Angiostrongylus cantonensis: A species of parasitic nematodes distributed throughout the Pacific islands that infests the lungs of domestic rats. Human infection, caused by consumption of raw slugs and land snails, results in eosinophilic meningitis.Angiostrongylus: A genus of parasitic nematodes of the superfamily METASTRONGYLOIDEA. Two species, ANGIOSTRONGYLUS CANTONENSIS and A. vasorum, infest the lungs of rats and dogs, respectively. A. cantonensis is transmissible to man where it causes frequently fatal infection of the central nervous system.Strongylida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA.Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Metastrongyloidea: A superfamily of nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA. Characteristics include a fluid-filled outer layer of cuticle and a reduced mouth and bursa.Snails: Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.Eosinophilia: Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.Food Parasitology: The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Gastropoda: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of SNAILS and slugs. The former have coiled external shells and the latter usually lack shells.Central Nervous System Helminthiasis: Infections of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; or MENINGES caused by HELMINTHS (parasitic worms).Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.DNA, Helminth: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.Gnathostoma: A genus of parasitic nematodes that occurs in mammals including man. Infection in humans is either by larvae penetrating the skin or by ingestion of uncooked fish.Nematode Infections: Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Hawaii: A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)Strongyloidea: A superfamily of strongyles or roundworms which are parasites in the intestinal tract of equines, pigs, rodents, and primates (including man). It includes the genera Cyasthostomum, Ransomus, Globocephalus, OESOPHAGOSTOMUM, and STRONGYLUS.Jamaica: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Kingston. It was discovered in 1494 by Columbus and was a Spanish colony 1509-1655 until captured by the English. Its flourishing slave trade was abolished in the 19th century. It was a British colony 1655-1958 and a territory of the West Indies Federation 1958-62. It achieved full independence in 1962. The name is from the Arawak Xaymaca, rich in springs or land of springs. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p564 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p267)Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Antibodies, Helminth: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.Antigens, Helminth: Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.Thailand: Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.Hebrides: A group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean west of Scotland, comprising the Outer Hebrides and the Inner Hebrides.Micronesia: The collective name for islands of the Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines, including the Mariana, PALAU, Caroline, Marshall, and Kiribati Islands. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p761 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p350)Vanuatu: A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Port-Vila. It was called New Hebrides until 1980. It was discovered in 1606 by the Portuguese, forgotten for 160 years, then visited by Bougainville in 1768 and Captain Cook in 1774. It was under joint British and French administration from 1906 until it became independent in 1980 under the name of Vanuatu. The name is native, meaning our land. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p833 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p570)Polynesia: The collective name for the islands of the central Pacific Ocean, including the Austral Islands, Cook Islands, Easter Island, HAWAII; NEW ZEALAND; Phoenix Islands, PITCAIRN ISLAND; SAMOA; TONGA; Tuamotu Archipelago, Wake Island, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. Polynesians are of the Caucasoid race, but many are of mixed origin. Polynesia is from the Greek poly, many + nesos, island, with reference to the many islands in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p966 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p426)Photophobia: Abnormal sensitivity to light. This may occur as a manifestation of EYE DISEASES; MIGRAINE; SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; MENINGITIS; and other disorders. Photophobia may also occur in association with DEPRESSION and other MENTAL DISORDERS.TaiwanMeninges: The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Meningitis, Pneumococcal: An acute purulent infection of the meninges and subarachnoid space caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, most prevalent in children and adults over the age of 60. This illness may be associated with OTITIS MEDIA; MASTOIDITIS; SINUSITIS; RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; sickle cell disease (ANEMIA, SICKLE CELL); skull fractures; and other disorders. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; HEADACHE; neck stiffness; and somnolence followed by SEIZURES; focal neurologic deficits (notably DEAFNESS); and COMA. (From Miller et al., Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p111)Meningitis, Aseptic: A syndrome characterized by headache, neck stiffness, low grade fever, and CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis in the absence of an acute bacterial pathogen. Viral meningitis is the most frequent cause although MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; RICKETTSIA INFECTIONS; diagnostic or therapeutic procedures; NEOPLASTIC PROCESSES; septic perimeningeal foci; and other conditions may result in this syndrome. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p745)Meningitis, Viral: Viral infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space. TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RUBELLA; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORBIVIRUS infections; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RHABDOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; JC VIRUS infections; and RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS may cause this form of meningitis. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, neck pain, vomiting, PHOTOPHOBIA, and signs of meningeal irritation. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp1-3)Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Trombiculidae: Family of MITES in the superfamily Trombiculoidea, suborder Prostigmata, which attack humans and other vertebrates, causing DERMATITIS and severe allergic reactions. Chiggers, red bugs, and harvest mites commonly refer to the larval stage of Trombiculid mites, the only parasitic stage of the mite's life cycle.Phthiraptera: An order of small, wingless parasitic insects, commonly known as lice. The suborders include ANOPLURA (sucking lice); AMBLYCERA; ISCHNOCERA; and Rhynchophthirina (elephant and warthog lice).Esocidae: A family of freshwater fish of the order ESOCIFORMES, comprising the pikes, inhabiting the waters of the Northern Hemisphere. There is one genus, Esox, with five species: northern pike, grass pickerel, chain pickerel, muskellunge, and Amur pike.Arguloida: An order of CRUSTACEA that are parasitic on freshwater fish.Acari: A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Argasidae: A family of softbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include ARGAS and ORNITHODOROS among others.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Reference Books: Books designed by the arrangement and treatment of their subject matter to be consulted for definite terms of information rather than to be read consecutively. Reference books include DICTIONARIES; ENCYCLOPEDIAS; ATLASES; etc. (From the ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Nematoda: A class of unsegmented helminths with fundamental bilateral symmetry and secondary triradiate symmetry of the oral and esophageal structures. Many species are parasites.BooksPublic Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Dictyocaulus Infections: Infection with nematodes of the genus DICTYOCAULUS. In deer, cattle, sheep, and horses the bronchi are the site of infestation.Dictyocaulus: Nematodes parasitic in the bronchi of herbivorous animals.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis. (1/105)

In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms.  (+info)

Jejunal perforation caused by abdominal angiostrongyliasis. (2/105)

The authors describe a case of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in an adult patient presenting acute abdominal pain caused by jejunal perforation. The case was unusual, as this affliction habitually involves the terminal ileum, appendix, cecum or ascending colon. The disease is caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus costaricensis, whose definitive hosts are forest rodents while snails and slugs are its intermediate hosts. Infection in humans is accidental and occurs via the ingestion of snail or slug mucoid secretions found on vegetables, or by direct contact with the mucus. Abdominal angiostrongyliasis is clinically characterized by prolonged fever, anorexia, abdominal pain in the right-lower quadrant, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Although usually of a benign nature, its course may evolve to more complicated forms such as intestinal obstruction or perforation likely to require a surgical approach. Currently, no efficient medication for the treatment of abdominal angiostrongyliasis is known to be available. In this study, the authors provide a review on the subject, considering its etiopathogeny, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment.  (+info)

MR findings of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis attributed to Angiostrongylus cantonensis. (3/105)

Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is prevalent and widely distributed in Thailand, especially in the northeastern and central parts of the country. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is one of the causative agents of fatal eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. The nematodes produce extensive tissue damage by moving through the brain and inducing an inflammatory reaction. We report the clinical features and the findings revealed by MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in six patients with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. The clinical presentation included severe headache, clouded consciousness, and meningeal irritation. Abnormal findings on MR images included prominence of the Virchow-Robin spaces, subcortical enhancing lesions, and abnormal high T2 signal lesions in the periventricular regions. Proton brain MR spectroscopy was performed in three patients and was abnormal in one severe case, showing decreased choline in a lesion. Small hemorrhagic tracts were found in one case. Lesions thought to be due to microcavities and migratory tracts were found in only one case. We believe the MR imaging and MR spectroscopy findings are of diagnostic value and helpful in understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease.  (+info)

Eosinophilic meningitis due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in a returned traveler: case report and review of the literature. (4/105)

Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is the principal cause of eosinophilic meningitis worldwide, and the increase in world travel and shipborne dispersal of infected rat vectors has extended this parasite to regions outside of its traditional geographic boundaries. We report a case of eosinophilic meningitis due to A. cantonensis in a patient who recently returned from a trip in the Pacific.  (+info)

An outbreak of eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis in travelers returning from the Caribbean. (5/105)

BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by the roundworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis are rarely reported, even in regions of endemic infection such as Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. We report an outbreak of A. cantonensis meningitis among travelers returning from the Caribbean. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among 23 young adults who had traveled to Jamaica. We used a clinical definition of eosinophilic meningitis that included headache that began within 35 days after the trip plus at least one of the following: neck pain, nuchal rigidity, altered cutaneous sensations, photophobia, or visual disturbances. RESULTS: Twelve travelers met the case definition for eosinophilic meningitis. The symptoms began a median of 11 days (range, 6 to 31) after their return to the United States. Eosinophilia was eventually documented in all nine patients who were hospitalized, although on initial evaluation, it was present in the peripheral blood of only four of the nine (44 percent) and in the cerebrospinal fluid of five (56 percent). Repeated lumbar punctures and corticosteroid therapy led to improvement in symptoms in two of three patients with severe headache, and intracranial pressure decreased during corticosteroid therapy in all three. Consumption of one meal (P=0.001) and of a Caesar salad at that meal (P=0.007) were strongly associated with eosinophilic meningitis. Antibodies against an A. cantonensis--specific 31-kD antigen were detected in convalescent-phase serum samples from 11 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Among travelers at risk, the presence of headache, elevated intracranial pressure, and pleocytosis, with or without eosinophilia, particularly in association with paresthesias or hyperesthesias, should alert clinicians to the possibility of A. cantonensis infection.  (+info)

Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats and snails after an outbreak of human eosinophilic meningitis, Jamaica. (6/105)

After an outbreak in 2000 of eosinophilic meningitis in tourists to Jamaica, we looked for Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats and snails on the island. Overall, 22% (24/109) of rats harbored adult worms, and 8% (4/48) of snails harbored A. cantonensis larvae. This report is the first of enzootic A. cantonensis infection in Jamaica, providing evidence that this parasite is likely to cause human cases of eosinophilic meningitis.  (+info)

Immunoblot evaluation of the specificity of the 29-kDa antigen from young adult female worms Angiostrongylus cantonensis for immunodiagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. (7/105)

The antigenic components of Angiostrongylus cantonensis young adult female worm somatic extract (FSE) were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting. The sera tested were from patients with proven angiostrongyliasis, other parasitic diseases, and healthy adults. Both the sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were tested from patients with clinical angiostrongyliasis. The CSF from patients with other neurological diseases were also included. Using SDS-PAGE, we found that the FSE comprised more than 30 polypeptides. Immunoblot analysis revealed at least 12 or 13 antigenic bands in patients with proven or clinical angiostrongyliasis, respectively. The patterns of reactivity recognized by the serum and CSF antibodies against FSE were similar. These antigenic components had molecular masses ranging from less than 14.4 to more than 94 kDa. The prominent antigenic band of 29-kDa might serve as a reliable marker for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of immunoblot analysis in this antigenic band were 55.6%, 99.4%, 83.3% and 97.4%, respectively.  (+info)

A clinical study of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by angiostrongyliasis. (8/105)

OBJECTIVE: To improve the clinician's awareness of angiostrongyliasis. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data as well as the epidemiological information concerning 18 patients with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis were analyzed. RESULTS: All patients had a history of eating raw fresh water snail (Ampularium canaliculatus) before the onset of the disease. Incubation period ranged from 1 to 25 days. The major symptoms of the patients had severe headache and pain in the trunk and limbs. Increased eosinophlic count in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid was noted. Tested by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), sera were specifically IgG-antibody positive against Angiostrougylus cantonensis antigen, but were negative against other parasitic antigens such as Paragonimus westermani, Cysticerus, Cellulosae hominis, Echinococcus granulosus and Trichinella spiralis. Abnormal spotty signals were found in 2 cases with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed slow alpha rhythm. All the patients were effectively treated with combined administration of albendazole and dexamethazone. CONCLUSIONS: Angiostrongyliasis is one of the common causes leading to eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. To our knowledge, Wenzhou is the first small outbreak site of angiostrongyliasis discovered in Chinese mainland.  (+info)

  • Scientists are calling for a more thorough study of the epidemiology of A. cantonensis , stricter food-safety policies, and the increase of knowledge on how to properly consume products commonly infested by the parasite, such as snails and slugs that act as intermediate hosts or those that act as paratenic hosts , such as fish, frogs, or freshwater prawns. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnosis is supported by positive antibody-detection tests for A. cantonensis , e.g., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot analysis (Eamsobhana & Tungtrongchitr 2005, Cross & Chen 2007, Eamsobhana & Yong 2009). (fiocruz.br)
  • Cuando el parásito infecta a los caracoles terrestres Achatina , se enquista en su interior y puede infectar accidentalmente a las personas y otros mamíferos. (revistabiomedica.org)
  • Establecer la distribución geográfica de A. cantonensis en huéspedes intermediarios ( Achatina fulica ) y definitivos ( Rattus spp . (revistabiomedica.org)
  • The cycle of A. cantonensis occurs mainly in molluscs and rodents. (scielo.br)
  • 2007) and the hypothesis that the introduction of this parasite occurred through the migration of infected rodents on ships coming mainly from Asia and Africa, a project was implemented to investigate the presence of A. cantonensis in the areas surrounding the main ports of Brazil ( Fig. 1 ). (scielo.br)
  • In 1987, A. cantonensis roundworm was identified for the first time in North America in rodents. (cdc.gov)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a parasitic nematode found in rodents, is the. (news-medical.net)
  • Martin-Alonso A, Foronda P, Quispe-Ricalde MA, Feliu C, Valladares B. Seroprevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Wild Rodents from the Canary Islands. (hawaii.edu)
  • Between December 2000 and May 2002, two cases of A. cantonensis were diagnosed in tawny frogmouths in the Sydney area by the Australian Registry of Wildlife Health at Taronga Zoo. (agriculture.gov.au)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis -infected rats were examined for the presence of antigen sensitive lymphocytes, as assessed by the in vitro uptake of tritiated thymidine by cells of various lymphoid organs (cervical, mediastinal and mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and peripheral blood), following stimulation by adult worm antigen. (ajtmh.org)
  • Adult female worm of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with characteristic barber-pole appearance (anterior end of worm is to the top). (wikipedia.org)
  • increasing quantities of AChE were found in young adult A. cantonensis from the brain of rats. (edu.au)
  • We performed polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism using restriction endonuclease ClaI, directed to the internal transcribed spacer region 2 of A. cantonensis larval DNA. (unicamp.br)
A Case Report on Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis
A Case Report on Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis (medsci.org)
Rat lungworm disease: 9 cases confirmed in Hawaii - CNN
Rat lungworm disease: 9 cases confirmed in Hawaii - CNN (edition.cnn.com)
Parasite sickens Thai workers after they eat raw snails - Taipei Times
Parasite sickens Thai workers after they eat raw snails - Taipei Times (taipeitimes.com)
Rat lungworm disease: Hawaii visitor eats slug, gets parasite | Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
Rat lungworm disease: Hawaii visitor eats slug, gets parasite | Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (ledger-enquirer.com)
Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Scientific Journals|OMICS International|tropical Medicine And Surgery
Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Scientific Journals|OMICS International|tropical Medicine And Surgery (omicsonline.org)
Distribution of Eosinophilic Meningitis Cases Attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Hawaii - Volume 13, Number 11...
Distribution of Eosinophilic Meningitis Cases Attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Hawaii - Volume 13, Number 11... (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
CDC - DPDx - Angiostrongyliasis cantonensis
CDC - DPDx - Angiostrongyliasis cantonensis (cdc.gov)
An Overview of Zoonotic Helminth Infections in North America
An Overview of Zoonotic Helminth Infections in North America (medscape.com)
Atlas of Human Infectious Diseases | Infectious Disease | Infectious Disease & Microbiology | Medicine, Nursing & Dentistry |...
Atlas of Human Infectious Diseases | Infectious Disease | Infectious Disease & Microbiology | Medicine, Nursing & Dentistry |... (wiley.com)
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Jamaica Articles All Issues - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Oxychilus alliarius (garlic snail)
Oxychilus alliarius (garlic snail) (cabi.org)
CDC - Angiostrongylus
CDC - Angiostrongylus (cdc.gov)
Search
Search (cambridge.org)
Gnathostomiasis Follow-up: Further Outpatient Care, Further Inpatient Care, Transfer
Gnathostomiasis Follow-up: Further Outpatient Care, Further Inpatient Care, Transfer (emedicine.medscape.com)
Community Academic Profiles - Faculty & Researchers - Stanford Medicine
Community Academic Profiles - Faculty & Researchers - Stanford Medicine (med.stanford.edu)
Table of contents | Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry
Table of contents | Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (jnnp.bmj.com)
A medical mystery reveals the dangers of eating raw centipedes | Science News
A medical mystery reveals the dangers of eating raw centipedes | Science News (sciencenews.org)
Emerging Angiostrongyliasis in Mainland China - Volume 14, Number 1-January 2008 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC
Emerging Angiostrongyliasis in Mainland China - Volume 14, Number 1-January 2008 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Volume 15, Number 6-June 2009 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC
Volume 15, Number 6-June 2009 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Case #289 - December, 2010
Case #289 - December, 2010 (cdc.gov)
CDC - DPDx - Angiostrongylus costaricensis
CDC - DPDx - Angiostrongylus costaricensis (cdc.gov)
Rat lungworm disease is popping up in the mainland United States | Science News
Rat lungworm disease is popping up in the mainland United States | Science News (sciencenews.org)
Rat lungworm disease is popping up in the mainland United States | Science News
Rat lungworm disease is popping up in the mainland United States | Science News (sciencenews.org)
Ag chief Adam Putnam says Florida's giant snail 'carries human meningitis' | PolitiFact Florida
Ag chief Adam Putnam says Florida's giant snail 'carries human meningitis' | PolitiFact Florida (politifact.com)
SWISS-MODEL Repository | A0A099ZYX9
SWISS-MODEL Repository | A0A099ZYX9 (swissmodel.expasy.org)
PCR-Based Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Tissue and Mucus Secretions from Molluscan Hosts | Applied and...
PCR-Based Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Tissue and Mucus Secretions from Molluscan Hosts | Applied and... (aem.asm.org)
Veronicella cubensis (Cuban slug)
Veronicella cubensis (Cuban slug) (cabi.org)
CNS  Flashcards by Aron Chacko | Brainscape
CNS Flashcards by Aron Chacko | Brainscape (brainscape.com)
Volume 13, Number 11-November 2007 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC
Volume 13, Number 11-November 2007 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Dot immunogold filtration assay (DIGFA) for the rapid detection of specific antibodies against the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus...
Dot immunogold filtration assay (DIGFA) for the rapid detection of specific antibodies against the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus... (cambridge.org)
Biological Hazard in Food - Parasites
Biological Hazard in Food - Parasites (cfs.gov.hk)
East Hawaii child is the fifth case of rat lungworm disease in 2018 | Hawaii 24/7
East Hawaii child is the fifth case of rat lungworm disease in 2018 | Hawaii 24/7 (hawaii247.com)
Genetic studies reveal how rat lungworm evolves | EurekAlert! Science News
Genetic studies reveal how rat lungworm evolves | EurekAlert! Science News (eurekalert.org)
Volume 10, Number 12-December 2004 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC
Volume 10, Number 12-December 2004 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Jason Andrews' Profile | Stanford Profiles
Jason Andrews' Profile | Stanford Profiles (profiles.stanford.edu)
Mother, son contract rat lungworm after eating raw centipedes | FOX 61
Mother, son contract rat lungworm after eating raw centipedes | FOX 61 (fox61.com)
Treatment of Human Parasitosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine | Ebook | Ellibs Ebookstore
Treatment of Human Parasitosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine | Ebook | Ellibs Ebookstore (ellibs.com)
Loop-mediated isothermal amplification: rapid detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Pomacea canaliculata |...
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Amebic Meningoencephalitis: Practice Essentials, Background, Prognosis
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Volume 8, Number 3-March 2002 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC
Volume 8, Number 3-March 2002 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Infective L3 of T. brevior.(A) and A. abstrusus (B) det | Open-i
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Laboratory rat - Wikipedia
Laboratory rat - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
JCI -
Lung-resident eosinophils represent a distinct regulatory eosinophil subset
JCI - Lung-resident eosinophils represent a distinct regulatory eosinophil subset (jci.org)
Snail diseases and problems
Snail diseases and problems (applesnail.net)
Humorous
Humorous (balloon-juice.com)
Two people got rat lungworm from eating raw centipedes. Could you be next? | Popular Science
Two people got rat lungworm from eating raw centipedes. Could you be next? | Popular Science (popsci.com)
Invasive Fresh Water Snail, China - Volume 13, Number 7-July 2007 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC
Invasive Fresh Water Snail, China - Volume 13, Number 7-July 2007 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Improved Molecular Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Mollusks and Other Environmental Samples with a Species-Specific...
Improved Molecular Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Mollusks and Other Environmental Samples with a Species-Specific... (aem.asm.org)
Welcome to CDC stacks
Welcome to CDC stacks (stacks.cdc.gov)
Nihon Naika Gakkai Zasshi
Nihon Naika Gakkai Zasshi (jstage.jst.go.jp)
Full Recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis Eosinophilic Meningitis - Volume 13, Number 6-June 2007 - Emerging Infectious...
Full Recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis Eosinophilic Meningitis - Volume 13, Number 6-June 2007 - Emerging Infectious... (wwwnc.cdc.gov)