A species of parasitic nematodes distributed throughout the Pacific islands that infests the lungs of domestic rats. Human infection, caused by consumption of raw slugs and land snails, results in eosinophilic meningitis.
A genus of parasitic nematodes of the superfamily METASTRONGYLOIDEA. Two species, ANGIOSTRONGYLUS CANTONENSIS and A. vasorum, infest the lungs of rats and dogs, respectively. A. cantonensis is transmissible to man where it causes frequently fatal infection of the central nervous system.
Infections with nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA.
Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)
A superfamily of nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA. Characteristics include a fluid-filled outer layer of cuticle and a reduced mouth and bursa.
Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.
Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.
The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.
An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.
A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of SNAILS and slugs. The former have coiled external shells and the latter usually lack shells.
Infections of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; or MENINGES caused by HELMINTHS (parasitic worms).
A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.
A genus of parasitic nematodes that occurs in mammals including man. Infection in humans is either by larvae penetrating the skin or by ingestion of uncooked fish.
Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)
A superfamily of strongyles or roundworms which are parasites in the intestinal tract of equines, pigs, rodents, and primates (including man). It includes the genera Cyasthostomum, Ransomus, Globocephalus, OESOPHAGOSTOMUM, and STRONGYLUS.
An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Kingston. It was discovered in 1494 by Columbus and was a Spanish colony 1509-1655 until captured by the English. Its flourishing slave trade was abolished in the 19th century. It was a British colony 1655-1958 and a territory of the West Indies Federation 1958-62. It achieved full independence in 1962. The name is from the Arawak Xaymaca, rich in springs or land of springs. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p564 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p267)
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.
Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis. (1/105)

In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms.  (+info)

Jejunal perforation caused by abdominal angiostrongyliasis. (2/105)

The authors describe a case of abdominal angiostrongyliasis in an adult patient presenting acute abdominal pain caused by jejunal perforation. The case was unusual, as this affliction habitually involves the terminal ileum, appendix, cecum or ascending colon. The disease is caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus costaricensis, whose definitive hosts are forest rodents while snails and slugs are its intermediate hosts. Infection in humans is accidental and occurs via the ingestion of snail or slug mucoid secretions found on vegetables, or by direct contact with the mucus. Abdominal angiostrongyliasis is clinically characterized by prolonged fever, anorexia, abdominal pain in the right-lower quadrant, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Although usually of a benign nature, its course may evolve to more complicated forms such as intestinal obstruction or perforation likely to require a surgical approach. Currently, no efficient medication for the treatment of abdominal angiostrongyliasis is known to be available. In this study, the authors provide a review on the subject, considering its etiopathogeny, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment.  (+info)

MR findings of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis attributed to Angiostrongylus cantonensis. (3/105)

Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is prevalent and widely distributed in Thailand, especially in the northeastern and central parts of the country. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is one of the causative agents of fatal eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. The nematodes produce extensive tissue damage by moving through the brain and inducing an inflammatory reaction. We report the clinical features and the findings revealed by MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in six patients with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. The clinical presentation included severe headache, clouded consciousness, and meningeal irritation. Abnormal findings on MR images included prominence of the Virchow-Robin spaces, subcortical enhancing lesions, and abnormal high T2 signal lesions in the periventricular regions. Proton brain MR spectroscopy was performed in three patients and was abnormal in one severe case, showing decreased choline in a lesion. Small hemorrhagic tracts were found in one case. Lesions thought to be due to microcavities and migratory tracts were found in only one case. We believe the MR imaging and MR spectroscopy findings are of diagnostic value and helpful in understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease.  (+info)

Eosinophilic meningitis due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in a returned traveler: case report and review of the literature. (4/105)

Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is the principal cause of eosinophilic meningitis worldwide, and the increase in world travel and shipborne dispersal of infected rat vectors has extended this parasite to regions outside of its traditional geographic boundaries. We report a case of eosinophilic meningitis due to A. cantonensis in a patient who recently returned from a trip in the Pacific.  (+info)

An outbreak of eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis in travelers returning from the Caribbean. (5/105)

BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by the roundworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis are rarely reported, even in regions of endemic infection such as Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. We report an outbreak of A. cantonensis meningitis among travelers returning from the Caribbean. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among 23 young adults who had traveled to Jamaica. We used a clinical definition of eosinophilic meningitis that included headache that began within 35 days after the trip plus at least one of the following: neck pain, nuchal rigidity, altered cutaneous sensations, photophobia, or visual disturbances. RESULTS: Twelve travelers met the case definition for eosinophilic meningitis. The symptoms began a median of 11 days (range, 6 to 31) after their return to the United States. Eosinophilia was eventually documented in all nine patients who were hospitalized, although on initial evaluation, it was present in the peripheral blood of only four of the nine (44 percent) and in the cerebrospinal fluid of five (56 percent). Repeated lumbar punctures and corticosteroid therapy led to improvement in symptoms in two of three patients with severe headache, and intracranial pressure decreased during corticosteroid therapy in all three. Consumption of one meal (P=0.001) and of a Caesar salad at that meal (P=0.007) were strongly associated with eosinophilic meningitis. Antibodies against an A. cantonensis--specific 31-kD antigen were detected in convalescent-phase serum samples from 11 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Among travelers at risk, the presence of headache, elevated intracranial pressure, and pleocytosis, with or without eosinophilia, particularly in association with paresthesias or hyperesthesias, should alert clinicians to the possibility of A. cantonensis infection.  (+info)

Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats and snails after an outbreak of human eosinophilic meningitis, Jamaica. (6/105)

After an outbreak in 2000 of eosinophilic meningitis in tourists to Jamaica, we looked for Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats and snails on the island. Overall, 22% (24/109) of rats harbored adult worms, and 8% (4/48) of snails harbored A. cantonensis larvae. This report is the first of enzootic A. cantonensis infection in Jamaica, providing evidence that this parasite is likely to cause human cases of eosinophilic meningitis.  (+info)

Immunoblot evaluation of the specificity of the 29-kDa antigen from young adult female worms Angiostrongylus cantonensis for immunodiagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. (7/105)

The antigenic components of Angiostrongylus cantonensis young adult female worm somatic extract (FSE) were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting. The sera tested were from patients with proven angiostrongyliasis, other parasitic diseases, and healthy adults. Both the sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were tested from patients with clinical angiostrongyliasis. The CSF from patients with other neurological diseases were also included. Using SDS-PAGE, we found that the FSE comprised more than 30 polypeptides. Immunoblot analysis revealed at least 12 or 13 antigenic bands in patients with proven or clinical angiostrongyliasis, respectively. The patterns of reactivity recognized by the serum and CSF antibodies against FSE were similar. These antigenic components had molecular masses ranging from less than 14.4 to more than 94 kDa. The prominent antigenic band of 29-kDa might serve as a reliable marker for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of immunoblot analysis in this antigenic band were 55.6%, 99.4%, 83.3% and 97.4%, respectively.  (+info)

A clinical study of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by angiostrongyliasis. (8/105)

OBJECTIVE: To improve the clinician's awareness of angiostrongyliasis. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data as well as the epidemiological information concerning 18 patients with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis were analyzed. RESULTS: All patients had a history of eating raw fresh water snail (Ampularium canaliculatus) before the onset of the disease. Incubation period ranged from 1 to 25 days. The major symptoms of the patients had severe headache and pain in the trunk and limbs. Increased eosinophlic count in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid was noted. Tested by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), sera were specifically IgG-antibody positive against Angiostrougylus cantonensis antigen, but were negative against other parasitic antigens such as Paragonimus westermani, Cysticerus, Cellulosae hominis, Echinococcus granulosus and Trichinella spiralis. Abnormal spotty signals were found in 2 cases with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed slow alpha rhythm. All the patients were effectively treated with combined administration of albendazole and dexamethazone. CONCLUSIONS: Angiostrongyliasis is one of the common causes leading to eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. To our knowledge, Wenzhou is the first small outbreak site of angiostrongyliasis discovered in Chinese mainland.  (+info)

Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasitic nematode, also known as the rat lungworm, which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans. The life cycle of this parasite involves rats as the definitive host and various mollusks, such as snails and slugs, as intermediate hosts. Humans can become accidentally infected by consuming raw or undercooked mollusks, contaminated vegetables, or through accidental ingestion of larvae present on produce. The parasite then migrates to the central nervous system, causing inflammation and potentially severe neurological symptoms.

Angiostrongylus is a genus of parasitic nematode roundworms that are known to cause serious diseases in humans and animals. The most common species that affects humans is Angiostrongylus cantonensis, also known as the rat lungworm. This parasite primarily infects rats but can accidentally infect humans through the consumption of raw or undercooked intermediate hosts, such as snails, slugs, or freshwater shrimp.

Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis can lead to a condition called angiostrongyliasis, which primarily affects the central nervous system. Symptoms of this disease may include severe headaches, neck stiffness, nausea, vomiting, and in some cases, temporary paralysis or long-term neurological damage.

Preventing Angiostrongylus infection involves avoiding the consumption of raw or undercooked intermediate hosts and practicing good hygiene when handling raw produce. In areas where the parasite is endemic, public health education campaigns are often implemented to raise awareness about the risks associated with this infection and promote preventative measures.

Strongylida infections are a group of parasitic diseases caused by roundworms that belong to the order Strongylida. These nematodes infect various hosts, including humans, causing different clinical manifestations depending on the specific species involved. Here are some examples:

1. Strongyloidiasis: This is an infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. The parasite can penetrate the skin and migrate to the lungs and small intestine, causing respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms such as cough, wheezing, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. In immunocompromised individuals, the infection can become severe and disseminated, leading to systemic illness and even death.
2. Hookworm infections: The hookworms Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus infect humans through skin contact with contaminated soil. The larvae migrate to the lungs and then to the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Heavy infections can cause anemia, protein loss, and developmental delays in children.
3. Trichostrongyliasis: This is a group of infections caused by various species of nematodes that infect the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. The parasites can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and anemia.
4. Toxocariasis: This is an infection caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, which infect dogs and cats, respectively. Humans can become infected through accidental ingestion of contaminated soil or food. The larvae migrate to various organs such as the liver, lungs, and eyes, causing symptoms such as fever, cough, abdominal pain, and vision loss.

Preventive measures for Strongylida infections include personal hygiene, proper sanitation, and avoidance of contact with contaminated soil or water. Treatment usually involves antiparasitic drugs such as albendazole or ivermectin, depending on the specific infection and severity of symptoms.

Meningitis is a medical condition characterized by the inflammation of the meninges, which are the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. This inflammation can be caused by various infectious agents, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites, or by non-infectious causes like autoimmune diseases, cancer, or certain medications.

The symptoms of meningitis may include fever, headache, stiff neck, nausea, vomiting, confusion, and sensitivity to light. In severe cases, it can lead to seizures, coma, or even death if not treated promptly and effectively. Bacterial meningitis is usually more severe and requires immediate medical attention, while viral meningitis is often less severe and may resolve on its own without specific treatment.

It's important to note that meningitis can be a serious and life-threatening condition, so if you suspect that you or someone else has symptoms of meningitis, you should seek medical attention immediately.

Metastrongyloidea is a superfamily of nematode (roundworm) parasites that have complex life cycles involving intermediate hosts such as mollusks or arthropods. The adult worms typically reside in the respiratory system, lungs, or other tissues of various mammalian hosts, including humans.

The Metastrongyloidea superfamily includes several medically and veterinarily important genera such as:

* Metastrongylus (e.g., M. pudendotectus, M. salmi) - found in the lungs of suids (pigs, wild boars, warthogs)
* Angiostrongylus (e.g., A. cantonensis, A. costaricensis) - parasites of rodents and other mammals, with zoonotic potential
* Crenosoma (e.g., C. vulpis, C. striatum) - found in the respiratory tracts of canids (dogs, wolves, foxes) and mustelids (otters, weasels)
* Varestrongylus (e.g., V. capreoli, V. alces) - parasites of cervids (deer, elk, moose)

These nematodes are often associated with respiratory and pulmonary diseases in their respective hosts, causing conditions such as pneumonia, bronchitis, or granulomatous inflammation. In humans, angiostrongyliasis can lead to eosinophilic meningitis, a severe neurological condition caused by the migration of larvae through the central nervous system.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "snails" is not a medical term. It is a common name used to refer to a large group of land and sea-dwelling mollusks that have coiled shells and move slowly by means of a muscular foot. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help! Just let me know what you're looking for.

Eosinophilia is a medical condition characterized by an abnormally high concentration of eosinophils in the circulating blood. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the immune system, particularly in fighting off parasitic infections and regulating allergic reactions. However, when their numbers become excessively high, they can contribute to tissue damage and inflammation.

Eosinophilia is typically defined as a count of more than 500 eosinophils per microliter of blood. Mild eosinophilia (up to 1,500 cells/μL) may not cause any symptoms and may be discovered during routine blood tests. However, higher levels of eosinophilia can lead to various symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, skin rashes, and organ damage, depending on the underlying cause.

The causes of eosinophilia are varied and can include allergic reactions, parasitic infections, autoimmune disorders, certain medications, and some types of cancer. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilia require identification and management of the underlying cause.

Food parasitology is not a commonly used term in medical or scientific communities. However, it generally refers to the study of parasites that are transmitted through food, including parasitic protozoa, helminths (worms), and arthropods (e.g., tapeworms, roundworms, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, etc.). Food parasitology involves understanding the life cycles, epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these foodborne parasites. It is an important field within medical and veterinary parasitology, as well as food safety and public health.

Meningoencephalitis is a medical term that refers to an inflammation of both the brain (encephalitis) and the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meninges), known as the meninges. It is often caused by an infection, such as bacterial or viral infections, that spreads to the meninges and brain. In some cases, it can also be caused by other factors like autoimmune disorders or certain medications.

The symptoms of meningoencephalitis may include fever, headache, stiff neck, confusion, seizures, and changes in mental status. If left untreated, this condition can lead to serious complications, such as brain damage, hearing loss, learning disabilities, or even death. Treatment typically involves antibiotics for bacterial infections or antiviral medications for viral infections, along with supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Gastropoda is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in biology. It refers to a large and diverse class of mollusks, commonly known as snails and slugs. These animals are characterized by a single, spiral-shaped shell that they carry on their backs (in the case of snails) or an internal shell (in the case of some slugs).

While Gastropoda is not a medical term per se, it's worth noting that certain species of gastropods can have medical relevance. For instance, some types of marine snails produce toxins that can be harmful or even fatal to humans if ingested. Additionally, some species of slugs and snails can serve as intermediate hosts for parasites that can infect humans, such as rat lungworms (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause a form of meningitis known as eosinophilic meningoencephalitis.

Central nervous system helminthiasis is a medical condition that refers to the invasion and infection of the central nervous system (CNS), specifically the brain and spinal cord, by parasitic worms, also known as helminths. This rare but serious condition can occur when helminth larvae or eggs accidentally migrate from their usual location in the body to the CNS through the bloodstream or cerebrospinal fluid.

The most common types of helminths that can cause CNS helminthiasis include:

1. Neurocysticercosis: This is caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium, which typically infects the muscles and brain. However, when the larvae invade the CNS, they can form cysts that cause inflammation, swelling, and damage to brain tissue.
2. Echinococcosis: This is caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. The larvae can form hydatid cysts in various organs, including the brain, leading to neurological symptoms.
3. Gnathostomiasis: This is caused by the larval stage of the nematode Gnathostoma spinigerum or Gnathostoma hispidum. The larvae can migrate to various organs, including the CNS, causing inflammation and damage to brain tissue.
4. Angiostrongyliasis: This is caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which typically infects rats but can accidentally infect humans through contaminated food or water. The larvae can migrate to the CNS and cause eosinophilic meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

Symptoms of CNS helminthiasis depend on the type of parasite involved, the location and extent of the infection, and the host's immune response. They can range from mild to severe and may include headache, seizures, weakness, numbness, vision changes, confusion, and cognitive impairment. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical presentation, imaging studies, and laboratory tests, such as serology or CSF analysis. Treatment depends on the type of parasite involved and may include antiparasitic drugs, corticosteroids, and supportive care. Prevention measures include avoiding contaminated food and water, practicing good hygiene, and using insect repellents to prevent mosquito-borne infections.

I'm not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "animal distribution" is not typically used in medical definitions. It is more commonly used in ecology and wildlife biology to refer to the pattern or manner in which animals are spatially arranged or distributed in their environment. If you have any concerns related to health or medicine, it would be best to consult a healthcare professional for accurate information.

Helminth DNA refers to the genetic material found in parasitic worms that belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) and Nematoda (roundworms). These parasites can infect various organs and tissues of humans and animals, causing a range of diseases.

Helminths have complex life cycles involving multiple developmental stages and hosts. The study of their DNA has provided valuable insights into their evolutionary history, genetic diversity, and mechanisms of pathogenesis. It has also facilitated the development of molecular diagnostic tools for identifying and monitoring helminth infections.

Understanding the genetic makeup of these parasites is crucial for developing effective control strategies, including drug discovery, vaccine development, and disease management.

"Gnathostoma" is a genus of parasitic nematodes (roundworms) that are known to cause gnathostomiasis, a foodborne zoonotic disease. The adult worms typically infect the stomach of carnivorous animals such as cats and dogs, while the larvae can migrate through various tissues in humans and other animals, causing cutaneous and visceral lesions.

The term "Gnathostoma" itself is derived from the Greek words "gnathos" meaning jaw and "stoma" meaning mouth, which refers to the distinctive muscular mouthparts (called "hooks") that these parasites use to attach themselves to their host's tissues.

It's worth noting that there are several species of Gnathostoma that can infect humans, with Gnathostoma spinigerum being one of the most common and widely distributed species. Proper cooking and hygiene practices can help prevent gnathostomiasis infection in humans.

Nematode infections, also known as roundworm infections, are caused by various species of nematodes or roundworms. These parasitic worms can infect humans and animals, leading to a range of health problems depending on the specific type of nematode and the location of the infection within the body.

Common forms of nematode infections include:

1. Ascariasis: Caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, this infection occurs when people ingest the parasite's eggs through contaminated food or water. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the worms may obstruct the intestines or migrate to other organs, leading to potentially life-threatening complications.
2. Hookworm infections: These are caused by Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. The larvae penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet, and migrate to the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and protein loss.
3. Trichuriasis: Also known as whipworm infection, this is caused by Trichuris trichiura. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal prolapse in severe cases.
4. Strongyloidiasis: Caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, this infection occurs when the larvae penetrate the skin, usually through contaminated soil, and migrate to the lungs and then the small intestine. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. In immunocompromised individuals, strongyloidiasis can lead to disseminated disease, which is potentially fatal.
5. Toxocariasis: This infection is caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, found in dogs and cats, respectively. Humans become infected through ingestion of contaminated soil or undercooked meat. Symptoms include fever, cough, abdominal pain, and vision loss in severe cases.
6. Enterobiasis: Also known as pinworm infection, this is caused by Enterobius vermicularis. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing perianal itching and restlessness, especially at night.

Preventive measures include:

1. Proper hand hygiene: Wash hands with soap and water after using the toilet, changing diapers, handling pets or their feces, and before preparing or eating food.
2. Personal hygiene: Keep fingernails short and clean, avoid biting nails, and wear shoes in public areas, especially where soil may be contaminated with human or animal feces.
3. Food safety: Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, cook meat properly, and avoid consuming raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or fish.
4. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean surfaces that come into contact with food, such as countertops, cutting boards, and utensils. Dispose of trash properly and maintain a clean living environment.
5. Pet care: Keep pets healthy and regularly deworm them as recommended by a veterinarian. Pick up pet feces promptly to prevent contamination of the environment.
6. Public health measures: Implement public health interventions, such as regular waste disposal, sewage treatment, and vector control, to reduce the transmission of parasitic infections.

A disease vector is a living organism that transmits infectious pathogens from one host to another. These vectors can include mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and other arthropods that carry viruses, bacteria, parasites, or other disease-causing agents. The vector becomes infected with the pathogen after biting an infected host, and then transmits the infection to another host through its saliva or feces during a subsequent blood meal.

Disease vectors are of particular concern in public health because they can spread diseases rapidly and efficiently, often over large geographic areas. Controlling vector-borne diseases requires a multifaceted approach that includes reducing vector populations, preventing bites, and developing vaccines or treatments for the associated diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hawaii" is not a medical term. It is the 50th and most recent state to have joined the United States, located in the Central Pacific. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

Strongyloidea is a superfamily of parasitic nematode (roundworm) worms that includes several medically important genera such as Strongyloides and Rhabditis. These parasites are known to infect humans and other animals, causing a variety of symptoms depending on the species and the location of the infection in the body.

The genus Strongyloides contains several species that can infect humans, including S. stercoralis, S. fuelleborni, and S. kellyi. These parasites are known to cause strongyloidiasis, a disease characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bloating, as well as skin rashes and respiratory symptoms in some cases.

The life cycle of Strongyloides species is complex and involves both free-living and parasitic stages. The worms can infect humans through contact with contaminated soil or water, and can then reproduce within the human body, causing ongoing infection and potentially serious complications if left untreated.

Treatment for strongyloidiasis typically involves administration of anti-parasitic drugs such as ivermectin or albendazole, which can help to eliminate the infection and prevent further transmission.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Jamaica" is not a medical term. It is a country located in the Caribbean Sea, known for its beautiful beaches, vibrant culture, and as the birthplace of reggae music. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

'Life cycle stages' is a term used in the context of public health and medicine to describe the different stages that an organism goes through during its lifetime. This concept is particularly important in the field of epidemiology, where understanding the life cycle stages of infectious agents (such as bacteria, viruses, parasites) can help inform strategies for disease prevention and control.

The life cycle stages of an infectious agent may include various forms such as spores, cysts, trophozoites, schizonts, or vectors, among others, depending on the specific organism. Each stage may have different characteristics, such as resistance to environmental factors, susceptibility to drugs, and ability to transmit infection.

For example, the life cycle stages of the malaria parasite include sporozoites (the infective form transmitted by mosquitoes), merozoites (the form that infects red blood cells), trophozoites (the feeding stage inside red blood cells), schizonts (the replicating stage inside red blood cells), and gametocytes (the sexual stage that can be taken up by mosquitoes to continue the life cycle).

Understanding the life cycle stages of an infectious agent is critical for developing effective interventions, such as vaccines, drugs, or other control measures. For example, targeting a specific life cycle stage with a drug may prevent transmission or reduce the severity of disease. Similarly, designing a vaccine to elicit immunity against a particular life cycle stage may provide protection against infection or disease.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, known as an antigen. They are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens, neutralizing or marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

Helminths are parasitic worms that can infect humans and animals. They include roundworms, tapeworms, and flukes, among others. Helminth infections can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type of worm and the location of the infection.

Antibodies to helminths are produced by the immune system in response to an infection with one of these parasitic worms. These antibodies can be detected in the blood and serve as evidence of a current or past infection. They may also play a role in protecting against future infections with the same type of worm.

There are several different classes of antibodies, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Antibodies to helminths are typically of the IgE class, which are associated with allergic reactions and the defense against parasites. IgE antibodies can bind to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators that help to protect against the worm.

In addition to IgE, other classes of antibodies may also be produced in response to a helminth infection. For example, IgG antibodies may be produced later in the course of the infection and can provide long-term immunity to reinfection. IgA antibodies may also be produced and can help to prevent the attachment and entry of the worm into the body.

Overall, the production of antibodies to helminths is an important part of the immune response to these parasitic worms. However, in some cases, the presence of these antibodies may also be associated with allergic reactions or other immunological disorders.

Helminth antigens refer to the proteins or other molecules found on the surface or within helminth parasites that can stimulate an immune response in a host organism. Helminths are large, multicellular parasitic worms that can infect various tissues and organs in humans and animals, causing diseases such as schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiases.

Helminth antigens can be recognized by the host's immune system as foreign invaders, leading to the activation of various immune cells and the production of antibodies. However, many helminths have evolved mechanisms to evade or suppress the host's immune response, allowing them to establish long-term infections.

Studying helminth antigens is important for understanding the immunology of helminth infections and developing new strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Some researchers have also explored the potential therapeutic use of helminth antigens or whole helminths as a way to modulate the immune system and treat autoimmune diseases or allergies. However, more research is needed to determine the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Thailand" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you!

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Angiostrongylus cantonensis. "Angiostrongylus". CDC.gov. Centers for Disease Control and ... Angiostrongylus+cantonensis at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Sydney Morning Herald ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasitic nematode (roundworm) that causes angiostrongyliasis, an infection that is the most ... Monks DJ, Carlisle MS, Carrigan M, Rose K, Spratt D, Gallagher A, Prociv P (2005). "Angiostrongylus cantonensis as a Cause of ...
See Angiostrongylus cantonensis.) "2016 Voices from the Vanguard - Claire Panosian". YouTube. Health Journalism at UGA. April ...
Parasites of Ovachlamys fulgens includes Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This article incorporates public domain text from the ...
Species in the genus Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen, 1935) Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Cespedes, 1971 ... "Angiostrongylus". NCBI taxonomy. Bethesda, MD: National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved 16 January 2019. Chen, ... Angiostrongylus is a genus of parasitic nematodes in the family Metastrongylidae. ... Morera, P.; Céspedes, R. (1971). "Angiostrongylus costaricensis n. sp.(Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea), a new lungworm occurring ...
Notable examples of metastrongyloid species include the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus (An.) cantonensis, a zoonotic parasite ... Angiostrongyliasis, is a parasitic infection caused in humans by the nematode, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Angiostrongyliasis ... "Autochthonous Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, France, 2016". Emerging Infectious ... Similarly, metastrongyloid species are common parasites of companion animals such as Angiostrongylus vasorum (or Crenosoma ...
Liver infection is also caused by the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Gỏi Lao cuisine Larb List of salads Thai salad ... "Thai Koi-Hoi Snail Dish and Angiostrongyliasis Due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis: Effects of Food Flavoring and Alcoholic ...
"Angiostrongylus cantonensis". Animal Diversity Web. Retrieved 2017-04-04. Alicata JE (1991). "The Discovery of Angiostrongylus ... Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm) can occur after ingestion of raw or undercooked snails or slugs, and ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis has many vectors among invertebrates, with the most common being several species of snails, ... https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/angiostrongylus/gen_info/faqs.html CDC info page about Angiostrongylus cantonensis Syed, Sofia. ...
Okano, T.; Haga, A.; Mizuno, E.; Onuma, M.; Nakaya, Y.; Nagamine, T. (2014). "Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: ...
Mackerras, M. J., & Sandars, D. F. (1955). The life history of the rat lung-worm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen)(Nematoda: ... Mackerras, M. J., & Sandars, D. F. (1955). The life history of the rat lung-worm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen)(Nematoda: ... A parasitic nematode species of lungworm, Angiostrongylus Mackerrasae, was named in her honor. The Mackerras husband and wife ...
Parasites of Bandicota indica include: Schistosoma spindale Angiostrongylus cantonensis Leptospirosis Hantavirus Babesiosis ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis, also known as "rat lungworm", is a nematode that causes eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Infected ... In the wild, this species often harbors the parasitic nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which can cause a very serious ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The worm also causes eosinophilic meningitis in humans. Starting in 2010, individuals of the ... and its possible role in the spread of the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen). PhD thesis, University of ...
The species has been recorded as a host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a parasitic nematode. Società italiana di malacologia ... "Potential intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the European Mediterranean region (Mallorca, Spain)", One Health ...
S. aeruginosa serves as an intermediate host for Angiostrongylus cantonensis and for Echinochasmus fujianensis. Predators of ... Results from the First National Survey on Angiostrongylus cantonensis in China". PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 3 (2): e368 ... "Bellamya aeruginosa acts as the intermediate host for Angiostrongylus cantonensis". Chinese Journal of Zoonoses 21(1): 24-26. ...
"Diagnostic morphology of the third-stage larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Aelurostrongylus ... "Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Rats and Snails after an Outbreak of Human Eosinophilic Meningitis, Jamaica". Emerging ...
... is a host for larvae of the parasites Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Rosenberg G ... "Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Rats and Snails after an Outbreak of Human Eosinophilic Meningitis, Jamaica". Emerging ...
Helminths infections causing increased blood eosinophil counts include: 1) nematodes, (i.e. Angiostrongylus cantonensis and ...
... is a host for the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which causes rat lungworm disease. Parmarion ...
Both Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a meningitis-causing nematode, have larval stages that can ... In a few rare cases, humans have developed Angiostrongylus cantonensis-induced meningitis from eating raw slugs. Live slugs ... Species of widely known medical importance pertaining to the genus Angiostrongylus are also parasites of slugs. ... "On the diversity of mollusc intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Cespedes, 1971 in southern Brazil". ...
However, it is a paratenic host for the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, also known as the rat lungworm. This nematode ... A. cantonensis parasitizes humans as well and causes angiostrongyliasis. P. manokwari is presumed to act as a transmission ... In an outbreak of angiostrongyliasis in the Okinawa Prefecture, populations of Angiostrongylasis cantonensis intermediates were ... July 2004) "Changing Epidemiology of Angiostrongyliasis Cantonensis in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan". Japanese Journal of ...
There is a further, but largely unexplored risk that Pomacea maculata harbors rat lungworm parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis ...
Parasites of Sarasinula plebeia include: Angiostrongylus cantonensis In Central America, Sarasinula plebeia is a serious pest ...
China were found to be infected with pathogenic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in 2009. Crude cyclotide extracts from both ... results from the first national survey on Angiostrongylus cantonensis in China". PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 3 (2): e368 ... undercooked snails of Pomacea canaliculata and other snails is the primary route of infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis ...
"Diagnostic morphology of the third-stage larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Aelurostrongylus ... The natural intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus vasorum are land slugs, land snails and freshwater snails. Angiostrongylus ... Angiostrongylus vasorum, also known as French heartworm, is a species of parasitic nematode in the family Metastrongylidae. It ... Morgan, E. R.; Shaw, S. E.; Brennan, S. F.; De Waal, T. D.; Jones, B. R.; Mulcahy, G. (2005). "Angiostrongylus vasorum: A real ...
13 are involved in fibronectin degradation of rat lung granulomatous fibrosis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis". ...
70 diners were diagnosed with angiostrongylus meningitis. The snail meat contained Angiostrongylus cantonensis, "a parasite ... began a program to educate doctors on the treatment of angiostrongylus meningitis. The Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and ...
December 2005). "Angiostrongylus cantonensis as a cause of cerebrospinal disease in a yellow-tailed black cockatoo ( ... suffering neurological symptoms were shown to be hosting the rat nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. They were the first non- ...
This slug is an intermediate host for Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, a round worm, the most common cause of ...
... were able to transfer a parasite called Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm). This parasite can infect humans if snails ...
... vector of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae), in Havana, Cuba". Molluscan Research. 35 (2): 139-142. doi ...
A meningitis-causing nematode, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which normally infests the lungs of rats, has a larval stage which ... and Angiostrongylus costaricensis. Like some other slugs, this species is often infested by the white parasitic slug mite ... "On the diversity of mollusc intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Cespedes, 1971 in southern Brazil". ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Angiostrongylus cantonensis. "Angiostrongylus". CDC.gov. Centers for Disease Control and ... Angiostrongylus+cantonensis at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Sydney Morning Herald ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasitic nematode (roundworm) that causes angiostrongyliasis, an infection that is the most ... Monks DJ, Carlisle MS, Carrigan M, Rose K, Spratt D, Gallagher A, Prociv P (2005). "Angiostrongylus cantonensis as a Cause of ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Gnathostoma spinigerum. Baylisascaris procyonis. Strongyloides stercoralis. Taenia solium ( ... suspicion of meningitis caused by A cantonensis, G spinigerum, or B procyonis should be entertained. Demonstrating the larvae ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis; Angiostrongylus; Meningite; Infecções por Strongylida; Humanos; Cães; Ratos; Animais; ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis / Angiostrongylus / Meningite Tipo de estudo: Estudo diagnóstico Limite: Animais / Humanos Idioma: ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis / Angiostrongylus / Meningite Tipo de estudo: Estudo diagnóstico Limite: Animais / Humanos Idioma: ... cantonensis and Angiostrongylus mackerrasae, the other neurotropic Angiostrongylus species, which is native to Australia. ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis favors tropical climes, and used to crop up only in Asia and some parts of the Caribbean. But after ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis, known as the rat lungworm, is spread primarily by rats. The adult form of the parasite-a roundworm ... Good news: no matter where you live, youre not going to pick up Angiostrongylus cantonensis by walking around barefoot or ...
"Diagnostic morphology of the third-stage larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Aelurostrongylus ... "Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Rats and Snails after an Outbreak of Human Eosinophilic Meningitis, Jamaica". Emerging ...
They can also be attacked by parasites, such as Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm. The parasites live in the snail ... Potentiality of Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca: Gastropoda) as intermediate host of the Angiostrongylus costaricensis ...
Angiostrongylus vasorum is a highly pathogenic metastrongylid nematode affecting dogs, which uses gastropod molluscs as ... A broad intermediate host range has also been reported for other Angiostrongylus species, such as A. cantonensis [42, 43] and A ... Wallace GD, Rosen L. Studies on eosinophillic meningitis V. Molluscan hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis on Pacific Islands. ... Yousif F, Lammer G. The suitability of several aquatic snails as intermediate hosts for Angiostrongylus cantonensis. ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection occurs mostly in Asia, the Pacific (including Hawaii), and the Caribbean, and can cause ... A handful of cases of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection have occurred in the continental United States, one in Louisiana ... for advice regarding three cases of presumed Angiostrongylus cantonensis (AC) infection. AC, commonly called the rat lungworm, ... In this new phase of the collaboration, a real-time PCR assay developed in-house at DPD to detect A. cantonensis is being used ...
So, back to rat lungworm - it is a tropical disease found in warm, moist climates that is caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis). Of these, at least 13 species of prawns/shrimp, crabs, flatworms, fish, frogs, toads, lizards and ...
Angiostrongyliasis is infection with larvae of worms of the genus Angiostrongylus. Depending on the infecting species, ... abdominal symptoms (Angiostrongylus costaricensis) or neural involvement with eosinophilic meningitis (A. cantonensis) result. ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis *Angiostrongyliasis. *Metastrongylus *Metastrongylosis. Ascaridida. *Ascaris lumbricoides * ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis. *Baylisascaris procyonis. *Gnathostoma spinigerum. Parasitic meningitis is not transmitted from ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Gnathostoma spinigerum. Baylisascaris procyonis. Strongyloides stercoralis. Taenia solium ( ... Eosinophilic meningitis due to Angiostrongylus and Gnathostoma species. Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Feb 1. 48(3):322-7. [QxMD MEDLINE ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Rat lungworm); Metastrongylidae; Angiostrongylus; Strongyloidea; Rhabditomorpha; Rhabditina; ... Description: English: Angiostrongylus cantonensis Male. Date: 1 April 2005, 15:06:31. Source: Own work. Author: Punlop ...
Wang Q-P, Wu Z-D, Wei J, Owen RL, Lun Z-R. Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis: an update. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 ... Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a review of its distribution, molecular biology and clinical significance as a human pathogen. ... Real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with ... Eamsobhana P. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis-a neglected disease with escalating importance. ...
A cantonensis Ab Spec Ql Code System Concept Status. Published. Code System Preferred Concept Name. Angiostrongylus cantonensis ...
18 Apr 2015 Angiostrongylus cantonensis - USA (02): (HI). *18 Apr 2015 Avian influenza (88): Burkina Faso, HPAI H5N1, poultry, ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis Nematode Invasion Pathway, Mallorca, Spain Delgado-Serra S, et al. Emerg Infect Dis, May 6, 2022. * ...
Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection is usually asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. Symptoms usually appear in 1-3 weeks. The ... Hawaii health officials are confirming a case of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, or rat lungworm, on Puna district on Hawaii ... Angiostrongyliasis is an infection caused by the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This is aparasitic infection in ... 3 thoughts on "Angiostrongylus case reported in Hawaii". * Pingback: Angiostrongylus case reported in Hawaii , World Wide ...
Global decline in suitable habitat for Angiostrongylus (=Parastrongylus) cantonensis: the role of climate change. PLoS One. ...
Segeritz, L.; Cardona, A.; Taubert, A.; Hermosilla, C.; Ruiz, A. Autochthonous Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Angiostrongylus ... Modrý, D.; Fecková, B.; Putnová, B.; Manalo, S.; Otranto, D. Alternative pathway in Angiostrongylus cantonensis ( ... The L3 larvae of A. cantonensis can enter new IH through the process known as intermediasis, which might occur in this life ... Likewise, infective A. cantonensis-L3 larvae liberated from dead or living gastropods can survive outside IH for a short time, ...
Prevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in snails in Fujian Province from 2017 to 2021 XIE Xianliang, CHEN Yunhong ...
  • cantonensis , the rat lungworm. (cdc.gov)
  • The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis , or rat lungworm, is the most common cause of human eosinophilic meningitis. (wormbase.org)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis ( rat lungworm) is recognised as the leading cause of human eosinophilic meningitis , a serious condition observed when nematode larvae migrate through the CNS. (bvsalud.org)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis , known as the rat lungworm, is spread primarily by rats. (popsci.com)
  • Guilherme Verocai] Rat lungworm is the common name for a parasitic worm or roundworm called Angiostrongylus cantonensis , which normally affects the lungs of rodents including the brown and black rat. (cdc.gov)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis , rat lungworm, a nematode parasite. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Hawaii health officials are confirming a case of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, or rat lungworm , on Puna district on Hawaii Island and are concerned there may be more. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • Angiostrongyliasis is an infection caused by the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • The most common is the rat lungworm or Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and its infection can lead to severe issues. (global-faq.com)
  • Pomacea species are also important transmitters of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, which has had major human health consequences, most notably in southern China, where the snails are eaten raw as a delicacy. (feedipedia.org)
  • Claire Panosian, '76 MD, '80 GME , who has pursued a career in tropical medicine, shared that she recently learned that John Longano, '78 MD, '82 GME , was the ER attending who cracked the famous outbreak of rat lungworm infection, also known as eosinophilic meningitis (formerly known as Angiostrongylus cantonensis) which was reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. (nm.org)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasitic nematode (roundworm) that causes angiostrongyliasis, an infection that is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. (wikipedia.org)
  • First described by Chinese parasitologist Hsin-Tao Chen (1904-1977) in 1935, after examining Cantonese rat specimens, the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis was identified in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with eosinophilic meningitis by Nomura and Lim in Taiwan in 1944. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiostrongylus vasorum is a highly pathogenic metastrongylid nematode affecting dogs, which uses gastropod molluscs as intermediate hosts. (springer.com)
  • Wolffhügel (1933) initially described this neurological parasitosis associated with small felines as " paraplejia cruralis parasitaria felis " and placed the nematode species within the genus Hemostrongylus , later renamed Angiostrongylus [ 1 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • This observation, along with epidemiology and autopsy of infected brains, confirmed A. cantonensis infection in humans as the cause of the majority of eosinophilic meningitis cases in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ingestion of food items that can be contaminated by the mucus excretions of intermediate or paratenic hosts, such as snails and slugs, or by the feces of rats that act as definitive hosts, can lead to infection of A. cantonensis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of A. cantonensis infection (2020-2022) were received for confirmatory laboratory testing and processed for DNA isolation and ultrasensitive Angiostrongylus qPCR targeting AcanR3390. (bvsalud.org)
  • Only A. cantonensis DNA was detected in canine CSF samples, and co-infection with A. mackerrasae using amplicon deep sequencing (ITS-2 rDNA ) was not demonstrated. (bvsalud.org)
  • Recently, CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases (DPD) was contacted by the Hawaii Department of Health (HI DOH) for advice regarding three cases of presumed Angiostrongylus cantonensis (AC) infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Hawaii: clinical characteristics and potential exposures. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection is usually asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • Angie-LAMP for diagnosis of human eosinophilic meningitis using dog as proxy: A LAMP assay for Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in cerebrospinal fluid. (bvsalud.org)
  • Real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with eosinophilic meningitis. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a closely related worm that causes intestinal angiostrongyliasis in Central and South America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists are calling for a more thorough study of the epidemiology of A. cantonensis, stricter food-safety policies, and the increase of knowledge on how to properly consume products commonly infested by the parasite, such as snails and slugs that act as intermediate hosts or those that act as paratenic hosts, such as fish, frogs, or freshwater prawns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiostrongylus vasorum is an emerging parasite in dogs, with frequent new reports throughout Europe and beyond [ 1 , 2 ]. (springer.com)
  • Angiostrongylus vasorum has an indirect life-cycle with canids such as domestic dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris ) and red foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) as the definitive host, terrestrial gastropod molluscs (slug or snail) acting as intermediate hosts, and frogs acting as paratenic or intermediate hosts [ 17 ]. (springer.com)
  • The distribution of G. paralysans adults within the meningeal veins of the subarachnoid space implies activation of the highly immunoreactive endothelium, as seen for Angiostrongylus vasorum [ 9 ] , probably resulting in thrombophlebitis with thrombus formation, venous congestion, and meningeal haemorrhages due to endothelium damage, as observed in severe feline gurltiosis [ 10 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • These items need to be properly washed and handled to prevent accidental ingestion of A. cantonensis larvae or the larvae-containing hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mollusks like snails and slugs pick up Angiostrongylus larvae by ingesting them in rat feces. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • So there was a parasitologist called Lawrence Ash that found Angiostrongylus in rats from Honolulu (Oahu Island). (cdc.gov)
  • So in the case of Angiostrongylus cantonensis , they are using slugs or snails, and within those snails or slugs, the larva. (cdc.gov)
  • This study aimed to assess the diagnostic utility of a newly designed LAMP assay to detect DNA of globally distributed and invasive A. cantonensis and Angiostrongylus mackerrasae, the other neurotropic Angiostrongylus species, which is native to Australia . (bvsalud.org)
  • citation needed] A. cantonensis is a helminth of the phylum Nematoda, order Strongylida, and superfamily Metastrongyloidea. (wikipedia.org)
  • A. cantonensis is considered the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Eamsobhana P. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis-a neglected disease with escalating importance. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • In 2013, A. cantonensis was confirmed present in Florida, USA, where its range and prevalence are expanding. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a recent study on free-ranging guiñas in Chile, although no presence of G. paralysans was observed, the isolation of other closely related nematodes such as Angiostrongylus sp. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Two etiological types are endemic to Costa Rica and is found in areas known to affect humans: Angiostrongylus of the tropical America1. (bvsalud.org)
  • A newly designed LAMP assay targeting the same gene target was directly compared to the reference ultrasensitive qPCR in a diagnostic laboratory setting to determine the presence of A. cantonensis DNA to diagnose CNA. (bvsalud.org)
  • But in the case of Angiostrongylus cantonensis , they have an indirect lifecycle. (cdc.gov)
  • This assembly of a laboratory strain of A. cantonensis from Guangzhou, China, was generated with Illumina and PacBio sequencing technologies by Sun Yat-Sen University , as described by Xu et al, 2019 . (wormbase.org)
  • The Angie-LAMP assay is a useful molecular tool for detecting Angiostrongylus DNA in canine CSF and performs comparably to a laboratory Angiostrongylus qPCR. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this new phase of the collaboration, a real-time PCR assay developed in-house at DPD to detect A. cantonensis is being used to analyze mollusk samples collected in Hawaii. (cdc.gov)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a review of its distribution, molecular biology and clinical significance as a human pathogen. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The first state in which Angiostrongylus cantonensis was found here in the US was Hawaii, and this goes back to late 50's and early 60's. (cdc.gov)
  • Guilherme Verocai] In the case of helminths or parasitic roundworms like Angiostrongylus cantonensis , we call the sentient host those in which sexual reproduction occurs. (cdc.gov)
  • Good news: no matter where you live, you're not going to pick up Angiostrongylus cantonensis by walking around barefoot or smooching someone who's riddled with brain worms. (popsci.com)
  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis favors tropical climes, and used to crop up only in Asia and some parts of the Caribbean. (popsci.com)
  • Description: English: Angiostrongylus cantonensis Male. (eol.org)
  • Description: Doctor and nurse giving examination and treatment for en:hookworm to one of children in Goodman School health room. (eol.org)