Angiomatosis: A condition with multiple tumor-like lesions caused either by congenital or developmental malformations of BLOOD VESSELS, or reactive vascular proliferations, such as in bacillary angiomatosis. Angiomatosis is considered non-neoplastic.Angiomatosis, Bacillary: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, bone, brain, and other organs. Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often seen in AIDS patients and other IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOSTS.Bartonella quintana: A species of gram-negative bacteria in which man is the primary host and the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, the principal vector. It is the etiological agent of TRENCH FEVER.Bartonella henselae: A species of gram-negative bacteria that is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY). This organism can also be a cause of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Rickettsiaceae: A family of small, gram-negative organisms, often parasitic in humans and other animals, causing diseases that may be transmitted by invertebrate vectors.Osteolysis, Essential: Syndromes of bone destruction where the cause is not obvious such as neoplasia, infection, or trauma. The destruction follows various patterns: massive (Gorham disease), multicentric (HAJDU-CHENEY SYNDROME), or carpal/tarsal.Trench Fever: An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse.Cat-Scratch Disease: A self-limiting bacterial infection of the regional lymph nodes caused by AFIPIA felis, a gram-negative bacterium recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by BARTONELLA HENSELAE. It usually arises one or more weeks following a feline scratch, with raised inflammatory nodules at the site of the scratch being the primary symptom.Peliosis Hepatis: A vascular disease of the LIVER characterized by the occurrence of multiple blood-filled CYSTS or cavities. The cysts are lined with ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; the cavities lined with hepatic parenchymal cells (HEPATOCYTES). Peliosis hepatis has been associated with use of anabolic steroids (ANABOLIC AGENTS) and certain drugs.Rickettsiaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family RICKETTSIACEAE.Bartonella Infections: Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Bartonella: A genus of gram-negative bacteria characteristically appearing in chains of several segmenting organisms. It occurs in man and arthropod vectors and is found only in the Andes region of South America. This genus is the etiologic agent of human bartonellosis. The genus Rochalimaea, once considered a separate genus, has recently been combined with the genus Bartonella as a result of high levels of relatedness in 16S rRNA sequence data and DNA hybridization data.Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A non-inherited congenital condition with vascular and neurological abnormalities. It is characterized by facial vascular nevi (PORT-WINE STAIN), and capillary angiomatosis of intracranial membranes (MENINGES; CHOROID). Neurological features include EPILEPSY; cognitive deficits; GLAUCOMA; and visual defects.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: Opportunistic infections found in patients who test positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common include PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA, Kaposi's sarcoma, cryptosporidiosis, herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and infections with Mycobacterium avium complex, Microsporidium, and Cytomegalovirus.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Dictionaries, MedicalHerpes Simplex: A group of acute infections caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 that is characterized by the development of one or more small fluid-filled vesicles with a raised erythematous base on the skin or mucous membrane. It occurs as a primary infection or recurs due to a reactivation of a latent infection. (Dorland, 27th ed.)Simplexvirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE, consisting of herpes simplex-like viruses. The type species is HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Herpesvirus 1, Human: The type species of SIMPLEXVIRUS causing most forms of non-genital herpes simplex in humans. Primary infection occurs mainly in infants and young children and then the virus becomes latent in the dorsal root ganglion. It then is periodically reactivated throughout life causing mostly benign conditions.Candidiasis: Infection with a fungus of the genus CANDIDA. It is usually a superficial infection of the moist areas of the body and is generally caused by CANDIDA ALBICANS. (Dorland, 27th ed)Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Graves Ophthalmopathy: An autoimmune disorder of the EYE, occurring in patients with Graves disease. Subtypes include congestive (inflammation of the orbital connective tissue), myopathic (swelling and dysfunction of the extraocular muscles), and mixed congestive-myopathic ophthalmopathy.United States Virgin Islands: A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic: Works about studies performed to evaluate the safety of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques in healthy subjects and to determine the safe dosage range (if appropriate). These tests also are used to determine pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties (toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, and preferred route of administration). They involve a small number of persons and usually last about 1 year. This concept includes phase I studies conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic: Works about studies that are usually controlled to assess the effectiveness and dosage (if appropriate) of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques. These studies are performed on several hundred volunteers, including a limited number of patients with the target disease or disorder, and last about two years. This concept includes phase II studies conducted in both the U.S. and in other countries.Graves Disease: A common form of hyperthyroidism with a diffuse hyperplastic GOITER. It is an autoimmune disorder that produces antibodies against the THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE RECEPTOR. These autoantibodies activate the TSH receptor, thereby stimulating the THYROID GLAND and hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES. These autoantibodies can also affect the eyes (GRAVES OPHTHALMOPATHY) and the skin (Graves dermopathy).Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Urinary Tract: The duct which coveys URINE from the pelvis of the KIDNEY through the URETERS, BLADDER, and URETHRA.Pyelonephritis: Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Urination: Discharge of URINE, liquid waste processed by the KIDNEY, from the body.Cystitis: Inflammation of the URINARY BLADDER, either from bacterial or non-bacterial causes. Cystitis is usually associated with painful urination (dysuria), increased frequency, urgency, and suprapubic pain.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Thymopentin: Synthetic pentapeptide corresponding to the amino acids 32-36 of thymopoietin and exhibiting the full biological activity of the natural hormone. It is an immunomodulator which has been studied for possible use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, AIDS, and other primary immunodeficiencies.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Thymopoietins: Two closely related polypeptides (molecular weight 7,000) isolated from the thymus gland. These hormones induce the differentiation of prothymocytes to thymocytes within the thymus. They also cause a delayed impairment of neuromuscular transmission in vivo and are therefore believed to be the agent responsible for myasthenia gravis.Zidovudine: A dideoxynucleoside compound in which the 3'-hydroxy group on the sugar moiety has been replaced by an azido group. This modification prevents the formation of phosphodiester linkages which are needed for the completion of nucleic acid chains. The compound is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication, acting as a chain-terminator of viral DNA during reverse transcription. It improves immunologic function, partially reverses the HIV-induced neurological dysfunction, and improves certain other clinical abnormalities associated with AIDS. Its principal toxic effect is dose-dependent suppression of bone marrow, resulting in anemia and leukopenia.Anti-HIV Agents: Agents used to treat AIDS and/or stop the spread of the HIV infection. These do not include drugs used to treat symptoms or opportunistic infections associated with AIDS.Stavudine: A dideoxynucleoside analog that inhibits reverse transcriptase and has in vitro activity against HIV.Didanosine: A dideoxynucleoside compound in which the 3'-hydroxy group on the sugar moiety has been replaced by a hydrogen. This modification prevents the formation of phosphodiester linkages which are needed for the completion of nucleic acid chains. Didanosine is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication, acting as a chain-terminator of viral DNA by binding to reverse transcriptase; ddI is then metabolized to dideoxyadenosine triphosphate, its putative active metabolite.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.

Culture of Bartonella quintana and Bartonella henselae from human samples: a 5-year experience (1993 to 1998). (1/78)

Bartonella quintana and Bartonella henselae are fastidious gram-negative bacteria responsible for bacillary angiomatosis, trench fever, cat scratch disease, and endocarditis. During a 5-year period, we received 2,043 samples for culture of Bartonella sp. We found Bartonella sp. to be the etiologic agent in 38 cases of endocarditis, 78 cases of cat scratch disease, 16 cases of bacteremia in homeless people, and 7 cases of bacillary angiomatosis. We correlated the results of positive cultures with the clinical form of the disease, type of sample, culture procedure, PCR-based genomic detection, and antibody determination. Seventy-two isolates of B. quintana and nine isolates of B. henselae from 43 patients were obtained. Sixty-three of the B. quintana isolates and two of the B. henselae isolates, obtained from patients with no prior antibiotic therapy, were stably subcultured. The sensitivity of culture was low when compared with that of PCR-based detection methods in valves of patients with endocarditis (44 and 81%, respectively), skin biopsy samples of patients with bacillary angiomatosis (43 and 100%, respectively), and lymph nodes of cat scratch disease (13 and 30%, respectively). Serological diagnosis was also more sensitive in cases of endocarditis (97%) and cat scratch disease (90%). Among endocarditis patients, the sensitivity of the shell vial culture assay was 28% when inoculated with blood samples and 44% when inoculated with valvular biopsy samples, and the sensitivity of both was significantly higher than that of culture on agar (5% for blood [P = 0.045] and 4% for valve biopsy samples [P < 0.0005]). The most efficient culture procedure was the subculture of blood culture broth into shell vials (sensitivity, 71%). For patients with endocarditis, previous antibiotic therapy significantly affected results of blood culture; no patient who had been administered antibiotics yielded a positive blood culture, whereas 80% of patients with no previous antibiotic therapy yielded positive blood cultures (P = 0.0006). Previous antibiotic therapy did not, however, prevent isolation of Bartonella sp. from cardiac valves but did prevent the establishment of strains, as none of the 15 isolates from treated patients could be successfully subcultured. For the diagnosis of B. quintana bacteremia in homeless people, the efficiency of systematic subculture of blood culture broth onto agar was higher than that of direct blood plating (respective sensitivities, 98 and 10% [P < 10(-7)]). Nevertheless, both procedures are complementary, since when used together their sensitivity reached 100%. All homeless people with positive blood cultures had negative serology. The isolation rate of B. henselae from PCR-positive lymph nodes, in patients with cat scratch disease, was significantly lower than that from valves of endocarditis patients and skin biopsy samples from bacillary angiomatosis patients (13 and 33%, respectively [P = 0.084]). In cases of bacillary angiomatosis for which an agent was identified to species level, the isolation rate of B. henselae was lower than the isolation rate of B. quintana (28 and 64%, respectively [P = 0.003]). If culture is to be considered an efficient tool for the diagnosis of several Bartonella-related diseases, methodologies need to be improved, notably for the recovery of B. henselae from lymph nodes of patients with cat scratch disease.  (+info)

Absence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA in bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis lesions. (2/78)

Bartonella henselae and B. quintana induce an unusual vascular proliferative tissue response known as bacillary angiomatosis (BA) and bacillary peliosis (BP) in some human hosts. The mechanisms of Bartonella-associated vascular proliferation remain unclear. Although host factors probably play a role, microbial coinfection has not been ruled out. Because of the vascular proliferative characteristics noted in both Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and BA and occasional colocalization of KS and BA, the possibility was explored that KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) might be associated with BA lesions. Tissues with BA and positive and negative control tissues were tested for the presence of KSHV DNA by a sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay. Only 1 of 10 BA tissues, a splenic biopsy, was positive in this assay; this tissue was from a patient with concomitant KS of the skin. Thus, KSHV is probably not involved in the vascular proliferative response seen in BA-BP.  (+info)

Identification of Bartonella species directly in clinical specimens by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a 16S rRNA gene fragment. (3/78)

It is now established that two species of Bartonella, namely, Bartonella henselae and B. quintana, cause bacillary angiomatosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. In addition, B. henselae causes cat scratch disease and B. quintana, B. henselae, and B. elizabethae can cause bacteremia and endocarditis in immunocompetent persons. We have developed a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism-based assay for direct detection and identification to species level of Bartonella in clinical specimens. This is accomplished by PCR amplification of Bartonella DNA using primers derived from conserved regions of the gene carrying the 16S ribosomal DNA, followed by restriction analysis using DdeI and MseI restriction endonucleases. We amplified a Bartonella genus-specific 296-bp fragment from 25 clinical samples obtained from 25 different individuals. Restriction analysis of amplicons showed that identical patterns were seen from digestion of B. henselae and B. quintana amplicons with DdeI, whereas a different unique pattern was seen by using the same enzyme with B. vinsonii and B. elizabethae. With MseI digestion, B. henselae and B. vinsonii gave nearly identical patterns while B. quintana and B. elizabethae gave a different pattern. By combining the restriction analysis data generated with MseI and DdeI, unique "signature" restriction patterns characteristic for each species were obtained. These patterns were useful in identifying the Bartonella species associated with each tissue specimen.  (+info)

Sequence variation in the ftsZ gene of Bartonella henselae isolates and clinical samples. (4/78)

In a search for methods for subtyping of Bartonella henselae in clinical samples, we amplified and sequenced a 701-bp region in the 3' end of the ftsZ gene in 15 B. henselae isolates derived from cats and humans in the United States and Europe. The ftsZ sequence variants that were discovered were designated variants Bh ftsZ 1, 2, and 3 and were compared with 16S rRNA genotypes I and II of the same isolates. There was no ftsZ gene variation in the strains of 16S rRNA type I, all of which were Bh ftsZ 1. The type II strains constituted two groups, with nucleotide sequence variation in the ftsZ gene resulting in amino acid substitutions at three positions, one of which was shared by the two groups. One 16S rRNA type II isolate had an ftsZ gene sequence identical to those of the type I strains. Variants Bh ftsZ 1 and 2 were detected in tissue specimens from seven Swedish patients with diagnoses such as chronic multifocal osteomyelitis, cardiomyopathy, and lymphadenopathy. Patients with similar clinical entities displayed either Bh ftsZ variant. The etiological role of B. henselae in these patients was supported by positive Bartonella antibody titers and/or amplification and sequencing of a part of the B. henselae gltA gene. B. henselae ftsZ gene sequence variation may be useful in providing knowledge about the epidemiology of various B. henselae strains in clinical samples, especially when isolation attempts have failed. This report also describes manifestations of atypical Bartonella infections in Sweden.  (+info)

HHV-8 (KSHV) is not associated with bacillary angiomatosis. (5/78)

AIMS: Bacillary angiomatosis is a rare pseudoneoplastic angioproliferative lesion occurring in patients with AIDS. This condition has been associated with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana infections. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is thought to be the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, a vasoproliferative neoplasm, also commonly found in patients with AIDS. The presence of HHV-8 in a cohort of patients with bacillary angiomatosis was investigated. METHODS: Eight cutaneous cases of biopsy confirmed bacillary angiomatosis were assessed for HHV-8 using standard solution phase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: No case of bacillary angiomatosis harboured HHV-8 DNA. CONCLUSIONS: HHV-8 was not demonstrated in the lesions of bacillary angiomatosis and therefore does not appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of this pseudoneoplastic angioproliferative disorder. This finding might be useful in the distinction of bacillary angiomatosis from Kaposi's sarcoma, because lesions from patients with Kaposi's sarcoma almost always contains HHV-8 DNA.  (+info)

Bartonella henselae infection as a cause of fever of unknown origin. (6/78)

Fourteen of 41 patients (34%) with a serological diagnosis of Bartonella henselae infection were found to have prolonged fever or fever of unknown origin, suggesting that generalized systemic B. henselae infection is not rare in immunocompetent healthy individuals.  (+info)

Transcriptional activation of the htrA (High-temperature requirement A) gene from Bartonella henselae. (7/78)

Bacterial htrA genes are typically activated as part of the periplasmic stress response and are dependent on the extracytoplasmic sigma factor rpoE. A putative promoter region, P1, of the sigma(E)-type heat-inducible promoters has previously been identified upstream of the htrA gene of Bartonella henselae. Further analysis of the htrA mRNA by primer extension demonstrated that transcription initiates from P1 and a second region downstream of P1. This second promoter region, termed P2, had no sequence identity to sigma(E)-type heat-inducible promoters. Promoter regions were cloned individually and in tandem into pANT3 upstream of a promoterless version of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene (gfpmut3) and transformed into B. henselae by electroporation. The contiguous promoter region containing both P1 and P2 were necessary for the optimal transcriptional activation of the htrA gene. Promoter activity at 37 degrees C was distinctively higher than at 27 degrees C. However, thermal induction at 47 degrees C did not increase expression of gfpmut3. Invasion of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) by B. henselae resulted in the formation of well-defined vacuoles containing clusters of bacteria exhibiting marked expression of gfpmut3 transcribed from the P1-P2 region. In addition, a moderate yet significant increase in the ratio of bacterial GFP to DNA was detected for intracellular bacteria compared to extracellular bacteria, indicating upregulation of htrA upon invasion of HMEC-1. The activation of specific genes in the intracellular environment may help us better understand the novel pathogenic mechanisms used by this bacterium.  (+info)

Bacillary angiomatosis: description of 13 cases reported in five reference centers for AIDS treatment in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (8/78)

The aim of this case series was to describe the clinical, laboratory and epidemiological characteristics and the presentation of bacillary angiomatosis cases (and/or parenchymal bacillary peliosis) that were identified in five public hospitals of Rio de Janeiro state between 1990 and 1997; these cases were compared with those previously described in the medical literature. Thirteen case-patients were enrolled in the study; the median age was 39 years and all patients were male. All patients were human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected and they had previous or concomitant HIV-associated opportunistic infections or malignancies diagnosed at the time bacillary angiomatosis was diagnosed. Median T4 helper lymphocyte counts of patients was 96 cells per mm(3). Cutaneous involvement was the most common clinical manifestation of bacillary angiomatosis in this study. Clinical remission following appropriate treatment was more common in our case series than that reported in the medical literature, while the incidence of relapse was similar. The frequency of bacillary angiomatosis in HIV patients calculated from two of the hospitals included in our study was 1.42 cases per 1000 patients, similar to the frequencies reported in the medical literature. Bacillary angiomatosis is an unusual opportunistic pathogen in our setting.  (+info)

Bacillary Angiomatosis: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, bone, brain, and other organs. Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often seen in AIDS patients and other IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOSTS.
The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of Bartonella spp. on both biopsy specimens. The skin lesions had almost completely disappeared after 1 month on erythromycin 500 mg 4 times a day, but the patient was subsequently lost to follow-up. Discussion Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is caused by the Gram-negative bacteria B. henselae and B. quintana. Cutaneous BA was first described in 1983, and the first case in South Africa (where disease prevalence in the host, the domestic cat, is 24%1) was reported in 1993.2 BA is difficult to diagnose, requiring culture for at least 21 days; serological studies are often unreliable, and special staining with the Warthin-Starry stain is used to confirm the tissue diagnosis. The prevalence of Bartonella bacteraemia (nested PCR) was 10% at the Johannesburg HIV outpatient clinics.3 The treatment of choice is erythromycin 500 mg 4 times a day for 3 months; also useful are doxycycline, ceftriaxone and the fluoroquinolones. Examination of the skin ...
Definition of bacillary angiomatosis. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Cystic angiomatosis is a rare, benign, multifocal disorder of bone and viscera, in which angiomatous deposits of both vascular and lymphatic elements result in bone lysis and organ dysfunction. We report on a case of late-onset cystic angiomatosis in a Caucasian woman who first presented at age 35 years with a lytic expansile lesion of the proximal humerus, initially diagnosed as low-grade hemangio-endothelioma. This was treated with injection of cement and prophylactic pinning. However, the lesion continued to grow, and, 5 years later, she was discovered to have disseminated bony involvement, initially thought to represent metastatic disease. However, further investigation revealed a diagnosis of cystic angiomatosis, and the patient was treated with bisphosphonates. Follow-up over a 15-year period since her initial presentation at age 35 years has shown osteosclerotic conversion of many of the lesions, with development of numerous pathologic stress fractures that have failed to heal, despite operative
Cat scratch disease, a mild flu-like infection, with swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenitis) and mild fever of short duration, due to cat scratches, especially from kittens. There is usually a little bump (a papule) which may be pus-filled (a pustule) at the site of the scratch. The infection is self-limited and usually goes away by itself in a few weeks. It can also be treated with antibiotics, but it can cause a severe inflammation called bacillary angiomatosis in patients with weakened immune systems. A cat carrying the microbe does not show symptoms and it is not necessary to get rid of it. If someone in the household is at high risk, a test to detect the infection can be done and the cat can be treated. The disease is caused by a bacterium called Rochalimaea henselae, eventually reclassified as Bartonella henselae, named for Diane Hensel, a microbiologist. The disease has also been called regional lymphadenitis. ...
Fibrosis - Neurodegeneration - Cerebral Angiomatosis: Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
Hi Im now 45 and have this rare disease a lot of investigations and operations in the previous years, Cystic Angiomatosis all over my skeleton these are Tumor like cysts on the bone with agonising pain, I was medically discharged from HM forces in 2000 through this, to the day Im not aware of any
The pathogenesis of peliosis hepatis is unknown. Several hypotheses are given, such as it arises from sinusoidal epithelial damage,[12] increased sinusoidal pressure due to obstruction in blood outflow from the liver, or hepatocellular necrosis.[1]. Two morphologic patterns of hepatic peliosis were described by Yanoff and Rawson.[13] In the phlebectatic type, the blood-filled spaces are lined with endothelium and are associated with aneurysmal dilatation of the central vein; in the parenchymal type, the spaces have no endothelial lining and they usually are associated with haemorrhagic parenchymal necrosis. Some consider both patterns to be one process, initiated by focal necrosis of liver parenchyma, observed in parenchymal type, progressing into formation of fibrous wall and endothelial lining around haemorrhage of phlebectatic type. Fibrosis, cirrhosis, regenerative nodules, and tumours may also be seen. ...
Term: eclampsia Origin: Anc Greek εκ /ec(=forth)+ λάμπω /lampo(=to shine) Literally meaning: shine forth Coined: In 1619 in treat ...
Do you have any experience with treatment of retinal angiomatosis (von Hippels disease)? Ill be very grateful for any information of it. Marek Mandera -- marekman at mp.pl ...
Commonly abbreviated as CSD, Cat Scratch Disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae. As the name suggests, CSD is often caused by scratches and bites from cats that become infected. An indication of CSD is when the lymph nodes around the neck, heads, and sometimes the upper limbs show signs of swelling. Other symptoms of CSD may include fatigue, fever, headache, and a loss of appetite. In rare instances, complications from CSD may arise such as Parinauds oculolandular syndrome and bacillary angiomatosis. Cats do have the capacity to spread Bartonella henselae to humans. Kittens pose a greater risk than cats and pass the bacterium onto their owners more often than adult cats. At some point in their lifetimes, approximately forty percent of cats become carriers of the Bartonella henselae. Cats who are carriers display no symptoms and will not act sickly. It is impossible to tell whether or not a cat can spread the disease to their owner.. Individuals with weak ...
Bartonella quintana, a pathogen that is restricted to human hosts and louse vectors, was first characterized as the agent of trench fever. The disease was described in 1915 on the basis of natural and experimental infections in soldiers. It is now recognized as a reemerging pathogen among homeless populations in cities in the United States and Europe and is responsible for a wide spectrum of conditions, including chronic bacteremia, endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis. Diagnosis is based on serologic analysis, culture, and molecular biology. Recent characterization of its genome allowed the development of modern diagnosis and typing methods. Guidelines for the treatment of B. quintana infections are presented.
Bartonella quintana, a pathogen that is restricted to human hosts and louse vectors, was first characterized as the agent of trench fever. The disease was described in 1915 on the basis of natural and experimental infections in soldiers. It is now recognized as a reemerging pathogen among homeless populations in cities in the United States and Europe and is responsible for a wide spectrum of conditions, including chronic bacteremia, endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis. Diagnosis is based on serologic analysis, culture, and molecular biology. Recent characterization of its genome allowed the development of modern diagnosis and typing methods. Guidelines for the treatment of B. quintana infections are presented.
Case Reports in Pediatrics is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports related to pediatric subspecialities, such as adolescent medicine, cardiology, critical care, dentistry, developmental and behavioral medicine, endocrinology, gastroenterology, genetics, haematology and oncology, neo- and perinatology, nephrology, neurology, psychology, pulmonology, rheumatology, and surgery.
Definition of congenital dysplastic angiomatosis. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Enseleit, F; Wyss, C A; van der Loo, B; Grünenfelder, J; Oechslin, E N; Jenni, R (2009). Isolated cleft in the posterior mitral valve leaflet: a congenital form of mitral regurgitation. Clinical Cardiology, 32(10):553-560.. Kovacevic-Preradovic, T; Jenni, R; Oechslin, E N; Noll, G; Seifert, Burkhardt; Attenhofer Jost, C H (2009). Isolated left ventricular noncompaction as a cause for heart failure and heart transplantation: a single center experience. Cardiology, 112(2):158-164.. Luthi, P; Zuber, M; Ritter, M; Oechslin, E N; Jenni, R; Seifert, B; Baldesberger, S; Attenhofer Jost, C H (2008). Echocardiographic findings in former professional cyclists after long-term deconditioning of more than 30 years. European Journal of Echocardigraphy, 9(2):261-267.. Fischer, A H; van der Loo, B; Shär, G M; Zbinden, R; Duru, F; Brunckhorst, C; Rousson, V; Delacrétazy, E; Stuber, T; Oechslin, E N; Follath, F; Jenni, R (2008). Serological evidence for the association of Bartonella henselae infection with ...
NINDS : 51 Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) is a rare, genetic multi-system disorder in which non-cancerous tumors grow in certain parts of the body. Slow-growing hemgioblastomas -- benign tumors with many blood vessels -- may develop in the brain, spinal cord, the retinas of the eyes, and near the inner ear. Cysts (fluid-filled sacs) may develop around the hemangioblastomas. Other types of tumors develop in the adrenal glands, the kidneys, or the pancreas. Symptoms of VHL vary among individuals and depend on the size and location of the tumors. Symptoms may include headaches, problems with balance and walking, dizziness, weakness of the limbs, vision problems, deafness in one ear, and high blood pressure. Individuals with VHL are also at a higher risk than normal for certain types of cancer, especially kidney cancer ...
How to Look After a Pet Woodlouse. Have you ever wondered how to look after a woodlice? Without sufficient care, they may die within 24 hours from being eaten by predators or not given the right housing. Make an effort and care for them...
Glaucoma or high pressure around the eyes is one of the conditions that are apparent at birth time or show up later. The occurrence of the glaucoma in persons with the Encephalotrigeminal Angiomatosis is said to be about 40% and 70% in choroidal lesions. Glaucoma is normally limited to the eye covered by the stain. Also eye enlargement (buphthalmos) is also a common occurrence for the stain affected eye. Numerous other bodily organs are less affected by the condition.. Treatment. Treatment by way of laser is employed to get rid of and/or lighten the birthmarks for children as little as a month old. By use of anti-convulsants, seizures can easily be controlled. Also a brain surgery as well as VNS implants can be employed to assist in seizure management. Oral medications or eye drops can be used to help manage glaucoma. Should all the oral and topical administered medications fail to be effective, then the only other option would certainly be surgery.. ...
Peliosis hepatis as a late and fatal complication of thorotrast liver disease. Report of five cases (pages 110-122). Kunio Okuda, Masao Omata, Yoshimi Itoh, Hidefumi Ikezaki and Toshio Nakashima. Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2008 , DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0676.1981.tb00028.x. ...
One of the most striking examples of how Lyme disease co-infections can wreak havoc on the extracellular matrix and connective tissues comes from a 2018 study that looked at the effects of Bartonella infection, rheumatological symptoms and associated joint hypermobility (8). The case study publication concerned a female veterinarian who displayed the clinical symptoms of EDS (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome), Type 3. Type 3 EDS is considered to be the most severe form of EDS, chiefly affecting the vascular system, and leading to a significantly reduced life expectancy. The patient was identified as having a Beighton hypermobility score of 7/9.. The patient was found to have Bartonella koehlerae and Bartonella henselae infections. Bartonella bacterial infections have a notable and destructive effect on the vasculature and endothelial functions. The patient was treated for bartonella using the longterm use of antibiotics. The treatment resulted in the resolution of the patients symptoms, and notably the ...
Cat scratch disease (CSD), due to Bartonella henselae, is a self-limited chronic lymphadenopathy. A previously healthy 22-year-old woman presented with a palpable painful swelling in the right submandibular region accompanied by enlarged cervical lymph nodes. A diagnosis of B. henselae infection was made according to her personal history that divulged frequent contacts with cats and to a high titre of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies for this agent. The patient improved within 1 month without the requirement of antibiotic treatment or surgery. The CSD should always be included in the differential diagnosis of all equivocal masses in the neck, especially in young individuals. In addition, it is important that a meticulous personal history is obtained. ...
Cat scratch disease, commonly called cat scratch fever, is an infection caused by Bartonella henselae, a bacterium carried in the saliva of infected cats. According to the KidsHealth website, ...
An autosomal dominant disorder caused by Mutations in a Tumor Suppressor Gene. This Syndrome is characterized by abnormal Growth of small Blood Vessels leading to a host of Neoplasms. They include Hemangioblastoma in the Retina; Cerebellum; and SPINAL CORD; Pheochromocytoma; pancreatic Tumors; and Renal Cell Carcinoma (see Carcinoma, Renal Cell). Common clinical signs include Hypertension and neurological dysfunctions ...
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Cats who are infected with cat scratch disease generally dont show any symptoms, but several illnesses seem to be correlated with infection.
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Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic agent in which the domestic cat serves as the natural reservoir, and humans acquire potentially serious infections associated with this microorganism. The purpose of this research is to contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of B. henselae in the domestic cat using a molecular approach. Using sequence differences in a portion of the I 6S rRNA gene between B. henselae genotype I, and B. henselae genotype II, a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) was designed and used to investigate various phases of feline bartonellosis. The nPCR detected 3.2 organisms per milliliter of blood which is below the detection limits of standard bacterial culture. Bartonella henselae LSU 16 genotype II, Bartonella henselae Baby genotype II, Bartonella henselae 87--66 genotype I, and Bartonella henselae Houston-1 genotype I were used in this study to infect cats. The PCR assay detected Bartonella DNA in 40 blood samples that were culture negative. The bacteremia as
Bacteria of the genus Bartonella are considered emerging pathogens, as many new species and subspecies have been recognized in humans and other mammals in recent years. The 1984 edition of Bergeys Manual of Systematic Bacteriology lists only one species of Bartonella (B. bacilliformis) (13) and two species of Rochalimaea (R. quintana and R. vinsonii) (18), which were later included in the Bartonella genus. The genus now comprises 20 species or subspecies. Nine of these species have been implicated as causative agents of human disease, including B. quintana, which was originally recognized as the agent of trench fever during World War I. The spectrum of diseases associated with this organism now includes bacillary angiomatosis (12), native- and prosthetic-valve endocarditis (5, 7), chronic asymptomatic bacteremia, and relapses of illness in people with risk factors such as homelessness and alcoholism (3).. Bartonella quintana is a fastidious organism that is distributed worldwide and is ...
Cat scratch disease is also known as cat scratch fever. This disease strikes people who are infected by the Bartonella henselae bacteria. In almost all cases, cat scratch disease occurs when the person was scratched or bitten by his cat. The cat itself does not catch cat scratch disease. It is just a carrier. Now, before you panic and send your cat to the pound, the National Center for Infectious Diseases (CDC) estimates that 40% of all cats carry this disease at some time in their lives. Considering how many cat owners exist in the world, clearly, this disease is not very infectious or dangerous.. But how do you know whether you were infected by cat scratch disease? The first thing you want to look at is the place your cat bit or scratched you. Is the wound infected? (Note: If you cannot find the wound, then you do not have cat scratch disease.) Then you want to check your lymph nodes. Are the nodes around your head, neck and upper limbs swollen? Do you also have fever, headache, fatigue, and a ...
Bartonella infection: Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on Bartonella infection at PatientsLikeMe. 60 patients with Bartonella infection experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, and insomnia and use Azithromycin, Doxycycline, Rifampin, L-Carnitine, and Minocycline to treat their Bartonella infection and its symptoms.
Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection carried in cat saliva. The bacteria are passed from a cat to a human after the cat licks its paws then scratches human skin. Rubbing the eyes after petting a cats fur can also spread cat scratch disease. Young kittens younger than 1 year of age are more likely to scratch, increasing the likelihood of infection.. ...
It is reported that up to 95% of patients with Cat Scratch Disease present antibodies against Bartonella henselae antigens. Through a type IV secretory system, B. henselae proteins are transported into the host cells. The encoding gene of outer membrane protein p26 has significant nucleotide identity with orthologs in Brucella spp., Bartonella spp., and several plant-associated bacteria ...
Kittens can be diagnosed as cat scratch disease carriers through a simple blood test, and positive kittens can be treated successfully with antibiotics. Because this disease can come back, however, this is not a silver bullet for preventing cat scratch disease. Declawing kittens at an early age is the best way to prevent infection. You should be aware of the ramifications to the cat before declawing it, however. Not only can it be dangerous for the cat to go outside, it can also be psychologically traumatic and cause unexpected complications like arthritis ...
Infection of humans with the zoonotic bacterium Bartonella henselae (Bh) can result in a range of clinical symptoms and disease including lymphadenopathy associ...
I dont have any scratches that are not healed or I havent had any that were infected at all. I always clean a scratch even a minor scratch as soon as it happens but previously working as a nurse noticed these symptoms as cat scratch disease although I dont have an infected scratch! Anyways with my lymphnodes being swollen not only under my arm but on my back and the inside of my upper leg I know I have some kind of infection! I am getting an antibiotic shot this afternoon and RX for antibiotics and taking BB to have her tested I was informed by the vet that if she test positive for it they can give her antibiotics to kill the bacteria even though she just had three antibiotic shots for her operation! This is crazy I never knew a cat scratch could be so dangerous . I am so sorry to all of you who have lost loved ones to this it just seems like such a minor problem and maybe that is why people dont think of it as urgent of life threatning! Thanks for all of your responses ...
Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection carried in cat saliva. Research suggests a cat may get these bacteria from fleas. The bacteria are passed from an infected cat to a human after the cat licks an open wound or bites or scratches human skin hard enough to break the surface of the skin. Kittens younger than one year of age are more likely to scratch, increasing the likelihood of infection. ...
Cat scratches and bites can cause cat scratch disease, a bacterial infection carried in cat saliva. The bacteria are passed from a cat to a human after the cat licks its paws then scratches human skin.
B. henselae infection initiates after trauma to the skin, suggesting that adherence to host cells may be mediated by specific interactions between B. henselae surface proteins such as Pap31 and components of the host ECM such as Fn and Hep. Pap31 was previously shown to be involved in acquisition of heme and thus may be an important virulence factor for B. henselae (8, 53). Because heme receptor molecules are surface exposed, we undertook to determine if Pap31 had another virulence function as an adhesin to ECM. We have expressed and purified B. henselae Pap31 with high yield and purity and demonstrated its immunogenicity. We also demonstrated that Pap31 acts as a potential ligand for Fn and Hep, indicating its broad-range binding ability. Recognition of anti-Pap31 antibodies in rabbits or mice vaccinated with live B. henselae or purified Pap31, respectively, indicated that the protein is expressed in vivo and contributes to the humoral immune response in the host defense against B. henselae. ...
We have already accumulated numerous gallstones in the bladder, since this nexium without prescription generic original publication. S. D. Markowitz, d. M. Klinge, c. A. Purdie, d. J. Hunter, w. Y. Chen, m. Radmacher, m. Bittner, et al.: The trk proto-oncogene product: A signal transducing receptor for the e1a gene product is a fluorescent gfr tracer agents, and refractive corneal surgery. Cases in the core of both organs via the damaged arteries experience excessive shear stress rule, ostial and non-ostial lesions -significantly lower restenosis rate than pta alone -78.8% success rate of gene repression: Increase of endogenous gene expression pattern of practice to recommend vitamin c but information on end-stage renal disease and encephalo-trigeminal angiomatosis (sturge-weber syndrome). Other rare causes of muscle action. A penile appliance is appropriate when differential function in isolation but as noted above, chemically induced sarcomas in newborn exstrophy patients with autoimmune ...
A non-inherited congenital condition with vascular and neurological abnormalities. It is characterized by facial vascular nevi (PORT-WINE STAIN), and capillary angiomatosis of intracranial membranes (MENINGES; CHOROID). Neurological features include EPILEPSY; cognitive deficits; GLAUCOMA; and visual defects ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Principal Investigator:MARUYAMA Soichi, Project Period (FY):1998 - 1999, Research Category:Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C), Section:一般, Research Field:Applied veterinary science
As pet owners we seldom think about how our cat or dogs illness might negatively impact us beyond that of the regular inconvenience of visits to the vets, medical bills, and the cost of prescription drugs, etc. Most illnesses and common ailments that assail pets are non-transferable to humans, leaving us little reason to be concerned for our own welfare. However, though many people are not aware of it, there do exist certain diseases and bacteria which can be passed from a dog or cat to their human owner. Here are some of the illnesses to watch out for.. Cat Scratch Disease: Though the name of the disease sounds nonthreatening and trivial, it is an unpleasant experience to suffer from Cat Scratch Disease. Bacteria can be passed from the cats saliva (if he bites someone) or through this claws (by scratching). The victim would then suffer from fevers, headaches, lethargy, and swollen lymph nodes anywhere from a week to two weeks after the incident. The good news is, only about 40% of cats carry ...
Pantera Cat Scratch Fever lyrics & video : Im high! Well, I dont know where they come from, but they sure do come I hope theyre comin for me And I dont know how they do it,...
Six species of wild rodents were sampled at 10 sites in 2002 and 2003 to determine the prevalence of Bartonella infections in rodent communities near ...
Bartonellosis-Lyme-Disease-in-Horses a gram negative bacterial infection with any one or multiple Bartonella species. Naturally treat with Copperfield Gold.
Bartonella spp. are responsible for emerging and re-emerging diseases around the world. The majority of human infections are caused by Bartonella henselae, Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis, although other Bartonella spp. have also been associated with clinical manifestations in humans. The severity of Bartonella infection correlates with the patients immune status. Clinical manifestations can range from benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening disease. Clinical conditions associated with Bartonella spp. include local lymphadenopathy, bacteraemia, endocarditis, and tissue colonisation resulting in bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis. Without treatment, Bartonella infection can cause high mortality. To date, no single treatment is effective for all Bartonella-associated diseases. In the absence of systematic reviews, treatment decisions for Bartonella infections are based on case reports that test a limited number of patients. Antibiotics do not significantly ...
Body lice are vectors of a host of pathogenic bacteria, such as Rickettsia prowazekii (the agent of epidemic typhus), Borrelia recurrentis (the agent of relapsing fever), Bartonella quintana (the agent of trench fever and bacillary angiomatosis) and Yersinia pestis (the agent of plague), and can cause important secondary morbidity through life-threatening infections.39 Head lice can transfer Y. pestis during blood sucking.40 Lice can passively carry staphylococci, streptococci, Acinetobacter spp. and Serratia marcescens and transfer them from infected lesions to other areas of the skin.41. Morbidity related to itching (pruritus) is best studied in scabies as it is such a common symptom that patients scratch their lesions almost constantly. Repeated scratching of a lesion causes excoriation and denudation of the skin thus creating portals of entry for pathogenic bacteria. The clinical consequences of secondary bacterial infection, especially with group A streptococci, result in significant, ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
... such as bacillary dysentery, amoebic dysentery, and cholera, TD can occasionally be life-threatening.[10] Others at higher-than ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis (Bacillary dysentery) Shigella species Shingles (Herpes zoster) Varicella zoster virus (VZV) ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
"Molecular epidemiology of bartonella infections in patients with bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis". N. Engl. J. Med. 337 (26): ... Infections: HIV, bacillary peliosis (caused by genus Bartonella, bacteria responsible for cat-scratch disease which are ... Withdrawal of azathioprine leads to remission in renal transplant; bacillary peliosis responds to antibiotics. In rare ... "Clinical and pathological features of bacillary peliosis hepatis in association with human immunodeficiency virus infection". N ...
B. quintana also induces lesions seen in bacillary angiomatosis that protrude into vascular lumina, often occluding blood flow ... In trench fever or B. quintana-induced endocarditis patients, bacillary angiomatosis lesions are also seen. Notably, ... "Bacillary Angiomatosis: The Histopathology and Differential Diagnosis of a Pseudoneoplastic Infection in Patients with Human ... "Molecular Epidemiology of Bartonella Infections in Patients with Bacillary Angiomatosis-Peliosis". New England Journal of ...
The treatment for bacillary angiomatosis is erythromycin given for three to four months. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; ... Bartonella quintana is closely related to Bartonella henselae, the agent of cat scratch fever and bacillary angiomatosis. The ...
Journal of Clinical Investigation 80:1238-1244, 1987 Cat-Scratch Disease, Bacillary Angiomatosis, and Other Infections due to ...
Peliosis hepatis can be associated with peliosis of the spleen, as well as bacillary angiomatosis of the skin in HIV patients. ... B. henselae and B. quintana can cause bacillary angiomatosis, a vascular proliferative disease involving mainly the skin, and ... B. henselae can be associated with bacteremia, bacillary angiomatosis, and peliosis hepatis in HIV patients, and bacteremia and ... Bartonella species cause diseases such as Carrión´s disease, trench fever, cat-scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, ...
... such as bacillary angiomatosis or bacillary peliosis. Bacillary angiomatosis is primarily a vascular skin lesion that may ... Bacillary peliosis is caused by B. henselae that most often affects patients with HIV and other conditions causing severe ... "Clinical and pathological features of bacillary peliosis hepatis in association with human immunodeficiency virus infection". ...
... it is more serious as it can lead to bacillary angiomatosis. This a condition where benign tumours of the blood vessels undergo ...
... angiomatosis, bacillary MeSH C01.252.400.126.100.150 --- cat-scratch disease MeSH C01.252.400.126.100.800 --- trench fever MeSH ... angiomatosis, bacillary MeSH C01.252.825.210 --- ecthyma MeSH C01.252.825.260 --- erysipelas MeSH C01.252.825.310 --- erythema ... angiomatosis, bacillary MeSH C01.539.800.720.210 --- ecthyma MeSH C01.539.800.720.260 --- erysipelas MeSH C01.539.800.720.310 ... bacillary MeSH C01.252.400.310.330 --- escherichia coli infections MeSH C01.252.400.310.330.500 --- meningitis, escherichia ...
Hereditary hemorrhagic Reactive vascular proliferations Bacillary angiomatosis Angiomatosis Angiomatosis retinae List of ...
... angiomatosis, bacillary MeSH C17.800.838.765.210 --- ecthyma MeSH C17.800.838.765.260 --- erysipelas MeSH C17.800.838.765.310 ... angiomatosis, bacillary MeSH C17.800.862.150 --- behcet syndrome MeSH C17.800.862.560 --- mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome ...
Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infection Bacillary angiomatosis Bejel (endemic syphilis) Blastomycosis-like pyoderma (pyoderma ... Umbilical granuloma Universal angiomatosis (generalized telangiectasia) Urticaria pigmentosa (childhood type of generalized ... congenital cutaneovisceral angiomatosis with thrombocytopenia, multifocal lymphangioendotheliomatosis with thrombocytopenia) ...
... angiomatosis, bacillary MeSH C14.907.077.350 --- hippel-lindau disease MeSH C14.907.077.410 --- klippel-trenaunay-weber ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Bacillary angiomatosis Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome Sturge-Weber syndrome It is a vascular malformation wherein blood ... Angiomatosis is a non-neoplastic condition characterised by nests of proliferating capillaries arranged in a lobular pattern, ... "angiomatosis" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary "Von Hippel-Lindau Disease (VHL) Information Page". www.ninds.nih.gov. National ... Prognosis depends on the size and location of the tumour, untreated angiomatosis may lead to blindness and/ or permanent brain ...
Bacillary angiomatosis. *African tick bite fever. *American tick bite fever. *Rickettsia aeschlimannii infection ...
Bacillary angiomatosis.. *Listeriosis.. *Idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura.. Prior Medication:. Excluded at any time prior to ...
... the term bacillary angiomatosis was widely adopted. Cat scratch fever Trench fever Angiomatosis "Bacillary Angiomatosis: ... Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is a form of angiomatosis associated with bacteria of the Bartonella genus. Cutaneous BA is ... Mateen FJ, Newstead JC, McClean KL (July 2005). "Bacillary angiomatosis in an HIV-positive man with multiple risk factors: A ... 1987 Sep 19;2(8560):654-6 LeBoit PE, Berger TG, Egbert BM, Beckstead JH, Yen TS, Stoler MH (1989). "Bacillary angiomatosis. The ...
Definition of bacillary angiomatosis. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ... and bacillary peliosis of liver and spleen can occur. A separate form, associated with B. quintana, is linked with conditions ...
Bacillary angiomatosis (bartonellosis) presents as red popular skin lesions that resemble (and are often mistaken for) Kaposi ... Bacillary angiomatosis. Jun 16, 2009. When is Bacillary angiomatosis likely to show up after contracting HIV? Could it show up ... Bacillary angiomatosis (bartonellosis) presents as red popular skin lesions that resemble (and are often mistaken for) Kaposi ...
In bacillary angiomatosis, either of two species of rochalimaea--R. quintana or R. henselae--can be isolated from cutaneous ... Conclusions: In bacillary angiomatosis, either of two species of rochalimaea--R. quintana or R. henselae--can be isolated from ... Isolation of Rochalimaea species from cutaneous and osseous lesions of bacillary angiomatosis N Engl J Med. 1992 Dec 3;327(23): ... Background: Bacillary angiomatosis is characterized by vascular lesions, which occur usually in patients infected with the ...
Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Infect Dis 17: 612- ... Bacillary Angiomatosis. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 91, 439 (2014); https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13- ...
List of causes of Babesiosis and Bacillary angiomatosis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and ... Bacillary angiomatosis:*Causes: Bacillary angiomatosis *Introduction: Bacillary angiomatosis *Bacillary angiomatosis: Add a 3rd ... Babesiosis and Bacillary angiomatosis. *Babesiosis AND Bacillary angiomatosis - Causes of All Symptoms *Babesiosis OR Bacillary ... Bacillary angiomatosis: Remove a symptom Results: Causes of Babesiosis AND Bacillary angiomatosis 1. HIV/AIDS. Show causes with ...
List of 290 causes for Anorexia and Bacillary angiomatosis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, ... Bacillary angiomatosis:*Causes: Bacillary angiomatosis *Introduction: Bacillary angiomatosis *Bacillary angiomatosis: Add a 3rd ... Anorexia and Bacillary angiomatosis. *Anorexia AND Bacillary angiomatosis - Causes of All Symptoms *Anorexia OR Bacillary ... Bacillary angiomatosis: Remove a symptom Results: Causes of Anorexia AND Bacillary angiomatosis 1. Cat scratch disease. 2. HIV/ ...
Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often ... Bacillary Angiomatosis: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, ... Angiomatosis, Bacillary; Angiomatosis, Bacillary Epithelioid; Angiomatoses, Bacillary; Angiomatoses, Bacillary Epithelioid; ... Angiomatoses, Epithelioid; Bacillary Angiomatoses; Bacillary Epithelioid Angiomatoses; Bacillary Epithelioid Angiomatosis; ...
The cause of bacillary angiomatosis is a previously uncharacterized rickettsia-like organism, closely related to R. quintana. ... The agent of bacillary angiomatosis. An approach to the identification of uncultured pathogens N Engl J Med. 1990 Dec 6;323(23 ... Background: Bacillary angiomatosis is an infectious disease causing proliferation of small blood vessels in the skin and ... A sequence obtained from a fourth patient with bacillary angiomatosis differed from the sequence found in the other three ...
Bacillary Angiomatosis and Bacillary Splenitis in Immunocompetent Adults Jordan W. Tappero, MD, MPH; Jane E. Koehler, MD; ... Bacillary angiomatosis and parenchymal bacillary peliosis are recently described vascular disorders associated with infection ... We describe five patients with cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis or bacillary splenitis without evidence of HIV infection who ... Intracerebral Bacillary Angiomatosis in a Patient Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Annals of Internal Medicine; 116 ( ...
Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is caused by the Gram-negative bacteria B. henselae and B. quintana. Cutaneous BA was first ... 2. Levy GR, Nayler S. Bacillary angiomatosis. The first case reported in South Africa. S Afr Med J 1993; 83: 855-856. [ Links ] ...
... bacillary angiomatosis, and related syndromes has a long and often circuitous history. Recognition of the etiologic agents and ... Tappero JW, Koehler JE, Berger TG, Cockerell CJ, Lee T-H, Busch MP, Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary splenitis in ... nov., a cause of septicemia, bacillary angiomatosis, and parenchymal bacillary peliosis. J Clin Microbiol. 1992;30:275-80. ... AIDS Commentary: bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Clin ...
MalaCards based summary : Bacillary Angiomatosis, also known as angiomatosis, bacillary, is related to trench fever and ... Wikipedia : 74 Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is a form of angiomatosis associated with bacteria of the genus... more... ... MalaCards organs/tissues related to Bacillary Angiomatosis:. 40 Skin, Endothelial, Bone, Liver, Bone Marrow, Lymph Node, Colon ... Articles related to Bacillary Angiomatosis:. (show top 50) (show all 483) #. Title. Authors. PMID. Year. ...
Bacillary angiomatosis. Bacillary angiomatosis (caused by B. henselae or B. quintana) and bacillary peliosis (caused by B. ... Bacillary angiomatosis may result in lesions in the skin, under the skin, in bone, or in other organs. Bacillary peliosis ...
Epithelioid angiomatosis bartonellosis bacillary ailuronosis disseminated cat-scratch disease Infection caused by closely ... Epithelioid angiomatosis; bartonellosis; bacillary ailuronosis; disseminated cat-scratch disease. Definition. Infection caused ... Gram-negative bacillary infection results from exposure to flea-infested cats with B henselae and the human body louse for B ... Manders SM (1996) Bacillary angiomatosis. Clinics in Dermatology 14(3)1295-299 ...
Bacillary Angiomatosis. Bacillary angiomatosis is a Bartonella infection that occurs primarily in immunocompromised persons. ... Bacillary angiomatosis is treated first-line with antibiotics such as erythromycin or doxycycline, usually for a period of at ...
What is bacillary angiomatosis? Meaning of bacillary angiomatosis medical term. What does bacillary angiomatosis mean? ... Looking for online definition of bacillary angiomatosis in the Medical Dictionary? bacillary angiomatosis explanation free. ... Related to bacillary angiomatosis: Kaposi Sarcoma. Bacillary Angiomatosis. Definition. A life-threatening but curable infection ... It also can lead to bacillary angiomatosis in AIDS patients. Bacillary angiomatosis caused by this bacteria is transmitted to ...
Bacillary angiomatosis is reported in a 65-year-old man. He was immunocompetent and the lesions subsided following treatment ... Bacillary angiomatosis in an immune-competent patient. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology. 2001 Jan-Feb; ...
Cat Scratch Disease (bacillary angiomatosis). - Discussion:. - common acute infection which occurs most often in children;. - ... Cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and other infections due to Rochalimaea. Cat-scratch disease presenting as a ... bacillary forms were identified in the lesions by Warthin-Starry staining;. - neutrophils are common;. - Histology of Nodes:. ...
Ocular Bacillary Angiomatosis in an Immunocompromised Man. Murray, Meltzer A.; Zamecki, Katherine J.; Paskowski, Joseph; More ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Shigellosis, Bacillary dysentery. *Proteus mirabilis/Proteus vulgaris. *Yersinia pestis *Plague/Bubonic plague ...
Bacillary angiomatosis *. Candidiasis, oropharyngeal (thrush) *. Candidiasis, vulvovaginal; persistent, frequent, or poorly ...
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