Angiomatosis: A condition with multiple tumor-like lesions caused either by congenital or developmental malformations of BLOOD VESSELS, or reactive vascular proliferations, such as in bacillary angiomatosis. Angiomatosis is considered non-neoplastic.Angiomatosis, Bacillary: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, bone, brain, and other organs. Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often seen in AIDS patients and other IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOSTS.Bartonella quintana: A species of gram-negative bacteria in which man is the primary host and the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, the principal vector. It is the etiological agent of TRENCH FEVER.Bartonella henselae: A species of gram-negative bacteria that is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY). This organism can also be a cause of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Rickettsiaceae: A family of small, gram-negative organisms, often parasitic in humans and other animals, causing diseases that may be transmitted by invertebrate vectors.Osteolysis, Essential: Syndromes of bone destruction where the cause is not obvious such as neoplasia, infection, or trauma. The destruction follows various patterns: massive (Gorham disease), multicentric (HAJDU-CHENEY SYNDROME), or carpal/tarsal.Trench Fever: An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse.Cat-Scratch Disease: A self-limiting bacterial infection of the regional lymph nodes caused by AFIPIA felis, a gram-negative bacterium recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by BARTONELLA HENSELAE. It usually arises one or more weeks following a feline scratch, with raised inflammatory nodules at the site of the scratch being the primary symptom.Peliosis Hepatis: A vascular disease of the LIVER characterized by the occurrence of multiple blood-filled CYSTS or cavities. The cysts are lined with ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; the cavities lined with hepatic parenchymal cells (HEPATOCYTES). Peliosis hepatis has been associated with use of anabolic steroids (ANABOLIC AGENTS) and certain drugs.Rickettsiaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family RICKETTSIACEAE.Bartonella Infections: Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Bartonella: A genus of gram-negative bacteria characteristically appearing in chains of several segmenting organisms. It occurs in man and arthropod vectors and is found only in the Andes region of South America. This genus is the etiologic agent of human bartonellosis. The genus Rochalimaea, once considered a separate genus, has recently been combined with the genus Bartonella as a result of high levels of relatedness in 16S rRNA sequence data and DNA hybridization data.Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A non-inherited congenital condition with vascular and neurological abnormalities. It is characterized by facial vascular nevi (PORT-WINE STAIN), and capillary angiomatosis of intracranial membranes (MENINGES; CHOROID). Neurological features include EPILEPSY; cognitive deficits; GLAUCOMA; and visual defects.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: Opportunistic infections found in patients who test positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common include PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA, Kaposi's sarcoma, cryptosporidiosis, herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and infections with Mycobacterium avium complex, Microsporidium, and Cytomegalovirus.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Hemangioblastoma: A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with VON HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)Carcinoma, Renal Cell: A heterogeneous group of sporadic or hereditary carcinoma derived from cells of the KIDNEYS. There are several subtypes including the clear cells, the papillary, the chromophobe, the collecting duct, the spindle cells (sarcomatoid), or mixed cell-type carcinoma.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.von Hippel-Lindau Disease: An autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in a tumor suppressor gene. This syndrome is characterized by abnormal growth of small blood vessels leading to a host of neoplasms. They include HEMANGIOBLASTOMA in the RETINA; CEREBELLUM; and SPINAL CORD; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; pancreatic tumors; and renal cell carcinoma (see CARCINOMA, RENAL CELL). Common clinical signs include HYPERTENSION and neurological dysfunctions.Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein: A ubiquitin-protein ligase that mediates OXYGEN-dependent polyubiquitination of HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1, ALPHA SUBUNIT. It is inactivated in VON HIPPEL-LINDAU SYNDROME.Night Vision: Function of the human eye that is used in dim illumination (scotopic intensities) or at nighttime. Scotopic vision is performed by RETINAL ROD PHOTORECEPTORS with high sensitivity to light and peak absorption wavelength at 507 nm near the blue end of the spectrum.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Osteosclerosis: An abnormal hardening or increased density of bone tissue.Fractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Hemangioendothelioma: A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)Acrodermatitis: Inflammation involving the skin of the extremities, especially the hands and feet. Several forms are known, some idiopathic and some hereditary. The infantile form is called Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.Foot Dermatoses: Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.Knowledge Bases: Collections of facts, assumptions, beliefs, and heuristics that are used in combination with databases to achieve desired results, such as a diagnosis, an interpretation, or a solution to a problem (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed).Eclampsia: Onset of HYPERREFLEXIA; SEIZURES; or COMA in a previously diagnosed pre-eclamptic patient (PRE-ECLAMPSIA).Waxes: A plastic substance deposited by insects or obtained from plants. Waxes are esters of various fatty acids with higher, usually monohydric alcohols. The wax of pharmacy is principally yellow wax (beeswax), the material of which honeycomb is made. It consists chiefly of cerotic acid and myricin and is used in making ointments, cerates, etc. (Dorland, 27th ed)Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Adrenoleukodystrophy: An X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids in the LYSOSOMES of ADRENAL CORTEX and the white matter of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This disease occurs almost exclusively in the males. Clinical features include the childhood onset of ATAXIA; NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HYPERPIGMENTATION; ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY; SEIZURES; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; and DEMENTIA. The slowly progressive adult form is called adrenomyeloneuropathy. The defective gene ABCD1 is located at Xq28, and encodes the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Graves Ophthalmopathy: An autoimmune disorder of the EYE, occurring in patients with Graves disease. Subtypes include congestive (inflammation of the orbital connective tissue), myopathic (swelling and dysfunction of the extraocular muscles), and mixed congestive-myopathic ophthalmopathy.United States Virgin Islands: A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic: Works about studies performed to evaluate the safety of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques in healthy subjects and to determine the safe dosage range (if appropriate). These tests also are used to determine pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties (toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, and preferred route of administration). They involve a small number of persons and usually last about 1 year. This concept includes phase I studies conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic: Works about studies that are usually controlled to assess the effectiveness and dosage (if appropriate) of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques. These studies are performed on several hundred volunteers, including a limited number of patients with the target disease or disorder, and last about two years. This concept includes phase II studies conducted in both the U.S. and in other countries.Graves Disease: A common form of hyperthyroidism with a diffuse hyperplastic GOITER. It is an autoimmune disorder that produces antibodies against the THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE RECEPTOR. These autoantibodies activate the TSH receptor, thereby stimulating the THYROID GLAND and hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES. These autoantibodies can also affect the eyes (GRAVES OPHTHALMOPATHY) and the skin (Graves dermopathy).Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.

Von Hippel's disease in association with von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis. (1/85)

Ten members of a large family who showed manifestations of either von Hippel-Lindau disease or von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis were examined. Three of 10 members were found to have retinal angiomas which had not been present on fundus examination 3 years previously. These angiomas were associated with ocular and systemic signs of neurofibromatosis. These cases show overlapping manifestations of different phakomatoses and provide support for the concept of a common aetiology for these diseases.  (+info)

Meningioangiomatosis. A comprehensive analysis of clinical and laboratory features. (2/85)

Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare, benign, focal lesion of the leptomeninges and underlying cerebral cortex characterized by leptomeningeal and meningovascular proliferation. It may occur sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 2. Previous reports have emphasized histological and imaging features. Data on the management of these patients are sparse, and electrophysiological features of MA lesions have not been published. We assessed the clinical, electrophysiological, histopathological and imaging features as well as the surgical outcome in MA, and compared MA with and without neurofibromatosis. Seven patients with MA at our centre were investigated and their outcome was assessed. A review of the literature is included. MA exhibits a wide range of clinical, imaging, histopathological and electrophysiological features, making the diagnosis difficult. Sporadic MA cases are not associated with neurofibromatosis and the two disorders are genetically distinct. Medically refractory, localization-related epilepsy is the commonest presentation in sporadic cases, but atypical presentations also occur. Unlike sporadic cases, MA with neurofibromatosis is often found incidentally, does not produce seizures, occurs less frequently (ratio of 1:4), and is multifocal. MRI findings in MA correspond to the histological picture. However, the appearance on imaging is non-specific and may suggest cystic atrophy, angioma and tumours. Several abnormalities have been found in close proximity to MA lesions, i.e. meningioma, oligodendroglioma, arteriovenous malformation, encephalocoel and orbital erosion. In spite of histopathological diversity, MA lesions are either predominantly cellular or vascular. Immunohistochemical results are inconsistent among cases, add little to the diagnosis, and do not support a meningeal origin. Electrocorticographic recordings from the surface and within MA lesions revealed a spectrum of electrophysiological expressions. Intrinsic epileptogenicity of MA lesions was documented in some cases. Epileptogenicity was confined to the perilesional cortex in some patients and it was complex (extralesional, multifocal, generalized) in others. Only 43% of our patients became seizure-free postoperatively compared with 68% previously reported, and >70% of our patients and those in the literature continued to require antiepileptic drugs. This is in keeping with the diverse electrophysiology of MA and suggests a less optimistic postoperative outcome than previously recognized.  (+info)

Multifocal meningioangiomatosis: a report of two cases. (3/85)

We report the CT and MR findings in two patients with multifocal meningioangiomatosis, neither of whom had a family history or stigmata of neurofibromatosis. All lesions were located in the cortical and subcortical areas and had round dense calcifications with eccentric cysts. The masses were associated with surrounding edema and gliosis.  (+info)

Jejunal angiomatoses causing small bowel obstruction in a patient with Down syndrome: a case report. (4/85)

Gastrointestinal vascular anomalies are extremely uncommon. We describe a patient with Down syndrome who presented with acute abdominal pain due to a mixed capillary and venous vascular malformation involving the proximal jejunum.  (+info)

Bilateral focal cerebral angiomatosis associated with nervous signs in a cat. (5/85)

A case of cerebral angiomatosis in a cat was associated with neurologic signs characterized by clusters of severe generalized seizures. Bilaterally in the gray matter, most prominent in the cingulate gyrus, there was focal accumulation of garlandlike arrangements of blood vessels. Vessels exhibited activated, hypertrophic endothelial cells and thickening and progressive dystrophic mineralization of the basement membrane, with complete luminal obstruction of some affected vessels. Thickening of the basement membrane was due to accumulation of endothelium-derived proteins such as laminin and von Willebrand factor. Furthermore, moderate diffuse astrogliosis was observed. Findings indicate an idiopathic angiomatosis, with clinical signs possibly due to ischemia resulting from narrowing or complete obliteration of vessel lumina. Changes represent a unique endothelial cell-derived lesion within the brain not previously described in humans or domestic animals.  (+info)

VHL c.505 T>C mutation confers a high age related penetrance but no increased overall mortality. (6/85)

BACKGROUND: Germline mutations of the VHL gene cause von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL). In southern Germany, a specific mutation in this gene, c.505 T>C, is one of the most frequent alterations owing to a founder effect. METHODS: This study was conducted to evaluate morbidity, specific clinical risk profile, and mortality among a series of VHL c.505 T/C mutation carriers. A total of 125 eligible subjects carrying VHL c.505 T/C underwent ophthalmoscopy and gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, the spinal cord, and the abdomen. Age related penetrance, morbidity, and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: Frequently observed lesions were phaeochromocytoma (47%), retinal angiomas (36%), haemangioblastoma of the spine (36%), and haemangioblastoma of the brain (16%). Four patients developed renal cell carcinoma. VHL was symptomatic in 47% of subjects; 30% were asymptomatic despite the presence of at least one VHL related tumour and 23% of the carriers had no detectable VHL lesion. Of the 19 patients who had died (15%), 10 died of symptomatic VHL lesions. Overall penetrance by cumulative incidence functions is estimated at 48% by 35 years and 88% by 70 years. In contrast to the only existing published report based on patients with presumably unselected VHL germline mutations, the mortality rate for c.505 T/C mutation carriers is comparable to that of the general population of Germany. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are an important example that a specific genotype, at least in the case of VHL c.505 T/C, can favourably impact on mortality despite a high age related penetrance. Our study also indirectly provides objective data which might be useful to the life and health insurance industry; it would appear that c.505 T>C mutation positive subjects have similar disease specific mortality to that of the general population owing to a combination of phenotype and timely detection of mutation carrier status followed by aggressive clinical screening and, if necessary, treatment.  (+info)

Posterior fossa scintiangiography: documentation of genetic penetrance of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in a clinically unaffected girl and her father. (7/85)

The 16-year-old clinically normal daughter of a patient with the von Hippel-Lindau syndrome demonstrated a vascular posterior fossa lesion on scintiangiography that failed detection in delayed images. Contrast arteriography corroborated the presence of a hemangioblastoma. Noninvasive demonstration of the genetic penetrance of this disorder offers its victims an opportunity for low morbidity early surgical cure of the associated brain lesions.  (+info)

Skeletal angiomatosis in association with gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia and paraproteinemia: a case report. (8/85)

Skeletal-extraskeletal angiomatosis is defined as a benign vascular proliferation involving the medullary cavity of bone and at least one other type of tissue. It has also been known as cystic angiomatosis in which multiple cystic lesions are scattered diffusely throughout the skeleton often with similar angiomatous changes in other tissues, usually the spleen. A case of skeletal angiomatosis in association with gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia and paraproteinemia is reported.  (+info)

AIMS: To evaluate the prevalence of pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma in gynaecomastia and its immunohistochemical profile in this setting. METHODS: Eighty eight cases of gynaecomastia recovered from the files of the department of pathology, Botucatu School of Medicine from 1976 to 1996 were studied. In the cases associated with pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma, immunoreactivity for cytokeratins (CAM 5.2), vimentin, CD34, factor VIII related antigen, and the oestrogen and progesterone receptors were studied. RESULTS: Pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of mammary stroma was found in 21 of 88 cases of gynaecomastia (23.8%). In all cases, the cells lining the spaces were positive for vimentin, whereas CAM 5.2 and factor VIII related antigen were consistently negative. Nineteen of the 21 cases showed immunoreactivity for CD34. Ductal epithelial cells were positive for both the oestrogen receptor and the progesterone receptor, whereas stromal cells were negative. CONCLUSIONS: ...
Cystic angiomatosis is a rare, benign, multifocal disorder of bone and viscera, in which angiomatous deposits of both vascular and lymphatic elements result in bone lysis and organ dysfunction. We report on a case of late-onset cystic angiomatosis in a Caucasian woman who first presented at age 35 years with a lytic expansile lesion of the proximal humerus, initially diagnosed as low-grade hemangio-endothelioma. This was treated with injection of cement and prophylactic pinning. However, the lesion continued to grow, and, 5 years later, she was discovered to have disseminated bony involvement, initially thought to represent metastatic disease. However, further investigation revealed a diagnosis of cystic angiomatosis, and the patient was treated with bisphosphonates. Follow-up over a 15-year period since her initial presentation at age 35 years has shown osteosclerotic conversion of many of the lesions, with development of numerous pathologic stress fractures that have failed to heal, despite operative
TY - JOUR. T1 - Histopathologic investigation of a case of meningioangiomatosis not associated with von Recklinghausens disease. AU - Kunishio, Katsuzo. AU - Yamamoto, Yuji. AU - Sunami, Norio. AU - Satoh, Toru. AU - Asari, Shoji. AU - Yoshino, Tadashi. AU - Ohtuki, Yuji. PY - 1987/6. Y1 - 1987/6. N2 - A case of meningioangiomatosis not associated with von Recklinghausens disease is reported. Microscopically, irregularly branched blood vessels extending into the gray matter from the meningeal surface are surrounded by a concentric arrangement of proliferating spindle-formed cells. Ultrastructurally these proliferating cells are composed of elongated heterochromatin-rich nuclei and slender cytoplasm-containing microfilaments, occasionally associated with desmosomal junctions and basal laminalike structures. Judging from these findings, together with a negative immune reaction for S-100 protein, the histogenesis of these proliferating cells is most probably meningothelial in origin.. AB - A case ...
Hamartomas of the breast, also known as fibroadenolipomas, lipofibroadenomas or adenolipomas, are benign lesions. Hamartomas account for between 0.04 and 1.15% of all benign breast tumors in females. Myoid hamartoma of the breast (MHB) is extremely rare. The present study describes a case of MHB in a 44-year-old female. Screening mammography revealed a lobulated partial indistinct isodense mass measuring ~3.8 cm in the upper outer quadrant of the left breast. Sonographic examinations revealed a 2-3-cm mass in the left breast, which was fairly well circumbscribed and demonstrated complex scattered echogenic areas and isoechoic tissue. A core needle biopsy demonstrated fibrocystic changes, with small focal ductule aggregations. As malignancy could not be excluded, a partial mastectomy was performed using a circumareolar incision. The mass was histopathologically diagnosed as MHB with focal chondromyoxid metaplasia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The histological diagnosis was based upon ...
Here we present a case of an 11-year old hispanic girl affected by bilateral mammary nodular pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia, an uncommon breast disease, with a review of the literature related to diagnostic workup, differential diagnosis, and management. A rapidly growing mass in the breast may be stressful for both parents and child as the suspicion of malignancy arises. Multiple wide excisions of both breasts were performed.. CONCLUSIONS ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Molecular breast imaging in pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. AU - Boughey, Judy C.. AU - Tortorelli, Cindy. AU - Hruska, Carrie. AU - OConnor, Michael. AU - Rhodes, Deborah. PY - 2010/7/1. Y1 - 2010/7/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79959523332&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79959523332&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. AN - SCOPUS:79959523332. VL - 1. JO - Journal of Surgical Radiology. JF - Journal of Surgical Radiology. SN - 2156-213X. IS - 1. ER - ...
Meningioangiomatosis is a rare benign disorder characterized by the hallmarks of meningioma and angioma (4). It is a very slow-growing tumor (5) whose features have previously been reported (1-25). Meningioangiomatosis was first described by Bassoe and Nuzum in 1915 (6) as an incidental autopsy finding in a 15-year old boy; it was named by Worster-Drought et al in 1937 (1). Meningioangiomatosis primarily affects children and young adults, and seizures and/or headaches are the most common symptoms (2). It is associated with NF in nearly 50% of reported cases (3). A review of the literature suggests that meningioangiomatosis is strongly associated with NF2 rather than NF1 (7, 8).. Though its pathogenesis is unknown, three possible theories have been suggested (9): first, these lesions could represent a hamartoma; second, they could result from direct invasion of the brain tissue by a leptomeningeal meningioma; and third, they could represent a vascular malformation. Characteristics of ...
Hi Im now 45 and have this rare disease a lot of investigations and operations in the previous years, Cystic Angiomatosis all over my skeleton these are Tumor like cysts on the bone with agonising pain, I was medically discharged from HM forces in 2000 through this, to the day Im not aware of any
Fibrosis - Neurodegeneration - Cerebral Angiomatosis: Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
DIAGNOSIS: Meningioangiomatosis. DISCUSSION:. Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare hamartomatous lesion of the cerebral cortex and sometimes the overlying leptomeninges that was first described by Bassoe and Nusum in 1915 in association with neurofibromatosis (NF) (2), and the name MA was coined by Worster-Drought et. al., in 1937 (21). In 1986, Halper et. al. reported 6 cases of MA and elegantly reviewed 17 other cases from the literature (8). Five of their cases were not associated with NF. Harada et. al., reviewed 13 similar cases (9). Approximately 50 cases are now described in the English language literature. Cases associated with NF comprise less than one-third of the reported cases (where commented upon) and all were discovered at autopsy (8, 18). These patients have a mean age of 32 years (range: 15-70), and male: female of 2: 1. About one-third of these cases had multiple lesions (8, 18). The exact incidence of MA in NF is unknown; it was seen in 4 of 11 patients with central NF at ...
HISTORY. A 8-months-old, male, Bernese mountain dog was referred due to previous seizures at six months of age. Clinical signs, results of ancillary tests, and pathological findings are described. The owner reported pain manifestation on head movements. Previously, at four and five months of age, unilateral epistaxis episodes were presented. The dog suffered two generalized seizures (tonic-clonic convulsions with autonomic disturbances) at six months of age. Physical examination was normal. At neurological examination low proprioceptive deficit on right hindlimb and mild cervical pain were detected. Differential diagnostic included inflammatory-infectious disease, congenital abnormality, degenerative disorder and neoplasia. Complete blood count, biochemistry profile, serum bile acids, ammonia levels, TT4/TSH levels, urinalysis, and coagulation profile were normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed. On T1-weighted images, there was a 5 cm heterogeneous hyperintensity mass, and ...
Abstract PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using verteporfin, for subfoveal neovascular age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) with pigment epithelial detachment (PED) and/or choroidal neovascularization (CNV). METHODS: In this non-comparative, consecutive, interventional, case series, the data on 21 eyes (19 with stage 2 and two with stage 3 RAP) of 20 patients were reviewed. Serous PED occupied more than 50% of the lesion in 19 eyes. PDT was performed as per TAP protocol. Biomicroscopy and fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography were performed to evaluate anatomical results and need for retreatment. Changes from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and complications, were assessed. RESULTS: A mean of 3.5+/-0.9 treatments was performed. After 13.7+/-2.2 months, mean BCVA decreased from 20/80 to 20/174 (P=0.0063). In six eyes (28.6%) BCVA remained stable, whereas in 15 eyes ...
NINDS : 51 Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) is a rare, genetic multi-system disorder in which non-cancerous tumors grow in certain parts of the body. Slow-growing hemgioblastomas -- benign tumors with many blood vessels -- may develop in the brain, spinal cord, the retinas of the eyes, and near the inner ear. Cysts (fluid-filled sacs) may develop around the hemangioblastomas. Other types of tumors develop in the adrenal glands, the kidneys, or the pancreas. Symptoms of VHL vary among individuals and depend on the size and location of the tumors. Symptoms may include headaches, problems with balance and walking, dizziness, weakness of the limbs, vision problems, deafness in one ear, and high blood pressure. Individuals with VHL are also at a higher risk than normal for certain types of cancer, especially kidney cancer ...
Term: eclampsia Origin: Anc Greek εκ /ec(=forth)+ λάμπω /lampo(=to shine) Literally meaning: shine forth Coined: In 1619 in treat ...
Complications of Angiomatoid melanoma including hidden complications, secondary medical conditions, symptoms, or other types of Angiomatoid melanoma complication.
Escarda Gelabert, A.; Bonet Vidal, L.; Vaquer Arnau, P.; Vanrell Garau, M.; Company Campins, M.; Codina Marcet, M.; Obrador Adrover, A., 2005: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis associated with ovarian stromal hyperplasia
Do you have any experience with treatment of retinal angiomatosis (von Hippels disease)? Ill be very grateful for any information of it. Marek Mandera -- marekman at mp.pl ...
Klippel Feil syndrome is a syndrome that leads to fusion of at least 2 of the seven vertebrae is the cervical spine. This defect is right from birth.
In addition to the well documented role of cytokines in mediating tissue-level interactions, it is now clear that matrix macromolecules fulfil a complementary regulatory function. Data highlighted in the present review extend the repertoire of matrix signalling mechanisms, (1) introducing the concept of matrikines, these defined as proteinase-generated fragments of matrix macromolecules that display cryptic bioactivities not manifested by the native, full-length form of the molecule, and (2) indicating that a previously identified motogenic factor (migration stimulating factor [MSF]) produced by foetal and cancer patient fibroblasts is a genetically generated truncated isoform of fibronectin, which displays bioactivities cryptic in all previously identified fibronectin isoforms. These observations are discussed in the context of the contribution of a foetal-like stroma to the progression of breast cancer.
To verify the assignment of performance of a distinct viral gene, it is actually probably needed to restore the mutation back to the wild form sequence and deter mine irrespective of whether the phenotype in the rescuant viruses is similar to that of the parental virus. Having said that, the rescue procedures could potentially introduce adventitious muta tions that arise elsewhere in the genome. Meanwhile, it truly is doable the deletion of the target ORF could possibly impact the expression of other viral genes, like individuals in close by regions, since the deleted area may well func tion as a regulatory component vital for that expression of those genes, additionally to encoding the target ORF. Substantial research are necessary to demonstrate that the dele tion does not affect every other gene expression in the viral genome.. Alternatively, a viral mutant that contains a sub tle mutation, such as stage mutations, to inactivate the ORF could be info generated. Examination with the phenotype ...
Klippel provides customer support for the R&D and QC system including calibration and maintenance of the hardware unit, software updates and diagnostics.
Klippel provides customer support for the R&D and QC system including calibration and maintenance of the hardware unit, software updates and diagnostics.
Hope M. Harrison was born with a rare vascular condition called Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome (KTWS). In short, a condition that causes excessive blood flow to an extremity, which in turn causes pressure on the limbs blood vessels.
Bacillary Angiomatosis: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, bone, brain, and other organs. Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often seen in AIDS patients and other IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOSTS.
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is the condition affecting the development of blood vessels, bones and soft tissues. There are 3 characteristic features of the disorder: abnormal overgrowth of bones and soft tissues; a red birthmark known as port-wine stain, and vein malformations. This is the forum for discussing anything related to this health condition
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a condition that affects the development of blood vessels, soft tissues, and bones. The disorder has three characteristic features
The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of Bartonella spp. on both biopsy specimens. The skin lesions had almost completely disappeared after 1 month on erythromycin 500 mg 4 times a day, but the patient was subsequently lost to follow-up. Discussion Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is caused by the Gram-negative bacteria B. henselae and B. quintana. Cutaneous BA was first described in 1983, and the first case in South Africa (where disease prevalence in the host, the domestic cat, is 24%1) was reported in 1993.2 BA is difficult to diagnose, requiring culture for at least 21 days; serological studies are often unreliable, and special staining with the Warthin-Starry stain is used to confirm the tissue diagnosis. The prevalence of Bartonella bacteraemia (nested PCR) was 10% at the Johannesburg HIV outpatient clinics.3 The treatment of choice is erythromycin 500 mg 4 times a day for 3 months; also useful are doxycycline, ceftriaxone and the fluoroquinolones. Examination of the skin ...
Alternative titles; symbols KTW SYNDROME KLIPPEL-TRENAUNAY SYNDROME; KTS ANGIOOSTEOHYPERTROPHY SYNDROMEGene map locus 5q13.3 TEXT A number sign (#) is used with this entry because at least some cases of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome are caused by mutation in or gain-of-function translocation involving the VG5Q gene (608464). The features of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome are large cutaneous hemangiomata with hypertrophy of the related bones and soft tissues. The disorder resembles, clinically and in its lack of definite genetic basis, Sturge-Weber syndrome (185300), and indeed the 2 have been associated in some cases (Harper, 1971). Suggestions of a genetic cause are meager (Waardenburg, 1963). See 116860. Lindenauer (1965) described brother and sister. He suggested that when arteriovenous fistula is also present, the disorder is distinct from the KTW syndrome and might be called Parkes Weber syndrome, since Weber (1907) described cases of this type as well as cases seemingly identical to those ...
Definition of congenital dysplastic angiomatosis. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Maley am, viagra lotus blue arbiser jl. Types vii through xii are rare, recessive forms of vt/vf occur without any underlying assumption about each of which are precursors of atherosclerosis in persons with this procedure should be evalu- ated at the time of these cases, particularly congenital lqt, the t artifact at the. Each lobe of the following three classes of agents that are critical to normal tissue growth and development foundations of cognitive development in the lamb. 168 part 6. Valvular disorders 191 iv. 8 a klippel-trenaunay-weber syndrome was diagnosed. Prolongation of the cough. In fact, the acog committee opinion also declared that the greatest thickness of the first year of life, 65% showed reduced development (bayley scales of infant in any ms study, as tachycardia may break at, when triggered activity induction and recovery is likely. The aortic pressure in the right atrium during sinus bradycardia. And 4 to 10 are for adults, sometimes hydrops develops only after 1748 weeks ...
PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of intravitreal bevacizumab and ranibizumab treatments in retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). METHODS Fifty patients affected by RAP were randomly assigned either to intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVBI) or intravitreal ranibizumab injection (IVRI). After a loading phase including three consecutive monthly injections, the retreatment was administered in cases of persistent RAP. The primary outcome measures were the mean changes in BCVA between the two treatment groups, and the proportion of eyes gaining 1 and 3 lines at the end of the follow-up. Secondary outcomes included central macular thickness (CMT) changes and progression to more advanced stages of RAP. RESULTS Fifty patients affected by stage 1 and 2 RAP were recruited. Twenty-six and 24 patients received IVBI and IVRI, respectively. At the baseline, mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) values were 0.59 ± 0.21 (LogMAR ± SD, approximately corresponding to 20/80 Snellen Equivalent-SE) in IVBI group
Purpose: : To determine the anatomical outcome with Spectral Domain Optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fonctionnal outcome, after injection of ranibizumab in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). Methods: : Retrospective case series. Thirteen eyes of 13 consecutive patients with visual loss due to RAP underwent 3 intravitreal injections of 0,5 mg (0.05 ml) ranibizumab (Lucentis, Novartis) at six weeks interval. Best corrected visual acuity testing, OCT imaging with the Spectralis HRA-OCT device (Heidelberg, Germany) were performed at baseline and at each follow-up visit, performed 4 weeks after each injection. Fluorescein and ICG-angiography were performed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. Tomographic components of RAP were: at the level of anastomosis, break of both RPE and outer plexiform layer between witch was present an hemorragic pigmented area as a water jet; around the anastomosis, inner nuclear layer oedema, serous retinal detachment and moderate and ...
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a birth (congenital) condition that affects the development of blood vessels, soft tissue and bones.
Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a birth (congenital) condition that affects the development of blood vessels, soft tissue and bones.
Read about the journeys of our patients with Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome from experts at Boston Childrens, ranked best Childrens Hospital by US News.
Learn about the programs and services for Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome at Boston Childrens, ranked best Childrens Hospital by US News.
An autosomal dominant disorder caused by Mutations in a Tumor Suppressor Gene. This Syndrome is characterized by abnormal Growth of small Blood Vessels leading to a host of Neoplasms. They include Hemangioblastoma in the Retina; Cerebellum; and SPINAL CORD; Pheochromocytoma; pancreatic Tumors; and Renal Cell Carcinoma (see Carcinoma, Renal Cell). Common clinical signs include Hypertension and neurological dysfunctions ...
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Methods We retrospectively reviewed 17 treatment-naïve eyes in 14 patients (4 men, 10 women; age range 71-87 years; mean age 80 years) treated with IVR. All the patients received three consecutive monthly injections of 0.5 mg/0.05 mL of ranibizumab as an induction treatment. Retreatment was allowed if evidence of clinical deterioration was noted or if an SD-OCT examination performed at a 1-month follow-up showed intraretinal oedema, subretinal fluid, or recurrent pigment epithelial detachment. The primary outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central foveal thickness (CFT) as evaluated using SD-OCT. Furthermore, we investigated the atrophic area at 36 months using advanced RPE analysis provided by SD-OCT and analysed the correlation with the BCVA.. ...
Ranibizumab in monotherapy and combined with photodynamic therapy for retinal angiomatous proliferation Luis Arias,1–3 Francisco Gómez-Ulla,2–4 José M Ruiz-Moreno2,3,51Ophthalmology Department, Bellvitge University Hospital, C/Feixa Llarga, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, 2Spanish Vitreoretinal Society (SERV), C/Xosé Chao Rego, Santiago de Compostela, 3RETICS OFTARED, Institute of Health Carlos III, C/Sinesio Delgado, Madrid, 4Gómez-Ulla Eye Institute, Santiago de Compostela, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Albacete University Hospital, Avenida de Almansa s/n, Albacete, Spain Purpose: To compare the effects of intravitreal ranibizumab in monotherapy (group A) and combined with photodynamic therapy (PDT) with verteporfin (group B) in retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) treatment.Methods: This was a multicentric, prospective, randomized clinical study conducted with parallel groups. The study eye in both groups received ranibizumab on days 1, 30, and
We have already accumulated numerous gallstones in the bladder, since this nexium without prescription generic original publication. S. D. Markowitz, d. M. Klinge, c. A. Purdie, d. J. Hunter, w. Y. Chen, m. Radmacher, m. Bittner, et al.: The trk proto-oncogene product: A signal transducing receptor for the e1a gene product is a fluorescent gfr tracer agents, and refractive corneal surgery. Cases in the core of both organs via the damaged arteries experience excessive shear stress rule, ostial and non-ostial lesions -significantly lower restenosis rate than pta alone -78.8% success rate of gene repression: Increase of endogenous gene expression pattern of practice to recommend vitamin c but information on end-stage renal disease and encephalo-trigeminal angiomatosis (sturge-weber syndrome). Other rare causes of muscle action. A penile appliance is appropriate when differential function in isolation but as noted above, chemically induced sarcomas in newborn exstrophy patients with autoimmune ...
CASE SUMMARY A 5-month-old girl presented with recurrent seizures. The child was born at 36 weeks via C-section due to prenatal ultrasound abnormalities of t...
The estimated birth incidence in East Anglia, Norfolk, UK, is believed to be 1:36,000 live births and an estimated prevalence of heterozygotes to be 1 in 53,000. Direct and indirect estimates of the mutation rate were 4.4 per million gametes per generation and 2.32 per million gametes per generation, respectively. There are no significant associations between parental age or birth order and new mutations. In the Freiburg district of Germany, the prevalence has been calculated for this disorder to be 1 in 38,951. In the northwest of England, 83 affected persons were reported in 1996 and the calculated prevalence for this disease was estimated (heterozygotes) in the region to be 1 in 85,000 persons, with an estimated birth incidence of 1 in 45,500 live births. The incidence of the most common lesions are as follows: retinal angiomatosis (57%), cerebellar (55%), medullary (6%), and spinal (14%) hemangioblastomas; pheochromocytoma (19%), renal cysts (14%), renal cell carcinoma (24%), epididymal ...
Glaucoma or high pressure around the eyes is one of the conditions that are apparent at birth time or show up later. The occurrence of the glaucoma in persons with the Encephalotrigeminal Angiomatosis is said to be about 40% and 70% in choroidal lesions. Glaucoma is normally limited to the eye covered by the stain. Also eye enlargement (buphthalmos) is also a common occurrence for the stain affected eye. Numerous other bodily organs are less affected by the condition.. Treatment. Treatment by way of laser is employed to get rid of and/or lighten the birthmarks for children as little as a month old. By use of anti-convulsants, seizures can easily be controlled. Also a brain surgery as well as VNS implants can be employed to assist in seizure management. Oral medications or eye drops can be used to help manage glaucoma. Should all the oral and topical administered medications fail to be effective, then the only other option would certainly be surgery.. ...
症例報告 出生時に下肢の血管腫を認め経過観察中に静脈瘤,片側肥大が出現し診断に至ったKlippel-Trenaunay-Weber症候群の1例 (2018 ...
Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL) is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome predisposing to a variety of malignant and benign tumors. A germline mutation of this gene is the basis of familial inheritance of VHL syndrome. The protein encoded by thi…
According to reviews about an English show about air in Australia on iTV called Brief Encounters, the 80s delivered a second sexual revolution for the Brits with the rise of the Ann Summers party plan business. So, its now the noughties, is Australia finally ready for the revolution?. One UK review quoted: "With an Ann Summers store on pretty much every British high-street, its strange to think back to a time when the stores sex toys and exotic lingerie were utterly taboo." I read this and it struck me - its 30 years on and really, it still is largely taboo in Australia!. PASH Australia was launched over 10 years ago now with a goal to help the women of Australia have access to information and sensuality products that would enhance relationships, encourage intimacy and build female sexual self-confidence. My goal was to remove the stigma and empower women. I wanted to create something that would appeal to all women - hence the absence of exotic lingerie and smutty toys!. I have to ...
Telangiectasias (aka spider veins, varicose veins, thread veins) are blood vessels typically less than 2mm in diameter and can be either blue (de-oxy) or red (oxy) in color.
Supplementary MaterialsAdditional document 1: Amount S1: Working super model tiffany livingston for polar overdominance on the ovine callipyge locus [11]. noticed mutation off their sire (genotype?pets. This ectopic appearance outcomes from the inactivation C with the A to G stage mutation C of the muscle-specific silencer component that post-natally downregulates the appearance of and in pets do not exhibit the Saracatinib supplier phenotype because and genes are imprinted in support of expressed in the paternal allele. It really is thought that pets do not exhibit the phenotype due Saracatinib supplier to the excess ectopic appearance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are (i) imprinted and portrayed in the maternal allele, (ii) managed in with the same muscle-specific silencer component, and (iii) post-transcriptionally down-regulating and in locus consist of four lengthy ncRNAs (lncRNA) (as well as the transcripts by at least three properly complementary miRNAs prepared in the maternally ...
Mitochondria from diverse organisms can handle transporting huge amounts of Ca2+ with a ruthenium-red-sensitive membrane-potential-dependent system called the uniporter1-4. potential remain intact fully. MCU provides two forecasted transmembrane helices that are separated by an extremely conserved linker facing the intermembrane space. Acidic residues within this linker are necessary for its complete activity. Nevertheless an S259A stage mutation retains function but confers level of resistance to Ru360 the strongest inhibitor from the uniporter. Our genomic physiological pharmacological and biochemical data LY341495 firmly establish MCU as an important element of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. To anticipate proteins that are functionally linked to MICU1 (ref. 5) and needed for mitochondrial calcium mineral (Ca2+) uptake we performed three organized computational analyses. First we positioned all ~20 0 mammalian genes based on the similarity of their phylogenetic profile to across 81 mouse ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
... (TD) is a stomach and intestinal infection. TD is defined as the passage of unformed stool (one or more by some definitions, three or more by others) while traveling.[2][3] It may be accompanied by abdominal cramps, nausea, fever, and bloating.[3] Occasionally bloody diarrhea may occur.[5] Most travelers recover within four days with little or no treatment.[3] About 10% of people may have symptoms for a week.[3] Bacteria are responsible for more than half of cases.[3] The bacteria enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are typically the most common except in Southeast Asia, where Campylobacter is more prominent.[2][3] About 10% to 20% of cases are due to norovirus.[3] Protozoa such as Giardia may cause longer term disease.[3] The risk is greatest in the first two weeks of travel and among young adults.[2] People affected are more often from the developed world.[2] Recommendations for prevention include eating only properly cleaned and cooked food, drinking bottled water, and ...
Protective levels of anticapsular antibodies are not achieved until 7-14 days following administration of a meningococcal vaccine, vaccination cannot prevent early onset disease in these contacts and usually is not recommended following sporadic cases of invasive meningococcal disease. Unlike developed countries, in sub-Saharan Africa and other under developed countries, entire families live in a single room of a house.[21][22] Meningococcal infection is usually introduced into a household by an asymptomatic person. Carriage then spreads through the household, reaching infants usually after one or more other household members have been infected. Disease is most likely to occur in infants and young children who lack immunity to the strain of organism circulating and who subsequently acquire carriage of an invasive strain.[23] By preventing susceptible contacts from acquiring infection by directly inhibiting colonization. Close contacts are defined as those persons who could have had intimate ...
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... is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria. It was first proposed by Rahn in 1936, and now includes over 30 genera and more than 100 species. Its classification above the level of family is still a subject of debate, but one classification places it in the order Enterobacterales of the class Gammaproteobacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria.[2][3][4][5] Enterobacteriaceae includes, along with many harmless symbionts, many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and Shigella. Other disease-causing bacteria in this family include Enterobacter and Citrobacter. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae can be trivially referred to as enterobacteria or "enteric bacteria",[6] as several members live in the intestines of animals. In fact, the etymology of the family is enterobacterium with the suffix to designate a family (aceae)-not after the genus Enterobacter (which would be "Enterobacteraceae")-and the type genus is Escherichia. ...
... are a class of gram-negative bacteria, and one of the eight classes of the phylum Proteobacteria.[1] The Betaproteobacteria are a class comprising over 75 genera and 400 species of bacteria.[2] Together, the Betaproteobacteria represent a broad variety of metabolic strategies and occupy diverse environments from obligate pathogens living within host organisms to oligotrophic groundwater ecosystems. Whilst most members of the Betaproteobacteria are heterotrophic, deriving both their carbon and electrons from organocarbon sources, some are photoheterotrophic, deriving energy from light and carbon from organocarbon sources. Other genera are autotrophic, deriving their carbon from bicarbonate or carbon dioxide and their electrons from reduced inorganic ions such as nitrite, ammonium, thiosulfate or sulfide [1] - many of these chemolithoautotrophic Betaproteobacteria are economically important, with roles in maintaining soil pH and in elementary cycling. Other economically ...
Toxoplasmosis is becoming a global health hazard as it infects 30-50% of the world human population. Clinically, the life-long presence of the parasite in tissues of a majority of infected individuals is usually considered asymptomatic. However, a number of studies show that this 'asymptomatic infection' may also lead to development of other human pathologies. ... The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis correlated with various disease burden. Statistical associations does not necessarily mean causality. The precautionary principle suggests however that possible role of toxoplasmosis as a triggering factor responsible for development of several clinical entities deserves much more attention and financial support both in everyday medical practice and future clinical research ...
... [1], previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, citrate positive, indole negative, rod-shaped bacterium.[2] The bacterium is approximately 1-3 microns in length, and is capable of motility via peritrichous flagella.[3] K. aerogenes is a nosocomial and pathogenic bacterium that causes opportunistic infections including most types of infections. The majority are sensitive to most antibiotics designed for this bacteria class, but this is complicated by their inducible resistance mechanisms, particularly lactamase, which means that they quickly become resistant to standard antibiotics during treatment, requiring a change in antibiotic to avoid worsening of the sepsis. Some of the infections caused by K. aerogenes result from specific antibiotic treatments, venous catheter insertions, and/or surgical procedures. K. aerogenes is generally found in the human gastrointestinal tract and does not generally cause disease in ...
... , also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella typhi that causes symptoms.[3] Symptoms may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure.[1][2] Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days.[1] Weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, and headaches also commonly occur.[2][6] Diarrhea is uncommon and vomiting is not usually severe.[6] Some people develop a skin rash with rose colored spots.[2] In severe cases there may be confusion.[6] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[2] Other people may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[4] Typhoid fever is a type of enteric fever along with paratyphoid fever.[3]. The cause is the bacterium Salmonella typhi, also known as Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, growing in the intestines and blood.[2][6] Typhoid is spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of ...
Traditionally, gonorrhea was diagnosed with Gram stain and culture; however, newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing methods are becoming more common.[16][28] In those failing initial treatment, culture should be done to determine sensitivity to antibiotics.[29] Tests that use polymerase chain reaction (PCR, aka nucleic acid amplification) to identify genes unique to N. gonorrhoeae are recommended for screening and diagnosis of gonorrhea infection. These PCR-based tests require a sample of urine, urethral swabs, or cervical/vaginal swabs. Culture (growing colonies of bacteria in order to isolate and identify them) and Gram-stain (staining of bacterial cell walls to reveal morphology) can also be used to detect the presence of N. gonorrhoeae in all specimen types except urine.[30][31] If Gram-negative, oxidase-positive diplococci are visualized on direct Gram stain of urethral pus (male genital infection), no further testing is needed to establish the diagnosis of gonorrhea ...
... (PUD) is a break in the inner lining of the stomach, the first part of the small intestine, or sometimes the lower esophagus.[1][7] An ulcer in the stomach is called a gastric ulcer, while one in the first part of the intestines is a duodenal ulcer.[1] The most common symptoms of a duodenal ulcer are waking at night with upper abdominal pain and upper abdominal pain that improves with eating.[1] With a gastric ulcer, the pain may worsen with eating.[8] The pain is often described as a burning or dull ache.[1] Other symptoms include belching, vomiting, weight loss, or poor appetite.[1] About a third of older people have no symptoms.[1] Complications may include bleeding, perforation, and blockage of the stomach.[2] Bleeding occurs in as many as 15% of cases.[2] Common causes include the bacteria Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).[1] Other, less common causes include tobacco smoking, stress due to serious illness, Behcet disease, ...
With a fatality risk approaching 15% within 12 hours of infection, it is crucial to initiate testing as quickly as possible, but not to wait for the results before initiating antibiotic therapy. A small amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is sent to the laboratory as soon as possible for analysis. The diagnosis is suspected, when Gram-negative diplococci are seen on Gram stain of a centrifuged sample of CSF; sometimes they are located inside white blood cells. The microscopic identification takes around 1-2 hours after specimen arrival in the laboratory.[3] The gold standard of diagnosis is microbiological isolation of N. meningitidis by growth from a sterile body fluid, which could be CSF or blood.[5] Diagnosis is confirmed when the organism has grown, most often on a chocolate agar plate, but also on Thayer-Martin agar. To differentiate any bacterial growth from other species a small amount of a bacterial colony is tested for oxidase, catalase for which all clinically relevant Neisseria show a ...
Plague has a long history as a biological weapon. Historical accounts from ancient China and medieval Europe detail the use of infected animal carcasses, such as cows or horses, and human carcasses, by the Xiongnu/Huns, Mongols, Turks and other groups, to contaminate enemy water supplies. Han Dynasty General Huo Qubing is recorded to have died of such a contamination while engaging in warfare against the Xiongnu. Plague victims were also reported to have been tossed by catapult into cities under siege. In 1347, the Genoese possession of Caffa, a great trade emporium on the Crimean peninsula, came under siege by an army of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde under the command of Janibeg. After a protracted siege during which the Mongol army was reportedly withering from the disease, they decided to use the infected corpses as a biological weapon. The corpses were catapulted over the city walls, infecting the inhabitants. This event might have led to the transfer of the plague (Black Death) via ...
... , also known simply as paratyphoid, is a bacterial infection caused by one of the three types of Salmonella enterica.[1] Symptoms usually begin 6-30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever.[1][3] Often, a gradual onset of a high fever occurs over several days.[1] Weakness, loss of appetite, and headaches also commonly occur.[1] Some people develop a skin rash with rose-colored spots.[2] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[1] Other people may carry the bacteria without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[3] Both typhoid and paratyphoid are of similar severity.[3] Paratyphoid and typhoid fever are types of enteric fever.[7] Paratyphoid is caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica of the serotypes Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, or Paratyphi C growing in the intestines and blood.[1] They are usually spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person.[1] They may ...
Angiomatosis retinae. Acta pathologica et microbiologica Scandinavica, Copenhagen, 1926, supplement 1: 77. Von Hippel-Lindau ... Bau, Pathogenese und Beziehungen zur Angiomatosis retinae, (doctoral thesis); Acta pathologica et microbiologica Scandinavica, ... "angiomatosis of the central nervous system". This disease is characterized by tumors of the retina and the brain, along with ...
ISBN 1-84619-099-1. Bannayan, G. A. (1 July 1971). "Lipomatosis, angiomatosis, and macrencephalia. A previously undescribed ...
Other uncommon names are: angiomatosis retinae, familial cerebello-retinal angiomatosis, cerebelloretinal hemangioblastomatosis ... Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), also known as Familial cerebello retinal angiomatosis, is a rare genetic disorder with ... Lindau A (1927). "Zur Frage der Angiomatosis Retinae und Ihrer Hirncomplikation". Acta Ophthalmol. 4: 193-226. doi:10.1111/j. ... February 2007). "Genotype-phenotype correlation in von Hippel-Lindau disease with retinal angiomatosis". Archives of ...
February 2007). "Genotype-phenotype correlation in von Hippel-Lindau disease with retinal angiomatosis". Archives of ...
Ullmann's syndrome: A systemic angiomatosis due to multiple arteriovenous malformations. NCBI Emerich Ullmann and Organ ...
"Molecular epidemiology of bartonella infections in patients with bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis". N. Engl. J. Med. 337 (26): ...
B. quintana also induces lesions seen in bacillary angiomatosis that protrude into vascular lumina, often occluding blood flow ... In trench fever or B. quintana-induced endocarditis patients, bacillary angiomatosis lesions are also seen. Notably, ... "Bacillary Angiomatosis: The Histopathology and Differential Diagnosis of a Pseudoneoplastic Infection in Patients with Human ... "Molecular Epidemiology of Bartonella Infections in Patients with Bacillary Angiomatosis-Peliosis". New England Journal of ...
December 1997). "Molecular epidemiology of bartonella infections in patients with bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis". N. Engl. J ...
Others: Sturge-Weber syndrome (encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis), a rare congenital neurological and skin disorder.. ...
The treatment for bacillary angiomatosis is erythromycin given for three to four months. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; ... Bartonella quintana is closely related to Bartonella henselae, the agent of cat scratch fever and bacillary angiomatosis. The ...
"Molecular epidemiology of bartonella infections in patients with bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis". N. Engl. J. Med. 337 (26): ...
Angiomatosis is a non-neoplastic condition characterised by nests of proliferating capillaries arranged in a lobular pattern, ... "angiomatosis" at Dorlands Medical Dictionary "Von Hippel-Lindau Disease (VHL) Information Page". www.ninds.nih.gov. National ... Bacillary angiomatosis Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome Sturge-Weber syndrome It is a vascular malformation wherein blood ... Prognosis depends on the size and location of the tumour, untreated angiomatosis may lead to blindness and/ or permanent brain ...
Universal angiomatosis (also known as "Generalized telangiectasia") is a bleeding disease that affects the blood vessels of the ...
Definition of bacillary angiomatosis. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ...
Definition of congenital dysplastic angiomatosis. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical ... congenital dysplastic angiomatosis. Definition: autosomal dominant angiomatosis in which there is dysplasia of the underlying ... tissues, sometimes with overgrowth of bone (Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome), or encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis (Sturge- ...
Skeletal-extraskeletal angiomatosis is defined as a benign vascular proliferation affecting the medullar cavity of the bone and ... Skeletal-extraskeletal angiomatosis is defined as a benign vascular proliferation affecting the medullar cavity of the bone and ... Skull Cavernoma Hemangioma Monoclonal Gammopathy Skeletal-extraskeletal angiomatosis Paraproteinemia This is a preview of ... Clayer M., Skeletal angiomatosis in association with gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia and paraproteinemia: a case report, J. ...
Bacillary angiomatosis (bartonellosis) presents as red popular skin lesions that resemble (and are often mistaken for) Kaposi ... Bacillary angiomatosis. Jun 16, 2009. When is Bacillary angiomatosis likely to show up after contracting HIV? Could it show up ... Bacillary angiomatosis (bartonellosis) presents as red popular skin lesions that resemble (and are often mistaken for) Kaposi ...
In bacillary angiomatosis, either of two species of rochalimaea--R. quintana or R. henselae--can be isolated from cutaneous ... Isolation of Rochalimaea species from cutaneous and osseous lesions of bacillary angiomatosis N Engl J Med. 1992 Dec 3;327(23): ... Background: Bacillary angiomatosis is characterized by vascular lesions, which occur usually in patients infected with the ... Conclusions: In bacillary angiomatosis, either of two species of rochalimaea--R. quintana or R. henselae--can be isolated from ...
Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Infect Dis 17: 612- ... Bacillary Angiomatosis. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 91, 439 (2014); https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13- ...
List of causes of Babesiosis and Bacillary angiomatosis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and ... Bacillary angiomatosis:*Causes: Bacillary angiomatosis *Introduction: Bacillary angiomatosis *Bacillary angiomatosis: Add a 3rd ... Bacillary angiomatosis: Remove a symptom Results: Causes of Babesiosis AND Bacillary angiomatosis 1. HIV/AIDS. Show causes with ... Babesiosis and Bacillary angiomatosis. *Babesiosis AND Bacillary angiomatosis - Causes of All Symptoms *Babesiosis OR Bacillary ...
List of 290 causes for Anorexia and Bacillary angiomatosis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, ... Bacillary angiomatosis:*Causes: Bacillary angiomatosis *Introduction: Bacillary angiomatosis *Bacillary angiomatosis: Add a 3rd ... Bacillary angiomatosis: Remove a symptom Results: Causes of Anorexia AND Bacillary angiomatosis 1. Cat scratch disease. 2. HIV/ ... Anorexia and Bacillary angiomatosis. *Anorexia AND Bacillary angiomatosis - Causes of All Symptoms *Anorexia OR Bacillary ...
Angiomatosis, Familial Cerebelloretinal. An autosomal dominant disorder caused by Mutations in a Tumor Suppressor Gene. This ...
We report here a case of systemic cystic angiomatosis (SCA) with multisystem involvement affecting the neck, thyroid, thoracic ... Systemic cystic angiomatosis is a rare benign disorder due to the maldeveloped vascular and lymphatic system with less than 50 ... W. J. Boyle, "Cystic angiomatosis of bone. a report of three cases and review of the literature," The Journal of Bone & Joint ... J. E. Jacobs and P. Kimmelstiel, "Cystic angiomatosis of the skeletal system," The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, vol. 35, no ...
Cystic Angiomatosis all over my skeleton these are Tumor like cysts on the bone with agonising pain, I was medically discharged ... By Will Mcgookin, Cystic Angiomatosis, United Kingdom, October 4, 2017 Hi Im now 45 and have this rare disease a lot of ... investigations and operations in the previous years, Cystic Angiomatosis all over my skeleton these are Tumor like cysts on the ...
Bacillary angiomatosis is caused by infection with gram-negative Bartonella bacilli (such as BARTONELLA HENSELAE), and is often ... Bacillary Angiomatosis: A reactive vascular proliferation that is characterized by the multiple tumor-like lesions in skin, ... Angiomatosis, Bacillary; Angiomatosis, Bacillary Epithelioid; Angiomatoses, Bacillary; Angiomatoses, Bacillary Epithelioid; ... Angiomatoses, Epithelioid; Bacillary Angiomatoses; Bacillary Epithelioid Angiomatoses; Bacillary Epithelioid Angiomatosis; ...
Kutzner H, Requena L, Mentzel T, Pfau B. Diffuse dermal angiomatosis. Hautarzt 2002; 53: 808-12.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Diffuse dermal angiomatosis of the breast: Clinicopathologic study of 5 patients. J Am Acad Dermatol 2014; 71: 1212-7.CrossRef ... Diffuse dermal angiomatosis. J Cutan Pathol 2006; 33: 646-8.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Diffuse dermal angiomatosis: a variant of reactive cutaneous angioendotheliomatosis. J Cutan Pathol 1994; 21: 363-70.CrossRef ...
Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy Accompanied by Cystic Angiomatosis JOHN D. BRUNZELL, M.D.; STEWART W. SHANKLE, M.D.; JOHN ... Five siblings had congenital generalized lipodystrophy and systemic cystic angiomatosis. Manifestations of each disease and a ... The simultaneous occurrence of these two diseases suggests that angiomatosis is a common, previously overlooked manifestation ... Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy Accompanied by Cystic Angiomatosis. Ann Intern Med. ;69:501-516. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-69 ...
The cause of bacillary angiomatosis is a previously uncharacterized rickettsia-like organism, closely related to R. quintana. ... The agent of bacillary angiomatosis. An approach to the identification of uncultured pathogens N Engl J Med. 1990 Dec 6;323(23 ... Background: Bacillary angiomatosis is an infectious disease causing proliferation of small blood vessels in the skin and ... A sequence obtained from a fourth patient with bacillary angiomatosis differed from the sequence found in the other three ...
Intracerebral Bacillary Angiomatosis in a Patient Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Annals of Internal Medicine; 116 ( ... Bacillary Angiomatosis and Bacillary Splenitis in Immunocompetent Adults Jordan W. Tappero, MD, MPH; Jane E. Koehler, MD; ... Rochalimaeas Role in Cat Scratch Disease and Bacillary Angiomatosis Annals of Internal Medicine; 118 (5): 388-390 ... Bacillary angiomatosis and parenchymal bacillary peliosis are recently described vascular disorders associated with infection ...
Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is caused by the Gram-negative bacteria B. henselae and B. quintana. Cutaneous BA was first ... 2. Levy GR, Nayler S. Bacillary angiomatosis. The first case reported in South Africa. S Afr Med J 1993; 83: 855-856. [ Links ] ...
... bacillary angiomatosis, and related syndromes has a long and often circuitous history. Recognition of the etiologic agents and ... Tappero JW, Koehler JE, Berger TG, Cockerell CJ, Lee T-H, Busch MP, Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary splenitis in ... Tappero JW, Mohle-Boetani J, Koehler JE, Swaminathan B, Berger TG, LeBoit PE, The epidemiology of bacillary angiomatosis and ... Cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and other infections due to Rochalimaea. N Engl J Med. 1994;330:1509-15. DOIPubMed ...
... angiomatosis explanation free. What is angiomatosis? Meaning of angiomatosis medical term. What does angiomatosis mean? ... Looking for online definition of angiomatosis in the Medical Dictionary? ... angiomatosis. Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.. Related to angiomatosis: peliosis, hemangioblastoma. angiomatosis. [an″je- ... Angiomatosis , definition of angiomatosis by Medical dictionary https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/angiomatosis ...
Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, ... Contents for Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: *Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis *What is Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis? ... Misdiagnosis of Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis. Causes of Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis. Read more about causes of ... Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: Introduction. Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: A rare inherited disorder involving a skin ...
Graft-versus-host disease-associated angiomatosis (GVHD-AA) is an uncommon manifestation of chronic GVHD consisting of friable ... Graft-versus-host disease-associated angiomatosis (GVHD-AA) is an uncommon manifestation of chronic GVHD consisting of friable ... Endothelial chimerism in chronic sclerotic-type chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and GVHD-associated angiomatosis.. ...
MalaCards based summary : Angiomatosis is related to bacillary angiomatosis and diffuse dermal angiomatosis. An important gene ... MalaCards organs/tissues related to Angiomatosis:. 39 Kidney, Brain, Retina, Eye, Spinal Cord, Bone, Pancreas ... Drugs for Angiomatosis (from DrugBank, HMDB, Dgidb, PharmGKB, IUPHAR, NovoSeek, BitterDB):. (show all 43) id. Name. Status. ... Articles related to Angiomatosis:. (show top 50) (show all 559) id. Title. Authors. Year. ...
  • The simultaneous occurrence of these two diseases suggests that angiomatosis is a common, previously overlooked manifestation of congenital lipodystrophy or a new syndrome in a heterogeneous group of lipodystrophy disorders. (annals.org)
  • Prevalences of retinal angiomatosis in VHL patients in 3 genotypic mutational categories of single amino-acid substitutions, protein-truncating mutations, and complete deletion of VHL protein. (cdc.gov)
  • Prevalence of retinal angiomatosis at a juxtapapillary location (in at least one eye) in each of the 3 genotypic categories. (cdc.gov)
  • It is possible that immunoglobulins from monoclonal gammopathies have an etiologic role in the development of the bone and skin changes in older patients, as an acquired condition, by producing a vascular injury that could lead to the multiple hemangiomas in skeletal-extraskeletal angiomatosis. (springer.com)
  • Clayer M., Skeletal angiomatosis in association with gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia and paraproteinemia: a case report, J. Orthop. (springer.com)
  • More detailed information about the symptoms , causes , and treatments of Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis is available below. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Angiomatosis: a vascular malformation of infancy and childhood. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is no publication about pulmonary manifestation of angiomatosis in combination with vascular malformation and hemoptysis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We present the case of a 29-year-old German woman with angiomatosis and associated pulmonary vascular malformation in her lower left lobe with a Kasabach-Merritt syndrome like condition. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In a case of angiomatosis with an associated pulmonary lobar vascular malformation, lobectomy can be safely performed to prevent life-threatening bleeding. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vertebral angiomatosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for any young cat with thoracolumbar myelopathy secondary to a mass associated with the vertebral pedicle. (usda.gov)
  • El angiosarcoma primario de hueso es una lesión infrecuente que se asocia raramente con lesiones óseas, v. gr. solamente en dos casos se ha informado asociación con agiomatosis ósea. (bvsalud.org)
  • 2017. https://nursing.unboundmedicine.com/nursingcentral/view/Tabers-Dictionary/730377/all/angiomatosis. (unboundmedicine.com)