Ethics Committees: Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.Committee Membership: The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.Advisory Committees: Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Professional Staff Committees: Committees of professional personnel who have responsibility for determining policies, procedures, and controls related to professional matters in health facilities.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Animal Care Committees: Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).Ethical Review: A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee: An advisory group composed primarily of staff physicians and the pharmacist which serves as the communication link between the medical staff and the pharmacy department.Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees: Committees established to review interim data and efficacy outcomes in clinical trials. The findings of these committees are used in deciding whether a trial should be continued as designed, changed, or terminated. Government regulations regarding federally-funded research involving human subjects (the "Common Rule") require (45 CFR 46.111) that research ethics committees reviewing large-scale clinical trials monitor the data collected using a mechanism such as a data monitoring committee. FDA regulations (21 CFR 50.24) require that such committees be established to monitor studies conducted in emergency settings.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Human Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.United StatesEthics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Great BritainConflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Multicenter Studies as Topic: Works about controlled studies which are planned and carried out by several cooperating institutions to assess certain variables and outcomes in specific patient populations, for example, a multicenter study of congenital anomalies in children.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Institute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Therapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Consensus: General agreement or collective opinion; the judgment arrived at by most of those concerned.American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Antifungal Agents: Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Consent Forms: Documents describing a medical treatment or research project, including proposed procedures, risks, and alternatives, that are to be signed by an individual, or the individual's proxy, to indicate his/her understanding of the document and a willingness to undergo the treatment or to participate in the research.European Union: The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Candida: A genus of yeast-like mitosporic Saccharomycetales fungi characterized by producing yeast cells, mycelia, pseudomycelia, and blastophores. It is commonly part of the normal flora of the skin, mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina, but can cause a variety of infections, including CANDIDIASIS; ONYCHOMYCOSIS; vulvovaginal candidiasis (CANDIDIASIS, VULVOVAGINAL), and thrush (see CANDIDIASIS, ORAL). (From Dorland, 28th ed)Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Animals, LaboratoryResearch Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Fluconazole: Triazole antifungal agent that is used to treat oropharyngeal CANDIDIASIS and cryptococcal MENINGITIS in AIDS.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Group Structure: The informal or formal organization of a group of people based on a network of personal relationships which is influenced by the size and composition, etc., of the group.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.EuropeAcademies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Formularies, Hospital: Formularies concerned with pharmaceuticals prescribed in hospitals.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Hospital Administration: Management of the internal organization of the hospital.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Itraconazole: A triazole antifungal agent that inhibits cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes required for ERGOSTEROL synthesis.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines: Combined vaccines consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and an acellular form of PERTUSSIS VACCINE. At least five different purified antigens of B. pertussis have been used in various combinations in these vaccines.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Awards and PrizesAuthorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Organization and Administration: The planning and managing of programs, services, and resources.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Mumps Vaccine: Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Annual Reports as Topic: Annual statements reviewing the status of the administrative and operational functions and accomplishments of an institution or organization.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hepatitis A Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with hepatitis A virus (HEPATOVIRUS).International Agencies: International organizations which provide health-related or other cooperative services.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Pharmacy Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the receiving, storing, and distribution of pharmaceutical supplies.JapanPersonal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Drug Storage: The process of keeping pharmaceutical products in an appropriate location.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Rimantadine: An RNA synthesis inhibitor that is used as an antiviral agent in the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.EnglandPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Health Systems Agencies: Health planning and resources development agencies which function in each health service area of the United States (PL 93-641).Zoology: The study of animals - their morphology, growth, distribution, classification, and behavior.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.TriazolesHelsinki Declaration: An international agreement of the World Medical Association which offers guidelines for conducting experiments using human subjects. It was adopted in 1962 and revised by the 18th World Medical Assembly at Helsinki, Finland in 1964. Subsequent revisions were made in 1975, 1983, 1989, and 1996. (From Encyclopedia of Bioethics, rev ed, 1995)National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.

Animal experiments: conference report.(1/47)

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Best practices for animal care committees and animal use oversight. (2/47)

Regulatory authorities around the world with oversight responsibility for the welfare of research animals have placed heavily reliance on local oversight committees. These animal care committees (ACCs) are part of an institutional animal welfare team that includes the institutional administration, principal investigators, attending veterinarian and animal care staff, as well as regulatory organizations and authorities. As a key component of this team, most ACCs function as an agent of the institution to ensure regulatory animal welfare compliance. Although regulatory testing involving animals presents some unique circumstances, the focus of all animal care committees is to minimize animal pain and distress. Federal requirements are often couched within a regulatory framework that is performance based and therefore very flexible. Thus, it is important for ACCs to establish very simple and specific institutional requirements and procedures and to work at promoting a broad understanding of them within their respective institutions. Experience suggests that ambiguity at the local level results in many unintended side effects and confusion. There are many "best practices" that can help the ACC promote institutional compliance and good animal welfare. These practices, although not universally appropriate for all institutions or activities, include ACC coordinator or administrator, designated protocol reviewer, alternate or duel ACC members, generic protocols and standard operating procedures, centralized controls and animal care facilities, conducting pilot studies, and ensuring the most humane endpoints.  (+info)

Ethical issues concerning animal research outside the laboratory. (3/47)

Unique ethical issues can be associated with research outside the customary laboratory setting. Protocols involving wild animals must consider that any infringement on the wild nature of the species can be disruptive and may involve pain, fear, anxiety, and frustration, all of which constitute ethical harm that must be balanced with anticipated benefit. Agricultural and companion animal research, however, take place in a human-engineered environment and involves domesticated species adapted to human contact. Special animal welfare issues can be related to agricultural production goals that fail to deal adequately with moral concerns. Human/companion animal relationships, on the other hand, present unique moral obligations to animal owners. Other factors may present additional ethical issues when research is performed outside the laboratory. These factors include a required sensitivity to the environment of wild animals and an awareness that this outside research may to quite public and, therefore, vulnerable to community perception. The institutional animal care and use committee(IACUC) has the responsibility to ensure that research in outside settings is ethical and properly implemented. This responsibility requires that IACUC members have knowledge of the needs of a wide range of species and that a process is in place to allow effective monitoring of research in remote locations. Finally, and most important, there must be a sensitivity to the unique ethical considerations outlined here. Armed with these strengths, the IACUC will be effective in what may be unfamiliar surroundings and will have a significant opportunity to cause improvements in animal welfare.  (+info)

Agricultural (nonbiomedical) animal research outside the laboratory: a review of guidelines for institutional animal care and use committees. (4/47)

Challenges and published guidelines associated with appropriate care and use of farm animals in agricultural research conducted outside the laboratory are briefly reviewed. The Animal Welfare Act (Title 9 of the 2000 Code of Federal Regulations), which regulates the care and use of agricultural animals in biomedical research, does not include livestock and poultry used in agricultural research. Farm animal research funded (and thereby regulated) by the US Public Health Service is further discussed in the National Research Council's 1996 Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. However, neither of these guidelines adequately addresses the unique attributes of research and teaching designed to improve production agriculture. That information is contained in the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Agricultural Research and Teaching (the Ag Guide), published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies in 1999. The Ag Guide provides excellent general recommendations for agricultural animal research. It serves as an invaluable resource for institutional animal care and use committees, which attempt to balance the welfare of farm animals and the needs of those working to improve animal agriculture.  (+info)

Does the Animal Welfare Act apply to free-ranging animals? (5/47)

Despite the long-standing role that institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) have played in reviewing and approving studies at academic institutions, compliance with the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) is not always complete for government natural resource agencies that use free-ranging animals in research and management studies. Even at universities, IACUCs face uncertainties about what activities are covered and about how to judge proposed research on free-ranging animals. One reason for much of the confusion is the AWA vaguely worded exemption for "field studies." In particular, fish are problematic because of the AWA exclusion of poikilothermic animals. However, most university IACUCs review studies on all animals, and the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) has published the "IRAC Principles," which extend coverage to all vertebrates used by federal researchers. Despite this extended coverage, many scientists working on wild animals continue to view compliance with the AWA with little enthusiasm. IACUCs, IACUC veterinarians, wildlife veterinarians, and fish and wildlife biologists must learn to work together to comply with the law and to protect the privilege of using free-ranging animals in research.  (+info)

Opportunistic research and sampling combined with fisheries and wildlife management actions or crisis response. (6/47)

Currently most of the activities of state, federal, first nation, and private conservation agencies, including management of and field research on free-ranging wildlife, are not regulated under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and thus not subject to National Institutes of Health guidelines or routine institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) review. However, every day thousands of fish and wildlife management activities occur across North America that provide an opportunity to take observations, measurements, biological specimens, or samples that may have research value. Most of these opportunities are secondary to ongoing and often mandated wildlife management or conservation actions. Strange as it may seem to the academic and research community, the full research potentials of these opportunities are rarely utilized. IACUCs and research institutions should strive to facilitate such research, which by its very nature is often more opportunistic than designed. They can do this by ensuring that their policies do not unnecessarily impede the rapid research responses needed, or over burden researchers with inappropriate reporting requirements designed for laboratory research. The most prominent reasons for failures to utilize wildlife research opportunities include lack of the following: personnel and expertise to collect and use the information; preparation for inevitable (or predictable) events (e.g., oil spills); resources to preserve and curate specimens; a mandate to conduct research; and recognition of the value in data or sample collection. IACUC support of open protocols and generic sampling plans can go a long way toward improving the development of useful knowledge from animals that will otherwise be lost. Opportunities to sample wildlife are categorized generally as dead sampling (road kill surveys, harvest sampling, lethal collection, and "die-offs"); live sampling (handling for marking, relocation or restocking; and captures for field or biological studies); and crisis response (e.g., population salvage operations or oil spills). Examples of the many unique situations in each category serve to illustrate how valuable research and sampling can be accomplished opportunistically. Several unique limitations of sample collection situation are described. It is recommended that IACUCs have mechanisms in place to facilitate good research in all of these circumstances.  (+info)

Fish research and the institutional animal care and use committee. (7/47)

Fish represent the most diverse group of animals in the vertebrate phylum. The more than 25,000 species are characterized by an array of anatomical, biochemical, physiological, and behavioral repertoires. For this reason, it is difficult to develop a comprehensive guideline on the care and use of fishes. Institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) meet the challenge of ensuring adequate fish welfare using guidelines (Animal Welfare Act [AWA] and Public Health Service [PHS] Policy and their guides) derived mainly from the care and use of mammalian species, which may not be optimal for regulating fish research, teaching, or extension activities. Discussion focuses on various issues that often confront IACUCs in meeting regulatory requirements while assuring proper fish welfare. Issues include questions concerning animal tracking and inventory, utilization of fisheries bycatch, facility inspections in remote locations, and euthanasia. Common sense solutions appropriate for field and laboratory fish activities are suggested, which should help investigators, IACUCs, and regulatory agencies meet PHS and AWA objectives.  (+info)

Surgical implantation of transmitters into fish. (8/47)

Although the Animal Welfare Act does not cover poikilotherms, individual institutions and policies and legal requirements other than the Animal Welfare Act (e.g., the US Public Health Service and the Interagency Research Animal Committee's Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training) require the review of projects involving fish by institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs). IACUCs may, however, lack the knowledge and experience to evaluate fish projects judiciously, especially when the projects are in field settings. Surgeries involving implantation of transmitters and other instruments into the coelom, which now comprise a very common research tool in the study of free-ranging fishes, are examples of surgeries that use a broad spectrum of surgical and anesthetic techniques, some of which would not be considered acceptable for similar work on mammals. IACUCs should apply the standards they would expect to be used for surgeries on homeotherms to surgeries on fish. Surgeons should be carefully trained and experienced. Surgical instruments and transmitters should be sterile. Regulations and laws on the use of drugs in animals should be followed, particularly those concerned with anesthetics and antibiotics used on free-ranging fish. Exceptions to surgical procedures should be made only when circumstances are extreme enough to warrant the use of less than optimal procedures.  (+info)

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) oversees the Universitys animal care and use program and is responsible for reviewing all animal care applications using vertebrate animals, ensuring compliance with federal animal welfare regulations, inspecting animal facilities and investigator laboratories, investigating animal concerns, and overseeing training and educational programs. Continue Here. • NIH/PHS Animal Welfare Assurance Number:D16-00256 (A3410-01 ...
2017 - 2018 Committee Members. Oversees and reviews all classroom and research projects involving the use of living vertebrate animals to ensure the humane care and use of animals in accordance with the Health Research Extension Act of 1985. Public law 99-158.. Chair:. Norm Garrison, faculty, Biology. Faculty/Staff:. Tamara Hatch, Office of Sponsored Programs Administration. Chris Lantz, Biology. Marcella Mullenax, Environmental Health Coordinator. Melanie Shoup-Knox, Psychology. Carolyn Strong, Research Integrity. K.T. Vaughan, Libraries & Educational Technologies. Institutional Official:. Dr. Heather ...
All animals were treated according to the ARVO Statement for the Use of Animals in Ophthalmic and Vision Research and standards set forth by the Baylor College of Medicine Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Protocols were approved by the Baylor College of Medicine Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Fourteen pigmented Dutch Belted rabbits weighing between 2 and 3 kg underwent filtration surgery in the right eye performed by a single surgeon (BJF) according to an established protocol with minor modifications during a 1-year period from August 2011 to August 2012. 45 Topical anesthetic (proparacaine 0.5%) was applied to the right eye of awake animals and the IOP recorded with a Tonopen (Reichert Technologies, Depew, NY). At least two measurements were taken, and the average of all recordings was documented as the IOP. Because significant rotation of the globe is common in anesthetized rabbits, the 12 oclock position of the limbus was identified with a marking pen prior to ...
Below is the list of hazardous agents. . If the hazard you propose to use is not listed below, you should search the internet for MSDS sheets and provide required information on protocol or addendum ...
It is important to minimize the 3 Ts: time, trash and trauma. Time is kept to a minimum by planning ahead, organizing equipment, and mastering the procedure to be performed. Trash is avoided by keeping instruments sterile, using proper aseptic technique, and wearing appropriate protective gear. Trauma is minimized by using gentle tissue handling techniques, using sharp instruments, keeping tissues moist with sterile saline, and placing sutures and staples to achieve tissue apposition while avoiding excessive tension. A subcuticular skin suture pattern will often preclude the chewing and premature removal of sutures by the animal.. Animals should be kept warm using an external heat source, particularly for procedures of any significant length (i.e., longer than 30 minutes). A circulating water blanket is the safest choice. Great care must be taken to prevent overheating or burning the animal when using other modalities. Some heating pads for rodents come with a rectal temperature probe that acts ...
Rodents with hanta virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and leptospirosis usually do not exhibit signs of disease. The disease agents are typically shed in the urine of infected animals and people acquire the infection by inhalation, oral ingestion and direct contact with contaminated urine or feces. These are occasionally transmitted from bite wounds and Leptospira can infect people through abraded skin. These diseases often initially appear as a mild flu-like illness in people but may progress to severe disease. LCMV infection is considered hazardous to the unborn fetus. Please refer to the WSU Hantavirus guidelines (http://www.iacuc.wsu.edu/documents/forms/pdf/Zoonoses_19.pdf) if working with wild rodents or in rodent-infested areas and buildings. Salmonellosis and campylobacterosis are acquired by contact and accidental ingestion of fecal material from infected rodents. Animals infected with these diseases may have diarrhea but some may show no symptoms of disease. Any animal ...
The liver is a pivotal organ in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and could modulate insulin resistance (IR) through the manufacturing of secreted proteins
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has set forth federal regulations governing the care and use of laboratory animals in biomedical research that are more extensive than those covering human subjects. The federal law called the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) sets high standards of care for lab animals with regard to their housing, feeding, cleanliness, ventilation and medical needs. It also requires the use of anesthesia or analgesic drugs for potentially painful procedures and during post-operative care. Most importantly, research institutions are required - by law - to establish an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) to oversee all work with animals. The IACUCs require researchers to justify their need for animals; select the most appropriate species and use the fewest number of animals possible to answer a specific question. All IACUCs include at least one veterinarian and one community representative, unaffiliated with the institution. These committees have the authority to ...
MSU is responsible for managing and administering awards, both Federal and non-Federal, in a manner so as to ensure that funding is expended and associated programs are implemented in full accordance with U.S. statutory and public policy requirements, including but not limited to: those protecting public welfare, the environment, and prohibiting discrimination. MSU has established a number of programs to ensure compliance with policies and procedures such as the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP), Office of Research Compliance (ORC), Institutional Review Board (IRB), Technology Transfer Office (TTO), Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), Radiation Safety Committee (RSC), Office of Legal Counsel, and MSU Biosafety Committee. This section expands upon the requirements for research projects that entail the use of human and animal subjects, impacts to the environment, and/or potentially involve conflicts of interest. The OSP Electronic Proposal Clearance Form (ePCF) requires the ...
The Research Compliance Office coordinates and monitors Middleburys research programs to ensure compliance with applicable regulations, statutes, and institutional policies. We do this through compliance committees, reports to federal agencies, and training programs.. Committee Descriptions. Our compliance committees include faculty, staff, and community members, and we thoroughly review all research conducted with vertebrate animals, human subjects, and recombinant DNA.. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) oversees and evaluates all aspects of Middleburys animal care and use program, and upholds our commitment to the highest level of care and humane handling of animals to foster meaningful scientific research and teaching.. The Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) oversees research that involves recombinant DNA (rDNA).. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) oversees all research involving human subjects to ensure the rights and welfare of participants. ...
RESEARCH USE ONLY The information herein is for educational and informational purposes only. THIS PRODUCT IS FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY. For use in animal studies, all research must be conducted with oversight from the appropriate Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) following the guidelines of the Animal Welfare Act…
Yet one thing wrong with the proposed policy is that the Steering Committee is not required, at least not explicitly required in the draft, to have public representatives. The policy says it will be composed of "federal employees." This raises the worry that public input and concerns over chimera research will not be adequately considered and addressed, and the public will not have a say in the direction of research.. We already have a model for public involvement in animal research. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) must have a non-scientist member and a non-affiliated member that represent the interests and concerns of the public. Rebecca Dresser says their role is to, "serve as reminders that animal research and education activities must be defensible to the broader society whose support is necessary to continue these activities . . . Once nonscientists become part of the committee, investigators and other committee members must explain and justify scientific practices ...
... requires a functioning partnership between faculty and research administrators. The Research Compliance Office works with Dartmouth faculty and all Dartmouth offices responsible for research administration to ensure compliance with federal laws and regulations, Dartmouth policies and sponsor requirements. The Research Compliance Office reports to the Vice Provost for Research, Dean R. Madden, PhD.. The Council on Sponsored Activities, the Office of Sponsored Projects, the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects and the Research Compliance Office assist in the review and development of policies and procedures, and conduct general research compliance oversight.. Please contact the Research Compliance Office with any related questions.. Henrike Frowein, LL. ...
Research involving Human Subjects, Animals, Recombinant DNA, Toxins, or Infectious Agents Federal regulations require that principal investigators planning to use human subjects; animal subjects; or recombinant DNA, toxins, or infectious agents as part of their research projects must have their protocols reviewed and approved by federally mandated and regulated compliance committees. In accordance with this mandate, NDSU has established three committees to review and approve human, animal, and biosafety research and to set institutional policies and procedures involving these regulated areas. Human subject research is reviewed by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Animal research, teaching, testing, or exhibition projects are reviewed by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). And research using recombinant DNA, infectious agents, human blood, bodily fluids or tissues is reviewed by the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC). When a grant is awarded, before release of grant ...
Radiosynthesis of [14C]Dasatinib. [14C]Dasatinib ([14C]BMS-354825) was synthesized at Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (Princeton, NJ) (Allentoff et al., 2008). The specific activity was 31.9 μCi/mg, and the radioactive purity was 98.7%.. Animal Welfare. Before study initiation, the protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee at Covance Laboratories Inc. (Madison, WI).. Test Animals, Housing, and Randomization. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (Harlan, Indianapolis, IN), approximately 8 to 9 days postpartum, were used for the lacteal secretion study. The rats weighed 287 to 351 g. Female Sprague-Dawley rats on gestation day 18 were used for the maternal and fetal tissue distribution study. The rats weighed 258 to 355 g. For all the studies, the animals were acclimated for at least 3 days before dose administration. During acclimation and the testing period, the animals were housed in individual polycarbonate shoe box cages. Certified Rodent Diet no. 8728CM (Harlan Teklad, ...
Notice of NIH Policy to All Applicants: Meeting rosters are provided for information purposes only. Applicant investigators and institutional officials must not communicate directly with study section members about an application before or after the review. Failure to observe this policy will create a serious breach of integrity in the peer review process, and may lead to actions outlined in NOT-OD-14-073 and NOT-OD-15-106, including removal of the application from immediate review. ...
Notice of NIH Policy to All Applicants: Meeting rosters are provided for information purposes only. Applicant investigators and institutional officials must not communicate directly with study section members about an application before or after the review. Failure to observe this policy will create a serious breach of integrity in the peer review process, and may lead to actions outlined in NOT-OD-14-073 and NOT-OD-15-106, including removal of the application from immediate review. ...
Alice R. Goepfert, M.D., professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologys Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, has been named associate dean for Graduate Medical Education in the School of Medicine and Designated Institutional Official for UAB Hospital ...
Alice R. Goepfert, M.D., professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologys Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, has been named associate dean for Graduate Medical Education in the School of Medicine and Designated Institutional Official for UAB Hospital ...
MSMR is a member organization that focuses on the use of animals in biomedical research, teaching and testing - a critically important, and often controversial issue underlying medical progress. We also take an active interest in life science education, and in other crucially important topics in biomedicine, such as the work of the oversight committees charged with protecting humans (Institutional Review Boards and Institutional Biosafety Committees) and animals (Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees) in research studies.. We provide materials and experiences to classroom teachers and their students, sponsor professional development training for the research community, and engage in public outreach and legislative monitoring regarding issues important to our members.. Our Mission: We promote and enhance biomedical research, including the humane care and use of animals, for the improved health and well-being of people, animals and the environment.. In fulfilling our mission, we foster a ...
Subjects. The procedures were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of the Ponce School of Medicine in compliance with National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals (Publication number DHHS NIH 86-23). Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 270-300 gm were transported from the Ponce School of Medicine colony to a satellite facility where they were individually housed in transparent polyethylene cages inside a negative-pressure Biobubble (Colorado Clean Room, Ft. Collins, CO). Rats were maintained on a 12 hr light/dark schedule with ad libitum access to water. Food was restricted to 10-15 gm of standard laboratory rat chow per day until rats reached 85% of their original weight. They were then trained to press a bar for food on a variable interval schedule of reinforcement (VI-60), in a standard operant chamber (Coulborn Instruments, Allentown, PA). This was done to maintain a constant level of activity against which freezing can be ...
Animal care guidelines according to the ARVO Statement for the Use of Animals in Ophthalmic and Vision Research were followed. All procedures were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee (St. Vincents Animal Ethics Committee protocol No. 060/09). Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J mice and Nox2 knockout mice (Nox2 KO) on a C57BL/6J background were supplied by Mary Dinauer (Department of Pediatrics, Washington University of School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO), 12 and bred at the EMSU mouse facility (Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia). The Nox2 genotype was confirmed with conventional genotyping (see Supplementary Fig. S2; Nox2 WT forward primer, 5′AAGAGAAACTCCTCTGCTGTGAA-3′; reverse primer, 5′CGCACTGGAACCCCTGAGAAAGG-3′; Nox2 KO forward primer, 5′AAGAGAAACTCCTCTGCTGTGAA-3′; reverse primer, GTTCTAATTCCATCAGAAGCTTATCG-3′; Sigma-Aldrich, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia). The OIR was induced by exposing 7-day-old neonatal mice (P7) and their mothers to 75% oxygen for 5 days (74.91 ...
Introduction Before advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) methods allowed for three-dimensional (3D) interrogation of myocardial strain, one-dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) strain analysis was the standard. The aim of this study was to investigate the incremental value of CMR-based 3D strain and to test the hypothesis that 3D strain is superior to 1D or 2D strain analysis in the assessment of viability using a porcine model of infarction. Method All animal studies complied with the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and conformed to Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. MI was induced in twenty young farm pigs with weights from twenty five to thirty five kilograms. An Angioplasty balloon was inserted into the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and inflated to a location just distal to the second diagonal branch of the LAD. After One hundred and fifty minutes, the occlusion of the artery was terminated. All surviving animals progressed to ...
In Vivo Experiments. All animal experiments described in this study were performed after review of the protocols and approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.. Murine Whole-Blood Leukotriene B4, Cysteinyl Leukotriene, Lipoxin A4, and PGE2 Assays. For in vitro assays of ionophore-stimulated lipid mediator production, CD-1 mice were euthanized, and blood was collected in heparin-containing syringes by cardiac puncture. The blood was diluted 1:2 (LTB4, LXA4) or 1:15 (LTC4/D4/E4, PGE2) in RPMI 1640 medium, and 200-μl aliquots of the diluted blood were added to wells of a 96-well tissue culture plate. JNJ-26993135 or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton were added at different concentrations to the diluted whole blood (final DMSO concentration of 0.1%) and preincubated for 15 min at 37°C in a humidified incubator. For murine ex vivo analysis of LTB4 production, blood was obtained from BALB/c mice 4 h after oral dosing of JNJ-26993135 and was diluted 1:1 in RPMI 1640 medium, ...
All individuals involved in research or teaching activities that use animals must complete the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) online training module Basic Training Program for Animal Users. The Animal Care and Use Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Program is also mandatory, and all participants must complete the Animal Care and Use Risk Assessment form on this site, which is used to evaluate the possible health risks due to animal exposures and occupational hazards. Depending on the project, participants may be required to follow the Division of Research Safety (DRS) Biological Safety Training.. The portal to access the mandatory programs and forms requires ID authentication. Access is restricted to University of Illinois faculty, students, staff, and authorized guest users. Contact the IACUC or OHS staff to set up a guest account.. The training must be renewed every three years. Risk Assessment Forms must be updated if exposures have changed due to change in research ...
Clenbuterol, a beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist, is used therapeutically to treat respiratory conditions in the horse. However, by virtue of its mechanism of action it has been suggested that clenbuterol may also have repartitioning affects in horses and as such the potential to affect performance. Clenbuterol decreases the percent fat and increases fat-free mass following high dose administration in combination with intense exercise in horses. In the current study, microarray analysis and real-time PCR were used to study the temporal effects of low and high dose chronic clenbuterol administration on differential gene expression of several skeletal muscle myosin heavy chains, genes involved in lipid metabolism and the β2-adrenergic receptor. The effect of clenbuterol administration on differential gene expression has not been previously reported in the horse, therefore the primary objective of the current study was to describe clenbuterol-induced temporal changes in gene expression following chronic
Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 12, Harlan Laboratories) 220-245 g at embryonic day (E)2 were allowed to acclimate to the animal facility for 2 d before experimental manipulation. The pregnant dams were individually housed in a sealed and vented cage (Sealed Space Plus, Techniplast). Animals were housed under standard laboratory conditions in a temperature 20°C ± 1, and relative humidity 60% controlled environment, with a normal 12 h light/dark cycle (lights on 7:00 A.M.-7:00 P.M.). Food and water were available ad libitum. All procedures were performed in accordance with University of Colorado Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidelines for the humane use of laboratory rats in biological research.. Dams were randomly assigned to either a treatment group receiving prenatal stress (n = 5) or to a control nonstressed group (n = 4). To avoid litter size confounds due to a high mortality rate in the animals receiving both stress and terbutaline, pregnant dams were exposed to a daily ...
Mouse lines. Albumin-tv-a and albumin-cre transgenic mice, and Trp53 and Ink4a/Arf conditional mutant mice have been previously described ( 24, 28- 30). All animals were kept in specific pathogen-free housing at the University of Massachusetts Medical School with abundant food and water. All experiments were reviewed and approved by the University of Massachusetts Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.. Virus delivery. The RCAS-GFP and RCAS-PyMT vectors have been previously described ( 31, 32). DF1 chicken fibroblasts ( 33, 34) transfected with RCAS vectors were maintained in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in humidified 37°C incubators under 5% CO2. Cells to be injected were harvested, washed once with PBS, and resuspended in PBS at a final concentration of 2 × 105 cells/μL. About 5 μL of the cell suspension was delivered by injection into the liver parenchyma of 2- or 3-day-old animals using Hamilton syringes attached with 26-gauge needles.. Tumor harvest and ...
Mice. Male C57BL/6J (WT), B6.SJL-Ptprca Pepcb/BoyJ (WT CD45.1), and B6.129S4-Ccr2tm1Ifc/J (Ccr2-/-) mice were obtained from The Jackson Laboratory. AM DKO mice have been described previously (87). Ccr2−/− and AM DKO mice have been backcrossed for more than 9 generations to a C57BL/6J background. All mice were bred under specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions with a 12-hour light/dark cycle in a temperature-controlled environment and ad libitum access to water and food pellets. All experimental protocols were conducted in accordance with the NIH guidelines and were approved by the Yale Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Mice were randomly allocated to experimental groups by coin flip and investigators were blinded to group allocation and/or genotype until after data analysis. Group size calculation in ICH experiments is based on our experience with the variability in these models, accounting for a resulting effect size ƒ (by analysis of variance [ANOVA]) of 0.6 with α less than ...
Animals. Wild-type mice from the 129T2/SvEmsJ background were bred and housed in a specific pathogen-free facility on a 12-hour light/12-hour dark cycle and fed ad libitum in accordance with the Northwestern Universitys Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee regulations. 129T2/SvEmsJ (129T2) mice were purchased from the Jackson Laboratory (stock 002065). mdx/hLTBP4 mice were generated as described previously (34, 60). Sgcg-null mice were generated as described in Hack et al. (46). Two- to 3-month-old males and females were used for all wild-type mouse experiments. Sgcg-null cohorts were age and sex matched with mice between 2 and 5 months old.. Plasmids. Plasmids encoding annexin A1, A2, and A6 with a carboxyl-terminal turboGFP tag were obtained from Origene. Subcloning of annexin A1, A2, and A6 to replace the GFP tag with tdTomato (Addgene) was performed by Mutagenix. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed by Mutagenix on annexin A1-GFP, A2-GFP, and A6-GFP to create the Ca2+-binding ...
Animals. Wild-type mice from the 129T2/SvEmsJ background were bred and housed in a specific pathogen-free facility on a 12-hour light/12-hour dark cycle and fed ad libitum in accordance with the Northwestern Universitys Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee regulations. 129T2/SvEmsJ (129T2) mice were purchased from the Jackson Laboratory (stock 002065). mdx/hLTBP4 mice were generated as described previously (34, 60). Sgcg-null mice were generated as described in Hack et al. (46). Two- to 3-month-old males and females were used for all wild-type mouse experiments. Sgcg-null cohorts were age and sex matched with mice between 2 and 5 months old.. Plasmids. Plasmids encoding annexin A1, A2, and A6 with a carboxyl-terminal turboGFP tag were obtained from Origene. Subcloning of annexin A1, A2, and A6 to replace the GFP tag with tdTomato (Addgene) was performed by Mutagenix. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed by Mutagenix on annexin A1-GFP, A2-GFP, and A6-GFP to create the Ca2+-binding ...
Tissue preparation. Mice were anesthetized and either lectin perfused or sacrificed without perfusion. Tumor tissues were embedded and flash frozen immediately after excision. Lectin-perfused animals received a retroorbital injection of 1 μL/g of rhodamine-conjugated RCAI lectin (Vector Laboratories). Animals were then perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde (Fisher) at 15 mL/min, followed by further perfusion with PBS at the same rate. Both flash frozen and lectin-perfused tissues were sectioned at 10-μm thickness, mounted and stored at −80°C. All experiments were approved by the University of California-San Francisco Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.. Immunocytochemical staining. Frozen sections were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Tissues were blocked for 1 h in 0.5% Tween (Fisher), 2% bovine serum albumin (Sigma Chemical Co.), and 5% normal horse or goat serum (Jackson ImmunoResearch, Inc.) and then incubated with primary antisera and dilutions: monoclonal rat anti-mouse CD31 ...
Supplementary MaterialsSupplementary Movie 1 41598_2020_65742_MOESM1_ESM. 120?rpm and a pullback velocity of 50 m/s and 500 m/sec to achieve an interval between frames was 25 m and 250 m. Each Nuciferine blood vessel was also imaged using a conventional OCT system at the same position with the same frame interval (51.2k A-line rate with a rotation speed of 3000?rpm and pullback velocity of 1 1.25?mm/s and 12.5?mm/s) to allow direct comparison against the OCT. Intravascular OCT system, used in this study, was built based on a prototype device from a commercial OCT manufacturer (NinePoint Medical, Cambridge, MA, USA). The axial and lateral resolution, defined as FWHM of peak intensity at the focal plane, of the OCT system was 11.58 m and 22.67 m, respectively. Following imaging, the animal blood vessels were resected, fixed, and processed for histopathological analysis. All animal studies were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Korea University College of Medicine ...
Generation and analysis of Hprt-targeted transgenic mice. Hprt-targeted ES cells containing the DSCR-1-lacZ transgene were used to generate chimeric mice as previously described (26). Chimeric males were bred to C57BL/6J females to obtain agouti offspring. Female agouti offspring were then bred to wild-type males to generate hemizygous male mice. Analysis of embryos and hemizygous adult male tissues was carried out as previously described (26, 28). The level and pattern of transgene expression were compared with those of the littermate negative control (same genetic background) mice. All animal studies were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees at the University of Tokyo and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Materials and cell culture. Human and murine VEGF were obtained from R&D Systems. Thrombin and CsA were obtained from Calbiochem. LPS and polyinosinic acid potassium salt [poly(I)] were from Sigma-Aldrich. Antibodies against PECAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and Mac1 ...
Science-based medicine is more than a set of methods or certain philosophy of medicine - it is an entire approach to what should be the core questions for any interventionist profession: is it real and does it work?. These are often deceptively difficult questions to answer. Fortunately we have at least a century of experience applying systematic methods to answering these questions within the context of medicine. This is a wealth of history from which to learn, full of cautionary tales and enlightening examples.. However, as Winston Churchill lamented, we tend to forget the lessons of the past leading to, "…the most thoughtless of ages. Every day headlines and short views.". Part of the mission of science-based medicine (and skepticism in general) is to remember the lessons of the past as they relate to science and pseudoscience, and to constantly remind the public and our colleagues of these lessons.. The history of medicine is littered with ideas that did not pan out, worthless treatments, ...
Explant Preparation. Hippocampal slices were prepared from 6- to 9-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat pups of both sexes using previously described techniques (Thomas et al., 1998; Thomas and Morrisett, 2000) and in accordance with National Institutes of Health and University of Texas Institutional Animal Use and Care Committee guidelines. In brief, brains were rapidly removed, cooled to 0 to 4°C for at least 3 min, and then 500-μm transverse sections were prepared and transferred to a holding chamber containing equilibration ACSF bubbled with 95% O2/5% CO2 and maintained at 32°C for 60 min before explanting. Equilibration ACSF consisted of 120 mM NaCl, 25 mM NaHCO3, 3.3 mM KCl, 1.2 mM NaH2PO4, 1.8 mM CaCl2, 2.4 mM MgSO4, and 10 mM dextrose. After equilibration, slices were transferred under sterile conditions onto Millicell-CM organotypic membrane inserts (generally, one to three slices per insert; Millipore, Bedford, MA) with media consisting of 75% minimal essential medium and 25% heat-inactivated ...
The SIRC Office has prepared a number of general risk assessments for chemical agents to aid workers is addressing the hazards posed by various classes of chemicals. The ultimate aim of a Chemical Agents Risk Assessment is to assess the risk from the use / presence of a chemical agent in the University, to the health and safety of persons and to identify control measures designed to reduce the risk from those chemicals to as low a level as possible. These documents must be reviewed by chemical users in order to ensure that they adequately manage the risks posed by the specific chemicals that they use and the processes that they undertake.. ...
MEGURO, Kenichi Professor(MD, PhD)のBrain Science-Based Preventive Care and Rehabilitation for Dementia in Communitiesについて
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Omega-3 fatty acids are incredibly important for your body and brain. This article lists 17 science-based health benefits of omega-3s.
RNA WebRing,A science-based webring to link together molecular biology groups who work with, or are interested in RNA transcription, processing, editing and other aspects of RNA metabolism.
RNA WebRing,A science-based webring to link together molecular biology groups who work with, or are interested in RNA transcription, processing, editing and other aspects of RNA metabolism.
RNA WebRing,A science-based webring to link together molecular biology groups who work with, or are interested in RNA transcription, processing, editing and other aspects of RNA metabolism.
Well, were back. Yes, after having our WordPress database somehow borked to the point where no new posts could be added and no existing posts could be edited since Friday, Science-Based Medicine is back in business-finally! As a result, some of you might have seen this post elsewhere, as it was considered to be somewhat time-sensitive, and I didnt want to delay,.... ...
7 Science-Based Benefits of Soursop for Cancer Treatments many cancer patients use Soursop to cure cancer because tis rich of anti oxidants properties.
SAGE: 11/21/12. Background Meta-analyses of clinical trial safety data have risen in importance beyond regulatory submissions. During drug development, sponsors need to recognize safety signals early and adjust the development program accordingly, so as to facilitate the assessment of causality. Once a product is marketed, sponsors add postapproval clinical trial data to the body of information to help understand existing safety concerns or those that arise from other postapproval data sources, such as spontaneous reports.. ...
PRC performs drug efficacy studies on animals provided by the Animal House and Research facility, which is located within the University campus on a 1200 square meter area and 350 square meter building.. ​JUST has adopted the Animal Care and Use Committee (ACUC) guidelines of the National Institute of Health (NIH), MD, USA several years ago.. ...
Park Slopes Methodist Hospital looks to expand - New York Methodist Hospital is looking to expand. At a Community Board 6 Land Use Committee meeting on Thursday July 12 at the hospital officials from Methodist Hospital outlined a plan that would ...
Addressing one clients on-farm challenge is a clear example of what motivates the employees of BIOMIN to work towards better customer outcomes each day.
Addressing one clients on-farm challenge is a clear example of what motivates the employees of BIOMIN to work towards better customer outcomes each day.
NSPCA Cares about all Animals. Retrieved 2017-04-22. Chambers, Dave. "You're free to bring private prosecutions for animal ... A committee chaired by Mr. Justice Allen Linden of the Law Reform Commission of Canada produced a Working Paper on Private ... resulting in animal abusers not being charged on charges of animal cruelty. The Constitutional Court of South Africa also ruled ... The reason the NSPCA brought the case before the Courts is because despite "overwhelming" evidence of animal cruelty or abuse‚ ...
Committee on the Review of the Smithsonian (January 2005). "Animal Care and Management at the National Zoo: Final Report" (PDF) ... care, suggesting that the publicized animal deaths were not indicative of a wider, undiscovered problem with animal care at the ... The committee found that most animals were well cared-for, and there was little to question regarding large mammal deaths from ... The committee concluded that in a majority of cases, the animal received appropriate care throughout its lifetime. In ...
In the United States, such experiments must be approved by an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Eddy, NB; Leimbach, ... The hot plate test is a test of the pain response in animals, similar to the tail flick test. It is used in basic pain research ... The Ethical Committee of the International Association for the Study of Pain has developed guidelines for the ethical use of ... The time of latency is defined as the time period between the zero point, when the animal is placed on the hot plate surface, ...
"Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Guidebook" (PDF). "About ORI , ORI - The Office of Research Integrity". ori.hhs.gov ... Act of 1985 requires that all research facilities using animals establish Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs ... The Animal Welfare Act of 1966 set standards of treatment of animals in research experiments. It requires all research ... The IACUCs report to the NIH Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare annually. The Health Research Extension Act of 1985 led to the ...
... chair of the Laboratory Animal Care and Use Committee; assistant head of the Clinical Investigations and Research department; ... In September 1999, she was assigned as the director of Restorative Care at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, ... chair of the Medical Records Committee, and Command Intern Coordinator. She has also served as the Specialty Leader for Intern ... and a Trauma and Critical Care fellowship at the Eastern Virginia Graduate School of Medicine in Norfolk, Virginia. Shortly ...
"Home - NSPCA Cares about all Animals". NSPCA Cares about all Animals. Retrieved 2017-04-18. "2012 Eco-Logic Awards - Eco-Logic ... Meredith received the Livestock Welfare Coordinating Committee (LWCC) award in recognition of her exceptional services to ... NSPCA Cares about all Animals. Retrieved 2017-04-18. "Move the world to protect animals". World Animal Protection International ... "Animal Care Expo 2012 : Humane Society International". www.hsi.org. Retrieved 2017-04-18. Webmaster, NSPCA (2016-06-10). " ...
As of 2007, she serves on the Brandon University Animal Care Committee. She had previously served on Brandon's Board of ... Brandon University Standing Committees, Brandon University, accessed 26 January 2007. Brandon University - Board of Governors ...
... demonstration Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Pain Genes Database. ... Most commonly, an intense light beam is focused on the animal's tail and a timer starts. When the animal flicks its tail, the ... The tail flick test is a test of the pain response in animals, similar to the hot plate test. It is used in basic pain research ... The tail flick test is one test to measure heat-induced pain in animals. This reflexive response is an indicator of pain ...
"We treated our animals in accordance with our local Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee." In the late 20th century and ... International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 6, 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-08. ... International Committee of Medical Journal Editors) released the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical ... issued by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (previously called the Vancouver guidelines): The text of ...
5 (1989) Issue 4. "Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees: A New Set of Clothes for the Emperor?", Journal of Medicine ... "Animal Rights, Animal Liberation: Seminal Ideas in the Movement to Extend Moral Consideration to Nonhuman Animals," Studies in ... The Animal Rights Movement in America: From Compassion to Respect. Twayne Publishers, 1994. "Comment on James Nelson's 'Animals ... 2 (1986) Issue 1. List of animal rights advocates Rollin, Bernard E. "Ethics, animal welfare and ACUCs," in John P. Gluck, Tony ...
Strom-Martin chaired the following the Assembly Education Committee; the Joint Legislative Committee on Fisheries and ... In 2000 she received the PAWPAC award, which recognized her work on behalf of animals. In 1999, Strom-Martin was given the Land ... Strom-Martin for her outstanding contributions and service to the children of California in 2001 and the Primary Care ... In addition, she was Vice Chair of the Joint Committee to Develop a Master Plan for Education, Kindergarten-Higher Education, ...
Aquatic Invertebrate Taxonomic Advisory Group in association with AZA Animal Welfare Committee. 9 September 2014. Retrieved 31 ... Here she guards and cares for them for about five months (160 days) until they hatch.[56] In colder waters, such as those off ... World Animal Foundation. Retrieved 12 April 2017.. *^ Simon, Matt (16 January 2015). "Absurd Creature of the Week: The ... Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 7 (2): 95-106. doi:10.1207/s15327604jaws0702_2. PMID ...
... birds and other more exotic animals. Werber often welcomed other animal experts for in-studio visits, as well as other animals ... He frequently donates his time to pet stores, examining pets to ensure they are properly cared for. He has also extended his ... He also served as a member of the legislative committee for the California Veterinary Medical Association. As a committed ... California animal hospital that is accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. Presently, Werber remains President ...
... continuing education for the animal care professional and to support zoo and aquarium personnel in their roles as animal care ... The ICZ evolved from AAZK's now-extinct International Outreach Committee (IOC). A major accomplishment of the IOC was procuring ... The foundation's chief goal is "the improvement of care and well-being of non-domestic animals in the broadest sense of the ... Association of British Wild Animal Keepers (ABWAK) The Association of British Wild Animal Keepers is a non-profit organization ...
He is currently serving on the Health Care and Business and Labor Committees. As Clackamas County Commissioner in, he received ... Later, while a state representative, his support and advocacy in animal-related measures saw him labeled as a 2011 "Top Dog" by ... Housing and Finance Committee. He was in the BiPartisan Tourism Caucus, and the Fish and Wildlife Caucus, and was a member of ... the Association of Oregon Counties Legislative Committee. He was also a member of the Education Commission of the States and ...
Each group of projects was under the special care of a particular committee: agriculture, animal husbandry, health, manual arts ... The health committee took care of the cleanliness of the school premises and promoted extension work in the communities. ... The agriculture committee, for example, was in charge of the upkeep of the grounds and gardens and supervised the agricultural ... but with domestic science and child care added. Since then, hundreds of young women have become professionals, especially in ...
Aquatic Invertebrate Taxonomic Advisory Group in association with AZA Animal Welfare Committee. 9 September 2014. Retrieved 31 ... Here she guards and cares for them for about five months (160 days) until they hatch.[61] In colder waters, such as those off ... World Animal Foundation. Retrieved 12 April 2017.. *^ Simon, Matt (16 January 2015). "Absurd Creature of the Week: The ... "Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science. 5 (4): 275-283. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.567.3108. doi:10.1207/S15327604JAWS0504_02. PMID ...
It adheres to the "Three R's" of animal research and is overseen by the Canadian Council on Animal Care. Through policy ... The Sealing Committee ensures that factual information on seals and sealing in Canada is made available from primary sources, ... Fur Institute of Canada Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Canadian Council on Animal Care International Fur Trade ... Respect for people, animals and the environment. Respect for tradition, heritage and culture. Respect for the right of ...
As required by the Animal Welfare Act, the center also maintains an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee; each IACUC ... Caring for our animals, ONPRC. "About ONPRC: Mission". Oregon Health Sciences University. 2006. Archived from the original ( ... It has been accredited by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International since 1975. ... Monkey Business, Willamette Week, December 13, 2006 "Caring for our Animals:Our primates". Oregon Health Sciences University. ...
... animal care and use programs, institutional biosafety programs (IBCs), research ethics committees (RECs), and embryonic stem ... Conference and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Conference. The AER Conference is held in the fall of ... credential in 2006 for individuals administering institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs). The CPIA credential is ... The two-day IACUC Conference focuses on issues pertaining to the care and use of animals in research. It typically draws 600 to ...
... ordered an audit of the Cook County Animal Care & Control department and passed legislation that created a countywide Animal ... Fritchey does zoning work before the Chicago City Council's Committee on Zoning. Fritchey is a lobbyist registered with the ... Animal welfare. A tireless animal rights advocate, Fritchey wrote and introduced the ordinance that bans retail sales of puppy ... Fritchey was Chairman of the Consumer Protection Committee from 1999 to 2002. His efforts to rein in escalating ATM fees ...
Skewes served as chair of the university's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Skewes also serves on the editorial ... Skewes began teaching animal and veterinary science at Clemson University in 1985; there, he studies animal welfare issues and ... Brutzman, Anna (7 May 2011). "Clemson officials: Lab animal investigations prompted change". Independent Mail. Retrieved 3 ... in Animal Physiology from Virginia Tech in 1985. He was the 1985 recipient of the Graduate Student Research Manuscript Award ...
"Purebred Dog Health Survey Results". Kennel Club/British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee. 2004. ... 3 (1): 2. Isberg, Caroline (2009). "The Leonberger Health Foundation: Who Are These People? Why Should I Care?". The LeoLetter ... The popular legend is that it was bred to resemble the coat-of-arms animal of Leonberg, the lion. The Leonberger dog became ... Animals portal Dogs portal Germany portal Junehall, Petra Breed Standard: Leonberger, 08-tryck, 2005. "AKC meet the Breeds: ...
Emergency Medicine and Critical care, The Post Graduate Committee in Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, 1991. ... Ticks of domestic animals. References[edit]. Citations[edit]. *^ a b c d "Ticks". Department of Medical Entomology, University ... They can be quite easy to find on short-haired animals, but very difficult to find on long-haired animals like Persian cats. If ... Stone BF (1986): Toxicoses induced by ticks and reptiles in domestic animals. In 'Natural Toxins. Animal, Plant and Microbial ...
The collection is funded by public programming and donations, while animal care is done by a collection of volunteers. Located ... The library was dedicated in 1971 in honor of the first chairman of the Churchville Preserve Advisory Committee. Named after ... Programs include nighttime campfires, nature walks, live animal demonstrations, children's clubs, and festivals such as the ... Churchville chose a symbol representing one of the more widely distributed animals found on its grounds. That symbol is the ...
Finding inspiration in Peter Kageyama book Love Where You Live, the committee's vision for this program is to create emotional ... "A Proud History of Caring for More Than 45 Years." Harris County Hospital District. Retrieved on February 9, 2012. ... These layers were created by millennia of river-borne sediments which gradually incorporated plant and animal matter, creating ... Overseeing the program is the Public Art Visioning Committee with members from the Art League of Baytown, Lee College Art ...
... or Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). ... or animal care and use.. III. Conditions. At WMU, research ... A committee member does not act in good faith if his/her acts or omissions on the committee are dishonest or influenced by ... Appointment of the Inquiry Committee-The VPR will appoint an Inquiry Committee and designate the chair within 10 business days ... The members of the Investigative Committee shall select the member to Chair the committee. It is the responsibility of the ...
There is a current need for a change in the attitudes of researchers toward the care and use of experimental animals in India. ... research and into the regulations of the Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments on Animals (CPCSEA ... Rita Seabra 2017-01-09T06:02:28+00:00 Tags: animal welfare, course evaluation, education, ethics, laboratory animal science, ... Temp Worker 2017-01-09T06:38:02+00:00 Tags: administration policies, animal welfare, laboratory animal science, resources, ...
Regulate animal care and use in all programs associated with the University; make recommendations and suggest policy for the ... for the University concerning animal care and welfare; conduct forums, as appropriate, on the needs for uses of and policies ... administration of the Division of Laboratory Animal Resources (DLAR) regarding animals in teaching and research programs; ...
Students will be provided with instruction on the general care and maintenance of their animals as well as practical handling ... Practical Workshops - Small Animals. The Office of the University Veterinarian offers a series of practical workshops on rodent ... Workshop 1: Handling and Routine Procedures (Small Animals). The objective of this workshop is to provide the student with an ... Workshop 2: Technical Procedures (Small Animals). Prerequisite: Module 1. The objective of this workshop is to provide students ...
Animal Welfare Regulations (Title 9 of the Code of Federal Regulations) *Questions and Answers about the Animal Welfare Act and ... Committees and Boards - CIRC, IACUC, IBC, IRB, RSC*Conflict of Interest Review Committee (CIRC) ... Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW) *Animal Welfare Information Center, U.S. Department ...
Each research institution will feature an animal care committee responsible for implementing a comprehensive animal care and ... The Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) is a national organization with a mandate to set standards for the care and use of ... These individuals are responsible for daily monitoring of the research animals and for providing the daily care to the animals ... How has animal research helped humans and other animals?. Animal research has played a vital role in virtually every major ...
... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee is responsible for making sure ... If you are going to use animals in your classes or research, be sure to complete the form below and get approval from the ... vertebrate animals used for research or instructional purposes are treated ethically. ... Committees and Members. *Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. *Faculty Resources *FPC Link to Faculty Review Timelines ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees must have a way to correct problems in animal care, including fair treatment of ... The central importance of Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees means that animal care and use is fundamentally ... In 1971, the Animal Welfare Act was revised, and compliance by institutions could be achieved through an animal care committee ... The animal care committee was required to have five members with expertise to regulate animal welfare at that institution, ...
... all classroom and research projects involving the use of living vertebrate animals to ensure the humane care and use of animals ... JMU Safety Committee * Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee * Institutional Review Board for Research Involving Human ...
Occupational Health and Safety in the Care and Use of Research Animals. Committee on Occupational Safety and Health in Research ... Full time, part time, and temporary personnel involved in animal care in UAF units that house animals for research and teaching ... Outer garments worn in animal rooms or during handling of animals in outdoor facilities are not to be worn outside the animal ... working within UAF animal facilities who are involved in the direct care of vertebrate animals and their living quarters, and ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee IACUC Information Office of Research Integrity ... Training in the care and use of animals is a required element of UAFs Assurance of Compliance with Public Health Service ... All concerns related to the care and use of live animals at UAF or by UAF faculty at other locations should be reported to the ... ORI works with OSP to flag potential animal care issues at the proposal stage so that everyone is aware of what will be ...
Animal Ordering and Disposition. Ordering Live Animals. All animal purchases require the approval of the animal facility ... animal facility manager. Once the animals have been purchased, the animal facilities will bill the designated account. There is ... Disposition of Animals. Each IACUC protocol specifies what will happen to the animals at the conclusion of the project. Common ... UAF specifically prohibits the use of a pro-card to purchase animals; the animal facility manager is the only person exempt ...
... the Nebraska Wesleyan University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) oversees all animal teaching, research ... The use of animals in teaching and research at Nebraska Wesleyan University is conducted in accordance with the Guide For The ... Care and Use of Laboratory Animals 8th edition (pdf) and guidelines provided by the Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare and ... To ensure the humane care and treatment of all animals used in teaching and research at the university, ...
Universitys animal care and use program and is responsible for reviewing all animal care applications using vertebrate animals ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Overview/Mission. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institutional ... Office of Animal Care & Use. (OACU). CB 7193. Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7193 ... NIH/PHS Animal Welfare Assurance Number:D16-00256 (A3410-01). • USDA Animal Research Facility Registration Number: 55-R-0004. ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Policy Statement. Quick Links. *Contact Us ... Initially, The Vertebrate Animal Section and the Approach part of the Research Strategy Section are the areas of the grant to ... In particular, "It is an institutional responsibility to ensure that the description of animal studies included in the ... NIH will accept Animal Use protocols that are not more than three years old at the time of starting the Project. NIH considered ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook. National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Office of Laboratory Animal ... Care_and_Use_Commit.html?id=KCUXH4XybosC&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook. ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidebook. Authors. National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Office of Laboratory ... 9 CFR AAALAC Accreditation Adjuvants alternatives analgesics anesthesia animal facilities animal research Animal Resources ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Search Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Search ... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) endorses the principle of the 3 Rs of Russell and Burch: replacement, ... The purpose of this policy is to identify those circumstances whereby animal transfer is in keeping with the principals of the ... The IACUC may approve the transfer of animals from AUPs involving minimal. potential for pain/distress, including breeding ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Search Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Search ... care and use program.. 4. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) makes recommendations to the IO concerning ... To assure compliance with this requirement, it is the policy of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee to provide ... program (OH&S) for the animal care and use program.. 2. The OH&S program is administered by the Office of the Vice-President ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) serve an important role in ensuring that ethical practices are used by ... Orlans FB (1988) Field research guidelines: impact on animal care and use committees. Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) serve an important role in ensuring that ethical practices are used by ... Ten practical realities for institutional animal care and use committees when evaluating protocols dealing with fish in the ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Tarleton State Universitys Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) ... TSU is dedicated to ensuring the animals used for Teaching and Research get the best possible care under approved Animal Care ... Tarletons program for humane care and use of animals, using the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals as a basis ... Tarletons Home PageOffice of Research and InnovationResearch ComplianceInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) ...
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Standard Operating Procedures for Hazardous Agents. Quick Links. *Contact Us ... Home > Administration > Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee , Standard Operating Procedures for Hazardous Agents ...
Home Facilities Management ServicesEnvironmental Health & SafetyInstitutional Biosafety CommitteeAnimal Care & Use Committee ( ... that of the Radiation Safety Committee (internal form, RO-13). All animal protocols involving irradiation of animals in the ... Infection Control Committee. 1015 Chestnut Street, Suite 610. Specimens of animal origin, especially cell lines, tumors or ... The Institutional Biosafety Committee has given the IACUC the authority to approve animal protocols involving human material ...
... policy of Case Western Reserve University to meet or exceed the highest quality standards for the humane treatment of animals ... Human Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee (HSCRO) * Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) * Good Lab Practices ... Human Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee (HSCRO) * Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) * Good Lab Practices ... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) It is the policy of Case Western Reserve University to meet or exceed the ...
Animals - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Mission and Vision. The mission of the Institutional Animal Care ... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) comprises one part of Iowa State Universitys overarching Animal Care ... The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) must approve any activities that involve the use of live vertebrate ... if a project is to be done at a site or in cooperation with an institution that has its own Animal Care and Use Committee, a ...
PLANNING COMMITTEE. Co-Chairs:. Dr. Saverio "Buddy" Capuano III is a Diplomate of ACLAM with 36 years of experience working ... He was involved in the care and use of small laboratory animals (mice, guinea pigs, rats, and poultry) and large animals (e.g ... biotech start-ups in human gene therapy and food animal genomics, and laboratory animal care and assurance. Dr. Niemi is a ... Care, Use, and Welfare of Marmosets as Animal Models for Gene Editing-Based Biomedical Research: Proceedings of a Workshop Get ...
  • ORI in conjunction with EHSRM, the University of Alaska Statewide Office of Risk Management, UAF Animal Resources Center and in consultation with the university's contract health care provider has established a matrix for categorizing personnel working with live vertebrates. (uaf.edu)
  • Second, the University's Animal Care Committee must approve the project. (mcgill.ca)
  • The animal care committee was required to have five members with expertise to regulate animal welfare at that institution, including at least one veterinarian. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the Attending Veterinarian for the Pittsburgh Facility for Infectious Disease Research from 1998-2001, Dr. Capuano provided veterinary care for a large colony of macaques (200) and acted as collaborator and co-investigator on numerous protocols involving a variety of infectious agents (e.g., simian immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, human influenza virus, mycobacterium tuberculosis, listeria monocytogenes, pneumocystis carinii, and trypanosoma cruzi) and transgenic vectors. (nap.edu)
  • As the Attending Veterinarian for the Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI) from 2001-2005, Dr. Capuano was responsible for the daily clinical care of the animal colony of the MWRI (250 NHPs, 2,000 rodents) and provided experimental support for numerous investigators performing reproductive, stem cell, and cloning research at MWRI. (nap.edu)
  • Further, each institution must establish an animal care and use committee that includes an outside member of the public and a veterinarian. (fbresearch.org)
  • a) Each research facility must have an attending veterinarian who is required to provide adequate veterinary care to the facilities animals (Sect. (usda.gov)
  • Cases evaluated as stable will be referred to the client's primary care veterinarian, other facilities, or other services within the MSU Hospital, if possible. (msu.edu)
  • Evidence must be provided that rodent tissue have been MAP tested or otherwise proven to be free of adventitious pathogens which could pose a threat to other animals in the colony and/or your plan for maintaining adequate isolation indicated. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • Recommendations in the Guide are based on published data, scientific principles, expert opinion, and experience with methods and practices that have proved to be con-sistent with both high-quality research and humane animal care and use. (wtamu.edu)
  • The 3Rs means reducing the number of animals needed in any given study, replacing animals with other models whenever possible and refining procedures to involve the fewest number of animals while still giving valid results. (fbresearch.org)
  • According to the NRC Guide, 8th Edition, "Reduction involves strategies for obtaining comparable levels of information from the use of fewer animals or for maximizing the information obtained from a given number of animals without increasing pain or distress. (umt.edu)
  • After anesthetic recovery, further monitoring for pain and distress will occur using the Animal Monitoring Plan (AMP) and the Animal Observation Record (AOR). (k-state.edu)
  • The committee recommends a maximum of four surgeries per frog: three survival surgeries plus one non-survival surgery (limited to 2 surgeries per side of frog) to minimize the distress experienced by any individual frog. (k-state.edu)
  • The vast majority of biomedical research does not result in significant discomfort or distress for research animals. (mcgill.ca)
  • Rat Bite Fever caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus is a bacterial infection of rodents that is transmitted through bites, scratches, direct contact with animals and their urine, saliva and feces or ingestion of contaminated food or water. (wsu.edu)
  • Fish and rodents, usually mice or rats, account for more than 83% per cent of the animals used in research and are bred specifically for research purposes. (mcgill.ca)
  • Approximately 20-30 percent of individuals working with laboratory animals will develop an allergic reaction to animal proteins and 5 -10 percent of individuals will develop asthma. (wsu.edu)
  • Access the Office of Animal Resources website at Thomas Jefferson University. (kimmelcancercenter.org)
  • William T. Hornaday was the park's first director and curator of all 185 animals when the park was first opened and took office on May 6, 1889. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theresa Colecchia of the Office of General Counsel has joined the committee revising the Commercialization of Inventions Through Independent Companies policy. (pitt.edu)
  • The Patent Policy committee is developing a draft which would provide the Office of Technology Management with sufficient funds from patent proceeds to support the Office as well as cover legal costs for investigating and developing patents. (pitt.edu)
  • The best-known residents are the giant pandas , but the zoo is also home to birds , great apes , big cats , Asian elephants , insects , amphibians , reptiles , aquatic animals , small mammals and many more. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Joe Newsome, Director of the Division of Laboratory Animal Resources (DLAR), conducted a slide presentation giving an overview of the current status/responsibilities of the DLAR as well as what he envisions as DLAR s role in the future. (pitt.edu)
  • Once any required safety trainings are complete and recommendations from the contract health care provider have been completed (or the individual provides justification for exclusion from certain recommendations), the participant and their supervisor are notified that he/she may begin work with live vertebrates. (uaf.edu)