An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.
An angiotensin receptor subtype that is expressed at high levels in a variety of adult tissues including the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, the KIDNEY, the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM and the NERVOUS SYSTEM. Activation of the type 1 angiotensin receptor causes VASOCONSTRICTION and sodium retention.
Cell surface proteins that bind ANGIOTENSINS and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.
Agents that antagonize ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR. Included are ANGIOTENSIN II analogs such as SARALASIN and biphenylimidazoles such as LOSARTAN. Some are used as ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENTS.
An angiotensin receptor subtype that is expressed at high levels in fetal tissues. Many effects of the angiotensin type 2 receptor such as VASODILATION and sodium loss are the opposite of that of the ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR.
Agents that antagonize ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTORS. Many drugs in this class specifically target the ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR.
A decapeptide that is cleaved from precursor angiotensinogen by RENIN. Angiotensin I has limited biological activity. It is converted to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME.
An antagonist of ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR with antihypertensive activity due to the reduced pressor effect of ANGIOTENSIN II.
Tetrazoles are heterocyclic organic compounds containing a 1,3,5-triazole ring with an additional nitrogen atom, often used in pharmaceuticals as bioisosteres for carboxylic acid groups due to their isoelectronic nature and similar hydrogen bonding capabilities.
Agents that antagonize the ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 2 RECEPTOR.
A heptapeptide formed from ANGIOTENSIN II after the removal of an amino acid at the N-terminal by AMINOPEPTIDASE A. Angiotensin III has the same efficacy as ANGIOTENSIN II in promoting ALDOSTERONE secretion and modifying renal blood flow, but less vasopressor activity (about 40%).
A class of drugs whose main indications are the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. They exert their hemodynamic effect mainly by inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. They also modulate sympathetic nervous system activity and increase prostaglandin synthesis. They cause mainly vasodilation and mild natriuresis without affecting heart rate and contractility.
Biphenyl compounds are organic substances consisting of two phenyl rings connected by a single covalent bond, and can exhibit various properties and uses, including as intermediates in chemical synthesis, components in plastics and dyes, and as additives in fuels.
An octapeptide analog of angiotensin II (bovine) with amino acids 1 and 8 replaced with sarcosine and alanine, respectively. It is a highly specific competitive inhibitor of angiotensin II that is used in the diagnosis of HYPERTENSION.
An ANGIOTENSIN II analog which acts as a highly specific inhibitor of ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR.
A peptidyl-dipeptidase that catalyzes the release of a C-terminal dipeptide, -Xaa-*-Xbb-Xcc, when neither Xaa nor Xbb is Pro. It is a Cl(-)-dependent, zinc glycoprotein that is generally membrane-bound and active at neutral pH. It may also have endopeptidase activity on some substrates. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 3.4.15.1.
Compounds containing 1,3-diazole, a five membered aromatic ring containing two nitrogen atoms separated by one of the carbons. Chemically reduced ones include IMIDAZOLINES and IMIDAZOLIDINES. Distinguish from 1,2-diazole (PYRAZOLES).
A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.
Compounds with a BENZENE fused to IMIDAZOLES.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Oligopeptides which are important in the regulation of blood pressure (VASOCONSTRICTION) and fluid homeostasis via the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. These include angiotensins derived naturally from precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, and those synthesized.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
A hormone secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX that regulates electrolyte and water balance by increasing the renal retention of sodium and the excretion of potassium.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
An alpha-globulin of about 453 amino acids, depending on the species. It is produced by the liver and secreted into blood circulation. Angiotensinogen is the inactive precursor of natural angiotensins. Upon successive enzyme cleavages, angiotensinogen yields angiotensin I, II, and III with amino acids numbered at 10, 8, and 7, respectively.
A BLOOD PRESSURE regulating system of interacting components that include RENIN; ANGIOTENSINOGEN; ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME; ANGIOTENSIN I; ANGIOTENSIN II; and angiotensinase. Renin, an enzyme produced in the kidney, acts on angiotensinogen, an alpha-2 globulin produced by the liver, forming ANGIOTENSIN I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme, contained in the lung, acts on angiotensin I in the plasma converting it to ANGIOTENSIN II, an extremely powerful vasoconstrictor. Angiotensin II causes contraction of the arteriolar and renal VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE, leading to retention of salt and water in the KIDNEY and increased arterial blood pressure. In addition, angiotensin II stimulates the release of ALDOSTERONE from the ADRENAL CORTEX, which in turn also increases salt and water retention in the kidney. Angiotensin-converting enzyme also breaks down BRADYKININ, a powerful vasodilator and component of the KALLIKREIN-KININ SYSTEM.
Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.
An angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that is used to treat HYPERTENSION and HEART FAILURE.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).
The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A synthetic nonapeptide (Pyr-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gln-Ile-Pro-Pro) which is identical to the peptide from the venom of the snake, Bothrops jararaca. It inhibits kininase II and ANGIOTENSIN I and has been proposed as an antihypertensive agent.
Persistent high BLOOD PRESSURE due to KIDNEY DISEASES, such as those involving the renal parenchyma, the renal vasculature, or tumors that secrete RENIN.
The active metabolite of ENALAPRIL and a potent intravenously administered angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. It is an effective agent for the treatment of essential hypertension and has beneficial hemodynamic effects in heart failure. The drug produces renal vasodilation with an increase in sodium excretion.
A branched-chain essential amino acid that has stimulant activity. It promotes muscle growth and tissue repair. It is a precursor in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway.
A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.
Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A family of neutral serine proteases with CHYMOTRYPSIN-like activity. Chymases are primarily found in the SECRETORY GRANULES of MAST CELLS and are released during mast cell degranulation.
The octapeptide amide of bovine angiotensin II used to increase blood pressure by vasoconstriction.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
Derivatives of BENZOIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxybenzene structure.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.
Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.
One of the ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS (ACE inhibitors), orally active, that has been used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure.
A diet which contains very little sodium chloride. It is prescribed by some for hypertension and for edematous states. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.
A flavoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the univalent reduction of OXYGEN using NADPH as an electron donor to create SUPEROXIDE ANION. The enzyme is dependent on a variety of CYTOCHROMES. Defects in the production of superoxide ions by enzymes such as NADPH oxidase result in GRANULOMATOUS DISEASE, CHRONIC.
A structure, situated close to the intraventricular foramen, which induces DRINKING BEHAVIOR after stimulation with ANGIOTENSIN II.
The consumption of liquids.
Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.
General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.
Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.
A direct-acting vasodilator that is used as an antihypertensive agent.
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
The predominant form of mammalian antidiuretic hormone. It is a nonapeptide containing an ARGININE at residue 8 and two disulfide-linked cysteines at residues of 1 and 6. Arg-vasopressin is used to treat DIABETES INSIPIDUS or to improve vasomotor tone and BLOOD PRESSURE.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
The renal tubule portion that extends from the BOWMAN CAPSULE in the KIDNEY CORTEX into the KIDNEY MEDULLA. The proximal tubule consists of a convoluted proximal segment in the cortex, and a distal straight segment descending into the medulla where it forms the U-shaped LOOP OF HENLE.
The narrow subcapsular outer zone of the adrenal cortex. This zone produces a series of enzymes that convert PREGNENOLONE to ALDOSTERONE. The final steps involve three successive oxidations by CYTOCHROME P-450 CYP11B2.
The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.
Sodium chloride used in foods.
An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.
Implanted fluid propulsion systems with self-contained power source for providing long-term controlled-rate delivery of drugs such as chemotherapeutic agents or analgesics. Delivery rate may be externally controlled or osmotically or peristatically controlled with the aid of transcutaneous monitoring.
Sodium excretion by URINATION.
A ZINC-dependent membrane-bound aminopeptidase that catalyzes the N-terminal peptide cleavage of GLUTAMATE (and to a lesser extent ASPARTATE). The enzyme appears to play a role in the catabolic pathway of the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
A long-acting angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. It is a prodrug that is transformed in the liver to its active metabolite ramiprilat.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Excision of kidney.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
A cluster of convoluted capillaries beginning at each nephric tubule in the kidney and held together by connective tissue.
Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.
A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.
A 21-amino acid peptide produced in a variety of tissues including endothelial and vascular smooth-muscle cells, neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, and endometrial cells. It acts as a modulator of vasomotor tone, cell proliferation, and hormone production. (N Eng J Med 1995;333(6):356-63)
A mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 18-hydroxylation of steroids in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-specific flavoprotein. This enzyme, encoded by CYP11B2 gene, is important in the conversion of CORTICOSTERONE to 18-hydroxycorticosterone and the subsequent conversion to ALDOSTERONE.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Thiazepines are heterocyclic chemical compounds containing a seven-membered ring with one nitrogen atom, one sulfur atom, and two carbon-carbon double bonds, which are not commonly found in nature but can be synthesized for potential use in pharmaceuticals or as building blocks in organic chemistry.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from MESODERM and comprised of three zones (outer ZONA GLOMERULOSA, middle ZONA FASCICULATA, and inner ZONA RETICULARIS) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN.
The presence of proteins in the urine, an indicator of KIDNEY DISEASES.
Highly reactive compounds produced when oxygen is reduced by a single electron. In biological systems, they may be generated during the normal catalytic function of a number of enzymes and during the oxidation of hemoglobin to METHEMOGLOBIN. In living organisms, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE protects the cell from the deleterious effects of superoxides.
A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).
The internal portion of the kidney, consisting of striated conical masses, the renal pyramids, whose bases are adjacent to the cortex and whose apices form prominent papillae projecting into the lumen of the minor calyces.
A generic term used to describe a group of polypeptides with related chemical structures and pharmacological properties that are widely distributed in nature. These peptides are AUTACOIDS that act locally to produce pain, vasodilatation, increased vascular permeability, and the synthesis of prostaglandins. Thus, they comprise a subset of the large number of mediators that contribute to the inflammatory response. (From Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacologic Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p588)
A potassium sparing diuretic that acts by antagonism of aldosterone in the distal renal tubules. It is used mainly in the treatment of refractory edema in patients with congestive heart failure, nephrotic syndrome, or hepatic cirrhosis. Its effects on the endocrine system are utilized in the treatments of hirsutism and acne but they can lead to adverse effects. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p827)
21-Amino-acid peptides produced by vascular endothelial cells and functioning as potent vasoconstrictors. The endothelin family consists of three members, ENDOTHELIN-1; ENDOTHELIN-2; and ENDOTHELIN-3. All three peptides contain 21 amino acids, but vary in amino acid composition. The three peptides produce vasoconstrictor and pressor responses in various parts of the body. However, the quantitative profiles of the pharmacological activities are considerably different among the three isopeptides.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
One of the ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS (ACE inhibitors) used for hypertension. It is a prodrug that is hydrolyzed after absorption to its main metabolite cilazaprilat.
A benzoic-sulfonamide-furan. It is a diuretic with fast onset and short duration that is used for EDEMA and chronic RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.
A complex of cells consisting of juxtaglomerular cells, extraglomerular mesangium lacis cells, the macula densa of the distal convoluted tubule, and granular epithelial peripolar cells. Juxtaglomerular cells are modified SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS found in the walls of afferent glomerular arterioles and sometimes the efferent arterioles. Extraglomerular mesangium lacis cells are located in the angle between the afferent and efferent glomerular arterioles. Granular epithelial peripolar cells are located at the angle of reflection of the parietal to visceral angle of the renal corpuscle.
Cell surface receptors that bind BRADYKININ and related KININS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The identified receptor types (B-1 and B-2, or BK-1 and BK-2) recognize endogenous KALLIDIN; t-kinins; and certain bradykinin fragments as well as bradykinin itself.
Fluid propulsion systems driven mechanically, electrically, or osmotically that are used to inject (or infuse) over time agents into a patient or experimental animal; used routinely in hospitals to maintain a patent intravenous line, to administer antineoplastic agents and other drugs in thromboembolism, heart disease, diabetes mellitus (INSULIN INFUSION SYSTEMS is also available), and other disorders.
Drugs that bind to and block the activation of MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTORS by MINERALOCORTICOIDS such as ALDOSTERONE.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.
Injections into the cerebral ventricles.
The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.
Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).
A constitutively expressed subtype of bradykinin receptor that may play a role in the acute phase of the inflammatory and pain response. It has high specificity for intact forms of BRADYKININ and KALLIDIN. The receptor is coupled to G-PROTEIN, GQ-G11 ALPHA FAMILY and G-PROTEIN, GI-GO ALPHA FAMILY signaling proteins.
A drive stemming from a physiological need for WATER.
An increase in the excretion of URINE. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.
Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.
Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
An angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. It is used in patients with hypertension and heart failure.
KIDNEY injuries associated with diabetes mellitus and affecting KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; ARTERIOLES; KIDNEY TUBULES; and the interstitium. Clinical signs include persistent PROTEINURIA, from microalbuminuria progressing to ALBUMINURIA of greater than 300 mg/24 h, leading to reduced GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE and END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE.
A group of ISOQUINOLINES in which the nitrogen containing ring is protonated. They derive from the non-enzymatic Pictet-Spengler condensation of CATECHOLAMINES with ALDEHYDES.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
The thin membranous structure supporting the adjoining glomerular capillaries. It is composed of GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS and their EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.
Heterocyclic compounds in which an oxygen is attached to a cyclic nitrogen.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A steroid metabolite that is the 11-deoxy derivative of CORTICOSTERONE and the 21-hydroxy derivative of PROGESTERONE.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
A long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker. It is effective in the treatment of ANGINA PECTORIS and HYPERTENSION.
The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).
An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.
The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Phosphoric acid esters of inositol. They include mono- and polyphosphoric acid esters, with the exception of inositol hexaphosphate which is PHYTIC ACID.
Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
A class of drugs that act by selective inhibition of calcium influx through cellular membranes.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).
Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.
Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.
Acrylates are a group of synthetic compounds based on acrylic acid, commonly used in various industrial and medical applications such as adhesives, coatings, and dental materials, known to cause allergic reactions and contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals.
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
2-, 3-, or 4-Pyridinecarboxylic acids. Pyridine derivatives substituted with a carboxy group at the 2-, 3-, or 4-position. The 3-carboxy derivative (NIACIN) is active as a vitamin.
Cell surface proteins that bind ENDOTHELINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells.
A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).
The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.
A CALCIUM-dependent, constitutively-expressed form of nitric oxide synthase found primarily in ENDOTHELIAL CELLS.
Nucleus in the anterior part of the HYPOTHALAMUS.
The presence of albumin in the urine, an indicator of KIDNEY DISEASES.
Rapidly decreasing response to a drug or physiologically active agent after administration of a few doses. In immunology, it is the rapid immunization against the effect of toxic doses of an extract or serum by previous injection of small doses. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.
Quantitative determination of receptor (binding) proteins in body fluids or tissue using radioactively labeled binding reagents (e.g., antibodies, intracellular receptors, plasma binders).
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind MINERALOCORTICOIDS and mediate their cellular effects. The receptor with its bound ligand acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of specific segments of DNA.
The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.
A 44-kDa extracellular signal-regulated MAP kinase that may play a role the initiation and regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. It phosphorylates a number of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; and MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS.
The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.
Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.
Inbred rats derived from Sprague-Dawley rats and used for the study of salt-dependent hypertension. Salt-sensitive and salt-resistant strains have been selectively bred to show the opposite genetically determined blood pressure responses to excess sodium chloride ingestion.
Compounds based on fumaric acid.
A subtype of endothelin receptor found predominantly in the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. It has a high affinity for ENDOTHELIN-1 and ENDOTHELIN-2.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
The functional units of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and the attached tubule.

Quantification of baroreceptor influence on arterial pressure changes seen in primary angiotension-induced hypertension in dogs. (1/7785)

We studied the role of the sino-aortic baroreceptors in the gradual development of hypertension induced by prolonged administration of small amounts of angiotensin II (A II) in intact dogs and dogs with denervated sino-aortic baroreceptors. Short-term 1-hour infusions of A II(1.0-100 ng/kg per min) showed that conscious denervated dogs had twice the pressor sensitivity of intact dogs. Long-term infusions of A II at 5.0 ng/kg per min (2-3 weeks) with continuous 24-hour recordings of arterial pressure showed that intact dogs required 28 hours to reach the same level of pressure attained by denervated dogs during the 1st hour of infusion. At the 28th hour the pressure in both groups was 70% of the maximum value attained by the 7th day of infusion. Both intact and denervated dogs reached nearly the same plateau level of pressure, the magnitude being directly related both the the A II infusion rate and the daily sodium intake. Cardiac output in intact dogs initially decreased after the onset of A II infusion, but by the 5th day of infusion it was 38% above control, whereas blood volume was unchanged. Heart rate returned to normal after a reduction during the 1st day of infusion in intact dogs. Plasma renin activity could not be detected after 24 hours of A II infusion in either intact or denervated dogs. The data indicate that about 35% of the hypertensive effect of A II results from its acute pressor action, and an additional 35% of the gradual increase in arterial pressure is in large measure a result of baroreceptor resetting. We conclude that the final 30% increase in pressure seems to result from increased cardiac output, the cause of which may be decreased vascular compliance. since the blood volume remains unaltered.  (+info)

Acute and chronic dose-response relationships for angiotensin, aldosterone, and arterial pressure at varying levels of sodium intake. (2/7785)

We examined the acute and chronic dose-response relationships between intravenously infused angiotensin II (A II) and the resulting changes in arterial pressure and plasma aldosterone concentration at varying levels of sodium intake. Sequential analysis of plasma aldosterone at each A II infusion rate resulted in an acute dose-related increase in plasma aldosterone which was markedly attenuated after the first 24 hours of infusion, the final level being directly related to the dose of A II and inversely related to sodium intake. A II infused at 5,15, and 23 ng/kg per min was associated with an initial increase (2nd to 8th hour) in plasma aldosterone to 2,6, and 9 times control values, respectively, in dogs receiving 40 mEq Na+/day. But, after the 1st day, aldosterone averaged only 1, 1.7, and 3 times control values for the next 2 weeks at the same rates of A II infusion. Dogs receiving 120 mEq Na+/day during A II infusion exhibited only a transient increase in plasma aldosterone during the 1st day. Sustained hypertension developed over a period of a week at all doses of A II at normal and high sodium intake, but did not occur at any dose of A II in sodium-depleted dogs. Increasing sodium intake from 40 to 120 mEq/day resulted in higher levels of hypertension, 125% compared to 140% of ocntrol values for dogs infused with A II, 5.0 ng/kg per min. We conclude that primary angiotensin-induced hypertension need not be associated with increased levels of plasma aldosterone, which appears to remain elevated only with amounts of A II greater than those required to sustain a significant degree of hypertension.  (+info)

Relaxin is a potent renal vasodilator in conscious rats. (3/7785)

The kidneys and other nonreproductive organs vasodilate during early gestation; however, the "pregnancy hormones" responsible for the profound vasodilation of the renal circulation during pregnancy are unknown. We hypothesized that the ovarian hormone relaxin (RLX) contributes. Therefore, we tested whether the administration of RLX elicits renal vasodilation and hyperfiltration in conscious adult, intact female rats. After several days of treatment with either purified porcine RLX or recombinant human RLX 2 (rhRLX), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) increased by 20%-40%. Comparable renal vasodilation and hyperfiltration was also observed in ovariectomized rats, suggesting that estrogen and progesterone are unnecessary for the renal response to rhRLX. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester completely abrogated the increase in ERPF and GFR elicited by chronic administration of purified porcine RLX. In contrast, the renal vasoconstrictory response to angiotensin II was attenuated by the RLX treatment. Short-term infusion of purified porcine RLX to conscious rats over several hours failed to increase ERPF and GFR. Plasma osmolality was consistently reduced by the chronic administration of both RLX preparations. In conclusion, the renal and osmoregulatory effects of chronic RLX administration to conscious rats resemble the physiological changes of pregnancy in several respects: (a) marked increases in ERPF and GFR with a mediatory role for nitric oxide; (b) attenuation of the renal circulatory response to angiotensin II; and (c) reduction in plasma osmolality.  (+info)

Angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated inhibition of K+ channel subunit kv2.2 in brain stem and hypothalamic neurons. (4/7785)

Angiotensin II (Ang II) has powerful modulatory actions on cardiovascular function that are mediated by specific receptors located on neurons within the hypothalamus and brain stem. Incubation of neuronal cocultures of rat hypothalamus and brain stem with Ang II elicits an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor-mediated inhibition of total outward K+ current that contributes to an increase in neuronal firing rate. However, the exact K+ conductance(s) that is inhibited by Ang II are not established. Pharmacological manipulation of total neuronal outward K+ current revealed a component of K+ current sensitive to quinine, tetraethylammonium, and 4-aminopyridine, with IC50 values of 21.7 micromol/L, 1.49 mmol/L, and 890 micromol/L, respectively, and insensitive to alpha-dendrotoxin (100 to 500 nmol/L), charybdotoxin (100 to 500 nmol/L), and mast cell degranulating peptide (1 micromol/L). Collectively, these data suggest the presence of Kv2.2 and Kv3.1b. Biophysical examination of the quinine-sensitive neuronal K+ current demonstrated a macroscopic conductance with similar biophysical properties to those of Kv2.2 and Kv3.1b. Ang II (100 nmol/L), in the presence of the AT2 receptor blocker PD123,319, elicited an inhibition of neuronal K+ current that was abolished by quinine (50 micromol/L). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the presence of Kv2.2 and Kv3.1b mRNA in these neurons. However, Western blot analyses demonstrated that only Kv2.2 protein was present. Coexpression of Kv2.2 and the AT1 receptor in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated an Ang II-induced inhibition of Kv2.2 current. Therefore, these data suggest that inhibition of Kv2.2 contributes to the AT1 receptor-mediated reduction of neuronal K+ current and subsequently to the modulation of cardiovascular function.  (+info)

Recent progress in angiotensin II type 2 receptor research in the cardiovascular system. (5/7785)

Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in regulating cardiovascular hemodynamics and structure. Multiple lines of evidence have suggested the existence of Ang II receptor subtypes, and at least 2 distinct receptor subtypes have been defined on the basis of their differential pharmacological and biochemical properties and designated as type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors. To date, most of the known effects of Ang II in adult tissues are attributable to the AT1 receptor. Recent cloning of the AT2 receptor contributes to reveal its physiological functions, but many functions of the AT2 receptor are still an enigma. AT1 and AT2 receptors belong to the 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor family. However, accumulating evidence demonstrates that the function and signaling mechanisms of these receptor subtypes are quite different, and these receptors may exert opposite effects in terms of cell growth and blood pressure regulation. We will review the role of the AT2 receptor in the cardiovascular system and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of AT2 receptor action.  (+info)

Intracellular sodium modulates the expression of angiotensin II subtype 2 receptor in PC12W cells. (6/7785)

Although the angiotensin II subtype 2 receptor (AT2-R) is expressed abundantly in the adrenal medulla, its physiological significance has not yet been determined. To obtain fundamental knowledge of the regulation of AT2-R expression in the adrenal medulla, we investigated the effects of modulating several ion channels on AT2-R expression in PC12W cells. Experiments were performed after 24 hours of serum depletion under subconfluent conditions. After 48 hours of treatment with various agonists or antagonists, the receptor density and mRNA level of AT2-Rs were quantified by 125I-[Sar1, Ile8]angiotensin II binding and Northern blot analysis. Ouabain (10 to 100 nmol/L) and insulin (10 to 100 nmol/L) dose-dependently increased receptor density and mRNA level. Analysis of the binding characteristics revealed that the ouabain-dependent increase in AT2-R levels was due to an increase in binding capacity without a change in the Kd value. These increases were blocked by lowering the Na+ concentration in the medium. A low concentration of the sodium ionophore monensin (10 nmol/L), the K+-channel blocker quinidine (10 micromol/L), and the ATP-sensitive K+-channel blockers tolbutamide (100 micromol/L) and glybenclamide (10 micromol/L) also significantly increased receptor density, but the ATP-sensitive K+-channel agonist cromakalim (100 micromol/L) decreased receptor density significantly (P<0.01). Nifedipine (10 micromol/L) decreased basal receptor density and completely blocked the increase in receptor density caused by these agents. The increase in receptor density caused by an increase in intracellular Na+ was accompanied by an increase in mRNA level, whereas the ATP-sensitive K+-channel blockers did not change mRNA level. Nifedipine slightly decreased mRNA level. These results suggest that AT2-R expression is sensitively regulated by intracellular cation levels. The change in intracellular Na+ level transcriptionally regulates AT2-R expression, whereas the K+-channel blocker-dependent upregulation appears to be at least in part posttranslational.  (+info)

Kidney aminopeptidase A and hypertension, part II: effects of angiotensin II. (7/7785)

Aminopeptidase A (APA) is the principal enzyme that metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to angiotensin III. Previously, we showed that kidney APA was elevated in spontaneously hypertensive rats and was reduced after angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. In the present study, we sought to determine whether kidney APA expression was altered after chronically elevated Ang II, either exogenously delivered via osmotic minipumps or endogenously produced in two-kidney, one clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats. Ang II (200 ng. kg-1. min-1) was infused subcutaneously for 1 or 2 weeks by osmotic minipumps, and 2K1C rats were tested 4 weeks after unilateral renal artery clipping. Blood pressure was not significantly elevated in the Ang II-infused animals but was significantly increased at 3 and 4 weeks in the 2K1C animals. APA was significantly elevated approximately 2-fold in kidney cortical membranes from Ang II-infused animals but was decreased 45% in the clipped kidney and 18% in the nonclipped kidneys from 2K1C animals. Isolated glomeruli from Ang II-infused animals and the nonclipped kidneys from 2K1C animals had markedly higher APA activity and immunoreactivity. Likewise, histochemical and immunohistochemical studies indicated that APA levels were increased in glomeruli from angiotensin-infused animals and in both nonclipped and clipped kidneys from 2K1C animals. In contrast, tubular APA was decreased in tubular elements from 2K1C animals, most markedly in the clipped kidneys. Thus, despite the increase in glomerular APA expression in kidneys from 2K1C animals, the decrease in tubular APA expression is more extensive and accounts for the measured reduction in total APA in cortical homogenates. Because clipped kidneys are not exposed to high blood pressure, these results suggest that glomerular APA expression is positively regulated and tubular APA negatively regulated by Ang II. These results further suggest that changes in kidney APA expression could influence the progression of angiotensin-dependent hypertension.  (+info)

Insulin-like growth factor-1 induces Mdm2 and down-regulates p53, attenuating the myocyte renin-angiotensin system and stretch-mediated apoptosis. (8/7785)

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 inhibits apoptosis, but its mechanism is unknown. Myocyte stretching activates p53 and p53-dependent genes, leading to the formation of angiotensin II (Ang II) and apoptosis. Therefore, this in vitro system was used to determine whether IGF-1 interfered with p53 function and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS), decreasing stretch-induced cell death. A single dose of 200 ng/ml IGF-1 at the time of stretching decreased myocyte apoptosis 43% and 61% at 6 and 20 hours. Ang II concentration was reduced 52% at 20 hours. Additionally, p53 DNA binding to angiotensinogen (Aogen), AT1 receptor, and Bax was markedly down-regulated by IGF-1 via the induction of Mdm2 and the formation of Mdm2-p53 complexes. Concurrently, the quantity of p53, Aogen, renin, AT1 receptor, and Bax was reduced in stretched myocytes exposed to IGF-1. Conversely, Bcl-2 and the Bcl-2-to-Bax protein ratio increased. The effects of IGF-1 on cell death, Ang II synthesis, and Bax protein were the consequence of Mdm2-induced down-regulation of p53 function. In conclusion, the anti-apoptotic impact of IGF-1 on stretched myocytes was mediated by its capacity to depress p53 transcriptional activity, which limited Ang II formation and attenuated the susceptibility of myocytes to trigger their endogenous cell death pathway.  (+info)

Angiotensin II is a potent vasoactive peptide hormone that plays a critical role in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which is a crucial regulator of blood pressure and fluid balance in the body. It is formed from angiotensin I through the action of an enzyme called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE).

Angiotensin II has several physiological effects on various organs, including:

1. Vasoconstriction: Angiotensin II causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle, leading to an increase in peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure.
2. Aldosterone release: Angiotensin II stimulates the adrenal glands to release aldosterone, a hormone that promotes sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys, thereby increasing water retention and blood volume.
3. Sympathetic nervous system activation: Angiotensin II activates the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increased heart rate and contractility, further contributing to an increase in blood pressure.
4. Thirst regulation: Angiotensin II stimulates the hypothalamus to increase thirst, promoting water intake and helping to maintain intravascular volume.
5. Cell growth and fibrosis: Angiotensin II has been implicated in various pathological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, and fibrosis, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular and renal diseases.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are two classes of medications commonly used in clinical practice to target the RAAS by blocking the formation or action of angiotensin II, respectively. These drugs have been shown to be effective in managing hypertension, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease.

The Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 (AT1 receptor) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds and responds to the hormone angiotensin II, which plays a crucial role in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). The RAAS is a vital physiological mechanism that regulates blood pressure, fluid, and electrolyte balance.

The AT1 receptor is found in various tissues throughout the body, including the vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, adrenal glands, kidneys, and brain. When angiotensin II binds to the AT1 receptor, it activates a series of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to vasoconstriction, increased sodium and water reabsorption in the kidneys, and stimulation of aldosterone release from the adrenal glands. These effects ultimately result in an increase in blood pressure and fluid volume.

AT1 receptor antagonists, also known as angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are a class of drugs used to treat hypertension, heart failure, and other cardiovascular conditions. By blocking the AT1 receptor, these medications prevent angiotensin II from exerting its effects on the cardiovascular system, leading to vasodilation, decreased sodium and water reabsorption in the kidneys, and reduced aldosterone release. These actions ultimately result in a decrease in blood pressure and fluid volume.

Angiotensin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds the angiotensin peptides, which are important components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). The RAAS is a hormonal system that regulates blood pressure and fluid balance.

There are two main types of angiotensin receptors: AT1 and AT2. Activation of AT1 receptors leads to vasoconstriction, increased sodium and water reabsorption in the kidneys, and cell growth and proliferation. On the other hand, activation of AT2 receptors has opposite effects, such as vasodilation, natriuresis (increased excretion of sodium in urine), and anti-proliferative actions.

Angiotensin II is a potent activator of AT1 receptors, while angiotensin IV has high affinity for AT2 receptors. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are two classes of drugs that target the RAAS by blocking the formation or action of angiotensin II, leading to decreased activation of AT1 receptors and improved cardiovascular outcomes.

Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers (ARBs) are a class of medications used to treat hypertension, heart failure, and protect against kidney damage in patients with diabetes. They work by blocking the action of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to constrict and blood pressure to increase, at its type 1 receptor. By blocking this effect, ARBs cause blood vessels to dilate, reducing blood pressure and decreasing the workload on the heart. Examples of ARBs include losartan, valsartan, irbesartan, and candesartan.

The Angiotensin II Receptor Type 2 (AT2R) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to the hormone angiotensin II, which plays a crucial role in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), a vital component in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance.

The AT2R is expressed in various tissues, including the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, brain, and reproductive organs. When angiotensin II binds to the AT2R, it initiates several signaling pathways that can lead to vasodilation, anti-proliferation, anti-inflammation, and neuroprotection.

In contrast to the Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 (AT1R), which is primarily associated with vasoconstriction, sodium retention, and fibrosis, AT2R activation has been shown to have protective effects in several pathological conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, atherosclerosis, and kidney disease.

However, the precise functions of AT2R are still being investigated, and its role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes may vary depending on the tissue type and context.

Angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARAs), also known as angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are a class of medications used to treat hypertension, heart failure, and protect against kidney damage in patients with diabetes. They work by blocking the action of angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor and hormone that increases blood pressure and promotes tissue fibrosis. By blocking the binding of angiotensin II to its receptors, ARAs cause relaxation of blood vessels, decreased sodium and water retention, and reduced cardiac remodeling, ultimately leading to improved cardiovascular function and reduced risk of organ damage. Examples of ARAs include losartan, valsartan, irbesartan, and candesartan.

Angiotensin I is a decapeptide (a peptide consisting of ten amino acids) that is generated by the action of an enzyme called renin on a protein called angiotensinogen. Renin cleaves angiotensinogen to produce angiotensin I, which is then converted to angiotensin II by the action of an enzyme called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE).

Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor, meaning it causes blood vessels to narrow and blood pressure to increase. It also stimulates the release of aldosterone from the adrenal glands, which leads to increased sodium and water reabsorption in the kidneys, further increasing blood volume and blood pressure.

Angiotensin I itself has little biological activity, but it is an important precursor to angiotensin II, which plays a key role in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance in the body.

Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) medication that is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but can also be used to manage chronic heart failure and protect against kidney damage in patients with type 2 diabetes. It works by blocking the action of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow and blood pressure to rise. By blocking this hormone's effects, losartan helps relax and widen blood vessels, making it easier for the heart to pump blood and reducing the workload on the cardiovascular system.

The medical definition of losartan is: "A synthetic angiotensin II receptor antagonist used in the treatment of hypertension, chronic heart failure, and diabetic nephropathy. It selectively blocks the binding of angiotensin II to the AT1 receptor, leading to vasodilation, decreased aldosterone secretion, and increased renin activity."

Tetrazoles are a class of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a five-membered ring with four nitrogen atoms and one carbon atom. They have the chemical formula of C2H2N4. Tetrazoles are stable under normal conditions, but can decompose explosively when heated or subjected to strong shock.

In the context of medicinal chemistry, tetrazoles are sometimes used as bioisosteres for carboxylic acids, as they can mimic some of their chemical and biological properties. This has led to the development of several drugs that contain tetrazole rings, such as the antiviral drug tenofovir and the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib.

However, it's important to note that 'tetrazoles' is not a medical term per se, but rather a chemical term that can be used in the context of medicinal chemistry or pharmacology.

Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Blockers (AT2RBs) are a class of drugs that selectively block the activation of Angiotensin II Type 2 receptors (AT2R). These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body and play a role in regulating blood pressure, inflammation, and cell growth.

Angiotensin II is a hormone that constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure. It binds to both AT1R and AT2R, but its effects are mainly mediated through AT1R. AT2RBs work by blocking the action of Angiotensin II at the AT2R, which can help lower blood pressure and reduce inflammation.

AT2RBs have been shown to have potential benefits in various clinical settings, including heart failure, diabetes, and kidney disease. However, their use is not as widespread as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), which primarily target the AT1R.

Some examples of AT2RBs include EMA401, PD123319, and TRV120027.

Angiotensin III is a hormone that is involved in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid balance in the body. It is formed by the enzymatic breakdown of angiotensin II, another hormone in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin III has similar physiological effects as angiotensin II, including vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels), stimulation of aldosterone release from the adrenal glands (which leads to sodium and water retention), and stimulation of thirst.

Angiotensin III is a peptide consisting of three amino acids, namely arginine-valine-tyrosine (Arg-Val-Tyr). It binds to and activates the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2), which are found in various tissues throughout the body. The activation of these receptors leads to a range of physiological responses, including increased blood pressure, heart rate, and fluid volume.

Angiotensin III is less potent than angiotensin II in its ability to cause vasoconstriction and aldosterone release, but it has been shown to have important roles in the regulation of cardiovascular function, particularly during conditions of reduced renal perfusion or low blood pressure. It may also contribute to the development of certain diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, and kidney disease.

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are a class of medications that are commonly used to treat various cardiovascular conditions, such as hypertension (high blood pressure), heart failure, and diabetic nephropathy (kidney damage in people with diabetes).

ACE inhibitors work by blocking the action of angiotensin-converting enzyme, an enzyme that converts the hormone angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor, meaning it narrows blood vessels and increases blood pressure. By inhibiting the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, ACE inhibitors cause blood vessels to relax and widen, which lowers blood pressure and reduces the workload on the heart.

Some examples of ACE inhibitors include captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, and fosinopril. These medications are generally well-tolerated, but they can cause side effects such as cough, dizziness, headache, and elevated potassium levels in the blood. It is important for patients to follow their healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking ACE inhibitors and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Biphenyl compounds, also known as diphenyls, are a class of organic compounds consisting of two benzene rings linked by a single carbon-carbon bond. The chemical structure of biphenyl compounds can be represented as C6H5-C6H5. These compounds are widely used in the industrial sector, including as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, as solvents, and in the production of plastics and dyes. Some biphenyl compounds also have biological activity and can be found in natural products. For example, some plant-derived compounds that belong to this class have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties.

Saralasin is a synthetic analog of the natural hormone angiotensin II, which is used in research and medicine. It acts as an antagonist of the angiotensin II receptor, blocking its effects. Saralasin is primarily used in research to study the role of the renin-angiotensin system in various physiological processes. In clinical medicine, it has been used in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions such as hypertension and pheochromocytoma, although its use is not widespread due to the availability of more effective and selective drugs.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for "1-Sarcosine-8-Isoleucine Angiotensin II." It is possible that this term is being used to describe an altered or modified form of the peptide hormone angiotensin II.

Angiotensin II is a powerful vasoconstrictor and plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid balance. Its octapeptide structure consists of eight amino acids, with the sequence Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe.

Modifying this sequence by replacing one or more amino acids can result in altered biological activity. In this case, "1-Sarcosine-8-Isoleucine" suggests that the first amino acid (Aspartic Acid) has been replaced with Sarcosine (N-methylglycine), and the eighth amino acid (Phenylalanine) has been replaced with Isoleucine.

However, without further context or research, it is difficult to provide a precise medical definition for this term. If you are seeking information on a specific scientific study or application, please provide more details so that I can give a more informed response.

Peptidyl-dipeptidase A is more commonly known as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). It is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which regulates blood pressure and fluid balance.

ACE is a membrane-bound enzyme found primarily in the lungs, but also in other tissues such as the heart, kidneys, and blood vessels. It plays a crucial role in converting the inactive decapeptide angiotensin I into the potent vasoconstrictor octapeptide angiotensin II, which constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure.

ACE also degrades the peptide bradykinin, which is involved in the regulation of blood flow and vascular permeability. By breaking down bradykinin, ACE helps to counteract its vasodilatory effects, thereby maintaining blood pressure homeostasis.

Inhibitors of ACE are widely used as medications for the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and diabetic kidney disease, among other conditions. These drugs work by blocking the action of ACE, leading to decreased levels of angiotensin II and increased levels of bradykinin, which results in vasodilation, reduced blood pressure, and improved cardiovascular function.

Imidazoles are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a double-bonded nitrogen atom and two additional nitrogen atoms in the ring. They have the chemical formula C3H4N2. In a medical context, imidazoles are commonly used as antifungal agents. Some examples of imidazole-derived antifungals include clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole. These medications work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes, leading to increased permeability and death of the fungal cells. Imidazoles may also have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anticancer properties.

Renin is a medically recognized term and it is defined as:

"A protein (enzyme) that is produced and released by specialized cells (juxtaglomerular cells) in the kidney. Renin is a key component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which helps regulate blood pressure and fluid balance in the body.

When the kidney detects a decrease in blood pressure or a reduction in sodium levels, it releases renin into the bloodstream. Renin then acts on a protein called angiotensinogen, converting it to angiotensin I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) subsequently converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II, which is a potent vasoconstrictor that narrows blood vessels and increases blood pressure.

Additionally, angiotensin II stimulates the adrenal glands to release aldosterone, a hormone that promotes sodium reabsorption in the kidneys and increases water retention, further raising blood pressure.

Therefore, renin plays a critical role in maintaining proper blood pressure and electrolyte balance in the body."

Benzimidazoles are a class of heterocyclic compounds containing a benzene fused to a imidazole ring. They have a wide range of pharmacological activities and are used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of the benzimidazoles are used as antiparasitics, such as albendazole and mebendazole, which are effective against a variety of worm infestations. Other benzimidazoles have antifungal properties, such as thiabendazole and fuberidazole, and are used to treat fungal infections. Additionally, some benzimidazoles have been found to have anti-cancer properties and are being investigated for their potential use in cancer therapy.

Vasoconstrictor agents are substances that cause the narrowing of blood vessels by constricting the smooth muscle in their walls. This leads to an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in blood flow. They work by activating the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine that bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel walls, causing them to contract.

Vasoconstrictor agents are used medically for a variety of purposes, including:

* Treating hypotension (low blood pressure)
* Controlling bleeding during surgery or childbirth
* Relieving symptoms of nasal congestion in conditions such as the common cold or allergies

Examples of vasoconstrictor agents include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and epinephrine. It's important to note that prolonged use or excessive doses of vasoconstrictor agents can lead to rebound congestion and other adverse effects, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Angiotensins are a group of hormones that play a crucial role in the body's cardiovascular system, particularly in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance. The most well-known angiotensins are Angiotensin I, Angiotensin II, and Angiotensin-(1-7).

Angiotensinogen is a protein produced mainly by the liver. When the body requires an increase in blood pressure, renin (an enzyme produced by the kidneys) cleaves angiotensinogen to form Angiotensin I. Then, another enzyme called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), primarily found in the lungs, converts Angiotensin I into Angiotensin II.

Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor, causing blood vessels to narrow and increase blood pressure. It also stimulates the release of aldosterone from the adrenal glands, which leads to increased sodium reabsorption in the kidneys, further raising blood pressure and promoting fluid retention.

Angiotensin-(1-7) is a more recently discovered member of the angiotensin family. It has opposing effects to Angiotensin II, acting as a vasodilator and counterbalancing some of the negative consequences of Angiotensin II's actions.

Medications called ACE inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) are commonly used in clinical practice to target the renin-angiotensin system, lowering blood pressure and protecting against organ damage in various cardiovascular conditions.

Antihypertensive agents are a class of medications used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). They work by reducing the force and rate of heart contractions, dilating blood vessels, or altering neurohormonal activation to lower blood pressure. Examples include diuretics, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, calcium channel blockers, and direct vasodilators. These medications may be used alone or in combination to achieve optimal blood pressure control.

Aldosterone is a hormone produced by the adrenal gland. It plays a key role in regulating sodium and potassium balance and maintaining blood pressure through its effects on the kidneys. Aldosterone promotes the reabsorption of sodium ions and the excretion of potassium ions in the distal tubules and collecting ducts of the nephrons in the kidneys. This increases the osmotic pressure in the blood, which in turn leads to water retention and an increase in blood volume and blood pressure.

Aldosterone is released from the adrenal gland in response to a variety of stimuli, including angiotensin II (a peptide hormone produced as part of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), potassium ions, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland. The production of aldosterone is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism involving sodium levels in the blood. High sodium levels inhibit the release of aldosterone, while low sodium levels stimulate its release.

In addition to its role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance and blood pressure, aldosterone has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, and primary hyperaldosteronism (a condition characterized by excessive production of aldosterone).

Hypertension is a medical term used to describe abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries, often defined as consistently having systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) over 80 mmHg. It is also commonly referred to as high blood pressure.

Hypertension can be classified into two types: primary or essential hypertension, which has no identifiable cause and accounts for about 95% of cases, and secondary hypertension, which is caused by underlying medical conditions such as kidney disease, hormonal disorders, or use of certain medications.

If left untreated, hypertension can lead to serious health complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, it is important for individuals with hypertension to manage their condition through lifestyle modifications (such as healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management) and medication if necessary, under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

A kidney, in medical terms, is one of two bean-shaped organs located in the lower back region of the body. They are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the body by performing several crucial functions such as:

1. Regulation of water and electrolyte balance: Kidneys help regulate the amount of water and various electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and calcium in the bloodstream to maintain a stable internal environment.

2. Excretion of waste products: They filter waste products from the blood, including urea (a byproduct of protein metabolism), creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle tissue), and other harmful substances that result from normal cellular functions or external sources like medications and toxins.

3. Endocrine function: Kidneys produce several hormones with important roles in the body, such as erythropoietin (stimulates red blood cell production), renin (regulates blood pressure), and calcitriol (activated form of vitamin D that helps regulate calcium homeostasis).

4. pH balance regulation: Kidneys maintain the proper acid-base balance in the body by excreting either hydrogen ions or bicarbonate ions, depending on whether the blood is too acidic or too alkaline.

5. Blood pressure control: The kidneys play a significant role in regulating blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which constricts blood vessels and promotes sodium and water retention to increase blood volume and, consequently, blood pressure.

Anatomically, each kidney is approximately 10-12 cm long, 5-7 cm wide, and 3 cm thick, with a weight of about 120-170 grams. They are surrounded by a protective layer of fat and connected to the urinary system through the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Angiotensinogen is a protein that is produced mainly by the liver. It is the precursor to angiotensin I, which is a molecule that begins the process of constriction (narrowing) of blood vessels, leading to an increase in blood pressure. When angiotensinogen comes into contact with an enzyme called renin, it is cleaved into angiotensin I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) then converts angiotensin I into angiotensin II, which is a potent vasoconstrictor and a key player in the body's regulation of blood pressure and fluid balance.

Angiotensinogen is an important component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which helps to regulate blood pressure and fluid balance by controlling the volume and flow of fluids in the body. Disorders of the RAAS can lead to high blood pressure, kidney disease, and other health problems.

The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is a complex hormonal system that regulates blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte balance, and vascular resistance. It plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of hypertension, heart failure, and kidney diseases.

Here's a brief overview of how it works:

1. Renin is an enzyme that is released by the juxtaglomerular cells in the kidneys in response to decreased blood pressure or reduced salt delivery to the distal tubules.
2. Renin acts on a protein called angiotensinogen, which is produced by the liver, converting it into angiotensin I.
3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), found in the lungs and other tissues, then converts angiotensin I into angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor that narrows blood vessels and increases blood pressure.
4. Angiotensin II also stimulates the release of aldosterone from the adrenal glands, which promotes sodium and water reabsorption in the kidneys, further increasing blood volume and blood pressure.
5. Additionally, angiotensin II has direct effects on the heart, promoting hypertrophy and remodeling, which can contribute to heart failure.
6. The RAS can be modulated by various medications, such as ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and aldosterone antagonists, which are commonly used to treat hypertension, heart failure, and kidney diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyridines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of organic compounds with the chemical structure of a six-membered ring containing one nitrogen atom and five carbon atoms (heterocyclic aromatic compound).

In a biological or medical context, pyridine derivatives can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. For example, some medications contain pyridine rings as part of their chemical structure. However, "Pyridines" itself is not a medical term or condition.

Enalapril is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of a hormone in the body called angiotensin II, which causes blood vessels to narrow and tighten. By blocking this hormone, Enalapril helps relax and widen blood vessels, making it easier for the heart to pump blood and reducing the workload on the heart.

Enalapril is commonly used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

The medication comes in the form of tablets or capsules that are taken orally, usually once or twice a day with or without food. The dosage will depend on various factors such as the patient's age, weight, and medical condition. It is important to follow the instructions of your healthcare provider when taking Enalapril.

Like all medications, Enalapril can cause side effects, including dry cough, dizziness, headache, fatigue, and nausea. More serious side effects may include allergic reactions, kidney problems, and low blood pressure. If you experience any concerning symptoms while taking Enalapril, it is important to contact your healthcare provider right away.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) are an inbred strain of rats that were originally developed through selective breeding for high blood pressure. They are widely used as a model to study hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases, as well as neurological disorders such as stroke and dementia.

Inbred strains of animals are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or offspring) for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at all genetic loci. This means that the animals within an inbred strain are essentially genetically identical to one another, which makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease processes.

SHR rats develop high blood pressure spontaneously, without any experimental manipulation, and show many features of human hypertension, such as increased vascular resistance, left ventricular hypertrophy, and renal dysfunction. They also exhibit a number of behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive deficits, which make them useful for studying the neurological consequences of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

Overall, inbred SHR rats are an important tool in biomedical research, providing a valuable model for understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to hypertension and related disorders.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

WKY (Wistar Kyoto) is not a term that refers to "rats, inbred" in a medical definition. Instead, it is a strain of laboratory rat that is widely used in biomedical research. WKY rats are an inbred strain, which means they are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a genetically uniform population.

WKY rats originated from the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and were established as a normotensive control strain to contrast with other rat strains that exhibit hypertension. They have since been used in various research areas, including cardiovascular, neurological, and behavioral studies. Compared to other commonly used rat strains like the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), WKY rats are known for their lower blood pressure, reduced stress response, and greater emotionality.

In summary, "WKY" is a designation for an inbred strain of laboratory rat that is often used as a control group in biomedical research due to its normotensive characteristics.

Vasoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of blood vessels due to the contraction of the smooth muscle in their walls. This process decreases the diameter of the lumen (the inner space of the blood vessel) and reduces blood flow through the affected vessels. Vasoconstriction can occur throughout the body, but it is most noticeable in the arterioles and precapillary sphincters, which control the amount of blood that flows into the capillary network.

The autonomic nervous system, specifically the sympathetic division, plays a significant role in regulating vasoconstriction through the release of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Various hormones and chemical mediators, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and serotonin, can also induce vasoconstriction.

Vasoconstriction is a vital physiological response that helps maintain blood pressure and regulate blood flow distribution in the body. However, excessive or prolonged vasoconstriction may contribute to several pathological conditions, including hypertension, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases.

Renal circulation refers to the blood flow specifically dedicated to the kidneys. The main function of the kidneys is to filter waste and excess fluids from the blood, which then get excreted as urine. To perform this function efficiently, the kidneys receive a substantial amount of the body's total blood supply - about 20-25% in a resting state.

The renal circulation process begins when deoxygenated blood from the rest of the body returns to the right side of the heart and is pumped into the lungs for oxygenation. Oxygen-rich blood then leaves the left side of the heart through the aorta, the largest artery in the body.

A portion of this oxygen-rich blood moves into the renal arteries, which branch directly from the aorta and supply each kidney with blood. Within the kidneys, these arteries divide further into smaller vessels called afferent arterioles, which feed into a network of tiny capillaries called the glomerulus within each nephron (the functional unit of the kidney).

The filtration process occurs in the glomeruli, where waste materials and excess fluids are separated from the blood. The resulting filtrate then moves through another set of capillaries, the peritubular capillaries, which surround the renal tubules (the part of the nephron that reabsorbs necessary substances back into the bloodstream).

The now-deoxygenated blood from the kidneys' capillary network coalesces into venules and then merges into the renal veins, which ultimately drain into the inferior vena cava and return the blood to the right side of the heart. This highly specialized circulation system allows the kidneys to efficiently filter waste while maintaining appropriate blood volume and composition.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Teprotide is not a medical condition but rather a medication. It's a synthetic peptide that acts as an inhibitor of the enzyme angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). ACE plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, which is a potent vasoconstrictor. By blocking this conversion, teprotide can help lower blood pressure and reduce the workload on the heart.

Teprotide was initially used in clinical trials for the treatment of hypertension and heart failure but has since been largely replaced by other ACE inhibitors with more favorable pharmacokinetic properties. It is still occasionally used in research settings to study the renin-angiotensin system's role in various physiological processes.

Renal hypertension, also known as renovascular hypertension, is a type of secondary hypertension (high blood pressure) that is caused by narrowing or obstruction of the renal arteries or veins, which supply blood to the kidneys. This can lead to decreased blood flow and oxygen delivery to the kidney tissue, activating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and resulting in increased peripheral vascular resistance, sodium retention, and extracellular fluid volume, ultimately causing hypertension.

Renal hypertension can be classified into two types:

1. Renin-dependent renal hypertension: This is caused by a decrease in blood flow to the kidneys, leading to increased renin release from the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney. Renin converts angiotensinogen to angiotensin I, which is then converted to angiotensin II by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor that causes an increase in peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure.
2. Renin-independent renal hypertension: This is caused by increased sodium retention and extracellular fluid volume, leading to an increase in blood pressure. This can be due to various factors such as obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, or pheochromocytoma.

Renal hypertension is often asymptomatic but can lead to serious complications such as kidney damage, heart failure, and stroke if left untreated. Diagnosis of renal hypertension involves imaging studies such as renal artery duplex ultrasound, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to identify any narrowing or obstruction in the renal arteries or veins. Treatment options include medications such as ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers, and diuretics, as well as interventions such as angioplasty and stenting to improve blood flow to the kidneys.

Enalaprilat is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors. It is the active metabolite of Enalapril. Enalaprilat works by blocking the action of angiotensin-converting enzyme, which helps to relax and widen blood vessels, thereby reducing blood pressure and increasing blood flow.

Enalaprilat is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. It is administered intravenously in a hospital setting, and its effects are usually seen within 15 minutes of administration. Common side effects of Enalaprilat include hypotension (low blood pressure), dizziness, headache, and nausea.

Valine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through diet. It is a hydrophobic amino acid, with a branched side chain, and is necessary for the growth, repair, and maintenance of tissues in the body. Valine is also important for muscle metabolism, and is often used by athletes as a supplement to enhance physical performance. Like other essential amino acids, valine must be obtained through foods such as meat, fish, dairy products, and legumes.

Captopril is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of a chemical in the body called angiotensin II, which causes blood vessels to narrow and release hormones that can increase blood pressure. By blocking the action of angiotensin II, captopril helps relax and widen blood vessels, which lowers blood pressure and improves blood flow.

Captopril is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. It may also be used to protect the kidneys from damage due to diabetes or high blood pressure. The medication comes in the form of tablets that are taken by mouth, usually two to three times per day.

Common side effects of captopril include cough, dizziness, headache, and skin rash. More serious side effects may include allergic reactions, kidney problems, and changes in blood cell counts. It is important for patients taking captopril to follow their doctor's instructions carefully and report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Norepinephrine, also known as noradrenaline, is a neurotransmitter and a hormone that is primarily produced in the adrenal glands and is released into the bloodstream in response to stress or physical activity. It plays a crucial role in the "fight-or-flight" response by preparing the body for action through increasing heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and glucose availability.

As a neurotransmitter, norepinephrine is involved in regulating various functions of the nervous system, including attention, perception, motivation, and arousal. It also plays a role in modulating pain perception and responding to stressful or emotional situations.

In medical settings, norepinephrine is used as a vasopressor medication to treat hypotension (low blood pressure) that can occur during septic shock, anesthesia, or other critical illnesses. It works by constricting blood vessels and increasing heart rate, which helps to improve blood pressure and perfusion of vital organs.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Chymases are a type of enzyme that belong to the family of serine proteases. They are found in various tissues and organs, including the heart, lungs, and immune cells called mast cells. Chymases play a role in several physiological and pathological processes, such as inflammation, tissue remodeling, and blood pressure regulation.

One of the most well-known chymases is found in the mast cells and is often referred to as "mast cell chymase." This enzyme can cleave and activate various proteins, including angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor that increases blood pressure. Chymases have also been implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure, as well as respiratory diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In summary, chymases are a group of serine protease enzymes that play important roles in various physiological and pathological processes, particularly in inflammation, tissue remodeling, and blood pressure regulation.

Angiotensin amide is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a form of angiotensin II, which is a potent vasoconstrictor (a substance that narrows blood vessels) in the body. Angiotensin II is formed from angiotensin I through the action of an enzyme called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE).

Angiotensin II amide, also known as angiotensin II-amide or angiotensin II-(1-8), refers to the biologically active form of angiotensin II. It is an octapeptide with the amino acid sequence Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe, and its carboxy terminus is amidated (has an amide group instead of a free carboxyl group). This amide form of angiotensin II is more stable than the non-amidated form and has a longer half-life in circulation.

Angiotensin II amide plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance by causing vasoconstriction, stimulating aldosterone release from the adrenal glands (which leads to sodium and water retention), and promoting thirst. Drugs that inhibit ACE or block angiotensin II receptors are commonly used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, which originates from the left ventricle of the heart and carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. It can be divided into several parts, including the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The ascending aorta gives rise to the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. The aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic, left common carotid, and left subclavian arteries, which supply blood to the head, neck, and upper extremities. The descending aorta travels through the thorax and abdomen, giving rise to various intercostal, visceral, and renal arteries that supply blood to the chest wall, organs, and kidneys.

Benzoates are the salts and esters of benzoic acid. They are widely used as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals to prevent the growth of microorganisms. The chemical formula for benzoic acid is C6H5COOH, and when it is combined with a base (like sodium or potassium), it forms a benzoate salt (e.g., sodium benzoate or potassium benzoate). When benzoic acid reacts with an alcohol, it forms a benzoate ester (e.g., methyl benzoate or ethyl benzoate).

Benzoates are generally considered safe for use in food and cosmetics in small quantities. However, some people may have allergies or sensitivities to benzoates, which can cause reactions such as hives, itching, or asthma symptoms. In addition, there is ongoing research into the potential health effects of consuming high levels of benzoates over time, particularly in relation to gut health and the development of certain diseases.

In a medical context, benzoates may also be used as a treatment for certain conditions. For example, sodium benzoate is sometimes given to people with elevated levels of ammonia in their blood (hyperammonemia) to help reduce those levels and prevent brain damage. This is because benzoates can bind with excess ammonia in the body and convert it into a form that can be excreted in urine.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Bradykinin is a naturally occurring peptide in the human body, consisting of nine amino acids. It is a potent vasodilator and increases the permeability of blood vessels, causing a local inflammatory response. Bradykinin is formed from the breakdown of certain proteins, such as kininogen, by enzymes called kininases or proteases, including kallikrein. It plays a role in several physiological processes, including pain transmission, blood pressure regulation, and the immune response. In some pathological conditions, such as hereditary angioedema, bradykinin levels can increase excessively, leading to symptoms like swelling, redness, and pain.

Cardiomegaly is a medical term that refers to an enlarged heart. It can be caused by various conditions such as high blood pressure, heart valve problems, cardiomyopathy, or fluid accumulation around the heart (pericardial effusion). Cardiomegaly can be detected through imaging tests like chest X-rays or echocardiograms. Depending on the underlying cause, treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, or in some cases, surgery. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Lisinopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, which is a type of medication used to treat various cardiovascular conditions. It works by blocking the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in relaxation and widening of blood vessels, decreased blood pressure, and increased blood flow.

Lisinopril is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. It may also be used to protect the kidneys from damage due to diabetes or high blood pressure. Additionally, it has been shown to reduce proteinuria (excess protein in urine) in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

Common side effects of Lisinopril include dizziness, headache, fatigue, and cough. More serious side effects may include angioedema (rapid swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat), hyperkalemia (elevated potassium levels), and impaired kidney function.

It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking Lisinopril and to report any unusual symptoms promptly. Regular monitoring of blood pressure, kidney function, and electrolyte levels may be necessary during treatment with this medication.

A sodium-restricted diet is a meal plan designed to limit the amount of sodium (salt) intake. The recommended daily sodium intake for adults is less than 2,300 milligrams (mg), but for those with certain medical conditions such as high blood pressure, heart failure, or chronic kidney disease, a lower daily sodium limit of 1,500 to 2,000 mg may be recommended.

A sodium-restricted diet typically involves avoiding processed and packaged foods, which are often high in sodium, and limiting the use of salt when cooking or at the table. Fresh fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains are encouraged as they are naturally low in sodium. It is important to read food labels carefully, as some foods may contain hidden sources of sodium.

Adhering to a sodium-restricted diet can help manage blood pressure, reduce fluid retention, and decrease the risk of heart disease and stroke. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider or a registered dietitian before starting any new diet plan to ensure that it meets individual nutritional needs and medical conditions.

The adrenal glands are a pair of endocrine glands that are located on top of the kidneys. Each gland has two parts: the outer cortex and the inner medulla. The adrenal cortex produces hormones such as cortisol, aldosterone, and androgens, which regulate metabolism, blood pressure, and other vital functions. The adrenal medulla produces catecholamines, including epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline), which help the body respond to stress by increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and alertness.

NADPH oxidase is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various cell types. The primary function of NADPH oxidase is to catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADPH to molecular oxygen, resulting in the formation of superoxide radicals. This enzyme complex consists of several subunits, including two membrane-bound components (gp91phox and p22phox) and several cytosolic components (p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and rac1 or rac2). Upon activation, these subunits assemble to form a functional enzyme complex that generates ROS, which serve as important signaling molecules in various cellular processes. However, excessive or uncontrolled production of ROS by NADPH oxidase has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, such as cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

The subfornical organ is a circumventricular organ located in the rostral part of the anterior wall of the third ventricle, above the fornix and posterior to the anterior commissure. It is one of the key structures involved in the regulation of fluid balance and cardiovascular function.

The subfornical organ contains specialized neurons that are sensitive to angiotensin II, a hormone that regulates blood pressure and fluid balance by stimulating thirst and vasopressin release. These neurons are not protected by the blood-brain barrier, allowing them to directly detect changes in circulating levels of angiotensin II and other substances.

The subfornical organ also contains receptors for other hormones and neurotransmitters that regulate fluid balance and cardiovascular function, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and nitric oxide. These receptors allow the subfornical organ to integrate information from multiple sources and modulate its responses accordingly.

Overall, the subfornical organ plays a critical role in maintaining fluid balance and cardiovascular homeostasis by detecting changes in circulating hormones and neurotransmitters and initiating appropriate physiological responses.

The term "drinking" is commonly used to refer to the consumption of beverages, but in a medical context, it usually refers to the consumption of alcoholic drinks. According to the Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary, "drinking" is defined as:

1. The act or habit of swallowing liquid (such as water, juice, or alcohol)
2. The ingestion of alcoholic beverages

It's important to note that while moderate drinking may not pose significant health risks for some individuals, excessive or binge drinking can lead to a range of negative health consequences, including addiction, liver disease, heart disease, and increased risk of injury or violence.

Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone that helps regulate water balance in the body. It is produced by the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. When the body is dehydrated or experiencing low blood pressure, vasopressin is released into the bloodstream, where it causes the kidneys to decrease the amount of urine they produce and helps to constrict blood vessels, thereby increasing blood pressure. This helps to maintain adequate fluid volume in the body and ensure that vital organs receive an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood. In addition to its role in water balance and blood pressure regulation, vasopressin also plays a role in social behaviors such as pair bonding and trust.

Hypertrophy, in the context of physiology and pathology, refers to an increase in the size of an organ or tissue due to an enlargement of its constituent cells. It is often used to describe the growth of muscle cells (myocytes) in response to increased workload or hormonal stimulation, resulting in an increase in muscle mass. However, hypertrophy can also occur in other organs such as the heart (cardiac hypertrophy) in response to high blood pressure or valvular heart disease.

It is important to note that while hypertrophy involves an increase in cell size, hyperplasia refers to an increase in cell number. In some cases, both hypertrophy and hyperplasia can occur together, leading to a significant increase in the overall size and function of the organ or tissue.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

Fibrosis is a pathological process characterized by the excessive accumulation and/or altered deposition of extracellular matrix components, particularly collagen, in various tissues and organs. This results in the formation of fibrous scar tissue that can impair organ function and structure. Fibrosis can occur as a result of chronic inflammation, tissue injury, or abnormal repair mechanisms, and it is a common feature of many diseases, including liver cirrhosis, lung fibrosis, heart failure, and kidney disease.

In medical terms, fibrosis is defined as:

"The process of producing scar tissue (consisting of collagen) in response to injury or chronic inflammation in normal connective tissue. This can lead to the thickening and stiffening of affected tissues and organs, impairing their function."

Renovascular hypertension is a type of secondary hypertension (high blood pressure) that is caused by renal artery stenosis or narrowing. This condition reduces blood flow to the kidneys, leading to the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which causes an increase in peripheral vascular resistance and blood volume, resulting in hypertension.

Renovascular hypertension is often seen in people with atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia, which are the most common causes of renal artery stenosis. Other conditions that can lead to renovascular hypertension include vasculitis, blood clots, and compression of the renal artery by nearby structures.

Diagnosis of renovascular hypertension typically involves imaging studies such as duplex ultrasound, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography to visualize the renal arteries and assess for stenosis. Treatment may involve medications to control blood pressure, lifestyle modifications, and procedures such as angioplasty and stenting to open up the narrowed renal artery. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow to the kidney.

Hydralazine is an antihypertensive medication, which means it is used to treat high blood pressure. It works by relaxing and widening the blood vessels, making it easier for the heart to pump blood through the body. This can help reduce the workload on the heart and lower blood pressure. Hydralazine is available in oral tablet form and is typically prescribed to be taken several times a day.

Hydralazine belongs to a class of medications called vasodilators, which work by relaxing the muscle in the walls of the blood vessels, causing them to widen. This increases the amount of blood that can flow through the blood vessels and reduces the pressure within them. Hydralazine is often used in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure.

It's important to note that hydralazine should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can cause side effects such as headache, dizziness, and rapid heartbeat. It may also interact with certain other medications, so it is important to inform your doctor of all medications you are taking before starting hydralazine.

Sodium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that is necessary for human health. In a medical context, sodium is often discussed in terms of its concentration in the blood, as measured by serum sodium levels. The normal range for serum sodium is typically between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Sodium plays a number of important roles in the body, including:

* Regulating fluid balance: Sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cells, which is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and preventing dehydration.
* Facilitating nerve impulse transmission: Sodium is involved in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in the nervous system, which is necessary for proper muscle function and coordination.
* Assisting with muscle contraction: Sodium helps to regulate muscle contractions by interacting with other minerals such as calcium and potassium.

Low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can cause symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma, while high sodium levels (hypernatremia) can lead to symptoms such as weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. Both conditions require medical treatment to correct.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Vascular resistance is a measure of the opposition to blood flow within a vessel or a group of vessels, typically expressed in units of mmHg/(mL/min) or sometimes as dynes*sec/cm^5. It is determined by the diameter and length of the vessels, as well as the viscosity of the blood flowing through them. In general, a decrease in vessel diameter, an increase in vessel length, or an increase in blood viscosity will result in an increase in vascular resistance, while an increase in vessel diameter, a decrease in vessel length, or a decrease in blood viscosity will result in a decrease in vascular resistance. Vascular resistance is an important concept in the study of circulation and cardiovascular physiology because it plays a key role in determining blood pressure and blood flow within the body.

Arginine vasopressin (AVP), also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone produced in the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. It plays a crucial role in regulating water balance and blood pressure in the body.

AVP acts on the kidneys to promote water reabsorption, which helps maintain adequate fluid volume and osmotic balance in the body. It also constricts blood vessels, increasing peripheral vascular resistance and thereby helping to maintain blood pressure. Additionally, AVP has been shown to have effects on cognitive function, mood regulation, and pain perception.

Deficiencies or excesses of AVP can lead to a range of medical conditions, including diabetes insipidus (characterized by excessive thirst and urination), hyponatremia (low sodium levels in the blood), and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness, and it functions to produce appropriate physiological responses to perceived danger. It's often associated with the "fight or flight" response. The SNS uses nerve impulses to stimulate target organs, causing them to speed up (e.g., increased heart rate), prepare for action, or otherwise respond to stressful situations.

The sympathetic nervous system is activated due to stressful emotional or physical situations and it prepares the body for immediate actions. It dilates the pupils, increases heart rate and blood pressure, accelerates breathing, and slows down digestion. The primary neurotransmitter involved in this system is norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline).

The proximal kidney tubule is the initial portion of the renal tubule in the nephron of the kidney. It is located in the renal cortex and is called "proximal" because it is closer to the glomerulus, compared to the distal tubule. The proximal tubule plays a crucial role in the reabsorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the filtrate that has been formed by the glomerulus. It also helps in the secretion of waste products and other substances into the urine.

The proximal tubule is divided into two segments: the pars convoluta and the pars recta. The pars convoluta is the curved portion that receives filtrate from the Bowman's capsule, while the pars recta is the straight portion that extends deeper into the renal cortex.

The proximal tubule is lined with a simple cuboidal epithelium, and its cells are characterized by numerous mitochondria, which provide energy for active transport processes. The apical surface of the proximal tubular cells has numerous microvilli, forming a brush border that increases the surface area for reabsorption.

In summary, the proximal kidney tubule is a critical site for the reabsorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the glomerular filtrate, contributing to the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the body.

Zona glomerulosa is a region of the adrenal gland, specifically the outer portion of the adrenal cortex. It is responsible for producing mineralocorticoids, with the principal one being aldosterone. Aldosterone helps regulate electrolyte and fluid balance in the body by increasing the reabsorption of sodium ions and water in the distal nephron of the kidney while promoting the excretion of potassium ions. This process assists in maintaining blood pressure and volume within normal ranges. The zona glomerulosa's function is primarily under the control of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS).

The thoracic aorta is the segment of the largest artery in the human body (the aorta) that runs through the chest region (thorax). The thoracic aorta begins at the aortic arch, where it branches off from the ascending aorta, and extends down to the diaphragm, where it becomes the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta is divided into three parts: the ascending aorta, the aortic arch, and the descending aorta. The ascending aorta rises from the left ventricle of the heart and is about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long. The aortic arch curves backward and to the left, giving rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. The descending thoracic aorta runs downward through the chest, passing through the diaphragm to become the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta supplies oxygenated blood to the upper body, including the head, neck, arms, and chest. It plays a critical role in maintaining blood flow and pressure throughout the body.

Sodium chloride, commonly known as salt, is an essential electrolyte in dietary intake. It is a chemical compound made up of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) ions. In a medical context, particularly in nutrition and dietetics, "sodium chloride, dietary" refers to the consumption of this compound in food sources.

Sodium plays a crucial role in various bodily functions such as maintaining fluid balance, assisting nerve impulse transmission, and contributing to muscle contraction. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day and further suggest an ideal limit of no more than 1,500 mg per day for most adults, especially those with high blood pressure. However, the average American consumes more than twice the recommended amount, primarily from processed and prepared foods. Excessive sodium intake can lead to high blood pressure and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Phenylephrine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as sympathomimetic amines. It primarily acts as an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist, which means it stimulates these receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels). This effect can be useful in various medical situations, such as:

1. Nasal decongestion: When applied topically in the nose, phenylephrine causes constriction of the blood vessels in the nasal passages, which helps to relieve congestion and swelling. It is often found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold and allergy products.
2. Ocular circulation: In ophthalmology, phenylephrine is used to dilate the pupils before eye examinations. The increased pressure from vasoconstriction helps to open up the pupil, allowing for a better view of the internal structures of the eye.
3. Hypotension management: In some cases, phenylephrine may be given intravenously to treat low blood pressure (hypotension) during medical procedures like spinal anesthesia or septic shock. The vasoconstriction helps to increase blood pressure and improve perfusion of vital organs.

It is essential to use phenylephrine as directed, as improper usage can lead to adverse effects such as increased heart rate, hypertension, arrhythmias, and rebound congestion (when used as a nasal decongestant). Always consult with a healthcare professional for appropriate guidance on using this medication.

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule made up of one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom. In the body, it is a crucial signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes such as vasodilation, immune response, neurotransmission, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. It is produced naturally by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from the amino acid L-arginine. Inhaled nitric oxide is used medically to treat pulmonary hypertension in newborns and adults, as it helps to relax and widen blood vessels, improving oxygenation and blood flow.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Oligopeptides are defined in medicine and biochemistry as short chains of amino acids, typically containing fewer than 20 amino acid residues. These small peptides are important components in various biological processes, such as serving as signaling molecules, enzyme inhibitors, or structural elements in some proteins. They can be found naturally in foods and may also be synthesized for use in medical research and therapeutic applications.

An implantable infusion pump is a small, programmable medical device that is surgically placed under the skin to deliver precise amounts of medication directly into the body over an extended period. These pumps are often used for long-term therapies, such as managing chronic pain, delivering chemotherapy drugs, or administering hormones for conditions like diabetes or growth hormone deficiency.

The implantable infusion pump consists of a reservoir to hold the medication and a mechanism to control the rate and timing of its delivery. The device can be refilled periodically through a small incision in the skin. Implantable infusion pumps are designed to provide consistent, controlled dosing with minimal side effects and improved quality of life compared to traditional methods like injections or oral medications.

It is important to note that implantable infusion pumps should only be used under the guidance and care of a healthcare professional, as they require careful programming and monitoring to ensure safe and effective use.

Natriuresis is the process or condition of excreting an excessive amount of sodium (salt) through urine. It is a physiological response to high sodium levels in the body, which can be caused by various factors such as certain medical conditions (e.g., kidney disease, heart failure), medications, or dietary habits. The increased excretion of sodium helps regulate the body's water balance and maintain normal blood pressure. However, persistent natriuresis may indicate underlying health issues that require medical attention.

Glutamyl Aminopeptidase (GAP, or sometimes also abbreviated as GP) is an enzyme that is found in many tissues throughout the body, including the kidneys and the intestines. Its primary function is to help break down proteins into smaller peptides and individual amino acids by removing certain types of amino acids from the ends of these protein chains.

GAP is a type of exopeptidase enzyme, which means that it works on the outside edges of proteins rather than in the middle. Specifically, GAP removes the amino acid glutamic acid (or its amide form, glutamine) from the N-terminus (the beginning end) of peptides and proteins.

In clinical settings, GAP is often measured in blood or urine samples as a biomarker for various medical conditions. For example, elevated levels of GAP in the blood may indicate liver disease or kidney damage, while decreased levels may be associated with certain types of cancer or gastrointestinal disorders. However, it's important to note that GAP is just one of many factors that doctors may consider when diagnosing and treating these conditions.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Ramipril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, which is a type of medication used to treat various cardiovascular conditions. It works by blocking the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, thereby causing relaxation and widening of blood vessels, decreasing blood pressure, and increasing blood flow.

Ramipril is primarily used for the treatment of hypertension (high blood pressure), heart failure, and the prevention of major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) and stroke in high-risk patients. It may also be used to improve survival after a heart attack.

The medication is available in oral tablet form and is typically taken once or twice daily, depending on the prescribed dosage. Side effects of ramipril can include cough, dizziness, headache, fatigue, nausea, and taste changes. Serious side effects are rare but may include kidney problems, hyperkalemia (high potassium levels), and angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat).

It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking ramipril and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly. Regular monitoring of blood pressure, kidney function, and potassium levels may be necessary during treatment with this medication.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Nephrectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of a kidney is removed. It may be performed due to various reasons such as severe kidney damage, kidney cancer, or living donor transplantation. The type of nephrectomy depends on the reason for the surgery - a simple nephrectomy involves removing only the affected portion of the kidney, while a radical nephrectomy includes removal of the whole kidney along with its surrounding tissues like the adrenal gland and lymph nodes.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

A kidney glomerulus is a functional unit in the nephron of the kidney. It is a tuft of capillaries enclosed within a structure called Bowman's capsule, which filters waste and excess fluids from the blood. The glomerulus receives blood from an afferent arteriole and drains into an efferent arteriole.

The process of filtration in the glomerulus is called ultrafiltration, where the pressure within the glomerular capillaries drives plasma fluid and small molecules (such as ions, glucose, amino acids, and waste products) through the filtration membrane into the Bowman's space. Larger molecules, like proteins and blood cells, are retained in the blood due to their larger size. The filtrate then continues down the nephron for further processing, eventually forming urine.

The mesenteric arteries are the arteries that supply oxygenated blood to the intestines. There are three main mesenteric arteries: the superior mesenteric artery, which supplies blood to the small intestine (duodenum to two-thirds of the transverse colon) and large intestine (cecum, ascending colon, and the first part of the transverse colon); the inferior mesenteric artery, which supplies blood to the distal third of the transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum; and the middle colic artery, which is a branch of the superior mesenteric artery that supplies blood to the transverse colon. These arteries are important in maintaining adequate blood flow to the intestines to support digestion and absorption of nutrients.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

The kidney cortex is the outer region of the kidney where most of the functional units called nephrons are located. It plays a crucial role in filtering blood and regulating water, electrolyte, and acid-base balance in the body. The kidney cortex contains the glomeruli, proximal tubules, loop of Henle, and distal tubules, which work together to reabsorb necessary substances and excrete waste products into the urine.

Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is a hormone that is primarily produced and secreted by the atria of the heart in response to stretching of the cardiac muscle cells due to increased blood volume. ANF plays a crucial role in regulating body fluid homeostasis, blood pressure, and cardiovascular function.

The main physiological action of ANF is to promote sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, which helps lower blood volume and reduce blood pressure. ANF also relaxes vascular smooth muscle, dilates blood vessels, and inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), further contributing to its blood pressure-lowering effects.

Defects in ANF production or action have been implicated in several cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. Therefore, ANF and its analogs are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Endothelin-1 is a small peptide (21 amino acids) and a potent vasoconstrictor, which means it narrows blood vessels. It is primarily produced by the endothelial cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelin-1 plays a crucial role in regulating vascular tone, cell growth, and inflammation. Its dysregulation has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure. It exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (ETA and ETB) on the surface of target cells.

Aldosterone synthase is a steroidogenic enzyme that is primarily responsible for the production of the hormone aldosterone in the adrenal gland. It is encoded by the CYP11B2 gene and is located within the mitochondria of the zona glomerulosa cells in the adrenal cortex.

Aldosterone synthase catalyzes two key reactions in the biosynthesis of aldosterone: the conversion of corticosterone to 18-hydroxycorticosterone and the subsequent conversion of 18-hydroxycorticosterone to aldosterone. These reactions involve the sequential addition of hydroxyl groups at the C18 position of the steroid molecule, which is a critical step in the synthesis of aldosterone.

Aldosterone plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and electrolyte balance by increasing the reabsorption of sodium and water in the distal nephron of the kidney, while promoting the excretion of potassium. Disorders of aldosterone synthase can lead to conditions such as primary hyperaldosteronism, which is characterized by excessive production of aldosterone and can result in hypertension and hypokalemia.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Thiazepines are not a recognized term in medical terminology or pharmacology. It appears that you may have misspelled "thiazepines," which also does not have a specific medical meaning. However, "thiazepine" is a chemical compound with a specific structure, and it is the core structure of some drugs such as thiazepine derivatives. These derivatives are often used for their sedative, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and muscle relaxant properties.

If you meant to ask about "thiazide" or "thiazide diuretics," I would be happy to provide a definition:

Thiazides are a class of diuretic medications that act on the distal convoluted tubule in the kidney, promoting sodium and chloride excretion. This also leads to increased water excretion (diuresis) and decreased extracellular fluid volume. Thiazide diuretics are primarily used to treat hypertension and edema associated with heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Common thiazide diuretics include hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, and indapamide.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

The adrenal cortex is the outer portion of the adrenal gland, which is located on top of the kidneys. It plays a crucial role in producing hormones that are essential for various bodily functions. The adrenal cortex is divided into three zones:

1. Zona glomerulosa: This outermost zone produces mineralocorticoids, primarily aldosterone. Aldosterone helps regulate sodium and potassium balance and thus influences blood pressure by controlling the amount of fluid in the body.
2. Zona fasciculata: The middle layer is responsible for producing glucocorticoids, with cortisol being the most important one. Cortisol regulates metabolism, helps manage stress responses, and has anti-inflammatory properties. It also plays a role in blood sugar regulation and maintaining the body's response to injury and illness.
3. Zona reticularis: The innermost zone produces androgens, primarily dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate form (DHEAS). These androgens are weak compared to those produced by the gonads (ovaries or testes), but they can be converted into more potent androgens or estrogens in peripheral tissues.

Disorders related to the adrenal cortex can lead to hormonal imbalances, affecting various bodily functions. Examples include Addison's disease (insufficient adrenal cortical hormone production) and Cushing's syndrome (excessive glucocorticoid levels).

Proteinuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of excess proteins, particularly albumin, in the urine. Under normal circumstances, only small amounts of proteins should be found in the urine because the majority of proteins are too large to pass through the glomeruli, which are the filtering units of the kidneys.

However, when the glomeruli become damaged or diseased, they may allow larger molecules such as proteins to leak into the urine. Persistent proteinuria is often a sign of kidney disease and can indicate damage to the glomeruli. It is usually detected through a routine urinalysis and may be confirmed with further testing.

The severity of proteinuria can vary, and it can be a symptom of various underlying conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, and other kidney diseases. Treatment for proteinuria depends on the underlying cause and may include medications to control blood pressure, manage diabetes, or reduce protein loss in the urine.

Superoxides are partially reduced derivatives of oxygen that contain one extra electron, giving them an overall charge of -1. They are highly reactive and unstable, with the most common superoxide being the hydroxyl radical (•OH-) and the superoxide anion (O2-). Superoxides are produced naturally in the body during metabolic processes, particularly within the mitochondria during cellular respiration. They play a role in various physiological processes, but when produced in excess or not properly neutralized, they can contribute to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, potentially leading to the development of various diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders.

NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) is not a medication, but rather a research chemical used in scientific studies. It is an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that synthesizes nitric oxide, a molecule involved in the relaxation of blood vessels.

Therefore, L-NAME is often used in experiments to investigate the role of nitric oxide in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. It is important to note that the use of L-NAME in humans is not approved for therapeutic purposes due to its potential side effects, which can include hypertension, decreased renal function, and decreased cerebral blood flow.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

Dietary sodium is a mineral that is primarily found in table salt (sodium chloride) and many processed foods. It is an essential nutrient for human health, playing a crucial role in maintaining fluid balance, transmitting nerve impulses, and regulating muscle contractions. However, consuming too much dietary sodium can increase blood pressure and contribute to the development of hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and kidney problems.

The recommended daily intake of dietary sodium is less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day for most adults, but the American Heart Association recommends no more than 1,500 mg per day for optimal heart health. It's important to note that many processed and restaurant foods contain high levels of sodium, so it's essential to read food labels and choose fresh, whole foods whenever possible to help limit dietary sodium intake.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (free radicals) and the body's ability to detoxify them or repair the damage they cause. This imbalance can lead to cellular damage, oxidation of proteins, lipids, and DNA, disruption of cellular functions, and activation of inflammatory responses. Prolonged or excessive oxidative stress has been linked to various health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related diseases.

The kidney medulla is the inner portion of the renal pyramids in the kidney, consisting of multiple conical structures found within the kidney. It is composed of loops of Henle and collecting ducts responsible for concentrating urine by reabsorbing water and producing a hyperosmotic environment. The kidney medulla has a unique blood supply and is divided into an inner and outer zone, with the inner zone having a higher osmolarity than the outer zone. This region of the kidney helps regulate electrolyte and fluid balance in the body.

Kinins are a group of endogenous inflammatory mediators that are involved in the body's response to injury or infection. They are derived from the decapeptide bradykinin and its related peptides, which are formed by the enzymatic cleavage of precursor proteins called kininogens.

Kinins exert their effects through the activation of specific G protein-coupled receptors, known as B1 and B2 receptors. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the body, including in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems.

Activation of kinin receptors leads to a range of physiological responses, including vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, pain, and smooth muscle contraction. Kinins are also known to interact with other inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to amplify the inflammatory response.

In addition to their role in inflammation, kinins have been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, including hypertension, asthma, arthritis, and pain. As such, kinin-targeted therapies are being explored as potential treatments for these and other diseases.

Spironolactone is a prescription medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as potassium-sparing diuretics. It works by blocking the action of aldosterone, a hormone that helps regulate sodium and potassium balance in your body. This results in increased urine production (diuresis) and decreased salt and fluid retention.

Spironolactone is primarily used to treat edema (fluid buildup) associated with heart failure, liver cirrhosis, or kidney disease. It's also prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure and primary hyperaldosteronism, a condition where the adrenal glands produce too much aldosterone.

Furthermore, spironolactone is used off-label to treat conditions such as acne, hirsutism (excessive hair growth in women), and hormone-sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

It's important to note that spironolactone can cause increased potassium levels in the blood (hyperkalemia) and should be used with caution in patients with kidney impairment or those taking other medications that affect potassium balance. Regular monitoring of electrolyte levels, including potassium and sodium, is essential during spironolactone therapy.

Endothelin is a type of peptide (small protein) that is produced by the endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelins are known to be potent vasoconstrictors, meaning they cause the narrowing of blood vessels, and thus increase blood pressure. There are three major types of endothelin molecules, known as Endothelin-1, Endothelin-2, and Endothelin-3. These endothelins bind to specific receptors (ETA, ETB) on the surface of smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel walls, leading to contraction and subsequent vasoconstriction. Additionally, endothelins have been implicated in various physiological and pathophysiological processes such as regulation of cell growth, inflammation, and fibrosis.

Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. They have thick, muscular walls that can withstand the high pressure of blood being pumped out of the heart. Arteries branch off into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further divide into a vast network of tiny capillaries where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste occurs between the blood and the body's cells. After passing through the capillary network, deoxygenated blood collects in venules, then merges into veins, which return the blood back to the heart.

Arterioles are small branches of arteries that play a crucial role in regulating blood flow and blood pressure within the body's circulatory system. They are the smallest type of blood vessels that have muscular walls, which allow them to contract or dilate in response to various physiological signals.

Arterioles receive blood from upstream arteries and deliver it to downstream capillaries, where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste products occurs between the blood and surrounding tissues. The contraction of arteriolar muscles can reduce the diameter of these vessels, causing increased resistance to blood flow and leading to a rise in blood pressure upstream. Conversely, dilation of arterioles reduces resistance and allows for greater blood flow at a lower pressure.

The regulation of arteriolar tone is primarily controlled by the autonomic nervous system, local metabolic factors, and various hormones. This fine-tuning of arteriolar diameter enables the body to maintain adequate blood perfusion to vital organs while also controlling overall blood pressure and distribution.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are highly reactive molecules containing oxygen, including peroxides, superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen. They are naturally produced as byproducts of normal cellular metabolism in the mitochondria, and can also be generated by external sources such as ionizing radiation, tobacco smoke, and air pollutants. At low or moderate concentrations, ROS play important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis, but at high concentrations, they can cause significant damage to cell structures, including lipids, proteins, and DNA, leading to oxidative stress and potential cell death.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Vasodilation is the widening or increase in diameter of blood vessels, particularly the involuntary relaxation of the smooth muscle in the tunica media (middle layer) of the arteriole walls. This results in an increase in blood flow and a decrease in vascular resistance. Vasodilation can occur due to various physiological and pathophysiological stimuli, such as local metabolic demands, neural signals, or pharmacological agents. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, tissue perfusion, and thermoregulation.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Cilazapril is an oral antihypertensive drug, which belongs to the class of medications known as ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of a chemical in the body called angiotensin II that causes blood vessels to narrow, thereby helping to relax and widen blood vessels, and lower blood pressure.

Cilazapril is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), and can also be used to improve survival after a heart attack and to manage chronic heart failure. It is available under the brand name Inhibace and in generic form as well. As with any medication, it should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who will consider the individual's medical history, current medications, and other factors before prescribing it.

Furosemide is a loop diuretic medication that is primarily used to treat edema (fluid retention) associated with various medical conditions such as heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney disease. It works by inhibiting the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in the ascending loop of Henle in the kidneys, thereby promoting the excretion of water, sodium, and chloride ions. This increased urine output helps reduce fluid accumulation in the body and lower blood pressure.

Furosemide is also known by its brand names Lasix and Frusid. It can be administered orally or intravenously, depending on the patient's condition and the desired rate of diuresis. Common side effects include dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, hearing loss (in high doses), and increased blood sugar levels.

It is essential to monitor kidney function, electrolyte levels, and fluid balance while using furosemide to minimize potential adverse effects and ensure appropriate treatment.

The Juxtaglomerular Apparatus (JGA) is a specialized region located at the junction between the afferent arteriole and the distal convoluted tubule in the nephron of the kidney. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance within the body through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS).

The JGA consists of three main components:

1. Juxtaglomerular Cells: These are specialized smooth muscle cells found in the media layer of the afferent arteriole. They have the ability to synthesize and release renin, an enzyme that initiates the RAAS cascade. When blood pressure decreases or when sodium levels in the distal convoluted tubule are low, these cells are stimulated to release renin.

2. Macula Densa: This is a group of specialized epithelial cells located within the wall of the distal convoluted tubule at its point of contact with the afferent arteriole. These cells monitor the concentration and flow rate of filtrate in the tubule and provide feedback to the juxtaglomerular cells regarding sodium levels and pressure changes in the nephron.

3. Lacis Cells: Also known as extraglomerular mesangial cells, lacis cells are located within the connective tissue surrounding the JGA. They help regulate blood flow to the glomerulus by contracting or relaxing in response to various stimuli.

In summary, the Juxtaglomerular Apparatus is a critical structure involved in maintaining homeostasis through its role in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

Bradykinin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds to and is activated by the peptide hormone bradykinin. There are two main types of bradykinin receptors, B1 and B2, which are distinguished by their pharmacological properties, distribution, and function.

Bradykinin Receptor B1 (B1R) is upregulated during tissue injury and inflammation, and it mediates pain, hyperalgesia, and vasodilation. The activation of B1R also promotes the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, contributing to the development of chronic inflammation.

Bradykinin Receptor B2 (B2R) is constitutively expressed in various tissues, including the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and nervous system. It mediates many of the physiological effects of bradykinin, such as vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and pain sensation. B2R also plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure, fluid balance, and tissue repair.

Both B1R and B2R are involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including inflammatory disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic pain conditions. Therefore, targeting these receptors with specific drugs has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for treating various medical conditions.

An infusion pump is a medical device used to deliver fluids, such as medications, nutrients, or supplements, into a patient's body in a controlled and precise manner. These pumps can be programmed to deliver specific amounts of fluid over set periods, allowing for accurate and consistent administration. They are often used in hospitals, clinics, and home care settings to administer various types of therapies, including pain management, chemotherapy, antibiotic treatment, and parenteral nutrition.

Infusion pumps come in different sizes and configurations, with some being portable and battery-operated for use outside of a medical facility. They typically consist of a reservoir for the fluid, a pumping mechanism to move the fluid through tubing and into the patient's body, and a control system that allows healthcare professionals to program the desired flow rate and volume. Some advanced infusion pumps also include safety features such as alarms to alert healthcare providers if there are any issues with the pump's operation or if the patient's condition changes unexpectedly.

Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are a class of medications that block the action of aldosterone, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands. Aldosterone helps regulate sodium and potassium balance and blood pressure by binding to mineralocorticoid receptors in the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and brain.

When aldosterone binds to these receptors, it promotes sodium retention and potassium excretion, which can lead to an increase in blood volume and blood pressure. MRAs work by blocking the binding of aldosterone to its receptors, thereby preventing these effects.

MRAs are primarily used to treat heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. By reducing sodium retention and increasing potassium excretion, MRAs can help lower blood pressure, reduce fluid buildup in the body, and improve heart function. Examples of MRAs include spironolactone and eplerenone.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Diuretics are a type of medication that increase the production of urine and help the body eliminate excess fluid and salt. They work by interfering with the reabsorption of sodium in the kidney tubules, which in turn causes more water to be excreted from the body. Diuretics are commonly used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure, heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney disease. There are several types of diuretics, including loop diuretics, thiazide diuretics, potassium-sparing diuretics, and osmotic diuretics, each with its own mechanism of action and potential side effects. It is important to use diuretics under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can interact with other medications and have an impact on electrolyte balance in the body.

Intraventricular injections are a type of medical procedure where medication is administered directly into the cerebral ventricles of the brain. The cerebral ventricles are fluid-filled spaces within the brain that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This procedure is typically used to deliver drugs that target conditions affecting the central nervous system, such as infections or tumors.

Intraventricular injections are usually performed using a thin, hollow needle that is inserted through a small hole drilled into the skull. The medication is then injected directly into the ventricles, allowing it to circulate throughout the CSF and reach the brain tissue more efficiently than other routes of administration.

This type of injection is typically reserved for situations where other methods of drug delivery are not effective or feasible. It carries a higher risk of complications, such as bleeding, infection, or damage to surrounding tissues, compared to other routes of administration. Therefore, it is usually performed by trained medical professionals in a controlled clinical setting.

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. The glomeruli are the tiny fibers in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood. A lower GFR number means that the kidneys aren't working properly and may indicate kidney disease.

The GFR is typically calculated using a formula that takes into account the patient's serum creatinine level, age, sex, and race. The most commonly used formula is the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation. A normal GFR is usually above 90 mL/min/1.73m2, but this can vary depending on the individual's age and other factors.

Blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the body. They form a network of tubes that carry blood to and from the heart, lungs, and other organs. The main types of blood vessels are arteries, veins, and capillaries. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body, while veins return deoxygenated blood back to the heart. Capillaries connect arteries and veins and facilitate the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste materials between the blood and the body's tissues.

The Bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to and is activated by the peptide hormone bradykinin. Upon activation, it triggers a variety of intracellular signaling pathways leading to diverse physiological responses such as vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, pain, and inflammation.

B2Rs are widely distributed in various tissues, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. They play a crucial role in several pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pain, and inflammatory diseases.

B2Rs are also the target of clinically used drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), which increase bradykinin levels and enhance its effects on B2Rs, leading to vasodilation and reduced blood pressure.

Thirst, also known as dry mouth or polydipsia, is a physiological need or desire to drink fluids to maintain fluid balance and hydration in the body. It is primarily regulated by the hypothalamus in response to changes in osmolality and volume of bodily fluids, particularly blood. Thirst can be triggered by various factors such as dehydration, excessive sweating, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, burns, certain medications, and medical conditions affecting the kidneys, adrenal glands, or other organs. It is a vital homeostatic mechanism to ensure adequate hydration and proper functioning of various bodily systems.

Diuresis is a medical term that refers to an increased production of urine by the kidneys. It can occur as a result of various factors, including certain medications, medical conditions, or as a response to a physiological need, such as in the case of dehydration. Diuretics are a class of drugs that promote diuresis and are often used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure, heart failure, and edema.

Diuresis can be classified into several types based on its underlying cause or mechanism, including:

1. Osmotic diuresis: This occurs when the kidneys excrete large amounts of urine in response to a high concentration of solutes (such as glucose) in the tubular fluid. The high osmolarity of the tubular fluid causes water to be drawn out of the bloodstream and into the urine, leading to an increase in urine output.
2. Forced diuresis: This is a medical procedure in which large amounts of intravenous fluids are administered to promote diuresis. It is used in certain clinical situations, such as to enhance the excretion of toxic substances or to prevent kidney damage.
3. Natriuretic diuresis: This occurs when the kidneys excrete large amounts of sodium and water in response to the release of natriuretic peptides, which are hormones that regulate sodium balance and blood pressure.
4. Aquaresis: This is a type of diuresis that occurs in response to the ingestion of large amounts of water, leading to dilute urine production.
5. Pathological diuresis: This refers to increased urine production due to underlying medical conditions such as diabetes insipidus or pyelonephritis.

It is important to note that excessive diuresis can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances, so it should be monitored carefully in clinical settings.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Ventricular remodeling is a structural adaptation process of the heart in response to stress or injury, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or pressure overload. This process involves changes in size, shape, and function of the ventricles (the lower chambers of the heart).

In ventricular remodeling, the heart muscle may thicken, enlarge, or become more stiff, leading to alterations in the pumping ability of the heart. These changes can ultimately result in cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, and an increased risk of arrhythmias (irregular heart rhythms).

Ventricular remodeling is often classified into two types:

1. Concentric remodeling: This occurs when the ventricular wall thickens (hypertrophy) without a significant increase in chamber size, leading to a decrease in the cavity volume and an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall.
2. Eccentric remodeling: This involves an increase in both the ventricular chamber size and wall thickness due to the addition of new muscle cells (hyperplasia) or enlargement of existing muscle cells (hypertrophy). As a result, the overall shape of the ventricle becomes more spherical and less elliptical.

Both types of remodeling can negatively impact heart function and contribute to the development of heart failure. Close monitoring and appropriate treatment are essential for managing ventricular remodeling and preventing further complications.

Drinking behavior refers to the patterns and habits related to alcohol consumption. This can include the frequency, quantity, and context in which an individual chooses to drink alcohol. Drinking behaviors can vary widely among individuals and can be influenced by a variety of factors, including cultural norms, personal beliefs, mental health status, and genetic predisposition.

Problematic drinking behaviors can include heavy drinking, binge drinking, and alcohol use disorder (AUD), which is characterized by a pattern of alcohol use that involves problems controlling intake, being preoccupied with alcohol, continuing to use alcohol even when it causes problems, having to drink more to get the same effect, or having withdrawal symptoms when rapidly decreasing or stopping alcohol.

It's important to note that drinking behaviors can have significant impacts on an individual's health and well-being, as well as their relationships, work, and other aspects of their life. If you are concerned about your own drinking behavior or that of someone else, it is recommended to seek professional help from a healthcare provider or addiction specialist.

Perfusion, in medical terms, refers to the process of circulating blood through the body's organs and tissues to deliver oxygen and nutrients and remove waste products. It is a measure of the delivery of adequate blood flow to specific areas or tissues in the body. Perfusion can be assessed using various methods, including imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and perfusion scintigraphy.

Perfusion is critical for maintaining proper organ function and overall health. When perfusion is impaired or inadequate, it can lead to tissue hypoxia, acidosis, and cell death, which can result in organ dysfunction or failure. Conditions that can affect perfusion include cardiovascular disease, shock, trauma, and certain surgical procedures.

Pressoreceptors are specialized sensory nerve endings found in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. They respond to changes in blood pressure by converting the mechanical stimulus into electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain. This information helps regulate cardiovascular function and maintain blood pressure homeostasis.

Vasodilator agents are pharmacological substances that cause the relaxation or widening of blood vessels by relaxing the smooth muscle in the vessel walls. This results in an increase in the diameter of the blood vessels, which decreases vascular resistance and ultimately reduces blood pressure. Vasodilators can be further classified based on their site of action:

1. Systemic vasodilators: These agents cause a generalized relaxation of the smooth muscle in the walls of both arteries and veins, resulting in a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and preload (the volume of blood returning to the heart). Examples include nitroglycerin, hydralazine, and calcium channel blockers.
2. Arterial vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in arterial vessel walls, leading to a reduction in afterload (the pressure against which the heart pumps blood). Examples include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct vasodilators like sodium nitroprusside.
3. Venous vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in venous vessel walls, increasing venous capacitance and reducing preload. Examples include nitroglycerin and other organic nitrates.

Vasodilator agents are used to treat various cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, angina, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is essential to monitor their use carefully, as excessive vasodilation can lead to orthostatic hypotension, reflex tachycardia, or fluid retention.

The renal artery is a pair of blood vessels that originate from the abdominal aorta and supply oxygenated blood to each kidney. These arteries branch into several smaller vessels that provide blood to the various parts of the kidneys, including the renal cortex and medulla. The renal arteries also carry nutrients and other essential components needed for the normal functioning of the kidneys. Any damage or blockage to the renal artery can lead to serious consequences, such as reduced kidney function or even kidney failure.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

Perindopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and previous myocardial infarction (heart attack). It works by blocking the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, which leads to decreased peripheral vascular resistance and reduced blood pressure. Additionally, perindopril inhibits the breakdown of bradykinin, a vasodilator, further contributing to its hypotensive effects.

Diabetic nephropathy is a kidney disease that occurs as a complication of diabetes. It is also known as diabetic kidney disease (DKD). This condition affects the ability of the kidneys to filter waste and excess fluids from the blood, leading to their accumulation in the body.

Diabetic nephropathy is caused by damage to the small blood vessels in the kidneys, which can occur over time due to high levels of glucose in the blood. This damage can lead to scarring and thickening of the kidney's filtering membranes, reducing their ability to function properly.

Symptoms of diabetic nephropathy may include proteinuria (the presence of protein in the urine), edema (swelling in the legs, ankles, or feet due to fluid retention), and hypertension (high blood pressure). Over time, if left untreated, diabetic nephropathy can progress to end-stage kidney disease, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Preventing or delaying the onset of diabetic nephropathy involves maintaining good control of blood sugar levels, keeping blood pressure under control, and making lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and getting regular exercise. Regular monitoring of kidney function through urine tests and blood tests is also important for early detection and treatment of this condition.

Tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) are not a medical condition, but rather a class of organic compounds that have been studied in the field of medicine and neuroscience. TIQs are naturally occurring substances found in various foods, beverages, and plants, as well as produced endogenously in the human body. They have been shown to have various pharmacological activities, including acting as weak psychoactive agents, antioxidants, and inhibitors of certain enzymes. Some TIQs have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of certain neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. However, more research is needed to fully understand their roles and potential therapeutic applications.

Heart failure is a pathophysiological state in which the heart is unable to pump sufficient blood to meet the metabolic demands of the body or do so only at the expense of elevated filling pressures. It can be caused by various cardiac disorders, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. Heart failure is often classified based on the ejection fraction (EF), which is the percentage of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle during each contraction. A reduced EF (less than 40%) is indicative of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), while a preserved EF (greater than or equal to 50%) is indicative of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). There is also a category of heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) for those with an EF between 40-49%.

The glomerular mesangium is a part of the nephron in the kidney. It is the region located in the middle of the glomerular tuft, where the capillary loops of the glomerulus are surrounded by a network of extracellular matrix and mesangial cells. These cells and matrix play an important role in maintaining the structure and function of the filtration barrier in the glomerulus, which helps to filter waste products from the blood.

The mesangial cells have contractile properties and can regulate the flow of blood through the capillaries by constricting or dilating the diameter of the glomerular capillary loops. They also play a role in immune responses, as they can phagocytize immune complexes and release cytokines and growth factors that modulate inflammation and tissue repair.

Abnormalities in the mesangium can lead to various kidney diseases, such as glomerulonephritis, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, and diabetic nephropathy.

Cyclic N-oxides are a class of organic compounds that contain a cyclic structure with a nitrogen atom bonded to an oxygen atom as an N-oxide. An N-oxide is a compound in which the nitrogen atom has a positive charge and the oxygen atom has a negative charge, forming a polar covalent bond. In cyclic N-oxides, this N-O group is part of a ring structure, which can be composed of various combinations of carbon, nitrogen, and other atoms. These compounds have been studied for their potential use in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and materials science.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Desoxycorticosterone (also known as desoxycorticosterone or DCZ) is a natural steroid hormone produced by the adrenal gland. It is a weak glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid, which means it has some effects on blood sugar metabolism and regulates electrolyte and fluid balance in the body.

Desoxycorticosterone is used as a medication in the form of its synthetic acetate ester, desoxycorticosterone acetate (DCA), to treat Addison's disease, a condition in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones. DCA helps to replace the missing mineralocorticoid activity and prevent the symptoms of low blood pressure, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalances associated with Addison's disease.

It is important to note that desoxycorticosterone should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have significant side effects if not properly monitored.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a medical condition in which the left ventricle of the heart undergoes an enlargement or thickening of its muscle wall. The left ventricle is the main pumping chamber of the heart that supplies oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.

In response to increased workload, such as hypertension (high blood pressure), aortic valve stenosis, or athletic training, the left ventricular muscle may thicken and enlarge. This process is called "hypertrophy." While some degree of hypertrophy can be adaptive in athletes, significant or excessive hypertrophy can lead to impaired relaxation and filling of the left ventricle during diastole, reduced pumping capacity, and decreased compliance of the chamber.

Left ventricular hypertrophy is often asymptomatic initially but can increase the risk of various cardiovascular complications such as heart failure, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and sudden cardiac death over time. It is typically diagnosed through imaging techniques like echocardiography or cardiac MRI and confirmed by measuring the thickness of the left ventricular wall.

Amlodipine is a type of medication known as a calcium channel blocker, which is primarily used to treat high blood pressure and angina (chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart). It works by relaxing the muscles around the blood vessels, which causes them to widen and improves blood flow. This helps to lower blood pressure and reduce the workload on the heart, making it easier for the heart to pump blood effectively.

Amlodipine is available in various strengths as a tablet or an extended-release tablet, and it is typically taken once daily. The medication may take several weeks to reach its full effect, so it is important to continue taking it even if you do not notice any immediate improvement in your symptoms.

As with any medication, amlodipine can cause side effects, including headache, dizziness, fatigue, and swelling of the ankles or feet. In rare cases, it may also cause more serious side effects such as allergic reactions, irregular heartbeat, or liver damage. If you experience any unusual symptoms while taking amlodipine, it is important to contact your healthcare provider right away.

It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking amlodipine, and to inform them of any other medications or supplements that you are taking, as well as any medical conditions that you have. This will help ensure that the medication is safe and effective for you to use.

Organ size refers to the volume or physical measurement of an organ in the body of an individual. It can be described in terms of length, width, and height or by using specialized techniques such as imaging studies (like CT scans or MRIs) to determine the volume. The size of an organ can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, body size, and overall health status. Changes in organ size may indicate various medical conditions, including growths, inflammation, or atrophy.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Smooth muscle myocytes are specialized cells that make up the contractile portion of non-striated, or smooth, muscles. These muscles are found in various organs and structures throughout the body, including the walls of blood vessels, the digestive system, the respiratory system, and the reproductive system.

Smooth muscle myocytes are smaller than their striated counterparts (skeletal and cardiac muscle cells) and have a single nucleus. They lack the distinctive banding pattern seen in striated muscles and instead have a uniform appearance of actin and myosin filaments. Smooth muscle myocytes are controlled by the autonomic nervous system, which allows them to contract and relax involuntarily.

These cells play an essential role in many physiological processes, such as regulating blood flow, moving food through the digestive tract, and facilitating childbirth. They can also contribute to various pathological conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and gastrointestinal disorders.

Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) is a group of enzymes that catalyze the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. There are three distinct isoforms of NOS, each with different expression patterns and functions:

1. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS or NOS1): This isoform is primarily expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes.
2. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS or NOS2): This isoform is induced by various stimuli such as cytokines, lipopolysaccharides, and hypoxia in a variety of cells including immune cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. iNOS produces large amounts of NO, which functions as a potent effector molecule in the immune response, particularly in the defense against microbial pathogens.
3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS or NOS3): This isoform is constitutively expressed in endothelial cells and produces low levels of NO that play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasodilation, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation.

Overall, NOS plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, immune response, cardiovascular function, and respiratory regulation. Dysregulation of NOS activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Parenteral infusions refer to the administration of fluids or medications directly into a patient's vein or subcutaneous tissue using a needle or catheter. This route bypasses the gastrointestinal tract and allows for rapid absorption and onset of action. Parenteral infusions can be used to correct fluid and electrolyte imbalances, administer medications that cannot be given orally, provide nutritional support, and deliver blood products. Common types of parenteral infusions include intravenous (IV) drips, IV push, and subcutaneous infusions. It is important that parenteral infusions are administered using aseptic technique to reduce the risk of infection.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Inositol phosphates are a family of molecules that consist of an inositol ring, which is a six-carbon heterocyclic compound, linked to one or more phosphate groups. These molecules play important roles as intracellular signaling intermediates and are involved in various cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism.

Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), also known as phytic acid, is a form of inositol phosphate that is found in plant-based foods. IP6 has the ability to bind to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and iron, which can reduce their bioavailability in the body.

Inositol phosphates have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. For example, altered levels of certain inositol phosphates have been observed in cancer cells, suggesting that they may play a role in tumor growth and progression. Additionally, mutations in enzymes involved in the metabolism of inositol phosphates have been associated with several genetic diseases.

Cardiac myocytes are the muscle cells that make up the heart muscle, also known as the myocardium. These specialized cells are responsible for contracting and relaxing in a coordinated manner to pump blood throughout the body. They differ from skeletal muscle cells in several ways, including their ability to generate their own electrical impulses, which allows the heart to function as an independent rhythmical pump. Cardiac myocytes contain sarcomeres, the contractile units of the muscle, and are connected to each other by intercalated discs that help coordinate contraction and ensure the synchronous beating of the heart.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a class of medications that work by inhibiting the influx of calcium ions into cardiac and smooth muscle cells. This action leads to relaxation of the muscles, particularly in the blood vessels, resulting in decreased peripheral resistance and reduced blood pressure. Calcium channel blockers also have anti-arrhythmic effects and are used in the management of various cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, angina, and certain types of arrhythmias.

Calcium channel blockers can be further classified into two main categories based on their chemical structure: dihydropyridines (e.g., nifedipine, amlodipine) and non-dihydropyridines (e.g., verapamil, diltiazem). Dihydropyridines are more selective for vascular smooth muscle and have a greater effect on blood pressure than heart rate or conduction. Non-dihydropyridines have a more significant impact on cardiac conduction and contractility, in addition to their vasodilatory effects.

It is important to note that calcium channel blockers may interact with other medications and should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Potential side effects include dizziness, headache, constipation, and peripheral edema.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) is a hormone produced and released by the anterior pituitary gland, a small endocrine gland located at the base of the brain. ACTH plays a crucial role in the regulation of the body's stress response and has significant effects on various physiological processes.

The primary function of ACTH is to stimulate the adrenal glands, which are triangular-shaped glands situated on top of the kidneys. The adrenal glands consist of two parts: the outer cortex and the inner medulla. ACTH specifically targets the adrenal cortex, where it binds to specific receptors and initiates a series of biochemical reactions leading to the production and release of steroid hormones, primarily cortisol (a glucocorticoid) and aldosterone (a mineralocorticoid).

Cortisol is involved in various metabolic processes, such as regulating blood sugar levels, modulating the immune response, and helping the body respond to stress. Aldosterone plays a vital role in maintaining electrolyte and fluid balance by promoting sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys.

ACTH release is controlled by the hypothalamus, another part of the brain, which produces corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). CRH stimulates the anterior pituitary gland to secrete ACTH, which in turn triggers cortisol production in the adrenal glands. This complex feedback system helps maintain homeostasis and ensures that appropriate amounts of cortisol are released in response to various physiological and psychological stressors.

Disorders related to ACTH can lead to hormonal imbalances, resulting in conditions such as Cushing's syndrome (excessive cortisol production) or Addison's disease (insufficient cortisol production). Proper diagnosis and management of these disorders typically involve assessing the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and addressing any underlying issues affecting ACTH secretion.

Kidney disease, also known as nephropathy or renal disease, refers to any functional or structural damage to the kidneys that impairs their ability to filter blood, regulate electrolytes, produce hormones, and maintain fluid balance. This damage can result from a wide range of causes, including diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, lupus, infections, drugs, toxins, and congenital or inherited disorders.

Depending on the severity and progression of the kidney damage, kidney diseases can be classified into two main categories: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). AKI is a sudden and often reversible loss of kidney function that occurs over hours to days, while CKD is a progressive and irreversible decline in kidney function that develops over months or years.

Symptoms of kidney diseases may include edema, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension, electrolyte imbalances, metabolic acidosis, anemia, and decreased urine output. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and severity of the disease and may include medications, dietary modifications, dialysis, or kidney transplantation.

Kidney tubules are the structural and functional units of the kidney responsible for reabsorption, secretion, and excretion of various substances. They are part of the nephron, which is the basic unit of the kidney's filtration and reabsorption process.

There are three main types of kidney tubules:

1. Proximal tubule: This is the initial segment of the kidney tubule that receives the filtrate from the glomerulus. It is responsible for reabsorbing approximately 65% of the filtrate, including water, glucose, amino acids, and electrolytes.
2. Loop of Henle: This U-shaped segment of the tubule consists of a thin descending limb, a thin ascending limb, and a thick ascending limb. The loop of Henle helps to concentrate urine by creating an osmotic gradient that allows water to be reabsorbed in the collecting ducts.
3. Distal tubule: This is the final segment of the kidney tubule before it empties into the collecting duct. It is responsible for fine-tuning the concentration of electrolytes and pH balance in the urine by selectively reabsorbing or secreting substances such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and hydrogen ions.

Overall, kidney tubules play a critical role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, regulating acid-base balance, and removing waste products from the body.

The heart ventricles are the two lower chambers of the heart that receive blood from the atria and pump it to the lungs or the rest of the body. The right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs, while the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Both ventricles have thick, muscular walls to generate the pressure necessary to pump blood through the circulatory system.

Acrylates are a group of chemical compounds that are derived from acrylic acid. They are commonly used in various industrial and commercial applications, including the production of plastics, resins, paints, and adhesives. In the medical field, acrylates are sometimes used in the formation of dental restorations, such as fillings and dentures, due to their strong bonding properties and durability.

However, it is important to note that some people may have allergic reactions or sensitivities to acrylates, which can cause skin irritation, allergic contact dermatitis, or other adverse effects. Therefore, medical professionals must use caution when working with these materials and ensure that patients are informed of any potential risks associated with their use.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid, is a form of vitamin B3 (B-complex vitamin) that is used by the body to turn food into energy. It is found in various foods including meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, and cereal grains. Niacin is also available as a dietary supplement and prescription medication.

As a medication, niacin is primarily used to treat high cholesterol levels. It works by reducing the production of LDL (bad) cholesterol in the body and increasing the levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. Niacin can also help lower triglycerides, another type of fat found in the blood.

Niacin is available in immediate-release, sustained-release, and extended-release forms. The immediate-release form can cause flushing of the skin, itching, tingling, and headaches, which can be uncomfortable but are not usually serious. The sustained-release and extended-release forms may have fewer side effects, but they can also increase the risk of liver damage and other serious side effects.

It is important to note that niacin should only be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can interact with other medications and have potentially serious side effects.

Endothelin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to endothelin, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. There are two main types of endothelin receptors: ETA and ETB. ETA receptors are found in vascular smooth muscle cells and activate phospholipase C, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium and subsequent contraction of the smooth muscle. ETB receptors are found in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. In endothelial cells, ETB receptor activation leads to the release of nitric oxide and prostacyclin, which cause vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells, ETB receptor activation causes vasoconstriction through a mechanism that is not fully understood.

Endothelin receptors play important roles in regulating blood flow, vascular remodeling, and the development of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. They are also involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis in various tissues.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis, in response to diverse stimuli such as mitogens, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and environmental stresses. They are highly conserved across eukaryotes and consist of a three-tiered kinase module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks), MAPK kinases (MKKs or MAP2Ks), and MAPKs.

Activation of MAPKs occurs through a sequential phosphorylation and activation cascade, where MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which in turn phosphorylate and activate MAPKs at specific residues (Thr-X-Tyr or Ser-Pro motifs). Once activated, MAPKs can further phosphorylate and regulate various downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases.

There are four major groups of MAPKs in mammals: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5/BMK1. Each group of MAPKs has distinct upstream activators, downstream targets, and cellular functions, allowing for a high degree of specificity in signal transduction and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAPK signaling pathways has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

The cardiovascular system, also known as the circulatory system, is a biological system responsible for pumping and transporting blood throughout the body in animals and humans. It consists of the heart, blood vessels (comprising arteries, veins, and capillaries), and blood. The main function of this system is to transport oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and cellular waste products throughout the body to maintain homeostasis and support organ function.

The heart acts as a muscular pump that contracts and relaxes to circulate blood. It has four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body, pumps it through the lungs for oxygenation, and then sends it back to the left side of the heart. The left side of the heart then pumps the oxygenated blood through the aorta and into the systemic circulation, reaching all parts of the body via a network of arteries and capillaries. Deoxygenated blood is collected by veins and returned to the right atrium, completing the cycle.

The cardiovascular system plays a crucial role in regulating temperature, pH balance, and fluid balance throughout the body. It also contributes to the immune response and wound healing processes. Dysfunctions or diseases of the cardiovascular system can lead to severe health complications, such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and peripheral artery disease.

Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III (NOS-III), also known as endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), is an enzyme responsible for the production of nitric oxide (NO) in the endothelium, the lining of blood vessels. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing NO as a byproduct. The release of NO from eNOS plays an important role in regulating vascular tone and homeostasis, including the relaxation of smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel walls, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and modulation of immune function. Mutations or dysfunction in NOS-III can contribute to various cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and erectile dysfunction.

The Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus (PVN) is a nucleus in the hypothalamus, which is a part of the brain that regulates various autonomic functions and homeostatic processes. The PVN plays a crucial role in the regulation of neuroendocrine and autonomic responses to stress, as well as the control of fluid and electrolyte balance, cardiovascular function, and energy balance.

The PVN is composed of several subdivisions, including the magnocellular and parvocellular divisions. The magnocellular neurons produce and release two neuropeptides, oxytocin and vasopressin (also known as antidiuretic hormone), into the circulation via the posterior pituitary gland. These neuropeptides play important roles in social behavior, reproduction, and fluid balance.

The parvocellular neurons, on the other hand, project to various brain regions and the pituitary gland, where they release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is responsible for the stress response. The PVN also contains neurons that produce corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a key neurotransmitter involved in the regulation of the HPA axis and the stress response.

Overall, the Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus is an essential component of the brain's regulatory systems that help maintain homeostasis and respond to stressors. Dysfunction of the PVN has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including hypertension, obesity, and mood disorders.

Albuminuria is a medical condition that refers to the presence of albumin in the urine. Albumin is a type of protein normally found in the blood, but not in the urine. When the kidneys are functioning properly, they prevent large proteins like albumin from passing through into the urine. However, when the kidneys are damaged or not working correctly, such as in nephrotic syndrome or other kidney diseases, small amounts of albumin can leak into the urine.

The amount of albumin in the urine is often measured in milligrams per liter (mg/L) or in a spot urine sample, as the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). A small amount of albumin in the urine is called microalbuminuria, while a larger amount is called macroalbuminuria or proteinuria. The presence of albuminuria can indicate kidney damage and may be a sign of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure. It is important to monitor and manage albuminuria to prevent further kidney damage and potential complications.

Tachyphylaxis is a medical term that refers to the rapid and temporary loss of response to a drug after its repeated administration, especially when administered in quick succession. This occurs due to the decreased sensitivity or responsiveness of the body's receptors to the drug, resulting in a reduced therapeutic effect over time.

In simpler terms, tachyphylaxis is when the body becomes quickly desensitized to a medication after taking it multiple times in a short period, causing the drug to become less effective or ineffective at achieving the desired outcome. This phenomenon can occur with various medications, including those used for treating pain, allergies, and psychiatric conditions.

It's important to note that tachyphylaxis should not be confused with tolerance, which is a similar but distinct concept where the body gradually becomes less responsive to a drug after prolonged use over time.

Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) is a type of cytokine, which is a cell signaling protein involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). TGF-β plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and wound healing. It also has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

TGF-β exists in multiple isoforms (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3) that are produced by many different cell types, including immune cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. The protein is synthesized as a precursor molecule, which is cleaved to release the active TGF-β peptide. Once activated, TGF-β binds to its receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and cell behavior.

In summary, Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and wound healing. It has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

The baroreflex is a physiological mechanism that helps regulate blood pressure and heart rate in response to changes in stretch of the arterial walls. It is mediated by baroreceptors, which are specialized sensory nerve endings located in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. These receptors detect changes in blood pressure and send signals to the brainstem via the glossopharyngeal (cranial nerve IX) and vagus nerves (cranial nerve X), respectively.

In response to an increase in arterial pressure, the baroreceptors are stimulated, leading to increased firing of afferent neurons that signal the brainstem. This results in a reflexive decrease in heart rate and cardiac output, as well as vasodilation of peripheral blood vessels, which collectively work to reduce blood pressure back towards its normal level. Conversely, if arterial pressure decreases, the baroreceptors are less stimulated, leading to an increase in heart rate and cardiac output, as well as vasoconstriction of peripheral blood vessels, which helps restore blood pressure.

Overall, the baroreflex is a crucial homeostatic mechanism that helps maintain stable blood pressure and ensure adequate perfusion of vital organs.

Intravenous (IV) infusion is a medical procedure in which liquids, such as medications, nutrients, or fluids, are delivered directly into a patient's vein through a needle or a catheter. This route of administration allows for rapid absorption and distribution of the infused substance throughout the body. IV infusions can be used for various purposes, including resuscitation, hydration, nutrition support, medication delivery, and blood product transfusion. The rate and volume of the infusion are carefully controlled to ensure patient safety and efficacy of treatment.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Prostaglandins are naturally occurring, lipid-derived hormones that play various important roles in the human body. They are produced in nearly every tissue in response to injury or infection, and they have diverse effects depending on the site of release and the type of prostaglandin. Some of their functions include:

1. Regulation of inflammation: Prostaglandins contribute to the inflammatory response by increasing vasodilation, promoting fluid accumulation, and sensitizing pain receptors, which can lead to symptoms such as redness, heat, swelling, and pain.
2. Modulation of gastrointestinal functions: Prostaglandins protect the stomach lining from acid secretion and promote mucus production, maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa. They also regulate intestinal motility and secretion.
3. Control of renal function: Prostaglandins help regulate blood flow to the kidneys, maintain sodium balance, and control renin release, which affects blood pressure and fluid balance.
4. Regulation of smooth muscle contraction: Prostaglandins can cause both relaxation and contraction of smooth muscles in various tissues, such as the uterus, bronchioles, and vascular system.
5. Modulation of platelet aggregation: Some prostaglandins inhibit platelet aggregation, preventing blood clots from forming too quickly or becoming too large.
6. Reproductive system regulation: Prostaglandins are involved in the menstrual cycle, ovulation, and labor induction by promoting uterine contractions.
7. Neurotransmission: Prostaglandins can modulate neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability, affecting pain perception, mood, and cognition.

Prostaglandins exert their effects through specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of target cells. There are several distinct types of prostaglandins (PGs), including PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2 (prostacyclin), and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). Each type has unique functions and acts through specific receptors. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid derived from membrane phospholipids, by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, inhibit COX activity, reducing prostaglandin synthesis and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects.

A radioligand assay is a type of in vitro binding assay used in molecular biology and pharmacology to measure the affinity and quantity of a ligand (such as a drug or hormone) to its specific receptor. In this technique, a small amount of a radioactively labeled ligand, also known as a radioligand, is introduced to a sample containing the receptor of interest. The radioligand binds competitively with other unlabeled ligands present in the sample for the same binding site on the receptor. After allowing sufficient time for binding, the reaction is stopped, and the amount of bound radioligand is measured using a technique such as scintillation counting. The data obtained from this assay can be used to determine the dissociation constant (Kd) and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of the receptor-ligand interaction, which are important parameters in understanding the pharmacological properties of drugs and other ligands.

Medical Definition:

Mineralocorticoid Receptors (MRs) are a type of nuclear receptor protein that are activated by the binding of mineralocorticoid hormones, such as aldosterone. These receptors are expressed in various tissues and cells, including the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and brain.

When activated, MRs regulate gene expression related to sodium and potassium homeostasis, water balance, and electrolyte transport. This is primarily achieved through the regulation of ion channels and transporters in the distal nephron of the kidney, leading to increased sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion.

Abnormalities in mineralocorticoid receptor function have been implicated in several diseases, including hypertension, heart failure, and primary aldosteronism.

Drug synergism is a pharmacological concept that refers to the interaction between two or more drugs, where the combined effect of the drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects. This means that when these drugs are administered together, they produce an enhanced therapeutic response compared to when they are given separately.

Drug synergism can occur through various mechanisms, such as:

1. Pharmacodynamic synergism - When two or more drugs interact with the same target site in the body and enhance each other's effects.
2. Pharmacokinetic synergism - When one drug affects the metabolism, absorption, distribution, or excretion of another drug, leading to an increased concentration of the second drug in the body and enhanced therapeutic effect.
3. Physiochemical synergism - When two drugs interact physically, such as when one drug enhances the solubility or permeability of another drug, leading to improved absorption and bioavailability.

It is important to note that while drug synergism can result in enhanced therapeutic effects, it can also increase the risk of adverse reactions and toxicity. Therefore, healthcare providers must carefully consider the potential benefits and risks when prescribing combinations of drugs with known or potential synergistic effects.

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

Water-electrolyte balance refers to the regulation of water and electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate) in the body to maintain homeostasis. This is crucial for various bodily functions such as nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, fluid balance, and pH regulation. The body maintains this balance through mechanisms that control water intake, excretion, and electrolyte concentration in various body fluids like blood and extracellular fluid. Disruptions in water-electrolyte balance can lead to dehydration or overhydration, and imbalances in electrolytes can cause conditions such as hyponatremia (low sodium levels) or hyperkalemia (high potassium levels).

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 (MAPK3), also known as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, in response to extracellular stimuli such as growth factors, hormones, and stress.

MAPK3 is activated through a phosphorylation cascade that involves the activation of upstream MAPK kinases (MKK or MEK). Once activated, MAPK3 can phosphorylate and activate various downstream targets, including transcription factors, to regulate gene expression. Dysregulation of MAPK3 signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

A chemical stimulation in a medical context refers to the process of activating or enhancing physiological or psychological responses in the body using chemical substances. These chemicals can interact with receptors on cells to trigger specific reactions, such as neurotransmitters and hormones that transmit signals within the nervous system and endocrine system.

Examples of chemical stimulation include the use of medications, drugs, or supplements that affect mood, alertness, pain perception, or other bodily functions. For instance, caffeine can chemically stimulate the central nervous system to increase alertness and decrease feelings of fatigue. Similarly, certain painkillers can chemically stimulate opioid receptors in the brain to reduce the perception of pain.

It's important to note that while chemical stimulation can have therapeutic benefits, it can also have adverse effects if used improperly or in excessive amounts. Therefore, it's essential to follow proper dosing instructions and consult with a healthcare provider before using any chemical substances for stimulation purposes.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

The medulla oblongata is a part of the brainstem that is located in the posterior portion of the brainstem and continues with the spinal cord. It plays a vital role in controlling several critical bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. The medulla oblongata also contains nerve pathways that transmit sensory information from the body to the brain and motor commands from the brain to the muscles. Additionally, it is responsible for reflexes such as vomiting, swallowing, coughing, and sneezing.

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a highly sensitive analytical technique used in clinical and research laboratories to measure concentrations of various substances, such as hormones, vitamins, drugs, or tumor markers, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues. The method relies on the specific interaction between an antibody and its corresponding antigen, combined with the use of radioisotopes to quantify the amount of bound antigen.

In a typical RIA procedure, a known quantity of a radiolabeled antigen (also called tracer) is added to a sample containing an unknown concentration of the same unlabeled antigen. The mixture is then incubated with a specific antibody that binds to the antigen. During the incubation period, the antibody forms complexes with both the radiolabeled and unlabeled antigens.

After the incubation, the unbound (free) radiolabeled antigen is separated from the antibody-antigen complexes, usually through a precipitation or separation step involving centrifugation, filtration, or chromatography. The amount of radioactivity in the pellet (containing the antibody-antigen complexes) is then measured using a gamma counter or other suitable radiation detection device.

The concentration of the unlabeled antigen in the sample can be determined by comparing the ratio of bound to free radiolabeled antigen in the sample to a standard curve generated from known concentrations of unlabeled antigen and their corresponding bound/free ratios. The higher the concentration of unlabeled antigen in the sample, the lower the amount of radiolabeled antigen that will bind to the antibody, resulting in a lower bound/free ratio.

Radioimmunoassays offer high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, making them valuable tools for detecting and quantifying low levels of various substances in biological samples. However, due to concerns about radiation safety and waste disposal, alternative non-isotopic immunoassay techniques like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have become more popular in recent years.

'Rats, Inbred Dahl' are a strain of laboratory rats that have been selectively bred for research purposes. They were first developed by Dr. Lewis L. Dahl in the 1960s at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. These rats are known for their susceptibility to develop high blood pressure (hypertension) and related cardiovascular diseases, making them a valuable model for studying hypertension and its complications.

Inbred Dahl rats are typically divided into two main strains: the Dahl Salt-Sensitive (SS/JrHsdMcwi or SS) rat and the Dahl Salt-Resistant (SR/JrHsdMcwi or SR) rat. When fed a high-salt diet, the SS rats develop severe hypertension, kidney damage, and cardiac hypertrophy, while the SR rats are relatively resistant to these effects.

The Inbred Dahl rats have contributed significantly to our understanding of the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of hypertension and related disorders. They continue to be widely used in biomedical research today.

Fumarates are the salts or esters of fumaric acid, a naturally occurring organic compound with the formula HO2C-CH=CH-CO2H. In the context of medical therapy, fumarates are used as medications for the treatment of psoriasis and multiple sclerosis.

One such medication is dimethyl fumarate (DMF), which is a stable salt of fumaric acid. DMF has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, and it's used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

The exact mechanism of action of fumarates in these conditions is not fully understood, but they are thought to modulate the immune system and have antioxidant effects. Common side effects of fumarate therapy include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, and abdominal pain, as well as flushing and skin reactions.

Endothelin A (ETA) receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by the peptide hormone endothelin-1, endothelin-2, and endothelin-3. It is widely expressed in various tissues and organs, including vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiac myocytes, fibroblasts, and kidney cells. Activation of ETA receptor leads to vasoconstriction, increased cell proliferation, and fibrosis, which contribute to the development of hypertension, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, ETA receptor antagonists have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for these conditions.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

A nephron is the basic structural and functional unit of the kidney. It is responsible for filtering blood, reabsorbing necessary substances, and excreting waste products into the urine. Each human kidney contains approximately one million nephrons.

The structure of a nephron includes a glomerulus, which is a tuft of capillaries surrounded by Bowman's capsule. The glomerulus filters blood, allowing small molecules like water and solutes to pass through while keeping larger molecules like proteins and blood cells within the capillaries.

The filtrate then passes through the tubular portion of the nephron, which includes the proximal convoluted tubule, loop of Henle, distal convoluted tubule, and collecting duct. The tubular portion reabsorbs necessary substances like water, glucose, amino acids, and electrolytes back into the bloodstream while excreting waste products like urea and creatinine into the urine.

Overall, nephrons play a critical role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, regulating blood pressure, and removing waste products from the body.

Hydrochlorothiazide is a diuretic drug, which means it helps the body get rid of extra salt and water by increasing the amount of urine that is produced. The medical definition of Hydrochlorothiazide is:

A thiazide diuretic drug used to treat hypertension and edema associated with heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney disorders. It works by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium and chloride ions in the distal convoluted tubule of the nephron, which increases water excretion and decreases blood volume and pressure. Hydrochlorothiazide may be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. It is also used to treat conditions such as diabetes insipidus, renal tubular acidosis, and hypercalcemia.

The usual starting dose of hydrochlorothiazide for adults is 25 mg to 50 mg once a day, which may be increased gradually depending on the patient's response. The maximum recommended daily dose is 100 mg. Common side effects of hydrochlorothiazide include increased urination, headache, dizziness, and muscle cramps.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

Podocytes are specialized cells that make up the visceral epithelial layer of the glomerular basement membrane in the kidney. They have long, interdigitating foot processes that wrap around the capillaries of the glomerulus and play a crucial role in maintaining the filtration barrier of the kidney. The slit diaphragms between the foot processes allow for the passage of small molecules while retaining larger proteins in the bloodstream. Podocytes also contribute to the maintenance and regulation of the glomerular filtration rate, making them essential for normal renal function. Damage or loss of podocytes can lead to proteinuria and kidney disease.

Acetophenones are organic compounds that consist of a phenyl group (a benzene ring with a hydroxyl group replaced by a hydrogen atom) bonded to an acetyl group (a carbonyl group bonded to a methyl group). The chemical structure can be represented as CH3COC6H5.

Acetophenones are aromatic ketones and can be found in essential oils of various plants, as well as in some synthetic fragrances. They have a characteristic sweet, fruity odor and are used in the perfume industry. In addition to their use as fragrances, acetophenones have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and analgesic effects. However, more research is needed before they can be considered safe and effective for medical use.

An animal model in medicine refers to the use of non-human animals in experiments to understand, predict, and test responses and effects of various biological and chemical interactions that may also occur in humans. These models are used when studying complex systems or processes that cannot be easily replicated or studied in human subjects, such as genetic manipulation or exposure to harmful substances. The choice of animal model depends on the specific research question being asked and the similarities between the animal's and human's biological and physiological responses. Examples of commonly used animal models include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and non-human primates.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

A Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter (NHA) is a type of membrane transport protein that exchanges sodium ions (Na+) and protons (H+) across a biological membrane. It is also known as a Na+/H+ antiporter or exchanger. This exchange mechanism plays a crucial role in regulating pH, cell volume, and intracellular sodium concentration within various cells and organelles, including the kidney, brain, heart, and mitochondria.

In general, NHA transporters utilize the energy generated by the electrochemical gradient of sodium ions across a membrane to drive the uphill transport of protons from inside to outside the cell or organelle. This process helps maintain an optimal intracellular pH and volume, which is essential for proper cellular function and homeostasis.

There are several isoforms of Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporters found in different tissues and organelles, each with distinct physiological roles and regulatory mechanisms. Dysfunction or alterations in NHA activity have been implicated in various pathophysiological conditions, such as hypertension, heart failure, neurological disorders, and cancer.

Autoradiography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize and localize the distribution of radioactively labeled compounds within tissues or organisms. In this process, the subject is first exposed to a radioactive tracer that binds to specific molecules or structures of interest. The tissue is then placed in close contact with a radiation-sensitive film or detector, such as X-ray film or an imaging plate.

As the radioactive atoms decay, they emit particles (such as beta particles) that interact with the film or detector, causing chemical changes and leaving behind a visible image of the distribution of the labeled compound. The resulting autoradiogram provides information about the location, quantity, and sometimes even the identity of the molecules or structures that have taken up the radioactive tracer.

Autoradiography has been widely used in various fields of biology and medical research, including pharmacology, neuroscience, genetics, and cell biology, to study processes such as protein-DNA interactions, gene expression, drug metabolism, and neuronal connectivity. However, due to the use of radioactive materials and potential hazards associated with them, this technique has been gradually replaced by non-radioactive alternatives like fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or immunofluorescence techniques.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 (MAPK1), also known as Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2), is a protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is a member of the MAPK family, which regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress response.

MAPK1 is activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by upstream activators like MAPKK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase) in response to various extracellular signals such as growth factors, hormones, and mitogens. Once activated, MAPK1 phosphorylates downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases, thereby modulating their activities and ultimately influencing gene expression and cellular responses.

MAPK1 is widely expressed in various tissues and cells, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of MAPK1 signaling pathways has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to treat these disorders.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Neprilysin (NEP), also known as membrane metallo-endopeptidase or CD10, is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that functions as a zinc-dependent metalloprotease. It is widely expressed in various tissues, including the kidney, brain, heart, and vasculature. Neprilysin plays a crucial role in the breakdown and regulation of several endogenous bioactive peptides, such as natriuretic peptides, bradykinin, substance P, and angiotensin II. By degrading these peptides, neprilysin helps maintain cardiovascular homeostasis, modulate inflammation, and regulate neurotransmission. In the context of heart failure, neprilysin inhibitors have been developed to increase natriuretic peptide levels, promoting diuresis and vasodilation, ultimately improving cardiac function.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Subcutaneous infusion is a method of administering medication or fluids into the body through the layer of skin and tissue beneath the dermis and above the muscle. This is typically done using an infusion pump that delivers the medication or fluid in small, continuous amounts. The medication or fluid is usually contained in a sterile bag or bottle and is connected to the infusion pump via a tube with a needle at the end. The needle is inserted through the skin into the subcutaneous tissue, allowing the medication or fluid to be slowly infused into the body.

Subcutaneous infusions are often used to administer medications that need to be given over a long period of time, such as antibiotics, pain relievers, and immunosuppressive drugs. They can also be used to provide fluids and electrolytes to patients who are unable to drink or eat enough on their own. Subcutaneous infusions are generally well-tolerated and have fewer complications than intravenous (IV) infusions, making them a good option for many patients. However, they may not be suitable for all medications or for patients with certain medical conditions. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate method of administration for a given medication or treatment.

Transgenic rats are genetically modified rats that have incorporated foreign DNA (transgene) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA techniques in the laboratory. The transgene can come from any species, including other mammals, plants, or even bacteria. Once the transgene is introduced into the rat's embryonic cells, it becomes a permanent part of the rat's genetic makeup and is passed on to its offspring.

Transgenic rats are used in biomedical research as models for studying human diseases, developing new therapies, and testing the safety and efficacy of drugs. They offer several advantages over traditional laboratory rats, including the ability to manipulate specific genes, study gene function and regulation, and investigate the underlying mechanisms of disease.

Some common applications of transgenic rats in research include:

1. Modeling human diseases: Transgenic rats can be engineered to develop symptoms and characteristics of human diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's. This allows researchers to study the disease progression, test new treatments, and evaluate their effectiveness.
2. Gene function and regulation: By introducing specific genes into rats, scientists can investigate their role in various biological processes, such as development, aging, and metabolism. They can also study how genes are regulated and how they interact with each other.
3. Drug development and testing: Transgenic rats can be used to test the safety and efficacy of new drugs before they are tested in humans. By studying the effects of drugs on transgenic rats, researchers can gain insights into their potential benefits and risks.
4. Toxicology studies: Transgenic rats can be used to study the toxicity of chemicals, pollutants, and other substances. This helps ensure that new products and treatments are safe for human use.

In summary, transgenic rats are genetically modified rats that have incorporated foreign DNA into their own genome. They are widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function and regulation, develop new therapies, and test the safety and efficacy of drugs.

Transforming Growth Factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a cytokine that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. It is a multifunctional protein involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix production. TGF-β1 plays crucial roles in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and repair, as well as in pathological conditions such as fibrosis and cancer. It signals through a heteromeric complex of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways, primarily the Smad-dependent pathway. TGF-β1 has context-dependent functions, acting as a tumor suppressor in normal and early-stage cancer cells but promoting tumor progression and metastasis in advanced cancers.

"Spin labels" are a term used in the field of magnetic resonance, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). They refer to molecules or atoms that have been chemically attached to a system of interest and possess a stable, unpaired electron. This unpaired electron behaves like a tiny magnet and can be manipulated using magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses in EPR experiments. The resulting changes in the electron's spin state can provide information about the local environment, dynamics, and structure of the system to which it is attached. Spin labels are often used in biochemistry and materials science to study complex biological systems or materials at the molecular level.

Mesangial cells are specialized cells that are found in the mesangium, which is the middle layer of the glomerulus in the kidney. The glomerulus is a network of capillaries where blood filtration occurs. Mesangial cells play an important role in maintaining the structure and function of the glomerulus. They help regulate the size of the filtration slits between the capillary endothelial cells and the podocytes (specialized epithelial cells) by contracting and relaxing, similar to smooth muscle cells. Additionally, mesangial cells can phagocytize immune complexes and other debris in the glomerulus, contributing to the body's immune response. They also produce extracellular matrix components that provide structural support for the glomerulus. Mesangial cell dysfunction or injury can contribute to kidney diseases such as glomerulonephritis and diabetic nephropathy.

Meclofenamic acid is a type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, such as cyclooxygenase (COX), which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Meclofenamic acid is often used to treat a variety of conditions, including menstrual cramps, arthritis, and other types of musculoskeletal pain. It may also be used to reduce fever and relieve symptoms associated with colds and flu.

Like other NSAIDs, meclofenamic acid can have side effects, such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney or liver problems. It should be taken under the guidance of a healthcare provider, who can monitor for potential adverse effects and adjust the dosage accordingly.

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a family of membrane receptors that play an essential role in cellular signaling and communication. These receptors possess seven transmembrane domains, forming a structure that spans the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane. They are called "G-protein-coupled" because they interact with heterotrimeric G proteins upon activation, which in turn modulate various downstream signaling pathways.

When an extracellular ligand binds to a GPCR, it causes a conformational change in the receptor's structure, leading to the exchange of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) for guanosine triphosphate (GTP) on the associated G protein's α subunit. This exchange triggers the dissociation of the G protein into its α and βγ subunits, which then interact with various effector proteins to elicit cellular responses.

There are four main families of GPCRs, classified based on their sequence similarities and downstream signaling pathways:

1. Gq-coupled receptors: These receptors activate phospholipase C (PLC), which leads to the production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). IP3 induces calcium release from intracellular stores, while DAG activates protein kinase C (PKC).
2. Gs-coupled receptors: These receptors activate adenylyl cyclase, which increases the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and subsequently activates protein kinase A (PKA).
3. Gi/o-coupled receptors: These receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase, reducing cAMP levels and modulating PKA activity. Additionally, they can activate ion channels or regulate other signaling pathways through the βγ subunits.
4. G12/13-coupled receptors: These receptors primarily activate RhoGEFs, which in turn activate RhoA and modulate cytoskeletal organization and cellular motility.

GPCRs are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and sensory perception. Dysregulation of GPCR function has been implicated in numerous diseases, making them attractive targets for drug development.

The forearm is the region of the upper limb between the elbow and the wrist. It consists of two bones, the radius and ulna, which are located side by side and run parallel to each other. The forearm is responsible for movements such as flexion, extension, supination, and pronation of the hand and wrist.

Indole is not strictly a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that can be found in the human body and has relevance to medical and biological research. Indoles are organic compounds that contain a bicyclic structure consisting of a six-membered benzene ring fused to a five-membered pyrrole ring.

In the context of medicine, indoles are particularly relevant due to their presence in certain hormones and other biologically active molecules. For example, the neurotransmitter serotonin contains an indole ring, as does the hormone melatonin. Indoles can also be found in various plant-based foods, such as cruciferous vegetables (e.g., broccoli, kale), and have been studied for their potential health benefits.

Some indoles, like indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane, are found in these vegetables and can have anti-cancer properties by modulating estrogen metabolism, reducing inflammation, and promoting cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells. However, it is essential to note that further research is needed to fully understand the potential health benefits and risks associated with indoles.

Adrenergic beta-antagonists, also known as beta blockers, are a class of medications that block the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline (also known as epinephrine and norepinephrine) on beta-adrenergic receptors. These receptors are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the heart, lungs, and blood vessels.

Beta blockers work by binding to these receptors and preventing the activation of certain signaling pathways that lead to increased heart rate, force of heart contractions, and relaxation of blood vessels. As a result, beta blockers can lower blood pressure, reduce heart rate, and decrease the workload on the heart.

Beta blockers are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), heart failure, irregular heart rhythms, migraines, and certain anxiety disorders. Some common examples of beta blockers include metoprolol, atenolol, propranolol, and bisoprolol.

It is important to note that while beta blockers can have many benefits, they can also cause side effects such as fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Additionally, sudden discontinuation of beta blocker therapy can lead to rebound hypertension or worsening chest pain. Therefore, it is important to follow the dosing instructions provided by a healthcare provider carefully when taking these medications.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

I couldn't find a medical definition specifically for "Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental." However, I can provide you with information about experimental diabetes research and its relevance to understanding the disease.

Experimental diabetes models are used in biomedical research to study the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and to test potential therapies or treatments. These models can be broadly categorized into two types: chemically-induced and genetically modified.

1. Chemically-induced diabetes models: These involve administering chemicals, such as alloxan or streptozotocin, to animals (commonly mice or rats) to destroy their pancreatic β-cells, which produce insulin. This results in hyperglycemia and symptoms similar to those seen in type 1 diabetes in humans.
2. Genetically modified diabetes models: These involve altering the genes of animals (commonly mice) to create a diabetes phenotype. Examples include non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which develop an autoimmune form of diabetes similar to human type 1 diabetes, and various strains of obese mice with insulin resistance, such as ob/ob or db/db mice, which model aspects of type 2 diabetes.

These experimental models help researchers better understand the mechanisms behind diabetes development and progression, identify new therapeutic targets, and test potential treatments before moving on to human clinical trials. However, it's essential to recognize that these models may not fully replicate all aspects of human diabetes, so findings from animal studies should be interpreted with caution.

Fosinopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and to improve survival after a myocardial infarction. It works by blocking the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, which leads to decreased peripheral vascular resistance, decreased blood pressure, and increased plasma renin activity. Fosinopril is available in oral tablet form for medical use.

A cross-over study is a type of experimental design in which participants receive two or more interventions in a specific order. After a washout period, each participant receives the opposite intervention(s). The primary advantage of this design is that it controls for individual variability by allowing each participant to act as their own control.

In medical research, cross-over studies are often used to compare the efficacy or safety of two treatments. For example, a researcher might conduct a cross-over study to compare the effectiveness of two different medications for treating high blood pressure. Half of the participants would be randomly assigned to receive one medication first and then switch to the other medication after a washout period. The other half of the participants would receive the opposite order of treatments.

Cross-over studies can provide valuable insights into the relative merits of different interventions, but they also have some limitations. For example, they may not be suitable for studying conditions that are chronic or irreversible, as it may not be possible to completely reverse the effects of the first intervention before administering the second one. Additionally, carryover effects from the first intervention can confound the results if they persist into the second treatment period.

Overall, cross-over studies are a useful tool in medical research when used appropriately and with careful consideration of their limitations.

Pentolinium tartrate is a synthetic anticholinergic drug, which is primarily used as a peripheral nerve blocker in surgical procedures. It functions by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that stimulates involuntary muscle contractions, secretions, and other physiological responses.

The tartrate form of pentolinium is a salt of pentolinium, which increases its solubility in water and facilitates its administration as an injection. The drug works by blocking the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, particularly those found in smooth muscle, glands, and the heart.

Pentolinium tartrate is used to reduce salivation, sweating, and other autonomic responses during surgical procedures. It may also be used to treat conditions such as hypertension or urinary incontinence, although its use for these indications has declined with the development of newer drugs.

As with any medication, pentolinium tartrate can have side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, and constipation. It should be used with caution in patients with certain medical conditions, such as glaucoma or prostatic hypertrophy, and should not be used in patients with a history of allergic reactions to the drug.

3-Mercaptopropionic acid is an organic compound with the formula CH3SHCO2H. It is a colorless liquid that is used as a building block in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. The compound is characterized by the presence of a thiol (also called a mercaptan) group, which consists of a sulfur atom bonded to a hydrogen atom (-SH). This functional group makes 3-mercaptopropionic acid a strong smelling, acidic compound that can react with various substances.

In the medical field, 3-mercaptopropionic acid is not used directly as a drug or therapeutic agent. However, it may be employed in the synthesis of certain medications or as a reagent in diagnostic tests. For instance, it has been used to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and detecting brain tumors.

It is important to note that 3-mercaptopropionic acid can have adverse health effects if not handled properly. It can cause skin and eye irritation, and prolonged exposure may lead to more severe health issues. Therefore, appropriate safety measures should be taken when working with this compound in a laboratory or industrial setting.

Endomyocardial fibrosis is a rare heart condition characterized by the thickening and scarring (fibrosis) of the inner layer of the heart muscle (endocardium) and the muscular walls of the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles). This process can restrict the heart's ability to fill properly with blood, leading to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. The exact cause of endomyocardial fibrosis is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve an abnormal immune response or inflammation. It is more commonly found in tropical regions of Africa and Asia. Treatment typically involves medications to manage symptoms and improve heart function, as well as potentially surgical interventions to remove the scar tissue and restore normal heart function.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Systole is the phase of the cardiac cycle during which the heart muscle contracts to pump blood out of the heart. Specifically, it refers to the contraction of the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart. This is driven by the action of the electrical conduction system of the heart, starting with the sinoatrial node and passing through the atrioventricular node and bundle branches to the Purkinje fibers.

During systole, the pressure within the ventricles increases as they contract, causing the aortic and pulmonary valves to open and allowing blood to be ejected into the systemic and pulmonary circulations, respectively. The duration of systole is typically shorter than that of diastole, the phase during which the heart muscle relaxes and the chambers fill with blood.

In clinical settings, the terms "systolic" and "diastolic" are often used to describe blood pressure measurements, with the former referring to the pressure exerted on the artery walls when the ventricles contract and eject blood, and the latter referring to the pressure when the ventricles are relaxed and filling with blood.

Arrestins are a family of proteins that play a crucial role in regulating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. There are four main types of arrestins: visual arrestin (also known as arr1 or S-arrestin), β-arrestin1 (also known as arr2 or Kon/Vec), β-arrestin2 (also known as arr3 or hTHT), and arrestin-domain containing protein 1 (ARRDC1).

Arrestins bind to the intracellular domains of activated GPCRs, which leads to several outcomes:

1. They prevent further activation of G proteins by the receptor, effectively "arresting" the signal transduction process.
2. They promote the internalization (endocytosis) of the receptor from the cell membrane into endosomes, where it can be either degraded or recycled back to the cell surface.
3. They act as scaffolds for various signaling complexes and mediate interactions between GPCRs and other intracellular signaling proteins, leading to the activation of different signaling pathways.

Overall, arrestins play a critical role in fine-tuning GPCR signaling, ensuring appropriate cellular responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and other extracellular signals.

Electrolytes are substances that, when dissolved in water, break down into ions that can conduct electricity. In the body, electrolytes are responsible for regulating various important physiological functions, including nerve and muscle function, maintaining proper hydration and acid-base balance, and helping to repair tissue damage.

The major electrolytes found in the human body include sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. These electrolytes are tightly regulated by various mechanisms, including the kidneys, which help to maintain their proper balance in the body.

When there is an imbalance of electrolytes in the body, it can lead to a range of symptoms and health problems. For example, low levels of sodium (hyponatremia) can cause confusion, seizures, and even coma, while high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can lead to heart arrhythmias and muscle weakness.

Electrolytes are also lost through sweat during exercise or illness, so it's important to replace them through a healthy diet or by drinking fluids that contain electrolytes, such as sports drinks or coconut water. In some cases, electrolyte imbalances may require medical treatment, such as intravenous (IV) fluids or medication.

The abdominal aorta is the portion of the aorta, which is the largest artery in the body, that runs through the abdomen. It originates from the thoracic aorta at the level of the diaphragm and descends through the abdomen, where it branches off into several smaller arteries that supply blood to the pelvis, legs, and various abdominal organs. The abdominal aorta is typically divided into four segments: the suprarenal, infrarenal, visceral, and parietal portions. Disorders of the abdominal aorta can include aneurysms, atherosclerosis, and dissections, which can have serious consequences if left untreated.

The angiotensin II receptors, (ATR1) and (ATR2), are a class of G protein-coupled receptors with angiotensin II as their ... angiotensin II. The AT1 and AT2 receptors share a sequence identity of ~30%, but have a similar affinity for angiotensin II, ... The angiotensin receptor is activated by the vasoconstricting peptide angiotensin II. The activated receptor in turn couples to ... The AT4 receptor is activated by the angiotensin II metabolite angiotensin IV, and may play a role in regulation of the CNS ...
Angiotensin II receptor blockers, as their name implies, block the action of angiotensin II at its receptors and therefore may ... "Angiotensin II". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine. "Angiotensin II acetate". Drug Information Portal ... Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a medication that is used to treat hypotension resulting from septic shock or other distributive ... Angiotensin II is a naturally occurring hormone secreted as part of the renin-angiotensin system that results in powerful ...
March 2020). "Angiotensin II and angiotensin 1-7: which is their role in atrial fibrillation?". Heart Failure Reviews. Springer ... It is released into the bloodstream where one of sACE2's functions is to turn excess angiotensin II into angiotensin 1-7 which ... ACE2 has an opposing effect to ACE, degrading angiotensin II into angiotensin (1-7), thereby lowering blood pressure. sACE2, as ... June 2020). "Association of Inpatient Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers With ...
... s (ARBs), formally angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) antagonists, also known as angiotensin ... While angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors block the cleavage of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, the active peptide ... due to inhibition of angiotensin II production by ACE inhibitors or competitive antagonism of the angiotensin II receptor by ... "List of Angiotensin receptor blockers (angiotensin II inhibitors)". Drugs.com. 2020-02-28. Retrieved 2020-03-21. "Blood ...
... (AT1) is the best characterized angiotensin receptor. It is encoded in humans by the AGTR1 gene ... The angiotensin receptor is activated by the vasoconstricting peptide angiotensin II. The activated receptor in turn couples to ... "Angiotensin II receptor blocker", Wikipedia, 2022-07-26, retrieved 2022-08-10 Wilson JX (1984). "The renin-angiotensin system ... shows considerably less binding affinities in case of all angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Angiotensin II receptor type 1 ...
... , also known as the AT2 receptor is a protein that in humans is encoded by the AGTR2 gene. ... "Entrez Gene: AGTR2 angiotensin II receptor, type 2". Ewert S, Laesser M, Johansson B, Holm M, Aneman A, Fandriks L (March 2003 ... Angiotensin II is a potent pressor hormone and a primary regulator of aldosterone secretion. It is an important effector ... Angiotensin II receptor type 2 (AGTR2) gene is a protein coding gene responsible for encoding AGTR2, the integral membrane ...
Action of neprilysin on angiotensin I or angiotensin II. Action of prolyl endopeptidase on angiotensin I. Action of ACE on ... angiotensin 1-9. Action of neprilysin on angiotensin 1-9. Action of ACE2 on angiotensin II. Ang (1-7) has been shown to have ... 2018). "The ACE2/Angiotensin-(1-7)/MAS Axis of the Renin-Angiotensin System: Focus on Angiotensin-(1-7)". Physiol Rev. 1 (98): ... angiotensin II (Ang II). The polypeptide Ang I can be converted into Ang (1-7) by the actions of neprilysin (NEP) and thimet ...
Angiotensin II binds to the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT1), which sets off a number of actions that result in ... In addition, inhibiting angiotensin II formation diminishes angiotensin II-mediated aldosterone secretion from the adrenal ... Kininase II is the same as angiotensin-converting enzyme. Thus, the same enzyme (ACE) that generates a vasoconstrictor (ANG II ... Likewise it converts the inactive decapeptide angiotensin I to the octapeptide angiotensin II by removing the dipeptide His-Leu ...
Angiotensin I may have some minor activity, but angiotensin II is the major bio-active product. Angiotensin II has a variety of ... Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, also known as angiotensin receptor blockers, can be used to prevent angiotensin II from ... The decapeptide is known as angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is then converted to an octapeptide, angiotensin II by angiotensin- ... vasopressor activity of angiotensin II. Angiotensin IV also has adrenocortical and vasopressor activities Angiotensin II is a ...
It is cleaved at the N-terminus by renin to result in angiotensin I, which will later be modified to become angiotensin II. ... It is part of the renin-angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure. Angiotensin also stimulates the release of ... and angiotensin II levels. In mice with a full body deficit of angiotensinogen, the effects observed were low newborn survival ... An oligopeptide, angiotensin is a hormone and a dipsogen. It is derived from the precursor molecule angiotensinogen, a serum ...
Computer modeling was used to compare S-8308 and S-8307 with Ang II and it was seen that Ang II contains two acidic residues ... angiotensin I (Ang I) and Ang II. In the 1970s, scientists first observed Ang II to harm the heart and kidneys, and individuals ... are a group of antihypertensive drugs that act by blocking the effects of the hormone angiotensin II (Ang II) in the body, ... "The distribution of angiotensin II type 1 receptors, and the tissue renin-angiotensin systems", Molecular Medicine Today, 1 (1 ...
It is a derivative of angiotensin II. Angiotensin "Angiotensinamide". Index nominum, international drug directory = ... Angiotensinamide (INN; BAN and USAN angiotensin amide) is a potent vasoconstrictor used as a cardiac stimulant. ...
Angiotensin II -> Vasopressin) Increase PAI-1 and PAI-2 also through Angiotensin II Lipid Increase HDL, triglyceride Decrease ... II. Correlation of the extent of conversion of plasma androstenedione to estrone with age". The Journal of Clinical ... Opposing Effects of Estrogen in Two Prototypical Autoimmune Diseases". Frontiers in Immunology. 6: 635. doi:10.3389/fimmu. ... 92 (2): 169-180. doi:10.1016/S0166-4328(97)00189-7. PMID 9638959. S2CID 28276218. Warnock JK, Swanson SG, Borel RW, Zipfel LM, ...
Two years after his research on angiotensin blockers at Harvard, Watkins returned to Johns Hopkins and joined the admissions ... Barreras, Amy; Gurk-Turner, Cheryle (January 2003). "Angiotensin II receptor blockers". Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical ... Angiotensin blockers were created in order to avoid the side effects of ACE inhibitors, which were previously the drug of ... The research work that Watkins completed during those two years at Harvard contributed to the safety and efficiency of the drug ...
Ryan, Una; Ryan, James W (April 1980). "Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: II. Pulmonary Endothelial Cells in Culture". ... Ryan has two daughters, Tamsin Smith, a poet and social impact innovator, who helped create and served as founding president of ... II. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. ISBN 978-0-8493-4991-1. Ryan, Una S. (1988). Endothelial Cells. Vol. III. Boca Raton, ... Ryan, Una; Ryan, James W; Smith, David S (1975). "Alveolar type II cells: Studies on the mode of release of lamellar bodies". ...
Inagaki K, Iwanaga Y, Sarai N, Onozawa Y, Takenaka H, Mochly-Rosen D, Kihara Y (Oct 2002). "Tissue angiotensin II during ... Paul K, Ball NA, Dorn GW, Walsh RA (Nov 1997). "Left ventricular stretch stimulates angiotensin II--mediated ... angiotensin II and diastolic stretch; adenosine; hypoxia and Akt-induced stem cell factor; ROS generated via pharmacologic ... Initially, PKCε was thought to protect mitochondria from MPT through its association with VDAC1, ANT, and hexokinase II; ...
ARBs block angiotensin II from acting. The patient's diet should also be changed. The patient should restrict salt intake to ... ACEIs will decrease hypertension by preventing the body from creating angiotensin II, which narrows the blood vessels. ... If the DPGN is caused by IgA nephropathy then corticosteroids, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEIs), angiotensin ... Two common immunosuppressive drugs used to treat DPGN are cyclophosphamide (CYC) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) if the DPGN is ...
Angiotensin is involved in regulating aldosterone and is the core regulator. Angiotensin II acts synergistically with potassium ... by increase in the plasma concentration of angiotensin III. by increased plasma angiotensin II, ACTH, or potassium levels. The ... Aldosterone synthase normally is not ACTH sensitive, and is only activated by angiotensin II.[citation needed] Aldosterone ... Control of aldosterone release from the adrenal cortex: The role of the renin-angiotensin system: ...
... is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. It was withdrawn from FDA review by the manufacturer after phase III ... ISBN 978-0-12-369417-1. Dina R, Jafari M (July 2000). "Angiotensin II-receptor antagonists: an overview". Am J Health Syst ... Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, Biphenyls, All stub articles, Cardiovascular system drug stubs). ...
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... angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II; angiotensin II causes vasoconstriction and ... competitive angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) antagonist, reducing the end organ responses to angiotensin II. Losartan ... angiotensin II, and ultimately decreasing blood pressure. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists include losartan, valsartan, ... It works by blocking angiotensin II. Losartan was patented in 1986, and approved for medical use in the United States in 1995. ...
... fimasartan blocks angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptors), reducing pro-hypertensive actions of angiotensin II, such as ... Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) then catalyzes the reaction that forms angiotensin II, which acts on AT1 receptors on the ... Harada K, Sugaya T, Murakami K, Yazaki Y, Komuro I (November 1999). "Angiotensin II type 1A receptor knockout mice display less ... Sun Y, Zhang JQ, Zhang J, Ramires FJ (August 1998). "Angiotensin II, transforming growth factor-beta1 and repair in the ...
This secreted protein catalyzes the cleavage of angiotensin I into angiotensin 1-9, and angiotensin II into the vasodilator ... The virus is able to use Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as an entry receptor to bind to and enter target cells. It is ... "ACE2 angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 - Gene". NCBI. 2020-02-28. Retrieved 2020-03-21. The protein encoded by this gene ... Recombinant viruses can arise when two viral genomes are present in the same host cell. The first cases of the infection with ...
Ariza AC, Bobadilla NA, Halhali A (2007). "[Endothelin 1 and angiotensin II in preeeclampsia]". Rev. Invest. Clin. 59 (1): 48- ... The B2 receptor forms a complex with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), and this is thought to play a role in cross-talk ... Cassano G, Susca F, Lippe C, Guanti G (1999). "Two B1 and B2 bradykinin receptor antagonists fail to inhibit the Ca2+ response ... Alternate start codons result in two isoforms of the protein. Bradykinin receptor GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000168398 ...
subsequently angiotensin II was indicted - Ganong, Mulrow)). Denton and colleagues showed direct action of Angiotensin II on ... They had two sons. Denton died on 18 November 2022, at the age of 98. In 1995, on election to the National Academy of Sciences ... II. Renal physiology in electrolyte subtraction. Acta medica scandinavica, 140 suppl. 261, 1-202, 1951 Denton, D. A. (22 ... For twelve years (1978-1991) he was with Professor Sune Bergstrom, Chairman of the Nobel Foundation, one of two foreign members ...
In 2013 MERS-CoV was identified in three members of a dromedary camel herd held in a Qatar barn, which was linked to two ... angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). However, it was later discovered that neutralization of ACE2 by recombinant antibodies ... MERS-CoV genomes are phylogenetically classified into two clades, clade A and B. The earliest cases were of clade A clusters, ... On 2 May 2014, the Corona Map was launched to track the MERS coronavirus in realtime on the world map. The data is officially ...
Katz AM (1990). "Angiotensin II: Hemodynamic regulator or growth factor?". J Mol Cell Cardiol. 22 (7): 739-747. doi:10.1016/ ... Peptide separation by two-dimensional chromatography and electrophoresis. Katz AM, Chernoff AI (1959). "Structural similarities ... KATZ, AM; DREYER, WJ; ANFINSEN, CB (Nov 1959). "Peptide separation by two-dimensional chromatography and electrophoresis". The ... 180 (2): 392-402. doi:10.1152/ajplegacy.1955.180.2.392. PMID 14361747. KATZ, A. M.; KATZ, L. N.; WILLIAMS, F. L. (1 November ...
The gene product interacts with the angiotensin II type I receptor and negatively regulates angiotensin II signaling. ... "The angiotensin II type I receptor-associated protein, ATRAP, is a transmembrane protein and a modulator of angiotensin II ... Type-1 angiotensin II receptor-associated protein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the AGTRAP gene. This gene encodes ... "Entrez Gene: AGTRAP angiotensin II receptor-associated protein". Human AGTRAP genome location and AGTRAP gene details page in ...
... is largely responsible for converting angiotensin I to the vasoactive peptide angiotensin II. Angiotensin II has been ... Jenne DE, Tschopp J (1991). "Angiotensin II-forming heart chymase is a mast-cell-specific enzyme". Biochem. J. 276 (2): 567-8. ... "Entrez Gene: CMA1 chymase 1, mast cell". Urata H, Nishimura H, Ganten D (1996). "Chymase-dependent angiotensin II forming ... Caughey GH, Raymond WW, Wolters PJ (2000). "Angiotensin II generation by mast cell alpha- and beta-chymases". Biochim. Biophys ...
"Stochastic sensing of Angiotensin II with lysenin channels". Scientific Reports. 7 (1): 2448. Bibcode:2017NatSR...7.2448S. doi: ... As with most PFTs, lysenin oligomerization occurs in a two-step process, as was recently imaged. The process begins with ... Breaking the sphingomyelin asymmetry between the two leaflets of the lipid bilayer by punching holes in the membrane and ... 3.0.co;2-w. PMID 10684578. Sukumwang, N.; Umezawa, K. (2013). "Earthworm-Derived Pore-Forming Toxin Lysenin and Screening of ...
The angiotensin II receptors, (ATR1) and (ATR2), are a class of G protein-coupled receptors with angiotensin II as their ... angiotensin II. The AT1 and AT2 receptors share a sequence identity of ~30%, but have a similar affinity for angiotensin II, ... The angiotensin receptor is activated by the vasoconstricting peptide angiotensin II. The activated receptor in turn couples to ... The AT4 receptor is activated by the angiotensin II metabolite angiotensin IV, and may play a role in regulation of the CNS ...
ACE2 Protein binds to SARS Coronavirus-2 receptor binding domain. ... Angiotensin converting enzyme 2) an enzyme bound to cell ... ACE-2 plays a role as a mono-carboxypeptidase which degrades Ang I to produce the nonapeptide Ang 1-9 and Ang II to create the ... 2 main domains in coronavirus S1 have been recognized, the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain. One or the other and/or ... ACE-2 Human Recombinant Protein is shipped on ice packs. Upon arrival, Store at -20°C. The addition of 0.1% albmin is highly ...
Angiotensin 2 Receptor Blockers Category Drug Index Pediatric Oncall ...
Angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1) blockers inhibit the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems 8 and improve both the ... Angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers inhibit the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems and might improve skeletal and ... Angiotensin II blockers in obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomised controlled trial. S. Andreas, C. Herrmann-Lingen, T. ... Angiotensin II blockers in obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomised controlled trial. S. Andreas, C. Herrmann-Lingen, T. ...
Usage: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-2R) Rabbit Polyclonal, affinity-purified. Related Products: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-2R) ... Usage: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-2R) Rabbit Polyclonal, affinity-purified. Related Products: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-2R) ... Usage: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-1R) Rabbit Polyclonal, affinity-purified. Related Products: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-1R) ... Related Products: Angiotensin II receptor (AT-1R) Rabbit Polyclonal, affinity-purified (Cat. #AB-N27AP), Angiotensin II ...
Prolonged Infusions of Angiotensin II and Norepinephrine and Blood Pressure, Electrolyte Balance, and Aldosterone and Cortisol ... Prolonged Infusions of Angiotensin II and Norepinephrine and Blood Pressure, Electrolyte Balance, and Aldosterone and Cortisol ...
XFEL structure of human angiotensin II type 2 receptor (Orthorhombic form) in complex with compound 1 (N-benzyl-N-(2-ethyl-4- ... oxo-3-{[2-(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)[1,1-biphenyl]-4-yl] methyl}-3,4-dihydroquinazolin-6-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamide) ... The angiotensin II receptors AT 1 R and AT 2 R serve as key components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. AT 1 R has ... Structural basis for selectivity and diversity in angiotensin II receptors.. Zhang, H., Han, G.W., Batyuk, A., Ishchenko, A., ...
Olmesartan blocks the vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II by selectively blocking binding of angiotensin II to the AT-1 ... Because hypertension may be dependent on angiotensin II, antihypertensives that inhibit renin or angiotensin II are used widely ... Angiotensin II is the primary vasoactive hormone of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and plays an important role ... Enalapril is a competitive ACE inhibitor that prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor ...
Impact of Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker on Plasma Levels of Adiponectin and Advanced Oxidation Protein Products in Peritoneal ... Advanced oxidation protein products, Adiponectin, Angiotensin II receptor blocker, Atherosclerosis, Peritoneal dialysis ... Ryuichi Furuya, Mari Odamaki, Hiromichi Kumagai, Akira Hishida; Impact of Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker on Plasma Levels of ... The aim of this study was to determine the effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) on the oxidative stress and ...
A-II. angiotensin II. CN. cyanide. 2DG. 2-deoxyglucose. EIPA. 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride. ACE. angiotensin converting ... Angiotensin II (A-II) is known to potentiate ischemic dysfunction during ischemia, but the mechanisms involved are not ... Effects of Angiotensin II on Intracellular Calcium and Contracture in Metabolically Inhibited Cardiomyocytes. David R. Boston, ... Effects of Angiotensin II on Intracellular Calcium and Contracture in Metabolically Inhibited Cardiomyocytes. David R. Boston, ...
Enrolment for this trial named ATTRACT (Angiotensin II Type Two Receptor Agonist COVID-19 Trial) was performed between 21 July ... Rathinasabapathy A, Horowitz A, Horton K, Kumar A, Gladson S, Unger T, et al. The Selective Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor ... an integral component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (3). Within the RAS, the angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor ( ... Methods We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial with the novel oral angiotensin II type 2 receptor ...
The angiotensin II response to an acute exercise stimulus and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genotype. DR Woods 1,2 , ... This is the first report that DD subjects demonstrate a greater rise in Angiotensin II at 40 min post-exercise than II subjects ... The angiotensin II response to an acute exercise stimulus and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (. ... The angiotensin II response to an acute exercise stimulus and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genotype ...
The cells of the adrenal cortex contain angiotensin-II (AII), but whether this peptide is synthesized there (vs. internalized ... The cells of the adrenal cortex contain angiotensin-II (AII), but whether this peptide is synthesized there (vs. internalized ... Potassium-stimulated angiotensin release from superfused adrenal capsules and enzymatically dispersed cells of the zona ...
"Angiotensin ii receptors in the kidney: localization and physiological significance",. abstract = " Angiotensin II (Ang II) ... Angiotensin II (Ang II) exerts a variety of actions through specific receptor binding in the kidney. These include modulation ... N2 - Angiotensin II (Ang II) exerts a variety of actions through specific receptor binding in the kidney. These include ... AB - Angiotensin II (Ang II) exerts a variety of actions through specific receptor binding in the kidney. These include ...
... angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy. However, evidence is lacking about whether ... Patients with outpatient serum creatinine and potassium tests in the 30 days after starting ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II ... Routine laboratory monitoring after ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker initiation was not associated with a lower ... We identified 75 251 matched pairs initiating ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy between January 1, 2007 ...
Find information on Angiotensin II (Giapreza) in Daviss Drug Guide including dosage, side effects, interactions, nursing ... "Angiotensin II." Daviss Drug Guide, 18th ed., F.A. Davis Company, 2023. Medicine Central, im.unboundmedicine.com/medicine/view ... Drug-Guide/110551/all/angiotensin_II. Vallerand AHA, Sanoski CAC, Quiring CC. Angiotensin II. Daviss Drug Guide. F.A. Davis ... Vallerand, A. H., Sanoski, C. A., & Quiring, C. (2023). Angiotensin II. In Daviss Drug Guide (18th ed.). F.A. Davis Company. ...
Angiotensin II) ELISA Kit Rat AngII(Angiotensin II) ELISA Kit. To Order Contact Us: [email protected]. Rat Angiotensin II ( ... Description: A competitive inhibition quantitative ELISA assay kit for detection of Rat Angiotensin II (AngII) in samples from ... Description: A competitive inhibition quantitative ELISA assay kit for detection of Rat Angiotensin II (AngII) in samples from ... Description: This is Competitive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Rat Angiotensin II (AngII) in serum, plasma ...
Molecular characterization of angiotensin II type II receptors in rat pheochromocytoma cells. / Webb, Maria L.; Liu, Eddie C.K ... Molecular characterization of angiotensin II type II receptors in rat pheochromocytoma cells. In: Peptides. 1992 ; Vol. 13, No ... Molecular characterization of angiotensin II type II receptors in rat pheochromocytoma cells. Peptides. 1992;13(3):499-508. doi ... Molecular characterization of angiotensin II type II receptors in rat pheochromocytoma cells. ...
N2 - Angiotensin type 2 receptor-mediated effects of angiotensin II appear to counteract many of the effects mediated via the ... AB - Angiotensin type 2 receptor-mediated effects of angiotensin II appear to counteract many of the effects mediated via the ... Angiotensin type 2 receptor-mediated effects of angiotensin II appear to counteract many of the effects mediated via the ... abstract = "Angiotensin type 2 receptor-mediated effects of angiotensin II appear to counteract many of the effects mediated ...
ACE-Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Antagonists Reports suggest that NSAIDs may diminish the antihypertensive effect of ACE- ... These interactions should be given consideration in patients taking NSAIDs concomitantly with ACE-inhibitors or angiotensin II ... the co-administration of an NSAID and an ACE-inhibitor or an angiotensin II antagonist may result in further deterioration of ... Two large, controlled clinical trials of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10-14 days following ...
Order Rat Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 ACE2 ELISA Kit 96 well plate 01012683943 at Gentaur Angiotensin I Converting 2 ( ... ACEH; ACEII; ACE-II; Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A; ACE-related carboxypeptidase; Angiotensin-converting enzyme homolog; ... The concentration of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the samples is then determined by comparing the O.D. of the ... The kit may be stored at 4°C for immediate use within two days upon arrival. Reseal any unused strips with desiccant pack. ...
... Remuzzi A. ;Sangalli ... Regression of glomerulosclerosis can be induced by angiotensin II antagonism, but the effect of these treatments on the entire ... Regression of glomerulosclerosis can be induced by angiotensin II antagonism, but the effect of these treatments on the entire ... However, the progression of renal diseases can be delayed by angiotensin II blockers that stabilize renal function or ...
Preoperative use of renin angiotensin system antagonists has been considered an independent risk factor for development of ... Terlipressin infusion for prevention of vasoplegic syndrome in patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonist By ... Terlipressin infusion for prevention of vasoplegic syndrome in patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonist ... Preoperative use of renin angiotensin system antagonists has been considered an independent risk factor for development of ...
An established experimental platform applied angiotensin II (Ang II) challenge in the presence and absence of reduced p21- ... Ang II treatment increased such SK2 contributions to optically mapped action potential durations (APD80) and their ... These findings associate Ang II induced hypertrophy with increased SK2 expression brought about by a CaMKII/CREB signaling ... Ang II challenge replicated such increases in apamin-sensitive SK patch clamp currents as well as in real-time PCR and western ...
Use of Valsartan, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARB), and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors ... Sentinel Modular Program Report: Use of Valsartan, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARB), and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme ( ... angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in the Sentinel Distributed ... 2019 ICPE Poster: Exposure to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)/N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-contaminated Angiotensin-II Receptor ...
Prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in lower aldosterone secretion. ... Nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist that blocks the vasoconstricting and aldosterone-secreting effects of angiotensin ... Angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Class Summary. Useful for hypertension and heart failure in patients who are intolerant of ... inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Unfortunately, these two classes of drugs may lead to increased serum ...
ACE2 catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7, thereby counterbalancing ACE activity. Accumulating ... ACE2 catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7, thereby counterbalancing ACE activity. Accumulating ... ACE2 catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7, thereby counterbalancing ACE activity. Accumulating ... ACE2 catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7, thereby counterbalancing ACE activity. Accumulating ...
Abbreviations: ACEI = angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor; AHM = antihypertensive medication; ARB = angiotensin II receptor ... angiotensin II receptor blockers) to 28.9% (diuretics); 20.4% of beneficiaries who were prescribed renin-angiotensin system ... angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers, which were assessed individually and ... Nonadherence differed by multiple factors, including medication class (range: 16.9% for angiotensin II receptor blockers to ...
  • Angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers inhibit the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems and might improve skeletal and respiratory muscle strength in patients in whom these systems are activated. (ersjournals.com)
  • Angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT 1 ) blockers inhibit the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems 8 and improve both the quality of life and longevity in patients with heart failure. (ersjournals.com)
  • For management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), medication classes consist of diuretics, angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and beta-blockers. (medscape.com)
  • The aim of this study was to determine the effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) on the oxidative stress and adipocytokines in peritoneal dialysis patients. (karger.com)
  • However, the progression of renal diseases can be delayed by angiotensin II blockers that stabilize renal function or increaseGFR, even in advanced phases of the disease. (unimib.it)
  • The general approach to therapy of ischemic nephropathy involves control of hypertension, preferably with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). (medscape.com)
  • We compared the effect of aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor (DRI), with that of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) on albuminuria and urinary excretion of angiotensinogen , a marker of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system activity. (bvsalud.org)
  • ACE2 an entry receptor of SARS coronaviruses as well as SARS-CoV-2,.The coronavirus spike (S) glycoprotein is a class I viral fusion antigen located on the external envelope of the virion that takes part in a critical part in viral infection by identifying host cell receptors and facilitating fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. (prospecbio.com)
  • ACE2 Protein binds to SARS Coronavirus-2 [ CoV-2019 ] Spike receptor binding domain. (prospecbio.com)
  • Gao X, Zhang S, Gou J, Wen Y, Fan L, Zhou J, Zhou G, Xu G, Zhang Z (2022) Spike-mediated ACE2 down-regulation was involved in the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. (atsbio.com)
  • Objective: To determine the role of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as the receptor for SARS-CoV-2 entry, is also an important regulator of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) homeostasis, which plays an unsettled role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. (atsbio.com)
  • The SARS-CoV-2 virus is known to bind to and enter target cells through angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), an integral component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) ( 3 ). (medrxiv.org)
  • This assay has high sensitivity and excellent specificity for detection of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2). (polabo.com)
  • No significant cross-reactivity or interference between Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) and analogues was observed. (polabo.com)
  • The microtiter plate provided in this kit has been pre-coated with an antibody specific to Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2). (polabo.com)
  • Standards or samples are then added to the appropriate microtiter plate wells with a biotin-conjugated antibody specific to Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2). (polabo.com)
  • After TMB substrate solution is added, only those wells that contain Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2), biotin-conjugated antibody and enzyme-conjugated Avidin will exhibit a change in color. (polabo.com)
  • The concentration of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the samples is then determined by comparing the O.D. of the samples to the standard curve. (polabo.com)
  • Intra-assay Precision (Precision within an assay): 3 samples with low, middle and high level Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) were tested 20 times on one plate, respectively. (polabo.com)
  • Inter-assay Precision (Precision between assays): 3 samples with low, middle and high level Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) were tested on 3 different plates, 8 replicates in each plate. (polabo.com)
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a negative regulator of the renin-angiotensin system, and functions as the key SARS coronavirus receptor and stabilizer of neutral amino acid transporters. (elsevierpure.com)
  • ACE2 catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7, thereby counterbalancing ACE activity. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In addition, ACE2 is structurally a chimeric protein that has emerged from the duplication of 2 genes: homology with ACE at the carboxypeptidase domain and homology with Collectrin in the transmembrane C-terminal domain. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Aligned ACE2 protein sequences from human, rhesus macaque, African green monkey, cat, dog, American mink, mouse, and chicken cells in study of susceptibility to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) of cell lines and substrates used to diagnose and isolate influenza and other viruses. (cdc.gov)
  • Histopathology and localization of SARS-CoV-2 and its host cell entry receptor ACE2 in tissues from naturally infected US- farm ed mink (Neovison vison). (cdc.gov)
  • We characterized the pathological findings in 72 mink from US farm s with SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks, localized SARS-CoV-2 and its host cellular receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in mink respiratory tissues, and evaluated the utility of various test methods and specimens for SARS-CoV-2 detection in necropsy tissues. (cdc.gov)
  • The SARS-CoV-2 receptor ACE2 was extensively detected by IHC within turbinate epithelium, with decreased detection in lower respiratory tract epithelium and alveolar macrophages. (cdc.gov)
  • They identified a new association with a rare genetic variant at the Xp22.2 locus (rs190509934) that downregulates the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). (cdc.gov)
  • Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (18-740 a.a. (prospecbio.com)
  • ACE-2 (Angiotensin converting enzyme 2) an enzyme bound to cell membranes in various organs such as intestines arteries , lungs, heart & kidney. (prospecbio.com)
  • 50% of the predicted value and without obvious cardiovascular disease that would necessitate the administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker. (ersjournals.com)
  • Moreover, in patients with left heart failure, maximum inspiratory pressure improved after treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition 10 . (ersjournals.com)
  • Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was used to localize the Ang II receptors and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in rat, rabbit, and human kidney. (monash.edu)
  • Clinical practice guidelines recommend routine kidney function and serum potassium testing within 30 days of initiating ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy. (mcmaster.ca)
  • This analysis estimates the rates of valsartan (contaminated and uncontaminated with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) or N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)), angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in the Sentinel Distributed Database (SDD). (sentinelinitiative.org)
  • The catalytic efficiency is 400-fold higher with ANGIOTENSIN II as a substrate than with ANGIOTENSIN I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is also is a functional receptor for the spike glycoprotein (SPIKE PROTEIN, CORONAVIRUS) of the CORONAVIRUSES SARS-COV, SARS-COV2, and HCOV-NL63. (bvsalud.org)
  • Prevents conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, resulting in lower aldosterone secretion. (medscape.com)
  • May induce a more complete inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system than ACE inhibitors, does not affect the response to bradykinin, and is less likely to be associated with cough and angioedema. (medscape.com)
  • Overexpression of the alpha-2,6-sialyltransferase in MDCK cells increases influenza virus sensitivity to neuraminidase inhibitors. (cdc.gov)
  • Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors General treatment of diabetes mellitus for all patients involves lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The angiotensin II receptors, (ATR1) and (ATR2), are a class of G protein-coupled receptors with angiotensin II as their ligands. (wikipedia.org)
  • The AT1 and AT2 receptors share a sequence identity of ~30%, but have a similar affinity for angiotensin II, which is their main ligand. (wikipedia.org)
  • The angiotensin II receptors AT 1 R and AT 2 R serve as key components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. (rcsb.org)
  • To identify the mechanisms that underlie the differences in function and ligand selectivity between these receptors, here we report crystal structures of human AT 2 R bound to an AT 2 R-selective ligand and to an AT 1 R/AT 2 R dual ligand, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. (rcsb.org)
  • Our results thus provide insights into the structural basis of the distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of new selective ligands. (rcsb.org)
  • These data indicate that PC12W cells express a homogeneous population of AT 2 binding sites which differ significantly from AT 1 receptors in signal transduction and molecular structure. (researchwithrutgers.com)
  • AT 2 sites may act via potentially novel, biochemical pathways or, alternatively, be vestigial receptors. (researchwithrutgers.com)
  • Though the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is known to have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis, the exact mechanisms for this remain to be clarified. (karger.com)
  • We examined the effects of A-II on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca ++ ] i ) and cell contracture caused by metabolic inhibition in isolated adult rabbit ventricular myocytes. (aspetjournals.org)
  • In the presence of partial Na + /K + ATP pump inhibition ([K + ] o = 0.8 mM), there was a more significant increase in [Ca ++ ] i associated with exposure to CN+A-II vs. CN alone. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Partial inhibition of the Na + pump by exposure to 0.8 mM K + had no effect on myocyte survival in the absence of CN, but augmented the harmful effect of A-II on cell contracture caused by CN exposure. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Description: A competitive inhibition quantitative ELISA assay kit for detection of Rat Angiotensin II (AngII) in samples from serum, plasma, tissue homogenates, cell lysates, cell culture supernates or other biological fluids. (fslregister.nl)
  • Notably, 10-week inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system regenerated kidney vasculature and normalized Tgf-b and endothelin-1 gene expression in aged MWF rats. (unimib.it)
  • ABSTRACT Using data from the 2nd Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-2) in 2008-09 we investigated the in-hospital complications and 1-year outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with systemic hypertension from 6 Gulf countries. (who.int)
  • They are important in the renin-angiotensin system: they are responsible for the signal transduction of the vasoconstricting stimulus of the main effector hormone, angiotensin II. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiotensin type 2 receptor-mediated effects of angiotensin II appear to counteract many of the effects mediated via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. (tau.ac.il)
  • Loss of furin cleavage site attenuates SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. (cdc.gov)
  • This study expands on the knowledge of the pathology and pathogenesis of natural SARS-CoV-2 infection in mink and supports their further investigation as a potential animal model of SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • In NRCMs, Ang II challenge replicated such increases in apamin-sensitive SK patch clamp currents as well as in real-time PCR and western blot measures of SK2 mRNA and protein expression and cell hypertrophy. (ox.ac.uk)
  • These findings associate Ang II induced hypertrophy with increased SK2 expression brought about by a CaMKII/CREB signaling convergent with the PAK1 pathway thence upregulating the KCNN2 promoter activity. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The cells of the adrenal cortex contain angiotensin-II (AII), but whether this peptide is synthesized there (vs. internalized from the systemic circulation), whether it is secreted, and whether it is important in aldosterone production remain uncertain. (nih.gov)
  • Nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist that blocks the vasoconstricting and aldosterone-secreting effects of angiotensin II. (medscape.com)
  • The role of the sympathetic nervous system, epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and the renin angiotensin aldosterone system in the control of blood pressure was discussed. (cdc.gov)
  • Summary: BGPs could alleviate hypertension and dyslipidemia in SHRs by inhibiting ACE/Ang II/AT1R and activating the Ang II/AT2R signaling pathway. (atsbio.com)
  • The goal of medication treatment of group 2 pulmonary hypertension is to lower filling pressures and provide afterload reduction in patients with heart failure. (medscape.com)
  • Approved for use in group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension, there have been few trials evaluating their efficacy in group 2 pulmonary hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • We hypothesized that C21 alone or in combination with an angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist would blunt the development of hypertension and vascular damage in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. (tau.ac.il)
  • Hypertension , 59 (2), 291-299. (tau.ac.il)
  • diovascular disease, including stroke, RACE-2, which was a 9-month prospec- Systemic hypertension was defined in coronary artery disease (CAD), heart tive, multicentre study of 7847 consecu- the current registry as: either history of failure and peripheral vascular dis- tive patients with ACS from 6 adjacent hypertension diagnosed and treated ease [1-3]. (who.int)
  • ACE-2 plays a role as a mono-carboxypeptidase which degrades Ang I to produce the nonapeptide Ang 1-9 and Ang II to create the heptapeptide Ang 1-7. (prospecbio.com)
  • As of 25 January 2021, the WHO has reported almost 100 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and more than 2 million deaths globally ( 4 ). (medrxiv.org)
  • These changes were associated with reduced apoptosis, increased endothelial cell proliferation, and restoration of Nrf2 expression, suggesting mechanisms by which angiotensin II antagonism mediates regeneration of capillary segments. (unimib.it)
  • In conclusion, respiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients was not influenced by angiotensin II receptor blockade. (ersjournals.com)
  • Dual blockade of renin-angiotensin system increases risks of hypotension, hyperkalemia, and renal impairment. (medscape.com)
  • Compound 21 (C21), a selective angiotensin type 2 receptor agonist, has demonstrated beneficial effects on cardiac function after myocardial infarction in rodents. (tau.ac.il)
  • Angiotensin II (Ang II) exerts a variety of actions through specific receptor binding in the kidney. (monash.edu)
  • We incubated 20%m cryostat sections of kidney with either 125 I-[Sar 1 ]Ang II or 125 I-[Sar 1 , Ile 8 ]Ang II for Ang II binding or with 125 I-351A for ACE localization. (monash.edu)
  • Moderate binding of Ang II was observed over proximal convoluted tubules in the outer cortex of rat kidney. (monash.edu)
  • Here, using microcomputed tomography and scanning electron microscopy,we compared the size and extension of kidney blood vessels in untreatedWistar rats with those in untreated and angiotensin II antagonist-treated MunichWistar Frömter (MWF) rats that spontaneously develop kidney disease with age. (unimib.it)
  • The AT4 receptor is activated by the angiotensin II metabolite angiotensin IV, and may play a role in regulation of the CNS extracellular matrix, as well as modulation of oxytocin release. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following absorption, sulindac undergoes two major biotransformations - reversible reduction to the sulfide metabolite, and irreversible oxidation to the sulfone metabolite. (nih.gov)
  • With the twice-a-day dosage regimen, plasma concentrations of sulindac and its two metabolites accumulate: mean concentration over a dosage interval at steady state relative to the first dose averages 1.5 and 2.5 times higher, respectively, for sulindac and its active sulfide metabolite. (nih.gov)
  • Angiotensin II samples were drawn into chilled tubes containing a renin inhibitor, with plasma shock frozen in liquid nitrogen before RIA. (endocrine-abstracts.org)
  • Comparative Effects of Direct Renin Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker on Albuminuria in Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. (bvsalud.org)
  • severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 from patient with coronavirus disease, United States. (cdc.gov)
  • US CDC Real-time reverse transcription PCR panel for detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. (cdc.gov)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes respiratory disease in mink similar to human COVID-19. (cdc.gov)
  • This paper was prepared in response to the need for clear communication regarding the risk of transmission of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that causes COVID-19 in humans and the general societal concern of potential contamination of aquatic animals used as food or their products with the virus. (who.int)
  • The angiotensin receptor is activated by the vasoconstricting peptide angiotensin II. (wikipedia.org)
  • These studies reveal multiple sites where Ang II could modulate renal function by acting on the renal vasculature, glomeruli, vasa recta bundles, and proximal tubular sites. (monash.edu)
  • Ventricular SK2 upregulation following angiotensin II challenge: Modulation by p21-activated kinase-1. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Similar results were obtained with CN plus 2-deoxyglucose, and the effect of A-II was inhibited by 10 μM 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride. (aspetjournals.org)
  • This effect of A-II was completely reversed by the addition of 1 mM amiloride, a Na + /H + exchange inhibitor. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Initially half 'Amiloride' tablet (2.5mg) a day together with the usual dosage of the diuretic concurrently employed, subsequently adjusted if required, but not exceeding two 'Amiloride' tablets (10mg) a day. (janusinfo.se)
  • The dosage of Amiloride should not exceed two 'Amiloride' tablets (10 mg) a day. (janusinfo.se)
  • Description: This is Competitive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Rat Angiotensin II (AngII) in serum, plasma, tissue homogenates, cell lysates, cell culture supernates and other biological fluids. (fslregister.nl)
  • In formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) upper respiratory tract (URT) specimens, conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) was more sensitive than in situ hybridization (ISH) or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for detection of SARS-CoV-2. (cdc.gov)
  • Amended general principles for guidance in devising INN for pharmaceutical substances are attached as Appendix 2. (who.int)
  • In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the sympathetic nervous system, as well as the renin-angiotensin system, is activated with possible negative systemic effects on skeletal muscles. (ersjournals.com)
  • Patients with outpatient serum creatinine and potassium tests in the 30 days after starting ACE inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy were matched 1:1 to patients without follow-up tests. (mcmaster.ca)
  • Six-week-old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats received C21 (1 mg/kg per day), the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan (10 mg/kg per day), C21 plus losartan, or vehicle PO for 6 weeks. (tau.ac.il)
  • Lever-pressing behavior caused by intraseptal Angiotensin II in water-satiated rats. (bvsalud.org)
  • NICE is unable to make a recommendation on angiotensin II for treating vasosuppressor-resistant hypotension caused by septic or distributive shock. (bvsalud.org)
  • Objective: To identify angiotensin (Ang) II as a positive regulator of Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). (atsbio.com)
  • Kim D , Quinn J , Pinsky B , Shah NH , Brown I . Rates of co-infection between SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory pathogens. (cdc.gov)
  • Coinfection with SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory pathogens in patients with COVID-19 in Guangzhou, China. (cdc.gov)
  • 2 main domains in coronavirus S1 have been recognized, the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain. (prospecbio.com)
  • La eficiencia catalítica es 400 veces mayor con la ANGIOTENSINA II como sustrato que con la ANGIOTENSINA I. La enzima convertidora de la angiotensina 2 también es un receptor funcional para la GLICOPROTEÍNA DE LAS ESPÍCULAS DE CORONAVIRUS de los CORONAVIRUS SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV2 y HCoV-NL63. (bvsalud.org)
  • In COPD, the sympathetic nervous system, as well as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), is activated 5 - 7 , with potentially negative systemic effects, on skeletal muscles for example. (ersjournals.com)
  • AT 1 R has a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, but the function of AT 2 R is unclear and it has a variety of reported effects. (rcsb.org)
  • The binding sites and biochemical effects of angiotensin (A) II were investigated in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12W) cells. (researchwithrutgers.com)
  • These two classes of medications cause vasodilation, neurohormonal modification, and improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction. (medscape.com)
  • Angiotensin II (A-II) is known to potentiate ischemic dysfunction during ischemia, but the mechanisms involved are not completely established. (aspetjournals.org)
  • In January 2020, SARS-CoV-2 was identified as the causative agent of an outbreak of the new viral pneumonia disease COVID-19, with the first cases reported in December 2019 ( 1 - 3 ). (medrxiv.org)
  • Tay and colleagues then localized COX-2 to 1q25.2-q25.3 via fluorescein in situ hybridization. (medscape.com)
  • Angiotensin II enhances group 2 innate lymphoid cell responses via AT1a during airway inflammation. (atsbio.com)
  • We conclude that A-II directly enhances cell injury during CN exposure in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Methods We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial with the novel oral angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist C21 in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with C-reactive protein 50-150 mg/L but not needing mechanical ventilation. (medrxiv.org)
  • DRI and ARB reduced albuminuria in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes . (bvsalud.org)
  • Regression of glomerulosclerosis can be induced by angiotensin II antagonism, but the effect of these treatments on the entire vascular tree is unclear. (unimib.it)
  • Unfortunately, these two classes of drugs may lead to increased serum creatinine levels and hyperkalemia, limiting their utility. (medscape.com)