Radiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Radiology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of x-ray diagnostic and therapeutic services.Radiology, Interventional: Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Teleradiology: The electronic transmission of radiological images from one location to another for the purposes of interpretation and/or consultation. Users in different locations may simultaneously view images with greater access to secondary consultations and improved continuing education. (From American College of Radiology, ACR Standard for Teleradiology, 1994, p3)Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Radionuclide Angiography: The measurement of visualization by radiation of any organ after a radionuclide has been injected into its blood supply. It is used to diagnose heart, liver, lung, and other diseases and to measure the function of those organs, except renography, for which RADIOISOTOPE RENOGRAPHY is available.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Tomography, Spiral Computed: Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Computer Systems: Systems composed of a computer or computers, peripheral equipment, such as disks, printers, and terminals, and telecommunications capabilities.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.Multidetector Computed Tomography: Types of spiral computed tomography technology in which multiple slices of data are acquired simultaneously improving the resolution over single slice acquisition technology.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Iopamidol: A non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiological procedures.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Neuroradiography: Radiography of the central nervous system.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Iohexol: An effective non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiographic procedures. Its low systemic toxicity is the combined result of low chemotoxicity and low osmolality.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Indocyanine Green: A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations: Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.X-Ray Intensifying Screens: Screens which absorb the energy in the x-ray beam that has penetrated the patient and convert this energy into a light pattern which has as nearly as possible the same information as the original x-ray beam. The more light a screen produces for a given input of x-radiation, the less x-ray exposure and thus shorter exposure time are needed to expose the film. In most film-screen systems, the film is sandwiched between two screens in a cassette so that the emulsion on each side is exposed to the light from its contiguous screen.Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Radiation ProtectionX-Ray Film: A film base coated with an emulsion designed for use with x-rays.Speech Recognition Software: Software capable of recognizing dictation and transcribing the spoken words into written text.Local Area Networks: Communications networks connecting various hardware devices together within or between buildings by means of a continuous cable or voice data telephone system.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Forms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Circle of Willis: A polygonal anastomosis at the base of the brain formed by the internal carotid (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL), proximal parts of the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries (ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), the anterior communicating artery and the posterior communicating arteries.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Arteriovenous Malformations: Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Triiodobenzoic Acids: Triiodo-substituted derivatives of BENZOIC ACID.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Gadolinium DTPA: A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Subtraction Technique: Combination or superimposition of two images for demonstrating differences between them (e.g., radiograph with contrast vs. one without, radionuclide images using different radionuclides, radiograph vs. radionuclide image) and in the preparation of audiovisual materials (e.g., offsetting identical images, coloring of vessels in angiograms).Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Military ScienceRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Computer Terminals: Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Hospitals, Group Practice: Hospitals organized and controlled by a group of physicians who practice together and provide each other with mutual support.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Cineangiography: Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Work Simplification: The construction or arrangement of a task so that it may be done with the greatest possible efficiency.Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: The creation and display of functional images showing where the blood is flowing into the MYOCARDIUM by following over time the distribution of tracers injected into the blood stream.Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Multimedia: Materials, frequently computer applications, that combine some or all of text, sound, graphics, animation, and video into integrated packages. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial: The ratio of maximum blood flow to the MYOCARDIUM with CORONARY STENOSIS present, to the maximum equivalent blood flow without stenosis. The measurement is commonly used to verify borderline stenosis of CORONARY ARTERIES.Cerebral Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Myocardial Revascularization: The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Cardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques: Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the cardiac cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Moyamoya Disease: A noninflammatory, progressive occlusion of the intracranial CAROTID ARTERIES and the formation of netlike collateral arteries arising from the CIRCLE OF WILLIS. Cerebral angiogram shows the puff-of-smoke (moyamoya) collaterals at the base of the brain. It is characterized by endothelial HYPERPLASIA and FIBROSIS with thickening of arterial walls. This disease primarily affects children but can also occur in adults.World War I: Global conflict primarily fought on European continent, that occurred between 1914 and 1918.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Intracranial Arteriosclerosis: Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Medical Record Administrators: Individuals professionally qualified in the management of patients' records. Duties may include planning, designing, and managing systems for patient administrative and clinical data, as well as patient medical records. The concept includes medical record technicians.Coronary Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of CORONARY VESSELS. Most coronary aneurysms are due to CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS, and the rest are due to inflammatory diseases, such as KAWASAKI DISEASE.Gadolinium: Gadolinium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Gd, atomic number 64, and atomic weight 157.25. Its oxide is used in the control rods of some nuclear reactors.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Renal Artery Obstruction: Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System: Uniform method for health care providers and medical suppliers to report professional services, procedures, and supplies. It consists of alphanumeric codes and modifiers for the use of all public and private health insurers. It is developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Vasospasm, Intracranial: Constriction of arteries in the SKULL due to sudden, sharp, and often persistent smooth muscle contraction in blood vessels. Intracranial vasospasm results in reduced vessel lumen caliber, restricted blood flow to the brain, and BRAIN ISCHEMIA that may lead to hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HYPOXIA-ISCHEMIA, BRAIN).Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Radiography, Abdominal: Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.Choroid: The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Anterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Branches of the anterior cerebral artery supply the CAUDATE NUCLEUS; INTERNAL CAPSULE; PUTAMEN; SEPTAL NUCLEI; GYRUS CINGULI; and surfaces of the FRONTAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE.Compact Disks: Computer disks storing data with a maximum reduction of space and bandwidth. The compact size reduces cost of transmission and storage.Choroidal Neovascularization: A pathological process consisting of the formation of new blood vessels in the CHOROID.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Gated Blood-Pool Imaging: Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Libraries, Digital: Libraries in which a major proportion of the resources are available in machine-readable format, rather than on paper or MICROFORM.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Cavernous Sinus: An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Analog-Digital Conversion: The process of converting analog data such as continually measured voltage to discrete, digital form.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial: A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and, Interventions; Society of Interventional, Radiology; Society for Vascular, Medicine ...
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions; Society of Interventional Radiology; Society of Thoracic Surgeons; ... American College of Radiology; American Stroke Association; Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists; ...
TACE is an interventional radiology procedure performed in the angiography suite. The procedure involves gaining percutaneous ... Brown DB, Geschwind JF, Soulen MC, Millward SF, Sacks D (2006). "Society of Interventional Radiology position statement on ... is a minimally invasive procedure performed in interventional radiology to restrict a tumor's blood supply. Small embolic ... The interventional radiologist then performs a selective angiogram of the celiac trunk and possibly the superior mesenteric ...
Alternatively, in patients with refractory bleeding Interventional Radiology may be consulted for an angiogram with ... Today angiography is a good additional diagnostic, but then it can only be seen during a bleeding at that exact time. It is ... Seminars in Interventional Radiology. 29 (3): 178-186. doi:10.1055/s-0032-1326926. ISSN 0739-9529. PMC 3577586 . PMID 23997409 ... diagnosed and treated endoscopically; however, endoscopic ultrasound or angiography can be of benefit. Endoscopic techniques ...
Rösch's notable awards include: SCVIR Gold Medal Japanese Society of Angiography and Interventional Radiology Gold Medal ... thrombolysis and visceral angiography. Rösch would become the Chief of Vascular and Interventional Radiology at OHSU. During ... Society Gold Medal The Interventional Radiology Lifetime Achievement Award from Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology Society ... where Dotter gave his famous lecture on angiography, effectively creating the field of interventional radiology. Dotter ...
X-ray angiography). In fact, clinical trials are underway in the fields of vascular surgery and interventional radiology. Non- ...
The Radiology department runs 24 hours a day and has 2 modern CT machines, two interventional angiography suites, multiple ... and also houses the Hospital's Radiology department. ...
Angiography. Abrams was a founding fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), and he won an SIR Gold Medal in ... Society of Interventional Radiology. Retrieved March 29, 2016. "SIR Award Recipients". Society of Interventional Radiology. ... chief of the journal Postgraduate Radiology and the founding editor-in-chief of CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. ... He was then the Philip H. Cook Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School and was the chief radiologist at Brigham and ...
Colour Doppler Mammography and Interventional Radiology. Cancer Hospital, Block-B, North Nazimabad. Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, ... The services provided at hospitals are X-Ray and Ultrasound, MRI, CT scan, Digital Subtraction Angiography, ...
... and the field of interventional radiology blossomed. Building on the work of Seldinger, Charles Dotter and Andreas Gruentzig ... Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 The Seldinger technique is used for angiography, insertion of chest drains and ... Interventional procedures, such as thermoablation, angioplasty, embolisation or biopsy, may be performed. Upon completion of ... However, with the introduction of the Seldinger technique, angiography became a relatively risk-free procedure, ...
3D CT Angiography, PACS. Nuclear Medicine Interventional Radiology Pathology: Biochemistry, Clinical Pathology, Haematology, ... The following diagnostic facilities are available in the hospital: Radiology: X-Ray, Ultrasound, Colour Doppler, Mammography, ...
... may include stenting or medications to break down the clot provided at the site of obstruction by interventional radiology. ... The best method of diagnosis is angiography, with computer tomography (CT) being used when that is not available. Treatment of ... Radiology. 199 (3): 632-6. doi:10.1148/radiology.199.3.8637978. PMID 8637978. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2008-02-27. ... doi:10.1148/radiology.166.1.3336673. PMID 3336673. Taourel P, Deneuville M, Pradel J, Régent D, Bruel J (1996). "Acute ...
Society of Interventional Radiology, and the ACC/AHA Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Writing Committee to Develop Guidelines ... Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society for Vascular Medicine and Biology, ...
Seminars in Interventional Radiology. 23 (3): 223-229. doi:10.1055/s-2006-948759. ISSN 0739-9529. Nojiri, Junichi; Matsumoto, ... "MR Angiography and CT Angiography of the Artery of Adamkiewicz: Noninvasive Preoperative Assessment of Thoracoabdominal Aortic ... Nijenhuis RJ, Mull M, Wilmink JT, Thron AK, Backes WH (2006). "MR angiography of the great anterior radiculomedullary artery ( ... Its location can be identified with computed tomographic angiography. It is named for Albert Wojciech Adamkiewicz. Milen, Mark ...
They collaborated with many of the founders of Interventional Radiology, including Dr. Charles Dotter, to grow Cook, Inc. into ... Initially making medical devices, including guidewires for catheter angiography, Bill Cook and his wife Gayle started Cook ...
These are: Medical imaging physics is also known as diagnostic and interventional radiology physics. Clinical (both "in-house" ... and quality assurance of diagnostic radiology physics areas such as radiographic X-rays, fluoroscopy, mammography, angiography ... Medical physicists are often found in the following healthcare specialties: diagnostic and interventional radiology (also known ...
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of NeuroInterventional ... or computed tomography angiography (CTA) or invasive angiography. Revascularization of symptomatic stenoses has a much higher ... Carotid stenosis is diagnosed with ultrasound doppler studies of the neck arteries, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) ... American College of Radiology, American Society of Neuroradiology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Society of ...
The hospital is well equipped with an angiography suite, dialysis unit, lithotripsy suite, advanced interventional radiology ...
Critical Care Medicine Internal Medicine Urgent Care Clinic Interventional Radiology/Angiography Laboratory Services Medical ...
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of NeuroInterventional ... or post-stent balloon dilation and cerebral angiography. Carotid stenting is the preferred therapy for patients who are at an ... American College of Radiology, American Society of Neuroradiology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Society of ...
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, ... American College of Radiology, American Stroke Association, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, ...
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, ... Computed tomography angiography is a fast, noninvasive test that gives an accurate three-dimensional view of the aorta. These ... If there is high clinical suspicion, a more sensitive imaging test (CT angiogram, MR angiography, or transesophageal echo) may ... American College of Radiology, American Stroke Association, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, ...
Society of Interventional Radiology, and the ACC/AHA Task Force on Practice Guidelines (writing committee to develop guidelines ... Alternative less often used methods for visualization of an aneurysm include MRI and angiography. An aneurysm ruptures if the ... Clinical radiology. 70 (2): 183-196. doi:10.1016/j.crad.2014.09.010. PMID 25443774. GBD 2013 Mortality Causes of Death ... Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society for Vascular Medicine and Biology, ...
This area of vascular surgery is called Endovascular Surgery or Interventional Vascular Radiology, a term that some in the ... A recent trend in the United States is the stand-alone day angiography facility associated with a private vascular surgery ... Further development of the field has occurred via joint efforts between interventional radiology, vascular surgery, and ... Cardiothoracic surgeons and interventional cardiologists manage diseases of the heart vessels. Neurosurgeons and interventional ...
... fellowship is a one- or two-year program that follows diagnostic radiology residency. Interventional ... Angiography is traditionally used for diagnosis of vascular abnormalities or diagnosis and characterization of masses or other ... the American Society of Spine Radiology (ASSR), the American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR), and the American ... radiology residents are required to spend at least four months learning neuroradiology to be eligible for radiology board ...
Radiology *Interventional radiology. *Nuclear medicine. *Pathology *Anatomical pathology. *Clinical pathology. *Clinical ... angiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ... is the main organization of interventional nephrologists. Other ... ASDIN (American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology) ...
British Journal of Radiology;Apr2007, Vol. 80 Issue 952, pe81 Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm is uncommon, and the ... Interventional Neuroradiology;Feb2016, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p62 Background Double origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar ... Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and.... *Carotid and vertebral artery dissection syndromes. Thanvi, B ...
Interventional Radiology job opportunity is on Simply Hired. There are over 3132 Angiography Technologist, Interventional ... New Angiography Technologist, Interventional Radiology careers are added daily on SimplyHired.com. The low-stress way to find ... Interventional Radiology jobs available. See salaries, compare reviews, easily apply, and get hired. ... Interventional Radiology (IR) Technologist 3 - Interventional Lab - Orlando. Interventional Radiology, Radiology Tech., Imaging ...
Angiography. Dedicated to offering world-class medical services, PVHMC cares about patient-well-being and comfort. ... Interventional Radiology & Angiography. Treating Conditions Using Radiological Imaging. Interventional radiology is the ... The interventional neuro-radiology lab offers our community access to the same cutting-edge technology, previously only ... PVHMC now has a new state-of-the-art interventional radiology suite, which will allow physicians to diagnose and treat stroke ...
Interventional Radiology is a method of treatment that uses X-rays- to guide the insertion of catheters (tubes), wires, and ... Interventional radiology is often used as an alternative to much more invasive procedures such as surgery in order to enhance ... Interventional Radiology procedures also involve making a small incision (cut) into the skin. Small instruments are inserted ... Angiography. Angiography is a diagnostic procedure that is performed by a radiologist (a specialized doctor) with the ...
... interventional radiology, Monte Carlo, patient dosimetry, x-ray angiography National Category Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and ... A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM ... Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to ... Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Search outside of DiVA. GoogleGoogle Scholar. ...
Angiography, Biopsy, Thrombolysis, Embolization), Applications (Oncology, Cardiology, Urology & Nephrology) - - Market research ... Interventional Radiology Products Market by type (Stents, Catheters, IVC Filter, Accessories), Procedure Type (Angioplasty, ... Life Sciences»Diagnostics»Medical Imaging»Interventional Radiology Interventional Radiology Products Market by type (Stents, ... ANGIOGRAPHY*Table INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY PRODUCTS MARKET SIZE FOR ANGIOGRAPHY, BY REGION, 2014-2021 (USD MILLION) ...
INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY/RADIOLOGY ANGIOGRAPHY at Lee Health ... Florida Radiology Technology License Other: ARRT Registered. ... Performs diagnostic, angiographic and interventional imaging procedures in accordance with established procedures under ... LEAD SPECIAL PROCEDURES TECHNOLOGIST/INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY TECHNOLOGIST or RADIOLOGY ANGIOGRAPHY TECH. ...Bring your flip ...
Interventional Radiology. Fibroids. What are fibroids?. Fibroids are benign (non-cancerous) growths that develop in the muscle ... Interventional Cardiology * Coronary * Coronary angiography * Coronary angioplasty/stenting * Electrophysiology * Pulmonary ... Interventional Oncology * Targeted cancer therapies * Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) * Transcatheter Arterial ... Interventional Oncology * Targeted cancer therapies * Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) * Transcatheter Arterial ...
... this new edition focuses on the 100 topics essential to mastering contemporary interventional radiology. ... Completely revamped to reflect the fast-moving landscape of interventional radiology, ... Home , Books , Abrams Angiography: Interventional Radiology View PDF. Abrams Angiography: Interventional Radiology. ... Abrams Angiography: Interventional Radiology is included in the following Collections:. *Lippincott Williams & Wilkins ...
At Interventional Radiology Associates NZ, we offer a variety of diagnostic imaging services. For all appointments and ... Interventional Radiology Associates New Zealand. Home , Disclaimer , Privacy , Sitemap , Feedback , Tell a friend , Contact Us ... Interventional Radiology Associates. First Floor. Mercy Hospital. 98 Mountain Road. Epsom 1023. Auckland. (Co-located with ... Interventional Radiology Associates New Zealand. For all appointments and enquiries, please call (09) 623 6758 ...
Alphenix angiography systems deliver superior images, enhanced workflow and industry-leading dose-optimization tools, better ... Alphenix solutions for interventional radiology and oncology As interventional procedures and oncology treatments increase in ... Alphenix interventional angiography systems are available with a choice of flat panel detectors sizes to suit your coverage ... Alphenix floor- and ceiling-mounted C-arms support complex interventional procedures with an unprecedented range of patient ...
Catheter angiography is mostly used for final, precise planning and performing an interventional procedure. Assessment of ... The efficiency of interventional radiology can be improved by multidisciplinary consultations (vascular surgeon, angiologist, ... Catheter angiography. For many decades, catheter angiography has been the gold standard method. In recent years, CTA and MRA ... Disadvantages include that not all surgical procedures can be substituted by interventional radiology procedures; there are ...
... time interventional radiologist at Auckland City Hospital and his his practice covers all aspects of interventional radiology. ... Interventional Radiology Associates New Zealand. Home , Disclaimer , Privacy , Sitemap , Feedback , Tell a friend , Contact Us ... Interventional oncology is a minimally invasive treatment that directly targets difficult to treat cancerous conditions such as ... Interventional Urology involves treatment of patients with urological diseases and conditions such as kidney stones, cancer, ...
Canon Medical is proud to announce the Alphenix family of interventional systems. ... Angiography. Image Resolution for Tomorrows Interventions. Made possible.. Building on a legacy of unprecedented patient ... The new Alphenix family of interventional systems deliver images with clarity and precision. Combined with industry-leading ... The new Alphenix Workstation seamlessly integrates applications to help you plan, analyze and perform interventional procedures ...
Interventional Radiology. Womens IR. Interventional Radiology (IR) has introduced minimally invasive treatment options for ... Interventional Cardiology * Coronary * Coronary angiography * Coronary angioplasty/stenting * Electrophysiology * Pulmonary ... Interventional Oncology * Targeted cancer therapies * Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) * Transcatheter Arterial ... Interventional Oncology * Targeted cancer therapies * Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) * Transcatheter Arterial ...
A subset of radiology providing image guided diagnosis and treatment of all organs with minimum invasion. ... Thyrocervical Trunk Angiography Started by abegnaud, 03-12-2012 10:02 AM ... Forum: Interventional Radiology. A subset of radiology providing image guided diagnosis and treatment of all organs with ... Radiology report dictation Started by amyfust, 01-10-2019 12:18 PM ...
U.S. Interventional Radiology Market by Product (MRI System, Ultrasound Imaging System, CT Scanner, Angiography System, ... Fluoroscopy System, and Biopsy System), Procedure (Angiography, Balloon Angioplasty, Embolization, Biopsy, Vertebroplasty- ...
Interventional X-ray coronary angiography is a primary tool to guide catheter-based coronary interventions. High-quality images ... Radiology. 1967;89:815-24.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar. *. 5.. Seldinger SI. Catheter replacement of the needle in percutaneous ... Interventional X-ray coronary angiography is a primary tool to guide catheter-based coronary interventions. High-quality images ... Lanzer P. (2018) Interventional X-ray Coronary Angiography. In: Lanzer P. (eds) Textbook of Catheter-Based Cardiovascular ...
Angiography Technologist, Interventional Radiology, Days (ARRT, CI, VI, CV). Medstar Georgetown University Hospital - ... Certification in Vascular Interventional (VI), Cardiac-Interventional (CI) or Cardiovascular (CV) preferred or must be obtained ...
The radiology residency now incorporates training in many areas that were unknown a few decades ago. Today, as patients spend a ... will assist physicians and nurses in preparing patients and their families for the many procedures performed in the radiology ... the radiology department has evolved from a purely diagnostic area to one where multifaceted therapies are performed. ... Interventional radiology is primarily concerned with treating existing morbidities, with the main exception of angiography, and ...
Common interventional procedures. Angiography. An X-ray of the arteries or veins to diagnose blockages and other blood vessel ... What is Interventional Radiology?. Interventional Radiology is a specialized and rapidly-expanding field within the ... Use of angiography, balloon angioplasty, stenting, and thrombolysis to improve blood flow through a fistula or graft so the ... conventional radiology department. These radiologists specialize in minimally-invasive procedures and therapies using image ...
Radiology. , Read e-book online Abrams Angiography: Interventional Radiology (3rd Edition) PDF. ... Angiography: Interventional Radiology has been thoroughly remodeled to mirror the fast-moving panorama of interventional ... Read e-book online Abrams Angiography: Interventional Radiology (3rd Edition) PDF. Posted on March 8, 2018. by admin ... Abrams Angiography: Interventional Radiology (3rd Edition) by Jeffrey Geschwind, Michael Dake. by Jason. 4.2 ...
Our Interventional Radiology Services. * Angiography. Angiography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize the inside, ... Interventional Radiology. Interventional Radiology services can help to pinpoint a diagnosis, confirm a course of treatment, ...
Angiography and Angioplasty. A diagnostic angiogram is used to examine the inside of arteries and veins to detect blockages or ... Interventional Radiology. Minimally invasive interventional radiology techniques are used to treat a wide variety of medical ... Home/Services/Diagnostic Imaging/Interventional Radiology. Section Menu. Section Menu.... Diagnostic Imaging Home. • Bone ... Northwest Health offers a range of minimally invasive interventional radiology techniques to offer options to treat a variety ...
Coronary Angiography). *Cardiac Electrophysiology. *Cardiac Imaging. *Cardiac MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) of Heart or ...
  • These include angiography, venography and biopsies of mass lesions almost anywhere in the body to obtain tissue for pathologic diagnosis. (lahey.org)
  • Virtual reality will change how we look at a patient's anatomy during treatment,' said Wayne Monsky , MD, PhD, a professor of radiology at the University of Washington and lead author of the study. (prnewswire.com)
  • Among the finest in the nation, YRMC's hybrid operating room is an excellent addition to YRMC's extensive surgical suites and interventional facilities. (yrmc.org)