d before experimental manipulation. The pregnant dams were individually housed in a sealed and vented cage (Sealed Space Plus, Techniplast). Animals were housed under standard laboratory conditions in a temperature 20°C ± 1, and relative humidity 60% controlled environment, with a normal 12 h light/dark cycle (lights on 7:00 A.M.-7:00 P.M.). Food and water were available ad libitum. All procedures were performed in accordance with University of Colorado Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidelines for the humane use of laboratory rats in biological research.. Dams were randomly assigned to either a treatment group receiving prenatal stress (n = 5) or to a control nonstressed group (n = 4). To avoid litter size confounds due to a high mortality rate in the animals receiving both stress and terbutaline, pregnant dams were exposed to a daily ...
Mice. Female C57BL/6, BALB/c, and FVB/N mice were purchased from Charles River Laboratories. A breeder pair of HLA-A2/Kb was generously provided by Dr. L. Sherman (The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA). These mice were maintained and bred in the animal core facility at the University of Pennsylvania. The FVB/N HER-2/neu transgenic mice ( 20) were housed and bred at the Veterans Administration Hospital affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania. Mice were 6 to 8 wk old when used at the start of the experiments, which were done in accordance with regulations by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of the University of Pennsylvania.. Antibodies. The anti-HMW-MAA monoclonal antibody (mAb) VT80.12 has been previously described ( 21). Goat anti-mouse IgG-PE, anti-CD8b.2-FITC, anti-IFN-γ-PE, anti-mouse CD31-FITC, anti-mouse CD8α-PE, rat IgG2a, and rat IgG2b isotype controls were purchased from BD Biosciences. Anti-α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA)-Cy3 and anti-Flag M2 mAbs were ...
Mouse lines. Albumin-tv-a and albumin-cre transgenic mice, and Trp53 and Ink4a/Arf conditional mutant mice have been previously described ( 24, 28- 30). All animals were kept in specific pathogen-free housing at the University of Massachusetts Medical School with abundant food and water. All experiments were reviewed and approved by the University of Massachusetts Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.. Virus delivery. The RCAS-GFP and RCAS-PyMT vectors have been previously described ( 31, 32). DF1 chicken fibroblasts ( 33, 34) transfected with RCAS vectors were maintained in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in humidified 37°C incubators under 5% CO2. Cells to be injected were harvested, washed once with PBS, and resuspended in PBS at a final concentration of 2 × 105 cells/μL. About 5 μL of the cell suspension was delivered by injection into the liver parenchyma of 2- or 3-day-old animals using Hamilton syringes attached with 26-gauge needles.. Tumor harvest and ...
Mice. Male C57BL/6J (WT), B6.SJL-Ptprca Pepcb/BoyJ (WT CD45.1), and B6.129S4-Ccr2tm1Ifc/J (Ccr2-/-) mice were obtained from The Jackson Laboratory. AM DKO mice have been described previously (87). Ccr2−/− and AM DKO mice have been backcrossed for more than 9 generations to a C57BL/6J background. All mice were bred under specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions with a 12-hour light/dark cycle in a temperature-controlled environment and ad libitum access to water and food pellets. All experimental protocols were conducted in accordance with the NIH guidelines and were approved by the Yale Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Mice were randomly allocated to experimental groups by coin flip and investigators were blinded to group allocation and/or genotype until after data analysis. Group size calculation in ICH experiments is based on our experience with the variability in these models, accounting for a resulting effect size ƒ (by analysis of variance [ANOVA]) of 0.6 with α less than ...
Animal studies. All studies involving mice were approved by the UCSD Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. C57BL/6J mice were made diabetic by a low dose STZ protocol (AMDCC). The Sod2+/- mice were purchased from Jackson Laboratories and studied at the University of Michigan. Akita mice were derived from a cross between C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita males and C57BL/6J females or an F1 cross between male Akita C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita and female DBA (all purchased from Jackson Laboratories). Ampka2-/- mice were from Benoit Viollets lab and sent courtesy of Jay Chung at the NIH. In the interventional study with AICAR, diabetic and control mice were randomized to AICAR (500 mg/kg, i.p. daily), or metformin (150 mg/kg i.p. daily) (Sigma-Aldrich) was given to the F1 (DBA/2J × C57BL/6J) -Ins2Akita diabetic mice for a period of 2 weeks. Each experimental protocol consisted of 4 groups, wild-type control, wild-type diabetic (STZ treated), transgenic control, and transgenic diabetic (STZ treated). Each group ...
Animals. Male Wistar rats weighing 175-200 g were obtained from Charles River Breeding Farms (Montreal, Canada or Monza, Italy). The rats were fed standard laboratory chow and tap water. All experimental procedures described below were approved by our institutional animal research committees and were performed in accordance with nationally approved guidelines for the treatment of laboratory animals. In all experiments described below the sample size in each group was at least 5.. Effects of aspirin and NCX-4016. Rats were deprived of food for 18-20 h with free access to drinking water and were treated orally with aspirin (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg), equimolar doses of NCX-4016, or vehicle (1% carboxymethylcellulose). Three hours later, the rats were euthanized for blind assessment of gastric damage (28). The lengths (in mm) of all hemorrhagic lesions were measured with digital calipers, and the "gastric damage score" was calculated for each stomach by summing these values. After the damage was ...
The SIRC Office has prepared a number of general risk assessments for chemical agents to aid workers is addressing the hazards posed by various classes of chemicals. The ultimate aim of a Chemical Agents Risk Assessment is to assess the risk from the use / presence of a chemical agent in the University, to the health and safety of persons and to identify control measures designed to reduce the risk from those chemicals to as low a level as possible. These documents must be reviewed by chemical users in order to ensure that they adequately manage the risks posed by the specific chemicals that they use and the processes that they undertake.. ...
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Omega-3 fatty acids are incredibly important for your body and brain. This article lists 17 science-based health benefits of omega-3s.
RNA WebRing,A science-based webring to link together molecular biology groups who work with, or are interested in RNA transcription, processing, editing and other aspects of RNA metabolism.
RNA WebRing,A science-based webring to link together molecular biology groups who work with, or are interested in RNA transcription, processing, editing and other aspects of RNA metabolism.
RNA WebRing,A science-based webring to link together molecular biology groups who work with, or are interested in RNA transcription, processing, editing and other aspects of RNA metabolism.
7 Science-Based Benefits of Soursop for Cancer Treatments many cancer patients use Soursop to cure cancer because tis rich of anti oxidants properties.
Well, were back. Yes, after having our WordPress database somehow borked to the point where no new posts could be added and no existing posts could be edited since Friday, Science-Based Medicine is back in business-finally! As a result, some of you might have seen this post elsewhere, as it was considered to be somewhat time-sensitive, and I didnt want to delay,.... ...
SAGE: 11/21/12. Background Meta-analyses of clinical trial safety data have risen in importance beyond regulatory submissions. During drug development, sponsors need to recognize safety signals early and adjust the development program accordingly, so as to facilitate the assessment of causality. Once a product is marketed, sponsors add postapproval clinical trial data to the body of information to help understand existing safety concerns or those that arise from other postapproval data sources, such as spontaneous reports.. ...
PRC performs drug efficacy studies on animals provided by the Animal House and Research facility, which is located within the University campus on a 1200 square meter area and 350 square meter building.. ​JUST has adopted the Animal Care and Use Committee (ACUC) guidelines of the National Institute of Health (NIH), MD, USA several years ago.. ...
Park Slopes Methodist Hospital looks to expand - New York Methodist Hospital is looking to expand. At a Community Board 6 Land Use Committee meeting on Thursday July 12 at the hospital officials from Methodist Hospital outlined a plan that would ...
A Science-Based Dentist. Co-host of the Prism Podcast with Clay Jones, where we analyze the spectrum of scientific, rational, and critical thought. Find us on Twitter: Grant: @skepticaldds Clay: @skepticpedi Prism Podcast: @prismpodcast
Addressing one clients on-farm challenge is a clear example of what motivates the employees of BIOMIN to work towards better customer outcomes each day.
Addressing one clients on-farm challenge is a clear example of what motivates the employees of BIOMIN to work towards better customer outcomes each day.
Grain, flour and feed industry news and commentary offering insight on business, new products, market and product trends, supplier innovations and more.
These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease ...
While everyone rightly praised the efforts of her surgeon and physical therapist, another factor in her recovery was ignored: luck. Why are doctors and patients so reluctant to discuss a phenomenon that permeates medicine every day?. more. ...
NuvoCare was established in 2006 by Ryan J. Foley after 10 years of corporate research and development experience in the Nutraceutical industry. Ryans goal is to continually produce the highest quality science-based health solutions utilizing advanced patented ingredient research.
Note: These taxa pages are a work-in-progress. The fact that particular taxa cannot be found on our hierarchial taxa lists does not mean that the organisms are not inhabiting the park. Your help in identifying these missing taxa, and then presenting science-based proposals and funding for inventorying these hidden, yet intrinsically valuable life forms is much appreciated by the DLIA staff and Board of Directors, as well as the Parks Inventory and Monitoring personnel.. ...
Join the GGSC for an immersive, in-person experience May 2-5, 2019, in Scotts Valley, CA. With Jack Kornfield, Barbara Fredrickson, Richard Davidson, Dacher Keltner & other experts on the Science of a Meaningful Life. 13 CEs. ...
The additive strength derived from our parks, our field conservation work, and our global health network is unparalleled. Yet we could never do this work and achieve these results without the collaboration and support of hundreds of partners. With offices across the globe, WCS is well positioned to engage with representatives of government and civil society whose goals align with our science-based conservation mission.. ...
Isagenix does not work, states Dr. Harriet Hall on Science-Based Medicine. The product allegedly aids in weight loss, improves energy and performance, supports healthy aging and detoxifies the body....
Solgar, solgar is dedicated to providing consumers with quality, innovative, science-based supplements, when your serious about your health..its solgar.
Solgar, solgar is dedicated to providing consumers with quality, innovative, science-based supplements, when your serious about your health..its solgar.
Work fun? Dr. Paul Zak shows you a science-based way to create a workplace people enjoy coming to and foster high trust levels to boost performance.
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Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Biochemical Journal.. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address.. ...
Approved by Animal Institute Committee: 11/14/01. Reapproved: 6/15/11. Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) follows U.S. Government Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Teaching and the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals which state:. "Proper use of animals, including the avoidance or minimization of discomfort, distress and pain when consistent with sound scientific practices, is imperative. Unless the contrary is established, investigators should consider that procedures that cause pain or distress in human beings may cause pain or distress in other animals.". "Procedures with animals that may cause more than momentary or slight pain or distress should be performed with appropriate sedation, analgesia, or anesthesia, [unless the omission of these agents is justified for scientific reasons in writing by the investigator]. Surgical or other painful procedures should not be performed on ...
The most important thing to remember regarding field safety is that all the same requirements and regulations that must be followed in labs and animal facilities must also be adhered to in the field! This includes proper handling, storage, labeling, shipping, and disposal of all materials and appropriate use of PPE. Field work with animals has the same risks as work conducted in animal facilities, but those risks are compounded by risks associated with climate/weather, terrain, native plants, insects, wildlife and distance from help. Work with your unit safety officer and/or EHSRM to assess the risk factors associated with your specific location(s) and activities. The UA Statewide Office of Risk Management has published two documents related to remote travel: the UA Remote Travel Safety Guide and the UA Remote Travel Planning & Resource Guide. These documents provide excellent suggestions on how to prepare and pack for remote travel and address the most common health and safety risks encountered ...
USDA Animal Care, a unit within the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, administers the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). This federal law establishes requirements concerning the transportation, sale, and handling of certain animals and includes restrictions on the importation of live dogs for purposes of resale, prohibitions on animal fighting ventures, and provisions intended to prevent the theft of personal pets. Regulations established under the AWA set standards for the humane care and treatment for certain animals that are exhibited to the public, sold for use as pets, used in research, or transported commercially. Facilities using regulated animals for regulated purposes must provide their animals with adequate housing, sanitation, nutrition, water and veterinary care, and they must protect their animals from extreme weather and temperatures. The regulations also establish specific requirements that must be met prior to the importation of dogs for resale purposes. Highly-trained USDA ...
The Acting Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture [hereinafter Complainant], instituted this disciplinary administrative proceeding under the Animal Welfare Act, as amended (7 U.S.C. §§ 2131-2159) [hereinafter the Animal Welfare Act]; the regulations and standards issued under the Animal Welfare Act (9 C.F.R. §§ 1.1-3.142) [hereinafter the Regulations and Standards]; and the Rules of Practice Governing Formal Adjudicatory Proceedings Instituted by the Secretary Under Various Statutes (7 C.F.R. §§ 1.130-.151) [hereinafter the Rules of Practice], by filing a Complaint on February 22, 1996.. The Complaint alleges that: (1) on October 5, 1994, November 15, 1994, and January 31, 1995, Samuel Zimmerman [hereinafter Respondent] failed to maintain complete records showing the acquisition, disposition, and identification of animals in willful violation of section 10 of the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. § 2140) and section 2.75(a)(1) ...
The Southeastern Electric Exchange Joint Use Committee Meeting will be held April 18-19, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. KH Partner Tom Magee will participate in a legal panel. For more information, please contact Tom Magee ([email protected]; 202.434.4128).
Animal welfare in the United Kingdom relates to the treatment of animals in fields such as agriculture, hunting, medical testing and the domestic ownership of animals. It is distinct from animal conservation. The Animal Welfare Act 2006 is the latest animal welfare legislation in England and Wales. It superseded and consolidated more than 20 other pieces of legislation, such as the Protection of Animals Act 1934 and the Abandonment of Animals Act 1960. The 2006 Act introduced tougher penalties for neglect and cruelty, including fines of up to £20,000, a maximum jail term of 51 weeks and a lifetime ban on some owners keeping pets. Enforcers of the act such as the police or local authority inspectors (but not organisations such as the RSPCA) have more powers to intervene if they suspect a pet is being neglected. The Animal Welfare Act 2006 also introduced a welfare offence for the first time. This places a duty of care on pet owners to provide for their animals basic needs, such as adequate food ...
Any research, teaching, or creative activity that involves the use of vertebrate animals must be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) prior to ordering animals and prior to commencement of the activity. Applications for such approval may be obtained from the director of the Division of Laboratory Animal Resources (DLAR) or from the Univer-sity coordinator for research compliance. The chairs, deans, and division heads of departments in which laboratory animals are routinely used also have a supply of these applications.. The following is a brief summary of the federal, state, and campus regulations that govern the use of laboratory animals at Stony Brook:. 1. Except as stated in provision 2, all vertebrate animals must be ordered through DLAR. If a University purchase order is unacceptable to the supplier, the DLAR must be so informed in order to determine whether another supplier may be contacted.. 2. The IACUC may waive the requirement of mandatory acquisition of ...
Animal experimentation is a crucial component of scientific research and education. Most advances in modern biomedical science can be traced back to original studies in animals. The university continues to support this critical research while fully appreciating its additional complexities.. All animal research must be approved by the universitys Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), which works close with the Comparative Medicine-Laboratory Animal Facilities (CM-LAF) to help researchers develop effective and compliant protocols. ...
How much is at stake? There is no easy answer, but one important indicator of how this animal research complex continues to grow is how much the National Institutes of Health (NIH) spends on animal research. Although it is not possible to disaggregate the budgets to identify money spent on animal research for individual projects, it is possible to get a sense through Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee information. Reliable government sources have informed NAVS that approximately 47% of NIH-funded grants have an animal research-based component. This number has been fairly steady over the past ten years. In 2015, the NIH budget of almost $22 billion resulted in well over $10 billion in funding for projects that included animal experimentation.. Obviously the salaries of researchers and technicians who carry out animal experiments, as well as income from patents for the drugs and medical devices they develop, provide financial incentives and career advancement to conduct research on ...
Schulman Associates IRB and Falcon Consulting Group, a provider of Clinical Quality Assurance (CQA) and Good Clinical Practice (GCP) services, have formed a joint venture-Provision Research Compliance Services.. Provision offers global consultancy services for development and implementation of GCP and Human Research Protection (HRP) procedural standards and programs for the conduct of clinical research studies.. "There has never been a collaboration of GCP and HRP industry leaders specifically focused on meeting the compliance needs of research institutions around the world," said Michael Woods, Schulman Associates IRB president, CEO and institutional official. "Provision makes it easier for institutions to achieve their compliance goals and to engage in global development programs. It also helps study sponsors follow a simpler path to consistent compliance practices across a global network of research institutions.". Provision provides services that combine the GCP quality assurance experience ...
Figure 1 shows the association of date with number of R01 applications received by NIH for consideration in the May 2015 council round, the latest round for which complete award data are available. The primary R01 receipt date for new, unrevised applications was October 6, 2014. NIH received 2,788 applications through October 5, the day before the deadline; an additional 2068, or 43% of the total, came in on the October 6 due date. Even among the applications received before the deadline, the vast majority came in the week before. It may be worth noting that it is an institutional official, usually in the office of sponsored programs that is responsible for submit the applications. So PIs may have completed their application earlier, but may not have built in enough time for the authorized organizational official to process and submit the application earlier.. Perhaps submission patterns are more timely for small business applications. Figure 2 shows corresponding data for Small Business ...
CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are widely portrayed in the developing neurons mediating a variety of fundamental functions such as growth cone guidance neuronal polarity and axon elongation. beinteracted with cytoskeleton proteins. Taken collectively we exposed that CRMPs were colocalized with cytoskeleton in hippocampal neurons especially in growth cones. CRMPs can interact with both tubulin and actin therefore mediating neuronal development. by GST-pulldown assay. Materials and methods Animals The experiments were carried out on 1-day-old pups of Sprague-Dawley rats. All animal methods were performed Pracinostat in stringent accordance with the recommendations in the Guidebook for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. The protocol was authorized by the Jinan University or college Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). All attempts were made to minimize the suffering and quantity of animals used. Providers TRIzol reagent and SuperScript VILO ...
Chemicals. MRL-I, [ethyl-14C]MRL-I, MRL-II, [13CD3]MRL-II, and [methyl-14C]MRL-II (Fig. 1) were synthesized at Merck Research Laboratories and were provided as their arginine salts. Alamethicin, saccharolactone, and UDPGA were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, MO). Acetonitrile and methanol (HPLC grade) were obtained from Fisher Scientific Co. (Pittsburgh, PA). All other reagents were of analytical or HPLC grade.. Animals. Male Sprague-Dawley and obese Zucker rats were obtained from Charles River Laboratories Inc. (Wilmington, MA). They were housed in cages and maintained on a 12-h light/dark cycle. Access to food and water was allowed ad libitum. Rats used in this study were 14 to 16 weeks old; the Sprague-Dawley rats weighed ∼300 g and the obese Zucker rats weighed ∼600 g. All procedures for animal experiments were approved by the Merck Research Laboratories Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.. Studies in Bile Duct-Cannulated Rats. [14C]MRL-I (1 mg/kg) or [14C]MRL-II (0.5 ...
Dr. Kamal is a Research Associate Professor, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. He is a Chair, Subcommittee for Research Safety and member of Research and Development committee , North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health Care System, Malcom Randall VAMC. Also a member of Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health Care System.
Synthesis of bCD-PLL conjugate. bCD-PLL was prepared according to the synthetic procedure described in our previous communication (18). Briefly, bCD protein was isolated from transformed Escherichia coli cultures. The MRI contrast agent Gd3+-DOTA, a fluorescent probe rhodamine, and biotin were functionalized into the PLL moiety, respectively. The molar ratio of bCD hexamer/PLL/rhodamine/Gd3+-DOTA/biotin in bCD-PLL was measured as 1:1:1:15:3.. Mouse model and tumor implantation. All in vivo studies were done in compliance with institutional guidelines established by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Johns Hopkins University. wt or VEGF-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were inoculated at a concentration of 1 × 106 in 0.05 mL HBSS in the upper left thoracic mammary fat pad of female severe combined immunodeficient mice. Tumors were palpable at 10 to 15 days after implantation and reached a volume of approximately 250 to 400 mm3 within 30 to 35 days, at which ...
Mice, cell lines, peptides, and dimerizer drug. Six- to eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were purchased from the Center for Comparative Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and Harlan Sprague Dawley Laboratory. CD45.1 C57BL/6 mice, B6.129S1-IL12atm1Jm/J (IL-12p35-deficient), B6.129S1-IL12btm1Jm/J (IL-12p40-deficient), B6.129S1-Ifnγtm1Ts/J (IFN-γ-deficient), and B6.129S4-Cxcl10tm1Adl/J (IP-10-deficient) mice were purchased from the Jackson Laboratory and maintained under pathogen-free conditions in the Transgenic Mouse Facility at Baylor College of Medicine. Animal procedures were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Baylor College of Medicine. E.G7-OVA, EL-4, YAC-1, HEK293, B16.F10, and THP-1 cells were purchased from ATCC and cultured as recommended by the vendor. Peptides were produced at 80%-95% purity by Genemed Synthesis Inc. Dimerizer drugs, AP1903, and AP20187 were provided by ARIAD Pharmaceuticals. Recombinant plasmids and Ads are described in Supplemental ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University. Bangkok, Thailand. We divided 14 mice into equalsized sham and Chr IR surgery groups. The baseline blood chemistry tests were conducted 2 weeks before nephrectomy (-2 wk) using blood samples obtained from a tail vein. One week later a Chr IR injury was made as previously described [ 10 ], with slight modifications as follows. In brief, the surgery was conducted in 2 stages. In the first stage at 1 week after baseline blood collection (-1 wk), an abdominal incision was. ...
Selective modulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is thought to regulate processes impaired in schizophrenia, Alzheimers disease, and other dementias. One approach to target α7 nAChRs is by positive allosteric modulation. Structurally diverse compounds, including PNU-120596, 4-naphthalene-1-yl-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3-H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline-8-sulfonic acid amide (TQS), and 5-hydroxyindole (5-HI) have been identified as positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), but their receptor interactions and pharmacological profiles remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated interactions of these compounds at human α7 nAChRs, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Genistein was found to function as a PAM. Two types of PAM profiles were observed. 5-HI and genistein predominantly affected the apparent peak current (type I) whereas PNU-120596 and TQS increased the apparent peak current and evoked a distinct weakly decaying ...
Extracellular ATP acting through ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors, acts as a signalling molecule in the brain and periphery and has numerous physiological functions (Burnstock, 1999; North, 2002). When its role in regulation of body temperature (Tb) during infection is considered the ability to induce a release of cytokines seems to be potentially very significant. We have shown previously that ATP acting on P2 receptors in the CNS plays an important role in thermoregulation during fever (Gourine et al. 2002). In this study we investigated the effects of systemic P2 receptor blockade on regulation of Tb during fever.. Experiments were performed in adult male Wistar rats (280-350 g) and were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (in Minsk). Rats were anaesthetised (ketamine [87.0 mg kg-1] + xylazine [13.0 mg kg-1]) and a telemetry transmitter was implanted into the abdomen for monitoring of Tb. After a 7-day recovery period, fever was induced by intraperitoneal ...
In October 2016, the Ministry for Primary Industries began an investigation into allegations of breaches of the Animal Welfare Act 1999 at the Animal Control Unit of the Napier City Council.. The allegations related to the period between August 2015 and October 2016. The investigation was concluded in January 2017 and a report released in May 2017.. The report concluded there was either no or insufficient evidence of breaches of the Animal Welfare Act 1999.. ...
Lab animals are helping us unlock the mysteries of disease and deserve our respect. The US Government closely regulates the care of animals in research.
Depending on the agent to be used, the committee with oversight of the use of that agent will require a completed internal form, an informative abstract of the work to be done and a standard operating procedure for the use of the agent in animals. In the standard operating procedures consideration should be given to the amount of hazardous agent to be used, its toxic level for both animals and humans (LD50) and its metabolism, if involved, so that decisions can be made about its presence in excreta and bedding that require special handling. The speed of the approval process is directly related to the completeness of the abstract and the standard operating procedures.. The use of hazardous chemicals including carcinogens, teratogens and toxins, is reviewed by the Laboratory Safety Committee (internal form RO-14).. The use of biohazardous etiological agents, recombinant DNA, as well as human blood, tissues, body fluids, and primary cells or cell lines are reviewed by the Institutional Biosafety ...
We continue to have a positive and open dialogue with the AAALAC Council on Accreditation centered on the wide array of initiatives weve implemented to further strengthen our animal care and use program. We are on track to submit our Institutional Animal Care & Use Program Description by April 1, which will be followed by a mandatory site re-visit from AAALAC between May and July 2017. Additional details about the site visit, including the specific dates that AAALAC will be on campus, will be provided as they become available ...
The Animal Welfare Act sets out an ethical framework for the use of animals in research, testing, and teaching. Before a project using animals can take place, it must be approved by an animal ethics committee, which is also responsible for monitoring the project. Every project that uses animals must demonstrate that the benefits of the research (for example, to the maintenance of human health or the production and productivity of animals) are not outweighed by the likely harm to the animals being used for research.. Find out more about animals in research, testing, and teaching. ...
The 3Rs: Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement, are important from a legal, ethical and scientific standpoint. All research using animals in the US, for example at universities and pharmaceutical companies, is regulated by the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), which is administered by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) of the US Department of Agriculture…
Male SHR and normotensive WKY rats were obtained from Charles River Breeding Laboratories Inc (Wilmington, Mass) at 14 weeks of age and were maintained thereafter in accordance with our institutional animal care committee guidelines after prior approval of the experimental protocol. They were housed in temperature-controlled rooms on a 12-hour light/dark cycle and were fed usual rat chow and water ad libitum. At 23 weeks of age, the rats were randomly assigned to one of five groups of 16 rats each: untreated normotensive WKY-C (tap water), untreated SHR-C (tap water), SHR-E (30 mg·kg−1·d−1 by gavage), SHR-L (30 mg·kg−1· d−1 by gavage), and SHR-E&L (5 mg·kg−1 ·d−1 of each agent by gavage). The rats followed their respective treatments for 12 weeks. All rats were trained to run on a motor-driven treadmill (Columbus Instruments) at speeds ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 m/min, 0% grade, for ≈5 min/d for 2 to 3 days a week during the final 2 weeks of the protocol to familiarize them with ...
Animals, chemicals, and diets. Male Crj:CD-1 (ICR) mice (Charles River Japan, Inc., Tokyo, Japan) ages 5 weeks were used in this study. They were maintained at Kanazawa Medical University Animal Facility according to Institutional Animal Care Guidelines. All animals were housed in plastic cages (five or six mice per cage) with free access to drinking water and a pelleted basal diet and CRF-1 (Oriental Yeast Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). The mice were under controlled conditions of humidity (50 ± 10%), light (12/12-h light/dark cycle), and temperature (23 ± 2°C). They were quarantined for the first 7 days then separated randomly by body weight into experimental and control groups. A colonic carcinogen azoxymethane and sulfasalazine were purchased from Sigma-Chemical Co. (St. Louis, MO), and DSS with a molecular weight of 36,000 to 50,000 was purchased from ICN Biochemicals, Inc. (Aurora, OH). The DSS for induction of colitis was dissolved in water at a concentration of 1% (w/v). UDCA was obtained ...
Alternative therapies common among kids, study finds Proposed legislation integrates chiropractic physicians into public health service . "A newly proposed bill, H.R. 2851, in the U.S. House of Representatives calls for more incorporation of doctors
Heres an informative and well done skeptical comic from those geniuses over at PhD comics: We can glean a number of fascinating things from this comic. First, I bet you didnt know where the term mesmerizing came from. Youre welcome. Second, while medical professionals who practice science-based medicine would argue that the placebo effect is…
IFIC Foundation would like to congratulate the European Food Information Council (EUFIC), which is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year! Similar to IFIC in its mission, EUFIC provides balanced and science-based information on nutrition and health, food safety and quality, and consumer insights in Europe.
Definition of Indian Child Welfare Act in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is Indian Child Welfare Act? Meaning of Indian Child Welfare Act as a legal term. What does Indian Child Welfare Act mean in law?
The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is governed by a system of polices set forth by the federal Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare, Public Health Service and the United States Department of Agriculture. The IACUC oversees and routinely evaluates all components and facilities related to vertebrate animal care and use… assists institutions in caring for and using animals in ways judged to be scientifically, technically, and humanely appropriate… assists investigators in fulfilling their obligation to plan and conduct animal experiments in accord with the highest scientific, humane, and ethical principles. IACUC ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Micro-PET imaging of β-glucuronidase activity by the hydrophobic conversion of a glucuronide probe. AU - Tzou, Shey Cherng. AU - Roffler, Steve. AU - Chuang, Kuo Hsiang. AU - Yeh, Hsin Pei. AU - Kao, Chien Han. AU - Su, Yu Cheng. AU - Cheng, Chiu Min. AU - Tseng, Wei Lung. AU - Shiea, Jentaie. AU - Harm, I. Hong. AU - Cheng, Kai Wen. AU - Chen, Bing Mae. AU - Hwang, Jeng Jong. AU - Cheng, Tian Lu. AU - Wang, Hsin Ell. PY - 2009/9. Y1 - 2009/9. N2 - Purpose: To develop a new glucuronide probe for micro-positron emission topography (PET) that can depict β-glucuronidase (βG)-expressing tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: All animal experiments were preapproved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. A βG-specific probe was generated by labeling phenolphthalein glucuronide (PTH-G) with iodine 131 (131I) or 124I. To test the specificity of the probe in vitro, 124I-PTH-G was added to CT26 and βG-expressing CT26 (CT26/βG) cells. Mice bearing CT26 and CT26/βG tumors ...
Dr. Wang received her MD from New York University School of Medicine. She subsequently completed her internship in pediatrics and her residency in psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. After moving to the west coast, she joined the faculty at Stanford University, in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences with a focus on psychiatry resident education and college mental health. In 2012, she was delighted to have the opportunity to join the San Mateo County Behavioral Health and Recovery Services as Program Director for the Psychiatry Residency and as Designated Institutional Official overseeing graduate medical education. Her interests include community psychiatry, cultural psychiatry, and professional development. Dr. Wang is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and continues as Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) at Stanford University School of Medicine.. ...
Animal welfare and rights in India regards the treatment of and laws concerning non-human animals in India. It is distinct from animal conservation in India. India is home to several religious traditions advocating non-violence and compassion towards animals, and has passed a number of animal welfare reforms since 1960. India is also one of the worlds leading producers of animal products. Indias first national animal welfare law, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960, criminalizes cruelty to animals, though exceptions are made for the treatment of animals used for food and scientific experiments. The 1960 law also created the Animal Welfare Board of India to ensure the anti-cruelty provisions were enforced and promote the cause of animal welfare. Subsequent laws have placed regulations and restrictions on the use of draught animals, the use of performing animals, animal transport, animal slaughter, and animal experimentation. The Breeding of and Experiments on Animals (Control and ...
Cytogenetic map and phylogenetic sequence analyses imply that the three Myb genes of vertebrate animals arose by regional chromosomal duplications (or possibly by whole genome duplications), rather than by tandem gene duplications or retrotransposition events (Figs 1, 2; supplementary material Figs S1, S2). The evidence is consistent with a model that proposes an initial duplication of a B-Myb-like ancestral gene, followed by the evolution of a central transcriptional activation in one of the duplicates, followed by a second duplication of the proto-c/A-Myb gene to generate the c-Myb and A-Myb genes of existing vertebrates (Davidson et al., 2005).. Drosophila Myb and vertebrate B-Myb are normally expressed in most tissues during development. Increased expression of either of these proteins in Drosophila is compatible with normal development, cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and organismal viability (Table 1; Figs 3, 4). Others have reported that increased levels of Drosophila Myb can ...
In a country where animal welfare services are entirely dependent on public donations and good will, Cape Town is the first ever city in South Africa to provide grants to support dog and cat sterilisation.. Marking the 20th anniversary of World Spay Day, Mdzananda Animal Clinic - a project of IFAW - joined animal welfare groups across the city last week, Tuesday 25th February, in rolling out Cape Towns second dog and cat mass sterilisation project.. In the next six months a massive grant of R527 999 from the City Health Directorate will be used to, hopefully, sterilise 70 per cent of dogs and cats in Khayelitsha township on the Cape Flats.. Also on IFAW.org: CLAW South Africa find themselves refugees, for the moment. Mdzananda is based in Site B, Khayelitsha. The clinic provides the only full time, on site, animal welfare support to dogs and cats owned by the community of about 1,5-million people, so we are well placed to offer a base for this ambitious initiative to improve the welfare of the ...
Primate research animal. Baby marmoset monkey (Callithrix sp.) held in the gloved hands of a researcher, which was bred in captivity. This monkey may be used to study primate behaviour & biology, the development & transmission of human diseases, or to test novel drugs. Photographed at the New England Regional Primate Research Centre, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, USA. - Stock Image G352/0189

Research Misconduct Policy and Procedures | Policies | Western Michigan UniversityResearch Misconduct Policy and Procedures | Policies | Western Michigan University

... or Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). ... or animal care and use.. III. Conditions. At WMU, research ... A committee member does not act in good faith if his/her acts or omissions on the committee are dishonest or influenced by ... Appointment of the Inquiry Committee-The VPR will appoint an Inquiry Committee and designate the chair within 10 business days ... The members of the Investigative Committee shall select the member to Chair the committee. It is the responsibility of the ...
more infohttp://www.wmich.edu/node/36490

Practical Workshops-Small Animals | University Animal Care CommitteePractical Workshops-Small Animals | University Animal Care Committee

Students will be provided with instruction on the general care and maintenance of their animals as well as practical handling ... Practical Workshops - Small Animals. The Office of the University Veterinarian offers a series of practical workshops on rodent ... Workshop 1: Handling and Routine Procedures (Small Animals). The objective of this workshop is to provide the student with an ... Workshop 2: Technical Procedures (Small Animals). Prerequisite: Module 1. The objective of this workshop is to provide students ...
more infohttp://www.queensu.ca/uvet/node/21

Animal Ethics & Care in Science - FAQ | University Animal Care CommitteeAnimal Ethics & Care in Science - FAQ | University Animal Care Committee

Each research institution will feature an animal care committee responsible for implementing a comprehensive animal care and ... The Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) is a national organization with a mandate to set standards for the care and use of ... These individuals are responsible for daily monitoring of the research animals and for providing the daily care to the animals ... How has animal research helped humans and other animals?. Animal research has played a vital role in virtually every major ...
more infohttp://www.queensu.ca/uvet/node/24

Animal Care Standing CommitteeAnimal Care Standing Committee

Regulate animal care and use in all programs associated with the University; make recommendations and suggest policy for the ... for the University concerning animal care and welfare; conduct forums, as appropriate, on the needs for uses of and policies ... administration of the Division of Laboratory Animal Resources (DLAR) regarding animals in teaching and research programs; ...
more infohttps://etsu.edu/universitygovernance/governancecommittees/animalcare.php

James Madison University - Institutional Animal Care & Use CommitteeJames Madison University - Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee

... all classroom and research projects involving the use of living vertebrate animals to ensure the humane care and use of animals ... JMU Safety Committee * Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee * Institutional Review Board for Research Involving Human ...
more infohttps://www.jmu.edu/commisscommitt/InstitutionalAnimal.shtml

Institutional Animal Care and Use CommitteeInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee

... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee is responsible for making sure ... If you are going to use animals in your classes or research, be sure to complete the form below and get approval from the ... vertebrate animals used for research or instructional purposes are treated ethically. ... Committees and Members. *Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. *Faculty Resources *FPC Link to Faculty Review Timelines ...
more infohttp://simpson.edu/faculty-development/governance/committees-and-members/animal-care-and-use-committee/

Occupational Health and Safety | Institutional Animal Care & Use CommitteeOccupational Health and Safety | Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee

Occupational Health and Safety in the Care and Use of Research Animals. Committee on Occupational Safety and Health in Research ... Full time, part time, and temporary personnel involved in animal care in UAF units that house animals for research and teaching ... Outer garments worn in animal rooms or during handling of animals in outdoor facilities are not to be worn outside the animal ... working within UAF animal facilities who are involved in the direct care of vertebrate animals and their living quarters, and ...
more infohttps://uaf.edu/iacuc/uaf-policies-procedures/occupational-health-safety/

Office of Research Integrity | Institutional Animal Care & Use CommitteeOffice of Research Integrity | Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee IACUC Information Office of Research Integrity ... Training in the care and use of animals is a required element of UAFs Assurance of Compliance with Public Health Service ... All concerns related to the care and use of live animals at UAF or by UAF faculty at other locations should be reported to the ... ORI works with OSP to flag potential animal care issues at the proposal stage so that everyone is aware of what will be ...
more infohttps://www.uaf.edu/iacuc/iacuc-info/ori/

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Research Services | Creighton UniversityInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Research Services | Creighton University

Animal Welfare Regulations (Title 9 of the Code of Federal Regulations) *Questions and Answers about the Animal Welfare Act and ... Committees and Boards - CIRC, IACUC, IBC, IRB, RSC*Conflict of Interest Review Committee (CIRC) ... Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW) *Animal Welfare Information Center, U.S. Department ...
more infohttps://www.creighton.edu/researchservices/rcocommittees/iacuc/resources/

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | UNC ResearchInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee | UNC Research

Universitys animal care and use program and is responsible for reviewing all animal care applications using vertebrate animals ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Overview/Mission. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institutional ... Office of Animal Care & Use. (OACU). CB 7193. Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7193 ... NIH/PHS Animal Welfare Assurance Number:D16-00256 (A3410-01). • USDA Animal Research Facility Registration Number: 55-R-0004. ...
more infohttp://research.unc.edu/iacuc/

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee - WikipediaInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee - Wikipedia

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees must have a way to correct problems in animal care, including fair treatment of ... The central importance of Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees means that animal care and use is fundamentally ... In 1971, the Animal Welfare Act was revised, and compliance by institutions could be achieved through an animal care committee ... The animal care committee was required to have five members with expertise to regulate animal welfare at that institution, ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institutional_Animal_Care_and_Use_Committee

Policy Statement | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Albert Einstein College of MedicinePolicy Statement | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Policy Statement. Quick Links. *Contact Us ... Initially, The Vertebrate Animal Section and the Approach part of the Research Strategy Section are the areas of the grant to ... In particular, "It is an institutional responsibility to ensure that the description of animal studies included in the ... NIH will accept Animal Use protocols that are not more than three years old at the time of starting the Project. NIH considered ...
more infohttp://www.einstein.yu.edu/administration/animal-care-use-committee/default.aspx?id=51711

Animal Transfers -  Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) - University Of MontanaAnimal Transfers - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) - University Of Montana

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Search Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Search ... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) endorses the principle of the 3 Rs of Russell and Burch: replacement, ... The purpose of this policy is to identify those circumstances whereby animal transfer is in keeping with the principals of the ... The IACUC may approve the transfer of animals from AUPs involving minimal. potential for pain/distress, including breeding ...
more infohttps://www.umt.edu/research/compliance/IACUC/policies/PLCYanimaltransfers.php

Animal Care & Use Committee (IACUC) - Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University - Thomas Jefferson UniversityAnimal Care & Use Committee (IACUC) - Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University - Thomas Jefferson University

Home Facilities Management ServicesEnvironmental Health & SafetyInstitutional Biosafety CommitteeAnimal Care & Use Committee ( ... that of the Radiation Safety Committee (internal form, RO-13). All animal protocols involving irradiation of animals in the ... Infection Control Committee. 1015 Chestnut Street, Suite 610. Specimens of animal origin, especially cell lines, tumors or ... The Institutional Biosafety Committee has given the IACUC the authority to approve animal protocols involving human material ...
more infohttp://www.kimmelcancercenter.org/university/facilities_management/safety/environmental_health_safety/ibc/iacuc.html

A Brief Overview of Zoonotic Disease -  Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) - University Of MontanaA Brief Overview of Zoonotic Disease - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) - University Of Montana

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Search Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Search ... Allergies to animals are among the most common health problems affecting personnel who care for and use animals in research. ... Keep animal areas clean and disinfect equipment after using it on animals or in animal areas. Do not use cleaning techniques ... Animals may not show signs of the disease but can still infect other animals. Disease can range from very mild to severe ...
more infohttps://www.umt.edu/research/compliance/IACUC/vetguidelines/zoonoticDesease.php

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook - National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Office of Laboratory Animal...Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook - National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Office of Laboratory Animal...

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook. National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Office of Laboratory Animal ... Care_and_Use_Commit.html?id=KCUXH4XybosC&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook. ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook. Authors. National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Office of Laboratory ... 9 CFR AAALAC Accreditation Adjuvants alternatives analgesics anesthesia animal facilities animal research Animal Resources ...
more infohttps://books.google.com/books?id=KCUXH4XybosC&source=gbs_similarbooks_r&hl=en

Ten practical realities for institutional animal care and use committees when evaluating protocols dealing with fish in the...Ten practical realities for institutional animal care and use committees when evaluating protocols dealing with fish in the...

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) serve an important role in ensuring that ethical practices are used by ... Orlans FB (1988) Field research guidelines: impact on animal care and use committees. Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) serve an important role in ensuring that ethical practices are used by ... Ten practical realities for institutional animal care and use committees when evaluating protocols dealing with fish in the ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11160-015-9413-y

Policy No.0108: Alleviation of Pain and Discomfort in Animals | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Albert Einstein...Policy No.0108: Alleviation of Pain and Discomfort in Animals | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Albert Einstein...

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Policy No.0108: Alleviation of Pain and Discomfort in Animals. Approved by Animal ... Institute for Animal Care Use Committee > Policy Development , Policy No.0108: Alleviation of Pain and Discomfort in Animals ... In interpreting and implementing these policies and regulations, the Animal Institute Committee (AIC) has adopted the following ... and Teaching and the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals which state:. "Proper use of ...
more infohttp://www.einstein.yu.edu/administration/animal-care-use-committee/animal-care.aspx?id=33366

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) | Office of Research and Technology Management | Case Western Reserve...Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) | Office of Research and Technology Management | Case Western Reserve...

... policy of Case Western Reserve University to meet or exceed the highest quality standards for the humane treatment of animals ... Human Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee (HSCRO) * Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) * Good Lab Practices ... Human Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee (HSCRO) * Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) * Good Lab Practices ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) It is the policy of Case Western Reserve University to meet or exceed the ...
more infohttps://case.edu/research/faculty-staff/compliance/institutional-animal-care-and-use-committee-iacuc

Animals - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) | Office for Responsible ResearchAnimals - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) | Office for Responsible Research

Animals - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Mission and Vision. The mission of the Institutional Animal Care ... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) comprises one part of Iowa State Universitys overarching Animal Care ... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) must approve any activities that involve the use of live vertebrate ... if a project is to be done at a site or in cooperation with an institution that has its own Animal Care and Use Committee, a ...
more infohttps://www.compliance.iastate.edu/committees/iacuc

Occupational Health Program | Institutional Animal Care and Use CommitteeOccupational Health Program | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Occupational Health Program. If you are working with any live animal or animal ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Toggle navigation FIND PAGE Toggle navigation CLOSE ... The following materials are provided as educational tools for those individuals who work with animals. The materials present ...
more infohttps://iacuc.utk.edu/occupational-health-program/

Animal Care and Use Policies - Institutional Animal Care and Use CommitteeAnimal Care and Use Policies - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee

Use of Cadavers and Animal Parts. Use of Expired Medical Materials & Non-Pharmaceutical Grade (NPG) Substances in Research ... Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee. ... Maintaining Proper Animal Health Records of Research Animals. ...
more infohttp://viceprovost.tufts.edu/iacuc/policies/

Zoonoses Associated with Rodents | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Washington State UniversityZoonoses Associated with Rodents | Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee | Washington State University

Washington State University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Zoonoses Associated with Rodents. This document ... Report ill animals so that they can receive veterinary care.. *Keep animal areas clean and disinfect equipment after using it ... Individuals with exposure to animals and animal environments may develop allergic reactions to animal proteins (allergens). ... Animals infected with these diseases may have diarrhea but some may show no symptoms of disease. Any animal with diarrhea ...
more infohttps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-rodents/

IACUC Guidelines: Analgesia | Office of Animal Resources|Institutional Animal Care and Use CommitteeIACUC Guidelines: Analgesia | Office of Animal Resources|Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Office of Animal Resources. L350 PBDB. 169 Newton Road. Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1181 ... Animals should be monitored for an appropriate time period to determine if analgesia provisions are adequate. Any animal ... Acclimation of animals prior to surgery *Enhance environment to minimize stress (soft bedding, easy food access, soft food, ... An exception to a Guideline must be described and justified in the Animal Protocol and approved during the normal review ...
more infohttps://animal.research.uiowa.edu/iacuc-guidelines-analgesia

IACUC Guidelines: Rodent Survival Surgery | Office of Animal Resources|Institutional Animal Care and Use CommitteeIACUC Guidelines: Rodent Survival Surgery | Office of Animal Resources|Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Office of Animal Resources. L350 PBDB. 169 Newton Road. Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1181 ... Animal Preparation. *Anesthetize the animal in accordance with the approved Animal Protocol *Refer to the IACUC Guidelines on ... Postsurgical Care and Monitoring. *Immediately post-operatively, evaluate the animals surgical blood loss and provide ... Reflect the animals health status by commenting on animals appearance, posture and activity. ...
more infohttps://animal.research.uiowa.edu/iacuc-guidelines-rodent-survival-surgery
  • Other UAF personnel who may reasonably be expected to come in contact with vertebrate animals (live or dead), their viable tissues, body fluids or wastes (some personnel in facilities management, security, custodial services). (uaf.edu)
  • The use of biohazardous etiological agents, recombinant DNA, as well as human blood, tissues, body fluids, and primary cells or cell lines are reviewed by the Institutional Biosafety Committee (internal form OSA-11). (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • Specimens of animal origin, especially cell lines, tumors or tissues from rodents, must be clearly defined and identified as to source. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • IACUC approval is not required when all procedures are being carried out on tissues obtained from a slaughterhouse or from animals euthanized for another purpose. (iastate.edu)
  • If, however, animals are procured and euthanized/slaughtered to obtain tissues for a particular project, that project must be approved by the IACUC. (iastate.edu)
  • If you are working with any live animal or animal tissues/specimens, you are required to enroll in the Occupational Health Program. (utk.edu)
  • NIH will accept Animal Use protocols that are not more than three years old at the time of starting the Project. (yu.edu)
  • The IACUC may approve the transfer of animals from AUPs involving minimal potential for pain/distress, including breeding protocols, animals designated as "extras", or activities deemed to be so minimally invasive that transfer to another activity is considered an appropriate use of animal resources. (umt.edu)
  • The Institutional Biosafety Committee has given the IACUC the authority to approve animal protocols involving human material provided the animals are housed and the experiment is conducted under BL2 containment conditions. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • All animal protocols involving irradiation of animals in the Bodine Cancer Center, especially animals that have been treated with an infectious agent or human materials, require the approval of the Hospital Infection Control Committee before irradiation. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • Furthermore, to comply with the USDA's implementation of the Animal Welfare Act, investigators must document in their written protocols, the methods they have used to explore alternatives to procedures that cause more than momentary or slight discomfort, pain, or distress, and they must provide a written plan for dealing with pain, discomfort, or distress when it is encountered. (yu.edu)
  • It is the policy of Case Western Reserve University to meet or exceed the highest quality standards for the humane treatment of animals in research as governed by federal and state protocols and international accrediting agencies. (case.edu)
  • According to the NRC Guide, 8th Edition, "Reduction involves strategies for obtaining comparable levels of information from the use of fewer animals or for maximizing the information obtained from a given number of animals without increasing pain or distress. (umt.edu)
  • Procedures with animals that may cause more than momentary or slight pain or distress should be performed with appropriate sedation, analgesia, or anesthesia, [unless the omission of these agents is justified for scientific reasons in writing by the investigator]. (yu.edu)
  • Animals that would otherwise suffer severe or chronic pain or distress that cannot be relieved should be painlessly killed at the end of the procedure or, if appropriate, during the procedure. (yu.edu)
  • Continuing access to animal facilities and authorization to work with live vertebrates is contingent upon your continued participation in the OHSP. (uaf.edu)
  • Once any required safety trainings are complete and recommendations from the contract health care provider have been completed (or the individual provides justification for exclusion from certain recommendations), the participant and their supervisor are notified that he/she may begin work with live vertebrates. (uaf.edu)
  • In addition, the ORI serves as the point-of-contact for faculty, staff, students, the public, and regulators for all questions and concerns associated with the care and use of live vertebrates at UAF or by UAF researchers at other locations. (uaf.edu)
  • In 1979, U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) policy took over, requiring an animal care committee for each animal-using grantee institution and expanding the species covered to include all vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The IACUC must also include a veterinarian with training or experience with experimental animals, someone with no relation with the institution except for serving on the IACUC, a scientist with experience using experimental animals, and a nonscientist. (wikipedia.org)
  • All potential hazards intrinsic to or inherent in animal use have been identified and evaluated (i.e. animal bites, chemical cleaning agents, allergens, and zoonoses). (uaf.edu)
  • Individuals with exposure to animals and animal environments may develop allergic reactions to animal proteins (allergens). (wsu.edu)
  • A contingency plan to provide post-operative analgesia to older animals must be in place (see 6 below). (yu.edu)
  • The purpose of these guidelines is to describe appropriate analgesia regimens for the management of pain in animals used in teaching, research and testing at the University of Iowa. (uiowa.edu)
  • Animals should be monitored for an appropriate time period to determine if analgesia provisions are adequate. (uiowa.edu)
  • Any animal showing evidence of pain should be provided analgesia. (uiowa.edu)
  • If analgesia cannot be provided due to scientific reasons, the rationale should be described and approved in the Animal Protocol. (uiowa.edu)
  • Although allergies may be associated with any species of animal, in the laboratory most cases are due to contact with small rodents (mice and rats). (umt.edu)
  • Furthermore, many laboratory animals, especially prey species such as rodents, have evolved to mask signs of minor to moderate discomfort. (yu.edu)
  • Rat Bite Fever caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus is a bacterial infection of rodents that is transmitted through bites, scratches, direct contact with animals and their urine, saliva and feces or ingestion of contaminated food or water. (wsu.edu)
  • The objective of this workshop is to provide students with an understanding of pre-operative, surgical, and post-operative care and monitoring. (queensu.ca)
  • Identification of the species and approximate number of animals to be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most importantly, familiarize yourself about the animals that you will be working with and the potential zoonotic diseases associated with each species. (umt.edu)
  • Evaluation of conscious (awake) animals: Many of the signs described below are general indications of illness whose expression varies with species. (yu.edu)
  • These guidelines are intended for use by properly trained personnel listed on an IACUC-approved Animal Protocol who will be performing approved surgical procedures on rodent species, or assisting with those procedures. (uiowa.edu)
  • USDA covered species includes dogs, cats, nonhuman primates, guinea pig, hamster, rabbit, farm animal, or any other warm-blooded animal (* Members of the Genus Mus and Rattus are currently exempt from USDA coverage). (k-state.edu)
  • Advances around the world that have resulted from animal models include the treatments for rabies and smallpox and the discovery of penicillin and other modern antibiotics. (case.edu)
  • Proper use of animals, including the avoidance or minimization of discomfort, distress and pain when consistent with sound scientific practices, is imperative. (yu.edu)
  • Pain, discomfort, and distress in humans have a subjective component which makes it difficult to compare pain levels with animals. (yu.edu)
  • After anesthetic recovery, further monitoring for pain and distress will occur using the Animal Monitoring Plan (AMP) and the Animal Observation Record (AOR). (k-state.edu)
  • The goal of the CCAC guidelines is to strive for best research practices and optimal conditions for the animals, through constant improvement as new information on animal well-being and health becomes available. (queensu.ca)
  • The IACUC has provided a set of guidance documents (Policies, Guidelines, and Informational Sheets) for use when planning animal procedures at the University of Iowa. (uiowa.edu)
  • The UAF OHSP contracts out for all medical services (assessment, testing, preventative care, and treatment) to a local health care provider. (uaf.edu)
  • Participation in the Occupational Health & Safety Program (OHSP) for UAF Animal Facilities is mandated by UAF Policy #04-004 (Note: Research policies are accessible from the policy page on the Center for Research Services website. (uaf.edu)
  • Scientists use animals in research only when necessary and are constantly trying to reduce the amount of animals used, refine their techniques so fewer animals are needed and replace certain animal tests with alternatives, when possible. (queensu.ca)
  • The VCR is the UAF Institutional Official charged with oversight of the animal care program. (uaf.edu)
  • Depending on the agent to be used, the committee with oversight of the use of that agent will require a completed internal form, an informative abstract of the work to be done and a standard operating procedure for the use of the agent in animals. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • Once the student proves a level of competency, they will then apply the learned skills on conscious animals (where appropriate). (queensu.ca)
  • Additional care may include administration of parental fluids for maintenance of water and electrolyte balance, analgesics, and other drugs. (k-state.edu)
  • There are three categories based on frequency and duration of contact with animals, intensity of exposure, hazards associated with the animals to be handled, hazardous properties of agents used in the research, susceptibility of individual employees, hazard-control measures available, and occupational history of individual employees. (uaf.edu)
  • The participant is responsible for updating the Personnel Information on file with any changes in job or task or changes in animal contact or exposure to hazardous agents. (uaf.edu)
  • This group is also a heavily used laboratory animal, and is another important source of allergen exposure. (umt.edu)
  • AAHA is a small animal veterinary association providing veterinary professionals with resources. (dmoztools.net)
  • The University closely regulates studies to minimize the number of animals involved and insists its scientists utilize alternative methods-such as simulation and computer modeling, whenever feasible. (case.edu)
  • Thus catalyzed, and spurred by the efforts of Representative Joseph Y. Resnick, Congress created the Animal Welfare Act (1966), which named the USDA the responsible agency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients have a very important role to play in their own care, to make decisions with your physician, rather than just accepting whatever proposal the physician offers. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Evidence must be provided that rodent tissue have been MAP tested or otherwise proven to be free of adventitious pathogens which could pose a threat to other animals in the colony and/or your plan for maintaining adequate isolation indicated. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • This research benefits society in general by improving the health of people, the health of our companion animals, the health and well-being of food producing animals, and the well-being of wildlife and the environment. (queensu.ca)
  • Animal research has played a vital role in virtually every major medical advance of the last century, for both human and animal health. (queensu.ca)
  • Depending on the risk category, the individual may need to submit a confidential Medical Questionnaire (MQ) directly to the contract health care provider. (uaf.edu)
  • The contract health care provider may recommend risk specific preventive measures, immunizations, additional tests, and/or health monitoring. (uaf.edu)
  • All occupational health services (other than emergency care) must be pre-approved by EHSRM ( [email protected] or x5413). (uaf.edu)
  • All personnel working in UAF animal facilities receive an introduction to the occupational health and safety program as part of the required Facility Orientation. (uaf.edu)
  • Most research involving laboratory animals is funded by the United States National Institutes of Health or, to lesser extents, other federal agencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allergies to animals are among the most common health problems affecting personnel who care for and use animals in research. (umt.edu)
  • Research is essential to developing therapies for human and animal health and welfare. (case.edu)
  • Find out why Mayo Clinic is the right place for your health care. (mayoclinic.org)
  • delivering the highest quality of care to patients, as part of the Neuroscience Mission of the McGill University Health Centre. (mcgill.ca)
  • Each research institution will feature an animal care committee responsible for implementing a comprehensive animal care and use program that meets the national standards. (queensu.ca)
  • This includes an overview of the goals of the program, services available, the types of hazards present in the UAF animal facilities and their symptoms. (uaf.edu)
  • Each institution that receives PHS support for activities involving vertebrate animals or is subject to the authority of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) must operate an animal care and use program with clear lines of authority and responsibility. (smcvt.edu)
  • Procedures will initially be instructed on anesthetized animals. (queensu.ca)
  • Surgical or other painful procedures should not be performed on unanesthetized animals paralyzed by chemical agents. (yu.edu)
  • The development of vaccines for preventing diseases such as smallpox and polio, and the discovery of anaesthesia and drugs such as aspirin and insulin, all involved animal use. (queensu.ca)
  • It is the responsibility of Principal Investigator (PI) to education their staff on zoonotic diseases of the animals that they are using in their research or teaching activities. (umt.edu)
  • Transmission of zoonotic diseases from animals is primarily by direct contact, fecal-oral contact, indirect contact with invertebrate vectors and contaminated inanimate objects, or inhalation of aerosolized materials. (umt.edu)
  • Animals infected with these diseases may have diarrhea but some may show no symptoms of disease. (wsu.edu)
  • Failure to update these forms will result in loss of animal facility access privileges. (uaf.edu)
  • 1.1 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act does not apply in respect of an animal in the possession of the operator of a registered research facility or of a licensed operator of a supply facility. (ontario.ca)
  • 2) Section 11.3.1, clause 18.1 (1) (c.1), subsections 18.1 (3), (4) and (5) and sections 18.2 and 18.3 of the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act apply in respect of an orca, as defined in that Act, in the possession of the operator of a registered research facility or of a licensed operator of a supply facility. (ontario.ca)
  • Initially, The Vertebrate Animal Section and the Approach part of the Research Strategy Section are the areas of the grant to be compared with the protocol. (yu.edu)
  • The disease agents are typically shed in the urine of infected animals and people acquire the infection by inhalation, oral ingestion and direct contact with contaminated urine or feces. (wsu.edu)
  • Faculty are expected to obtain IACUC approval for these activities regardless of where the animals are maintained and/or the project is carried out. (iastate.edu)
  • The committee consists of faculty and employees of Saint Michael's College as well as members of the greater community. (smcvt.edu)
  • Case Western Reserve expects its researchers to conduct their investigations involving animals with the utmost compassion and dignity. (case.edu)
  • Risk factors for developing an allergic reaction include history of previous allergies to animals. (wsu.edu)