A benign tumor containing vascular, adipose, and muscle elements. It occurs most often in the kidney with smooth muscle elements (angiolipoleiomyoma) in association with tuberous sclerosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by MENTAL RETARDATION; EPILEPSY; and skin lesions (e.g., adenoma sebaceum and hypomelanotic macules). There is, however, considerable heterogeneity in the neurologic manifestations. It is also associated with cortical tuber and HAMARTOMAS formation throughout the body, especially the heart, kidneys, and eyes. Mutations in two loci TSC1 and TSC2 that encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, are associated with the disease.
A disease characterized by the progressive invasion of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS into the LYMPHATIC VESSELS, and the BLOOD VESSELS. The majority of the cases occur in the LUNGS of women of child-bearing age, eventually blocking the flow of air, blood, and lymph. The common symptom is shortness of breath (DYSPNEA).
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
Characteristic cells of granulomatous hypersensitivity. They appear as large, flattened cells with increased endoplasmic reticulum. They are believed to be activated macrophages that have differentiated as a result of prolonged antigenic stimulation. Further differentiation or fusion of epithelioid cells is thought to produce multinucleated giant cells (GIANT CELLS).
A benign neoplasm composed of a mixture of adipose tissue and blood vessels. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Cellular antigens that are specific for MELANOMA cells.
A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.
Neoplasms composed of fatty tissue or connective tissue made up of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in adipose tissue.
A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.
Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.
A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)
Excision of kidney.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
A rare benign tumor of the adrenal gland, several centimeters in diameter, composed in varying proportions of adipose tissue, lymphocytes, and primitive myeloid cells, probably a developmental abnormality. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.
Tumors or cancer of the pelvic region.

Differentiation of small hyperechoic renal cell carcinoma from angiomyolipoma: computer-aided tissue echo quantification. (1/177)

To assess the value of computer-aided tissue echo quantification in differentiating small hyperechoic renal cell carcinomas from angiomyolipomas, we studied ultrasonographic images of 15 renal cell carcinomas and 20 angiomyolipomas. After digitizing the images, we measured the absolute gray scale values of the renal cortex, central echo complex, and mass. The relative gray scale value (%) of the mass was calculated by setting the gray scale value of the cortex as 0% and the central echo complex as 100%. The relative gray scale value of renal cell carcinomas was in the range of 12 to 73% (mean, 28%), whereas that of angiomyolipomas was 30 to 204% (mean, 130%). The differentiation between small hyperechoic renal cell carcinomas and angiomyolipomas can be facilitated by computer-aided tissue echo quantification.  (+info)

Tuberous sclerosis associated with multiple hepatic lipomatous tumors and hemorrhagic renal angiomyolipoma. (2/177)

We report a case of tuberous sclerosis associated with hepatic lipomatous tumors and renal angiomyolipomas. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a high echoic large tumor in the left kidney. A provisional diagnosis of angiomyolipomas of the kidney was made based on computed tomography. Subsequent laparotomy revealed that the extracted tumor was renal angiomyolipoma. It was also revealed that there was an association with hepatic lipomatous tumors thought to be lipomas or angiomyolipomas by liver biopsy. Nearly half of all cases of angiomyolipoma in the kidney are reported as occasional association with tuberous sclerosis complex, but lipomatous tumors in the liver are rare.  (+info)

Angiomyolipoma of the liver--a case report and review of 48 cases reported in Japan. (3/177)

Hepatic angiomyolipoma was considered to be a rare benign tumor, but the number of cases has been increasing recently as imaging techniques improve. We describe a case of hepatic angiomyolipoma for which a definitive diagnosis could not be made on imagings and in which resection was performed. The patient had anti-HCV antibody and slight dysfunction of the liver. The tumor showed a heterogeneous high echo on ultrasonography and a low attenuation value of +32.6 Housfield Units, which was much higher than fat density, on plain computed tomography. Discrimination from hepatocellular carcinoma with fatty change was difficult preoperatively. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of spindle-shaped and epithelioid smooth muscles, adipose tissues and proliferating blood vessels and these histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic angiomyolipoma. The appearance of hepatic angiomyolipoma on imaging diagnosis varies widely due to the fact that the relative proportion of vessels, muscles and fats varies widely from tumor to tumor. The tumor in our case had relatively few fat components. We review 48 cases reported in Japan and discuss imaging diagnosis and surgical indications for tumors.  (+info)

Renal function after tumor enucleation: assessment by quantitative SPECT of 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid uptake by the kidneys. (4/177)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of functioning renal mass removed and the amount of remaining individual renal function after tumor enucleation. METHODS: Renal functional volume, percentage injected dose (%ID) per cubic centimeter of renal tissue and individual renal uptake of 24 operated and 24 contralateral kidneys were studied by two sequential SPECT quantitations of 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) uptake by the kidneys (QDMSA). The first study was before surgery and the second study was 1 to 6 mo (mean 3.5 mo) after surgery. Mean tumor size was 3.4 +/- 0.99 cm and all tumors were confined to the renal parenchyma (stages pT1 and pT2). RESULTS: In the operated kidneys, there was a statistically significant decrease in renal cortical volume (170 +/- 46 mL after surgery versus 207 +/- 45 mL before surgery, t = 6.2, P < 0.001) and individual renal uptake (10.3% +/- 3.0% after surgery versus 13.0% +/- 2.9% before surgery, t = 5.4, P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant change after surgery compared with before surgery in the %ID per cubic centimeter of renal tissue of the operated kidneys, and in the volume, %ID per cubic centimeter and uptake of the contralateral normal kidneys. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that QDMSA is a noninvasive method able to assess changes in separate renal function. The limited functioning parenchymal loss after tumor enucleation had no effect on the opposite kidneys.  (+info)

Trabecular angiomyolipoma mimicking hepatic cell carcinoma. (5/177)

Hepatic angiomyolipomas are rare tumors, especially in comparison with those occurring in the kidney. Nevertheless, it is important to be aware of their existence, especially when occurring in the liver, where they might have different subtypes. Not infrequently they are composed of rather irregular cells with epithelioid appearance. In these cases hepatocellular carcinoma or the possibility of other malignant tumors has to be ruled out, with the aid of numerous immunohistochemical reactions. The authors present a case of a female patient, whose liver lesion was first diagnosed on cytological examination as a hepatocellular carcinoma. Based on the preoperative cytological diagnosis, a large liver lobe resection was performed. Histological examination found an angiomyolipoma of the above-mentioned type, and the final diagnosis was ascertained with the aid of vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and HMB-45.  (+info)

Concurrent angiomyolipoma and renal cell neoplasia: a study of 36 cases. (6/177)

Little is known about the association of angiomyolipoma and adult renal-cell neoplasia. We studied the clinicopathologic features of 36 patients with concurrent angiomyolipoma and renal-cell neoplasia from the consultation and surgical pathology files of nine institutions. HMB-45 immunoreactivity was analyzed in both neoplasms. Twenty-five sporadic cases of patients with angiomyolipoma and renal-cell neoplasia and 11 cases of patients with tuberous sclerosis, as defined by Gomez' criteria, had mean ages of 59 and 53 years, respectively, and female-male ratios of 2:1 and 5:1, respectively. The mean size of the angiomyolipomas was 1 cm in the sporadic cases and 3 cm in those patients with tuberous sclerosis (medians: 0.5 and 3 cm, respectively, P =.002). The mean sizes of the renal-cell neoplasms were 5 cm in sporadic cases and 6 cm in patients with tuberous sclerosis (medians: 4 and 5 cm, respectively; P =.88). In both clinical settings, angiomyolipoma was more commonly the incidental tumor. Clear-cell (conventional) renal-cell carcinoma was the most common renal-cell neoplasm in both groups of patients, accounting for approximately two thirds of the tumors. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, 27% of renal-cell neoplasms were oncocytomas, compared with 8% in sporadic cases (P =.15). Papillary neoplasia, chromophobe, and collecting-duct renal-cell carcinoma were found only in sporadic cases. All of the 22 renal-cell neoplasms studied were negative for HMB-45, whereas all 25 angiomyolipomas studied were positive.  (+info)

Unilateral concurrence of pyelocaliceal diverticula and intracapsular angiomyolipoma in the kidney of a cat. (7/177)

A 7-month-old cat was examined for progressive abdominal distension. Radiography showed a fluid-containing cyst, which had subsequently ruptured as the result of a fall. Nephrectomy was performed, and examination revealed the coexistence of pyelocaliceal diverticula with a cystic intracapsular angiomyolipoma (mesenchymal hamartoma) in the left kidney. The diverticula were present on both cranial and caudal poles of the kidney and were lined by transitional epithelium. The hamartoma was characterized by the presence of multiple mesenchymal tissues, including thick-walled blood vessels, smooth muscle, and adipose tissue.  (+info)

A case of retroperitoneal lipoleiomyoma. (8/177)

We report a case of lipoleiomyoma which arose in retroperitoneum and presented with progressively distended abdomen in a 56-yr-old woman. The tumor was well encapsulated and consisted of two components, benign smooth muscle cells and mature adipose tissue without any atypia. It is likely to be mistaken as extrarenal angiomyolipoma, well-differentiated liposarcoma and leiomyoma with fatty change. We review the histologic characteristics of previously reported myolipoma and describe essential points of differential diagnosis.  (+info)

Angiomyolipoma is a type of benign tumor that occurs most commonly in the kidney. It is composed of blood vessels (angio-), smooth muscle cells (myo-), and fat cells (lipo-). Angiomyolipomas are usually associated with the genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex, but they can also occur spontaneously or as a result of other genetic conditions.

These tumors can vary in size and may cause symptoms such as pain, blood in the urine, or a palpable mass in the abdomen if they grow large enough. In some cases, angiomyolipomas may also be at risk for rupture and bleeding, particularly if they are larger than 4 cm in size.

Treatment options for angiomyolipomas include surveillance with imaging tests, medication to reduce the risk of bleeding, or surgical removal of the tumor. The choice of treatment depends on factors such as the size and location of the tumor, the presence of symptoms, and the patient's overall health.

Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a rare genetic disorder that causes non-cancerous (benign) tumors to grow in many parts of the body. These tumors can affect the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, eyes, and lungs. The signs and symptoms of TSC can vary widely, depending on where the tumors develop and how severely a person is affected.

The condition is caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, which regulate a protein that helps control cell growth and division. When these genes are mutated, the protein is not produced correctly, leading to excessive cell growth and the development of tumors.

TSC is typically diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, medical imaging, and genetic testing. Treatment for TSC often involves a multidisciplinary approach, with specialists in neurology, dermatology, cardiology, nephrology, pulmonology, and ophthalmology working together to manage the various symptoms of the condition. Medications, surgery, and other therapies may be used to help control seizures, developmental delays, skin abnormalities, and other complications of TSC.

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, progressive lung disease that primarily affects women of childbearing age. It is characterized by the abnormal growth of smooth muscle cells in the airways, blood vessels, and lymphatic system of the lungs. These cells can form cysts and lesions that can obstruct the airways and cause lung function to decline over time.

LAM can also affect other organs, such as the kidneys, where it can cause angiomyolipomas (benign tumors composed of blood vessels, muscle cells, and fat). In some cases, LAM may be associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a genetic disorder that causes benign tumors to grow in various organs of the body.

The exact cause of LAM is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which regulate cell growth and division. There is currently no cure for LAM, but treatments such as lung transplantation and medications that suppress the growth of smooth muscle cells may help manage symptoms and slow disease progression.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

Epithelioid cells are a type of cell that can be found in certain types of tissue in the body, including connective tissue and some organs. These cells have a characteristic appearance under a microscope, with an enlarged, oval or round shape and a pale, abundant cytoplasm. They may also have a nucleus that is centrally located and has a uniform, rounded shape.

Epithelioid cells are often seen in the context of inflammation or disease, particularly in relation to granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. In these conditions, epithelioid cells can form clusters known as granulomas, which are a hallmark of the diseases. The exact function of epithelioid cells is not fully understood, but they are thought to play a role in the immune response and may help to contain and eliminate foreign substances or pathogens from the body.

An angiolipoma is a benign (non-cancerous) tumor that is composed of both fatty tissue and blood vessels. It is a relatively uncommon type of lipoma, which is a more common benign soft tissue tumor made up entirely of fat cells. Angiolipomas typically appear as small, firm, rubbery nodules or lumps just under the skin, and they are usually found on the upper arms, forearms, and torso. They can also occur deeper within the body, although this is less common.

Angiolipomas are more likely to affect young adults than older individuals, and they tend to be multiple and recurrent in nature. While angiolipomas are generally not harmful, they may cause symptoms such as pain or discomfort if they grow large enough to put pressure on nearby nerves or blood vessels. Treatment is typically not necessary unless the tumor is causing symptoms or growing significantly in size. In these cases, surgical removal is usually recommended.

Melanoma-specific antigens are proteins or other molecules that are present on melanoma cells but not normally found on healthy cells in the body. These antigens can be recognized by the immune system as foreign and trigger an immune response, making them potential targets for immunotherapy treatments for melanoma.

There are two main types of melanoma-specific antigens: tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). TSAs are unique to cancer cells and are not found on normal cells, while TAAs are overexpressed or mutated versions of proteins that are also present in normal cells.

Examples of melanoma-specific antigens include Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and tyrosinase. These antigens have been studied extensively as targets for cancer vaccines, adoptive cell therapy, and other immunotherapy approaches to treat melanoma.

A lipoma is a common, benign (non-cancerous) soft tissue growth. It is composed of adipose or fatty tissue and typically found just beneath the skin, but they can also occur deeper within the body. Lipomas are usually round, moveable, and painless, although they may cause discomfort if they grow large enough to put pressure on nearby nerves or if they're located in a sensitive area. They generally grow slowly over time. Surgical removal is an option if the lipoma becomes bothersome or grows significantly in size. It's important to note that while lipomas are typically harmless, any new lumps or bumps should be evaluated by a healthcare professional to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other more serious conditions.

Neoplasms in adipose tissue refer to abnormal and excessive growths of cells that form tumors within the fatty connective tissue. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms, such as lipomas, are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to distant sites in the body (metastasis). An example of a malignant neoplasm in adipose tissue is liposarcoma. It's important to note that while some neoplasms may not cause any symptoms, others can cause pain, swelling or other uncomfortable sensations, and therefore should be evaluated by a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

An oxyphilic adenoma is a type of benign tumor that develops in the endocrine glands, specifically in the parathyroid gland. This type of adenoma is characterized by the presence of cells called oxyphils, which have an abundance of mitochondria and appear pink on histological examination due to their high oxidative enzyme activity. Oxyphilic adenomas are a common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, a condition in which the parathyroid glands produce too much parathyroid hormone (PTH), leading to an imbalance of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Symptoms of primary hyperparathyroidism may include fatigue, weakness, bone pain, kidney stones, and psychological disturbances. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the affected parathyroid gland.

Flank pain is defined as discomfort or pain located in the area of the body between the lower ribcage and the pelvis, specifically in the region of the abdomen that lies posterior to the axillary line (the line drawn from the underarm down the side of the body). This region contains several vital organs such as the kidneys, ureters, pancreas, colon, and parts of the reproductive system. Flank pain can be a symptom of various medical conditions affecting these organs, including but not limited to kidney stones, pyelonephritis (kidney infection), musculoskeletal issues, or irritable bowel syndrome. The intensity and character of flank pain may vary depending on the underlying cause, ranging from a dull ache to sharp stabbing sensations.

A hemangioma is a benign (noncancerous) vascular tumor or growth that originates from blood vessels. It is characterized by an overgrowth of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels. Hemangiomas can occur in various parts of the body, but they are most commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes.

Hemangiomas can be classified into two main types:

1. Capillary hemangioma (also known as strawberry hemangioma): This type is more common and typically appears during the first few weeks of life. It grows rapidly for several months before gradually involuting (or shrinking) on its own, usually within the first 5 years of life. Capillary hemangiomas can be superficial, appearing as a bright red, raised lesion on the skin, or deep, forming a bluish, compressible mass beneath the skin.

2. Cavernous hemangioma: This type is less common and typically appears during infancy or early childhood. It consists of large, dilated blood vessels and can occur in various organs, including the skin, liver, brain, and gastrointestinal tract. Cavernous hemangiomas on the skin appear as a rubbery, bluish mass that does not typically involute like capillary hemangiomas.

Most hemangiomas do not require treatment, especially if they are small and not causing any significant problems. However, in cases where hemangiomas interfere with vital functions, impair vision or hearing, or become infected, various treatments may be considered, such as medication (e.g., corticosteroids, propranolol), laser therapy, surgical excision, or embolization.

Nephrectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of a kidney is removed. It may be performed due to various reasons such as severe kidney damage, kidney cancer, or living donor transplantation. The type of nephrectomy depends on the reason for the surgery - a simple nephrectomy involves removing only the affected portion of the kidney, while a radical nephrectomy includes removal of the whole kidney along with its surrounding tissues like the adrenal gland and lymph nodes.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

Myelolipoma is a type of benign tumor that occurs in the adrenal gland, which is located on top of each kidney. This tumor is composed of both fatty tissue (lipoma) and cells that are similar to those found in the bone marrow (myeloid). Myelolipomas are usually small and asymptomatic, but they can grow larger and cause symptoms such as abdominal pain or discomfort, depending on their size and location.

Myelolipomas are rare tumors that typically affect middle-aged to older adults, with a slight female predominance. They are usually discovered incidentally during imaging studies performed for other medical conditions. In most cases, myelolipomas do not require treatment unless they cause symptoms or grow large enough to pose a risk of bleeding or rupture. Surgical removal is the standard treatment for symptomatic or complicated myelolipomas.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Multiple primary neoplasms refer to the occurrence of more than one primary malignant tumor in an individual, where each tumor is unrelated to the other and originates from separate cells or organs. This differs from metastatic cancer, where a single malignancy spreads to multiple sites in the body. Multiple primary neoplasms can be synchronous (occurring at the same time) or metachronous (occurring at different times). The risk of developing multiple primary neoplasms increases with age and is associated with certain genetic predispositions, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

The retroperitoneal space refers to the area within the abdominal cavity that is located behind (retro) the peritoneum, which is the smooth serous membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers the abdominal organs. This space is divided into several compartments and contains vital structures such as the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, duodenum, aorta, and vena cava.

The retroperitoneal space can be further categorized into two regions:

1. The posterior pararenal space, which is lateral to the psoas muscle and contains fat tissue.
2. The perirenal space, which surrounds the kidneys and adrenal glands and is filled with fatty connective tissue.

Disorders or conditions affecting the retroperitoneal space may include infections, tumors, hematomas, or inflammation, which can lead to various symptoms depending on the specific structures involved. Imaging techniques such as CT scans or MRI are commonly used to diagnose and assess retroperitoneal pathologies.

The renal veins are a pair of large veins that carry oxygen-depleted blood and waste products from the kidneys to the inferior vena cava, which is the largest vein in the body that returns blood to the heart. The renal veins are formed by the union of several smaller veins that drain blood from different parts of the kidney.

In humans, the right renal vein is shorter and passes directly into the inferior vena cava, while the left renal vein is longer and passes in front of the aorta before entering the inferior vena cava. The left renal vein also receives blood from the gonadal (testicular or ovarian) veins, suprarenal (adrenal) veins, and the lumbar veins.

It is important to note that the renal veins are vulnerable to compression by surrounding structures, such as the overlying artery or a tumor, which can lead to renal vein thrombosis, a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention.

Abdominal radiography, also known as a KUB (kidneys, ureters, bladder) X-ray, is a medical imaging technique used to examine the abdominal cavity. It involves using ionizing radiation to produce images of the internal structures of the abdomen, including the bones, organs, and soft tissues.

The procedure typically involves the patient lying down on a table while a specialized X-ray machine captures images of the abdomen from different angles. The images produced can help doctors diagnose and monitor a variety of conditions, such as kidney stones, intestinal obstructions, and abnormalities in the spine or other bones.

Abdominal radiography is a quick, painless, and non-invasive procedure that requires little preparation on the part of the patient. However, it does involve exposure to radiation, so it is typically only used when necessary and when other imaging techniques are not appropriate.

Pelvic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors located in the pelvic region. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They can originate from various tissues within the pelvis, including the reproductive organs (such as ovaries, uterus, cervix, vagina, and vulva in women; and prostate, testicles, and penis in men), the urinary system (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra), the gastrointestinal tract (colon, rectum, and anus), as well as the muscles, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues.

Malignant pelvic neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and spread to distant parts of the body (metastasize). The symptoms of pelvic neoplasms may vary depending on their location, size, and type but often include abdominal or pelvic pain, bloating, changes in bowel or bladder habits, unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge, and unintentional weight loss. Early detection and prompt treatment are crucial for improving the prognosis of malignant pelvic neoplasms.

Even if no angiomyolipoma is found, one can develop at any life stage. The angiomyolipoma can grow rapidly. In tuberous ... Angiomyolipomas are the most common benign tumour of the kidney. Although regarded as benign, angiomyolipomas may grow such ... Large angiomyolipomas can be treated with embolisation. Drug therapy for angiomyolipomas is at the research stage. The Tuberous ... Small angiomyolipomas and those without dilated blood vessels (aneurysms) cause few problems, but angiomyolipomas have been ...
Renal angiomyolipoma. Clinical and pathological study. Traumatic aneurysms and arteriovenous fistulas in Nigeria. Clinical ... Udekwu, FA (September 1966). "Renal angiomyolipoma. Clinical and pathological study". International Surgery. 46 (3): 205-14. ...
Angiomyolipoma of the kidney was previously considered to be a hamartoma or choristoma. A myoepithelial hamartoma, also known ... "Topic 28: Angiomyolipoma". eMedicine.com Radio. 2019-04-05. "Topic 316: Lung Hamartoma". eMedicine.com Radio. 2018-12-17. ( ...
Lowe BA, Brewer J, Houghton DC, Jacobson E, Pitre T (May 1992). "Malignant transformation of angiomyolipoma". J. Urol. 147 (5 ...
2006 Small trials showed promising results in the use of rapamycin to shrink angiomyolipoma and astrocytomas. Several larger ... "Sirolimus in Treating Patients With Angiomyolipoma of the Kidney". ClinicalTrials.gov (NIH). 21 November 2006. Retrieved 10 ... angiomyolipomas). 1885 French physicians Félix Balzer and Pierre Eugène Ménétrier reported a case of "adénomes sébacés de la ... "Antitumoral activity of rapamycin in renal angiomyolipoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex". American Journal of ...
"Sporadic facial angiofibroma and sporadic angiomyolipoma mimicking tuberous sclerosis complex". Journal of Medical Genetics. 59 ...
TSC angiomyolipomas differ from non-TSC angiomyolipomas in age of presentation (31.5 years vs 53.6 years), mean tumor size (8.2 ... An asymptomatic angiomyolipoma that is growing larger than 3 cm is best treated with an mTOR inhibitor drug. Other renal ... Scan the abdomen for tumours in various organs, but most importantly angiomyolipomata in the kidneys. MRI is superior to CT or ... Should angiomyolipoma bleed, this is best treated with embolisation and then corticosteroids. Removal of the kidney ( ...
Budde K, Gaedeke J (February 2012). "Tuberous sclerosis complex-associated angiomyolipomas: focus on mTOR inhibition". American ...
Sager RA, Woodford MR, Shapiro O, Mollapour M, Bratslavsky G. Sporadic renal angiomyolipoma in a patient with Birt-Hogg-Dube: ... "Sporadic renal angiomyolipoma in a patient with Birt-Hogg-Dubé: chaperones in pathogenesis". Oncotarget. 9 (31): 22220-22229. ...
Angiomyolipoma seen as a hyperechoic mass in the upper pole of an adult kidney. Figure 12. Patient with tuberous sclerosis and ... multiple angiomyolipomas in the kidney. Measurement of kidney length on the US image is illustrated by '+' and a dashed line. ...
Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) may require embolization or cauterization for control of bleeding, a complication that is thought ... Angiomyolipomas can sometimes spontaneously bleed, causing pain or low blood pressure. Cystic lymphangiomas or lymph nodes with ... LOH can be detected in microdissected LAM cells, in angiomyolipomas and lymph nodes from women with LAM, and in circulating LAM ... angiomyolipoma, lymphangioleiomyoma, chylothorax or serum VEGF-D > 800 pg/ml. If none of these clinical features are present, a ...
Chen, A; Scherr, D; Eid, JF (2000). "Renal Transplantation After in Vivo Excision of an Angiomyolipoma from a Living Unrelated ...
... and vascular components of renal angiomyolipomas". Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 131 (1): 122-5. doi:10.5858/2007-131-122-DEOMMI. ...
Renal angiomyolipomas and cysts are the most common manifestations of TSC involving the kidney. Renal disease is among the most ...
This disorder presents with many benign hamartomatous tumors including angiofibromas, renal angiomyolipomas, and pulmonary ...
2007). "Expression of the neural stem cell markers NG2 and L1 in human angiomyolipoma: are angiomyolipomas neoplasms of stem ...
It may be the first manifestation of a renal angiomyolipoma (AML), or the rupture of a renal artery or intraparenchymal ... Neoplasms are the most common underlying pathology in up to 60% of cases and include renal angiomyolipoma and renal cell ... Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy has been proposed as a surgical treatment of a ruptured angiomyolipoma causing ... due to Large Upper Pole Renal Angiomyolipoma: Does Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy Have a Role in Primary ...
"13-year-old tuberous sclerosis patient with renal cell carcinoma associated with multiple renal angiomyolipomas developing ...
"Comparison of T2-Weighted MRI With and Without Fat Suppression for Differentiating Renal Angiomyolipomas Without Visible Fat ...
... angiomyolipoma, clear-cell sugar tumour (CCST), lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and, clear-cell myomelanocytic tumour of ligamentum ... The most common tumours in the PEComa family are renal angiomyolipoma and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, both of which are ... although this link is stronger for angiomyolipoma and lymphangioleiomyomatosis than for other members of the PEComa family. ...
Benign kidney tumors such as angiomyolipomas can be treated with transarterial embolization to shrink the tumor size and reduce ...
Benign kidney tumors such as angiomyolipomas can be treated with transarterial embolization to shrink the tumor size and reduce ...
... tubular and spindle cell carcinoma Mixed epithelial stromal tumor Tumors that are considered benign include angiomyolipoma, ...
... a form of cancer Angiomyolipoma, a benign type of kidney tumour Anti-money laundering, an umbrella term for regulations that ...
... angiomyolipoma and lymphangiomyoma). HMB-45 should be stored at 4 degree Celsius. At 4 degrees Celsius the antibody will be ...
... angiomyolipoma MeSH C04.557.450.550.400 - lipoma MeSH C04.557.450.550.420 - liposarcoma MeSH C04.557.450.550.420.425 - ...
... epithelioid angiomyolipoma, Wilms tumor, solitary fibrous tumor, and some epithelial neoplasms. JCT often is described as ...
M8857/0 Spindle cell lipoma M8857/3 Fibroblastic liposarcoma M8858/3 Dedifferentiated liposarcoma M8860/0 Angiomyolipoma M8861/ ...
... angiomyolipoma and lymphangiomyoma). There is no evidence to support or refute adult population screening for malignant ...
... of the clear cell type of renal cell carcinoma as well as in minimal fat angiomyolipoma. T2*-weighted imaging can be created as ...
Even if no angiomyolipoma is found, one can develop at any life stage. The angiomyolipoma can grow rapidly. In tuberous ... Angiomyolipomas are the most common benign tumour of the kidney. Although regarded as benign, angiomyolipomas may grow such ... Large angiomyolipomas can be treated with embolisation. Drug therapy for angiomyolipomas is at the research stage. The Tuberous ... Small angiomyolipomas and those without dilated blood vessels (aneurysms) cause few problems, but angiomyolipomas have been ...
... scanning Percutaneous renal biopsy Renal arterial embolization Angiomyolipoma is a benign renal neoplasm compose... ... The preferred imaging modalities for kidney angiomyolipoma are the following: Plain abdominal radiography Ultrasonography CT ... Nonfatty angiomyolipomas are rare, but renal cell carcinoma may engulf fat. Angiomyolipomas may calcify and cause the HU value ... Which findings on CT scan are characteristic of kidney angiomyolipoma?. What is a kidney angiomyolipoma with minimal fat ...
... tuberous sclerosis who presented in hypovolemic shock secondary to rupture of one of her massive bilateral angiomyolipomas (AM ... The Wunderlichs syndrome secondary to massive bilateral angiomyolipomas associated with advanced tuberous sclerosis Saudi J ... tuberous sclerosis who presented in hypovolemic shock secondary to rupture of one of her massive bilateral angiomyolipomas ( ...
The occurrence of angiomyolipoma (AML) in tissue other than the kidney is uncommon, as is multiple AML developing exclusively ...
... scanning Percutaneous renal biopsy Renal arterial embolization Angiomyolipoma is a benign renal neoplasm compose... ... The preferred imaging modalities for kidney angiomyolipoma are the following: Plain abdominal radiography Ultrasonography CT ... Angiomyolipoma that is associated with tuberous sclerosis accounts for 20% of angiomyolipomas [3] . The lesions are typically ... Nonfatty angiomyolipomas are rare, but renal cell carcinoma may engulf fat. Angiomyolipomas may calcify and cause the HU value ...
N2 - Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC) is a rare variant of angiomyolipoma with minimal fat that contains epithelial ... AB - Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC) is a rare variant of angiomyolipoma with minimal fat that contains epithelial ... Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC) is a rare variant of angiomyolipoma with minimal fat that contains epithelial- ... abstract = "Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC) is a rare variant of angiomyolipoma with minimal fat that contains ...
... a 13-year-old patient presented with a rare combination of angiomyolipomas, renal cell carcinoma, and pulmonary nodules. What ... In the following examinations a large number of angiomyolipomas were found in both kidneys. One lesion showed an increasing ... Another benign tumor which often occurs together with tuberous sclerosis is the angiomyolipoma of the kidney. Furthermore, an ... 13-year-old Tuberous Sclerosis Patient With Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated With Multiple Renal Angiomyolipomas Developing ...
Small tumors are particularly echogenic, so small angiomyolipomas cannot be distinguished on sonograms. ...
A Case of Hepatic Angiomyolipoma Which Was Misdiagnosed as Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Hepatitis B Carrier. Jin Yeon Hwang , ...
A Case Report on the Effect of Everolimus in Renal Angiomyolipoma Associated With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex ...
Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the kidney) Some of these problems can be treated with techniques done at the same time ...
Conditions - hydronephrosis, ureter obstruction, angiomyolipoma. *Services - nephrostomy, ureteral stenting, endo-urinary ...
... angiomyolipomas; confetti skin lesions; dental enamel pits; intraoral fibromas; retinal achromatic patches; multiple renal ...
hepatic angiomyolipoma. * hepatic lymphangioma and hepatic lymphangiomatosis *infantile hemangioendothelioma. *hepatic ...
The antibody is also a useful aid for classification of angiomyolipomas. ... retina and the majority of cultured melanocytes as well as in melanomas and angiomyolipomas. The antibody is a useful aid for ... retina and the majority of cultured melanocytes as well as in melanomas and angiomyolipomas. The antibody is a useful aid for ...
CT detection of a renal angiomyolipoma or chylous ascites further supports the diagnosis. [8, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20] ... An association with renal angiomyolipomas is observed in as many as 50% of patients. The disease may occur sporadically or as ... Sagittal view of left kidney showing large fat-containing angiomyolipoma (arrows) arising from lower pole. View Media Gallery ... CT scan of the abdomen may detect lymphadenopathy or renal angiomyolipoma. The kidneys should be included in the initial ...
Retroperitoneal Extrarenal Angiomyolipomas: An Evidence-Based Approach to a Rare Clinical Entity. Case Reports in Nephrology ...
Imprint Cytology of Extrarenal Retroperitneal Angiomyolipoma: A Case Report. Ebook: Advances in Modern Medicine. ...
Kidney angiomyolipoma, Renal tubular acidosis, Interstitial nephritis, Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, Childhood ...
... renal angiomyolipoma in 35.3%, retinal hamartoma in 33.3%, and hepatic angiomyolipoma in 33.3%. Up to one-half of all patients ...
Emergency ultrasound diagnosis of a ruptured angiomyolipoma causing acute anemiaSutijono D, Pace C, Moore C. Emergency ... ultrasound diagnosis of a ruptured angiomyolipoma causing acute anemia. The Ultrasound Journal 2010, 1: 123-125. DOI: 10.1007/ ...
The differentiation of RCCs from benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma is very important to prevent ...
Retroperitoneal hamartoma mimicking angiomyolipoma: a case report and review of literature Hamartoma refers to the excessive ...
Renal Angiomyolipoma. Afinitor only. Indicated for the treatment of noncancerous kidney tumors (renal angiomyolipomas) with ... Breast cancer, NET, RCC, and TSC-associated renal angiomyolipoma. *Reduce dose to 2.5 mg qDay; may increase dose to 5 mg qDay ... Renal angiomyolipoma with tuberous sclerosis complex. Cardiac failure with some cases reported with pulmonary hypertension ( ... Hepatic impairment (Breast Cancer, NET, RCC, and TSC-Associated Renal Angiomyolipoma). *Mild (Child Pugh class A): Decrease ...
Mutations in the tuberous sclerosis complex-2 gene (TSC-2) have been described in LAM cells and angiomyolipomas (benign renal ... Renal angiomyolipomas, although usually asymptomatic, can cause bleeding if they grow large (eg, > 4 cm), usually manifesting ... hamartomas made of smooth muscle, blood vessels, and adipose). Angiomyolipomas occur in up to 50% of patients with LAM. These ...
The renal manifestations of TSC include angiomyolipomas, epithelial cysts which can resemble polycystic kidney disease, and ... including angiomyolipomas and RCCs, develop after somatic "second hit" inactivation of the remaining wild-type allele of TSC1 ... angiomyolipomas, cysts, renal cell carcinomas), lung (lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM]), and skin (angiofibromas). TSC patients ... renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Angiomyolipomas are the most frequent lesion (75%) followed by simple renal cysts (17%).1,2 Around ...
A Rare Case of Synchronous Oncocytoma and Angiomyolipoma of the Kidney  Younes, Ahmed I.; Jackson, Monica; Dal Zotto, Valeria ...
Compared with the placebo, mTOR inhibitors significantly reduced tumor volume in both angiomyolipoma (AML) (RR = 24.69, 95% CI ... For asymptomatic and growing angiomyolipoma (AML) larger than 3 cm in diameter, therapy with mTOR inhibitors may be the most ... Everolimus for angiomyolipoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex or sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis (EXIST-2): a ... Assessing the outcomes of everolimus on renal angiomyolipoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex in China: a two years ...
  • Incidental discovery of angiomyolipomas (AML) should trigger consideration of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), especially those who aged 18 to 40 years, and those with bilateral angiomyolipomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutations in the tuberous sclerosis complex-2 gene ( TSC-2 ) have been described in LAM cells and angiomyolipomas (benign renal hamartomas made of smooth muscle, blood vessels, and adipose). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an orphan disease that affects many organ systems to varying degrees and is typically characterized by benign tumors of the skin (facial angiofibroma), brain (subependymal giant cell astrocytoma), kidneys (angiomyolipoma), heart (rhabdomyoma), lungs (lymphangioleiomyomatosis) and retina (optic nerve tumor). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The Correlation Between Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Genotype and Renal Angiomyolipoma Phenotype. (cdc.gov)
  • Angiomyolipomas are the most common benign tumour of the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although regarded as benign, angiomyolipomas may grow such that kidney function is impaired or the blood vessels may dilate and burst, leading to bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Angiomyolipomas are typically found in the kidney, but have also been commonly found in the liver and less commonly the ovary, fallopian tube, spermatic cord, palate, and colon. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Maclean imaging classification system for renal angiomyolipomas is based on the location of the angiomyolipoma within the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, accurate measurements are hard to make with ultrasound, particularly if the angiomyolipoma is near the surface of the kidney (grade III). (wikipedia.org)
  • The occurrence of angiomyolipoma (AML) in tissue other than the kidney is uncommon, as is multiple AML developing exclusively in organs other than the kidney. (bmj.com)
  • Another benign tumor which often occurs together with tuberous sclerosis is the angiomyolipoma of the kidney. (medscape.com)
  • Here we report a diagnostically challenging case of a 13-year-old patient with tuberous sclerosis and angiomyolipomas of the kidney who developed an unclassified renal cell carcinoma as well as multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia. (medscape.com)
  • Sagittal view of left kidney showing large fat-containing angiomyolipoma (arrows) arising from lower pole. (medscape.com)
  • Large angiomyolipoma of left kidney with recent hemorrhage. (medscape.com)
  • Three methods of scanning can detect angiomyolipomas: ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared with the placebo, mTOR inhibitors significantly reduced tumor volume in both angiomyolipoma (AML) (RR = 24.69, 95% CI = 3.51,173.41, P = 0.001) and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) (RR = 27.85, 95% CI = 1.74,444.82, P = 0.02). (biomedcentral.com)
  • CT detection of a renal angiomyolipoma or chylous ascites further supports the diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • Contrast is occasionally needed for better definition of angiomyolipomas and the differential diagnosis between fat-poor angiomyolipomas and other renal tumors. (medscape.com)
  • When negative attenuation values of less than 20 HU are recorded in renal tumors, angiomyolipomas may be reliably diagnosed in the appropriate clinical setting, and the diagnosis of a renal cell carcinoma can generally be ruled out. (medscape.com)
  • The differentiation of RCCs from benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma is very important to prevent unnecessary surgery. (keio.ac.jp)
  • The lesions are typically larger than isolated angiomyolipomas, and they are often bilateral and multiple. (medscape.com)
  • We report the case of a 23-year-old female with advanced tuberous sclerosis who presented in hypovolemic shock secondary to rupture of one of her massive bilateral angiomyolipomas (AMLs). (nih.gov)
  • Most small angiomyolipoma lesions are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on imaging studies. (medscape.com)
  • For asymptomatic and growing angiomyolipoma (AML) larger than 3 cm in diameter, therapy with mTOR inhibitors may be the most effective therapy according to some short-duration studies. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Angiomyolipomas are strongly associated with the genetic disease tuberous sclerosis, in which most individuals have several angiomyolipomas affecting both kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the following examinations a large number of angiomyolipomas were found in both kidneys. (medscape.com)
  • Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign renal neoplasm composed of fat, vascular, and smooth muscle. (medscape.com)
  • Whether associated with these diseases or sporadic, angiomyolipomas are caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which govern cell growth and proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The final diagnosis was sporadic angiomyolipoma. (medscape.com)
  • Fat-rich angiomyolipomas are almost always hyperechoic on gray-scale ultrasound, and the lesion echogenicity is the same as or greater than that of renal sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Histopathological evaluation of nonneoplastic nephrectomy specimens must be thoroughly considered, particularly in unusual circumstances such as RRL, where a preoperative erroneous initial impression of a malignant lesion such as angiomyolipoma or liposarcoma is possible. (who.int)
  • [ 8 ] Not all angiomyolipomas are hyperechoic because the tumor constituents vary, and the fat content may be low. (medscape.com)
  • CT scanning is highly accurate in the characterization and diagnosis of angiomyolipoma lesions. (medscape.com)
  • Distinguishing a fat-poor angiomyolipoma from a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC) is a rare variant of angiomyolipoma with minimal fat that contains epithelial-lined cysts and may mimic a cystic renal cell carcinoma. (nyu.edu)
  • Angiomyolipomas occur in 80% of patients with tuberous sclerosis. (medscape.com)
  • Angiomyolipomas occur in young women with lymphangiomyomatosis without other stigmata of tuberous sclerosis. (medscape.com)
  • Angiomyolipomas occur in up to 50% of patients with LAM. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The demonstration of fatty attenuation in renal tumor on CT scanning studies is virtually diagnostic of angiomyolipomas. (medscape.com)
  • The final diagnosis was tuberous sclerosis-associated angiomyolipoma. (medscape.com)
  • Ultrasound is standard and is particularly sensitive to the fat in angiomyolipomas, but less so to the solid components. (wikipedia.org)
  • Le diagnostic d'ectopie rénale a été posé à l'imagerie médicale devant la présence de structure rénale individualisable en dehors de la fosse lombaire haute. (bvsalud.org)
  • The antibody is also a useful aid for classification of angiomyolipomas. (agilent.com)
  • Angiomyolipomas are less commonly found in the liver and rarely in other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolated angiomyolipoma occurs sporadically (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • An angiomyolipoma is composed of varying proportions of vascular cells, immature smooth muscle cells, and fat cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since all three components of an angiomyolipoma (vascular cells, immature smooth muscle cells, and fat cells) contain a "second-hit" mutation, they are believed to have derived from a common progenitor cell that developed the common second-hit mutation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two types are described: isolated angiomyolipoma and angiomyolipoma that is associated with t uberous sclerosis (see the images below). (medscape.com)
  • AML that is associated with tuberous sclerosis accounts for 20% of angiomyolipomas. (medscape.com)
  • The male-to-female sex distributions of angiomyolipoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis are nearly equal, but the prevalence is higher in women. (medscape.com)
  • Angiomyolipomas and lymphangiomyomatosis are sometimes considered the forme fruste of tuberous sclerosis. (medscape.com)
  • An association with renal angiomyolipomas is observed in as many as 50% of patients. (medscape.com)
  • Il s'agissait d'une étude descriptive avec une collecte rétrospective des données des patients hospitalisés et/ou reçus en consultation dans le service de Néphrologie du CHU de Yopougon à Abidjan entre Janvier 1991 et Décembre 2015. (bvsalud.org)
  • L'ectopie rénale croisée a été notée chez deux patients et l'ectopie bilatérale chez quatre dont un cas de fusion en fer à cheval. (bvsalud.org)
  • Le contrôle radiologique effectué chez les patients ayant présenté un traumatisme au stade IV a montré une reconstruction du rein et une absence d'extravasion de produit de contraste.Conclusion :Les traumatismes du rein sont de plus en plus fréquents. (bvsalud.org)
  • Angiomyolipomas of sufficient size may be appreciated on a plain abdominal radiograph or an IV urogram (see the images below). (medscape.com)
  • Most people with benign angiomyolipomas do not show signs or have symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiomyolipomas are tumours consisting of perivascular epithelioid cells (cells which are found surrounding blood vessels and which resemble epithelial cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Everolimus is US Food and Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of angiomyolipomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Melan-A, isolated as a melanoma-specific antigen, is a transmembrane protein, which is expressed in skin, retina and the majority of cultured melanocytes as well as in melanomas and angiomyolipomas. (agilent.com)
  • The characteristic appearances of angiomyolipomas with MRI include variable areas of high signal intensity within the tumor on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. (medscape.com)
  • Drug therapy for angiomyolipomas is at the research stage. (wikipedia.org)