Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.
A phthalic indicator dye that appears yellow-green in normal tear film and bright green in a more alkaline medium such as the aqueous humor.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
A family of spiro(isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-(9H)xanthen)-3-one derivatives. These are used as dyes, as indicators for various metals, and as fluorescent labels in immunoassays.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.
A pathological process consisting of the formation of new blood vessels in the CHOROID.
The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.
The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.
Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.
An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.
A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.
Disorders of the choroid including hereditary choroidal diseases, neoplasms, and other abnormalities of the vascular layer of the uvea.
The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.
Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.
An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.
Fluid accumulation in the outer layer of the MACULA LUTEA that results from intraocular or systemic insults. It may develop in a diffuse pattern where the macula appears thickened or it may acquire the characteristic petaloid appearance referred to as cystoid macular edema. Although macular edema may be associated with various underlying conditions, it is most commonly seen following intraocular surgery, venous occlusive disease, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, and posterior segment inflammatory disease. (From Survey of Ophthalmology 2004; 49(5) 470-90)
An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Blockage of the RETINAL VEIN. Those at high risk for this condition include patients with HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; and other CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.
Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.
Diseases of the uvea.
Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.
Central retinal vein and its tributaries. It runs a short course within the optic nerve and then leaves and empties into the superior ophthalmic vein or cavernous sinus.
The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.
Inflammation of the choroid.
The administration of substances into the VITREOUS BODY of the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.
Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.
Central retinal artery and its branches. It arises from the ophthalmic artery, pierces the optic nerve and runs through its center, enters the eye through the porus opticus and branches to supply the retina.
A visual impairment characterized by the accumulation of fluid under the retina through a defect in the retinal pigment epithelium.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina.
The coagulation of tissue by an intense beam of light, including laser (LASER COAGULATION). In the eye it is used in the treatment of retinal detachments, retinal holes, aneurysms, hemorrhages, and malignant and benign neoplasms. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)
Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.
Fluorescent probe capable of being conjugated to tissue and proteins. It is used as a label in fluorescent antibody staining procedures as well as protein- and amino acid-binding techniques.
Devices for examining the interior of the eye, permitting the clear visualization of the structures of the eye at any depth. (UMDNS, 1999)
Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.
Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).
Therapy using oral or topical photosensitizing agents with subsequent exposure to light.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Permanent dilation of preexisting blood vessels (CAPILLARIES; ARTERIOLES; VENULES) creating small focal red lesions, most commonly in the skin or mucous membranes. It is characterized by the prominence of skin blood vessels, such as vascular spiders.
The measurement of visualization by radiation of any organ after a radionuclide has been injected into its blood supply. It is used to diagnose heart, liver, lung, and other diseases and to measure the function of those organs, except renography, for which RADIOISOTOPE RENOGRAPHY is available.
Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
Inflammation of the retinal vasculature with various causes including infectious disease; LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC; MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS; BEHCET SYNDROME; and CHORIORETINITIS.
The single layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA, situated closely to the tips (outer segments) of the RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. These epithelial cells are macroglia that perform essential functions for the photoreceptor cells, such as in nutrient transport, phagocytosis of the shed photoreceptor membranes, and ensuring retinal attachment.
Ocular disorders attendant upon non-ocular disease or injury.
Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.
Diseases, dysfunctions, or disorders of or located in the iris.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.
Colloid or hyaline bodies lying beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. They may occur either secondary to changes in the choroid that affect the pigment epithelium or as an autosomal dominant disorder of the retinal pigment epithelium.
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
Small breaks in the elastin-filled tissue of the retina.
Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.
Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.
Drugs that are pharmacologically inactive but when exposed to ultraviolet radiation or sunlight are converted to their active metabolite to produce a beneficial reaction affecting the diseased tissue. These compounds can be administered topically or systemically and have been used therapeutically to treat psoriasis and various types of neoplasms.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The administration of substances into the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA; the CILIARY BODY; and the IRIS in the eye.
Tumors of the choroid; most common intraocular tumors are malignant melanomas of the choroid. These usually occur after puberty and increase in incidence with advancing age. Most malignant melanomas of the uveal tract develop from benign melanomas (nevi).
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Hemorrhage into the VITREOUS BODY.
A rare genetic disorder characterized by partial or complete absence of the CORPUS CALLOSUM, resulting in infantile spasms, MENTAL RETARDATION, and lesions of the RETINA or OPTIC NERVE.
Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.
Autosomal dominant hereditary maculopathy with childhood-onset accumulation of LIPOFUSION in RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM. Affected individuals develop progressive central acuity loss, and distorted vision (METAMORPHOPSIA). It is associated with mutations in bestrophin, a chloride channel.
A rare disorder consisting of microangiopathy of brain, retina, and inner ear ARTERIOLES. It is characterized by the clinical triad of encephalopathy, BRANCH RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION and VERTIGO/hearing loss.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
A non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiological procedures.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Inflammation of the choroid in which the sensory retina becomes edematous and opaque. The inflammatory cells and exudate may burst through the sensory retina to cloud the vitreous body.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
Agents and endogenous substances that antagonize or inhibit the development of new blood vessels.
An exudate between the RETINA and CHOROID from various sources including the vitreous cavity, SUBARACHNOID SPACE, or abnormal vessels.
A group of compounds containing the porphin structure, four pyrrole rings connected by methine bridges in a cyclic configuration to which a variety of side chains are attached. The nature of the side chain is indicated by a prefix, as uroporphyrin, hematoporphyrin, etc. The porphyrins, in combination with iron, form the heme component in biologically significant compounds such as hemoglobin and myoglobin.
Types of spiral computed tomography technology in which multiple slices of data are acquired simultaneously improving the resolution over single slice acquisition technology.
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)
A bright bluish pink compound that has been used as a dye, biological stain, and diagnostic aid.
The inner layer of CHOROID, also called the lamina basalis choroideae, located adjacent to the RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM; (RPE) of the EYE. It is a membrane composed of the basement membranes of the choriocapillaris ENDOTHELIUM and that of the RPE. The membrane stops at the OPTIC NERVE, as does the RPE.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
A form of RETINAL DEGENERATION in which abnormal CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION occurs under the RETINA and MACULA LUTEA, causing bleeding and leaking of fluid. This leads to bulging and or lifting of the macula and the distortion or destruction of central vision.
The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.
The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.
The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Measurement of light given off by fluorescein in order to assess the integrity of various ocular barriers. The method is used to investigate the blood-aqueous barrier, blood-retinal barrier, aqueous flow measurements, corneal endothelial permeability, and tear flow dynamics.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Congenital anomaly in which some of the structures of the eye are absent due to incomplete fusion of the fetal intraocular fissure during gestation.
An effective non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiographic procedures. Its low systemic toxicity is the combined result of low chemotoxicity and low osmolality.
Diseases affecting the eye.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.
An esterified form of TRIAMCINOLONE. It is an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. Intralesional, intramuscular, and intra-articular injections are also administered under certain conditions.
Presence of an intraocular lens after cataract extraction.
Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.
The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Excessive axial myopia associated with complications (especially posterior staphyloma and CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION) that can lead to BLINDNESS.
The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.
The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.
Perforations through the whole thickness of the retina including the macula as the result of inflammation, trauma, degeneration, etc. The concept includes retinal breaks, tears, dialyses, and holes.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).
Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.
Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.
Removal of the whole or part of the vitreous body in treating endophthalmitis, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign bodies, and some types of glaucoma.
An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.
Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.
Method of measuring and mapping the scope of vision, from central to peripheral of each eye.
A syndrome characterized by bilateral granulomatous UVEITIS with IRITIS and secondary GLAUCOMA, premature ALOPECIA, symmetrical VITILIGO, poliosis circumscripta (a strand of depigmented hair), HEARING DISORDERS, and meningeal signs (neck stiffness and headache). Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid reveals a pattern consistent with MENINGITIS, ASEPTIC. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p748; Surv Ophthalmol 1995 Jan;39(4):265-292)
The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.
The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.
A polygonal anastomosis at the base of the brain formed by the internal carotid (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL), proximal parts of the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries (ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), the anterior communicating artery and the posterior communicating arteries.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.
Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.
A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.
Triiodo-substituted derivatives of BENZOIC ACID.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.
A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.
Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.
The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).
The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.
Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Ischemic injury to the OPTIC NERVE which usually affects the OPTIC DISK (optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic) and less frequently the retrobulbar portion of the nerve (optic neuropathy, posterior ischemic). The injury results from occlusion of arterial blood supply which may result from TEMPORAL ARTERITIS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; COLLAGEN DISEASES; EMBOLISM; DIABETES MELLITUS; and other conditions. The disease primarily occurs in the sixth decade or later and presents with the sudden onset of painless and usually severe monocular visual loss. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy also features optic disk edema with microhemorrhages. The optic disk appears normal in posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. (Glaser, Neuro-Ophthalmology, 2nd ed, p135)
Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
A characteristic symptom complex.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.
Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
The creation and display of functional images showing where the blood is flowing into the MYOCARDIUM by following over time the distribution of tracers injected into the blood stream.
Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.
A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304)
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
Hereditary, progressive degeneration of the neuroepithelium of the retina characterized by night blindness and progressive contraction of the visual field.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
The ratio of maximum blood flow to the MYOCARDIUM with CORONARY STENOSIS present, to the maximum equivalent blood flow without stenosis. The measurement is commonly used to verify borderline stenosis of CORONARY ARTERIES.
Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.
The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
Specialized PHOTOTRANSDUCTION neurons in the vertebrates, such as the RETINAL ROD CELLS and the RETINAL CONE CELLS. Non-visual photoreceptor neurons have been reported in the deep brain, the PINEAL GLAND and organs of the circadian system.
Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the cardiac cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts.
Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.
Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.
Delivery of drugs into an artery.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
A noninflammatory, progressive occlusion of the intracranial CAROTID ARTERIES and the formation of netlike collateral arteries arising from the CIRCLE OF WILLIS. Cerebral angiogram shows the puff-of-smoke (moyamoya) collaterals at the base of the brain. It is characterized by endothelial HYPERPLASIA and FIBROSIS with thickening of arterial walls. This disease primarily affects children but can also occur in adults.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.
Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.
A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.
Fluorescein angiography. References[edit]. .mw-parser-output .reflist{font-size:90%;margin-bottom:0.5em;list-style-type:decimal ...
DS = Digital Subtraction Angiography. *DR = Digital Radiography. *EC = Echocardiography. *ES = Endoscopy. *FA = Fluorescein ...
"Low dose fluorescein angiography of the conjunctiva and episclera". British Journal of Ophthalmology. 71 (1): 2-10. doi:10.1136 ... Fluorescein angiography has been used to study the blood flow of the bulbar conjunctiva and to differentiate the bulbar ... Meyer, P. A. (1988-01-01). "Patterns of blood flow in episcleral vessels studied by low-dose fluorescein videoangiography". Eye ...
J. Donald M. Gass, a macular degeneration specialist developed the use of fluorescein angiography as a diagnostic tool, and Dr ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Norton, EW; Gutman, F (1965). "Diabetic retinopathy studied by fluorescein angiography ... pioneered the use of fluorescein angiography for the diagnosis of macular and retinal diseases, which led to the accurate ...
Fluorescein angiography is a helpful adjunct. Findings include delayed venous filling, hypofluorescence caused by hemorrhage ...
It is an important landmark in Fluorescein angiography. Its diameter is 0.5mm, the central 1.5 degrees of an individual's ...
Variability in fluorescein angiography interpretation for photodynamic therapy in age-related macular degeneration. Retina. ... Quantitative image sequence analysis of fundus fluorescein angiography. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers. 1999 Jan;30(1):72-3. 19. Shin ... Quantitative, spatio-temporal image analysis of fluorescein angiography in age-related macular degeneration. Proc SPIE 1998; ... retinal imaging with a number of publications on image analysis methods for modalities such as fluorescein angiography. He ...
Fluorescein angiography is commonly used to diagnose the syndrome. There have been several methods in treating patients with ... Fluorescein angiography is quite useful in diagnosing retinal features of the disease, and the use of ultrasonography and ... MRI, CT, and cerebral angiography may all be used to investigate the extent and location of any vascular lesions affecting the ...
Sodium Fluorescein Angiography (abbreviated SFA, FA or FAG) is used for the imaging of retinal vascular disease and utilises ... Following the development of fundus photography, David Alvis, and Harold Novotny, performed the first fluorescein angiography ( ... Marmor, Michael F. (2011-07-01). "Fluorescein angiography: Insight and serendipity a half century ago". Archives of ... Red free photography is also regularly used as a base line photo prior to Angiography. Angiography is a process of ...
The abnormal vessels are even better seen with fluorescein angiography. In advanced disease, glaucoma is diagnosed by measuring ...
Fluorescein angiography is used less often than in the past. These investigations may be followed by genetic testing in order ...
Techniques of fluorescein angiography developed by Knight won international acclaim. Knight was president of the Dunedin Film ...
Amar Agarwal (2007). Fundus Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green Angiography: A Textbook and Atlas. SLACK Incorporated. pp. 18-. ...
Fluorescein angiography is usually performed for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with POHS. ... Stefan Dithmar; Frank Gerhard Holz (28 April 2008). Fluorescence Angiography in Ophthalmology. Springer. pp. 168-. ISBN 978-3- ...
Fluorescein angiography (FA) is helpful in identifying the anomalous vasculature, particularly in the early stages of Type 2 ... Diagnosis of MacTel type 2 may be aided by the use of advanced imaging techniques such as fluorescein angiography, fundus ... An abnormal capillary pattern is may be idedntified with fluorescein angiography. Areas of focal RPE hyperplasia (pigment ... Indocyanine green angiography-guided laser photocoagulation directed at the leaky microaneurysms and vessels combined with sub- ...
International Symposium on Fluorescein Angiography Ghent 28 March-1 April 1976. Documenta Ophthalmologica Proceedings Series. 9 ...
McGregor, AD (1987). "The Allen test - an investigation of its accuracy by fluorescein angiography". J Hand Surg Br Vol. 12 (1 ... In addition, the results of Allen's tests do not appear to correlate with distal blood flow as demonstrated by fluorescein dye ...
Fluorescein angiography may demonstrate leakage in areas remote from the retinal infarctions. In a recent analysis (Susac et al ... Both patients underwent fluorescein retinal angiography that demonstrated multifocal retinal artery occlusions without evidence ... Gass Plaques and Fluorescein Leakage in Susac Syndrome. Journal of Neurological Sciences 299(1-2): 97-100; 2010 Susac JO, ...
In wet macular degeneration, angiography can visualize the leakage of bloodstream behind the macula. Fluorescein angiography ...
Its blood flow can be revealed by fluorescein angiography or laser Doppler imaging. Thus if the central retinal artery gets ...
"Classification of Human Retinal Microaneurysms Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscope Fluorescein Angiography". ... Usually not detected by CT angiography. Retinal microaneurysms can be diagnosed using ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, FFA, ...
One way to distinguish IRMA from retinal neovascularization is to perform fluorescein angiography. Since IRMA blood vessels are ... and therefore exhibit hyperfluorescence on fluorescein angiography. IRMA is deeper in the retina than neovascularization, has ...
Fluorescein angiography reveals an abrupt diminution in dye at the site of the obstruction. Visual field testing can confirm ...
On the basis of fluorescein angiography, CNV may be described as classic or occult. Two other tests that help identify the ... condition include indocyanine green angiography and optical coherence tomography. CNV is conventionally treated with ...
Fluorescein Angiography, and Electroretinography Features of Niacin Maculopathy: New Insight Into Pathogenesis". Journal of ...
Fluorescein angiography uses injection of a fluorescein dye to image the back of the retina. It is a commonly used technique ... "Comparison between optical coherence tomography and fundus fluorescein angiography for the detection of cystoid macular edema ...
He was also the director of the fluorescein angiography Laboratory at the Michael Reese Hospital. In 1977, he was a full ...
Fundus Fluorescein angiography (FFA): This is an imaging technique which relies on the circulation of fluorescein dye to show ... Fluorescein angiography is used to assess the extent of retinopathy that aids in treatment plan development. Optical coherence ... If there is reduced vision, fluorescein angiography can show narrowing or blocked retinal blood vessels clearly (lack of blood ... If macular edema is suspected, OCT and sometimes retinal angiography (FFA) may be performed. Diabetic retinopathy also affects ...
Further tests such as fluorescein angiography or lumbar puncture are usually performed to confirm the diagnosis. ...
"Fluorescein Angiography Does Not Alter the Initial Clinical Management of Choroidal Neovascularization in Age-Related Macular ...
... (FFA). This is a special test used for examination of blood vessels in the eye. It is an office ... Fluorescein Angiography may be done when any retinal disease, especially that involving the blood vessels is suspected, like ... A bright yellow- green dye, called fluorescein is injected into a vein in the arm. Various photos of the blood vessels are ...
Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood flow in the retina and choroid. ... Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood flow in the retina and choroid. ... Retinal fluorescein angiography: a sensitive and specific tool to predict coronary slow flow. Egypt Heart J. 2018;70(3):167-171 ... An abnormal value on a fluorescein angiography may be due to:. *Blood flow (circulatory) problems, such as blockage of the ...
Fluorescein angiography (FA), fluorescent angiography (FAG), or fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) is a technique for ... Fluorescein angiography does not involve the use of ionizing radiation. Fluorescein angiography was pioneered by German ... The fluorescein is administered intravenously in intravenous fluorescein angiography (IVFA) and orally in oral fluorescein ... Angiography at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) "Fluorescein angiography". U.S. National ...
Buy Practical Handbook of Fluorescein Angiography by Bruno Lumbroso, Marco Rispoli from Waterstones today! Click and Collect ... pathological fluorescein angiography analytical study, pathological fluorescein angiography and major fluorescein angiography ... Practical Handbook of Fluorescein Angiography (Paperback). Bruno Lumbroso (author), Marco Rispoli (author) Sign in to write a ... Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood flow in the retina and choroid, the ...
Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood flow in the retina and choroid. ... Also known as: Retinal photography and Eye angiography. Definition. Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special ... Velez-Montoya R, Olson JL, Mandava N. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. ... An abnormal value on a fluorescein angiography may be due to:. *Blood flow (circulatory) problems, such as blockage of the ...
What is a fluorescein angiography?. Answer: This is a technique that enables the observation of the vessels of the retina using ... a series of photographs taken after an intravenous injection of fluorescein. ...
... ... Comparison between Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography and Fluorescein Angiography," Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 2016, ...
... with diabetic retinopathy and 23 control eyes with fluorescein angiography (FA) and high-speed Fourier-domain optica ... Researchers examined 124 eyes (63 patients) with diabetic retinopathy and 23 control eyes with fluorescein angiography (FA) and ...
In the year 1969, F. Lescure presented the first results concerning fluorescein angiography of the ocular fundus in animals. ... Fluorescein angiography is a dynamic method to explore the fundus vasculature and tissues. ... Performing An Angiography. Half an hour before the test, the pupils of the animal will be dilated using tropicamide drops. ... The intravenous injection of fluorescein is done just after having changed the color camera by the black and white one. Each ...
Since fluorescein angiographic (FA) criteria for differentiating optic disc drusen (ODD) from optic disc edema (ODE) have been ... Early and late fluorescein angiography features distinguish optic disc drusen from edema ... Since fluorescein angiographic (FA) criteria for differentiating optic disc drusen (ODD) from optic disc edema (ODE) have been ...
Angiography Dyspnea Epinephrine Erythema Female Fluorescein Fluorescein Angiography Humans Hypotension Infusions, Intravenous ... BACKGROUND: Fluorescein angiography is the standard tool for the diagnosis of vitreoretinal diseases. Fluorescein sodium has ... A Case of Anaphylaxis Occurred after Fluorescein Angiography.. Lee SY , Kim JY , Kang MG , Kim MY , Song WJ , Jung JW , Kang HR ... Fluorescein Angiography MeSH Terms expand_less. expand_more. Anaphylaxis ...
Color photography vs fluorescein angiography in the detection of diabetic retinopathy in the diabetes control and complications ... we compared stereoscopic color fundus photography and stereoscopic fluorescein angiography in the detection of diabetic ... When used in conjunction with color photography, angiography allows a modest increase in sensitivity to the earliest signs of ... on review of fluorescein angiograms, including two standard 30 degrees fields in each eye. Of those patients with no ...
fluorescein angiography. FA. angiography. optical coherence tomography. OCT. phase variance. comparison. age-related macular ... Fluorescein angiography (FA) has long been the gold standard for vascular imaging of the retina and choroid. It is a test that ... Subjects will receive fluorescein angiography (FA) as part of their normal clinical evaluation and will undergo phase variance ... Comparison of Phase-variance Optical Coherence Tomography and Fluorescein Angiography in Retinovascular Imaging (PVOCT). This ...
Reasons for a Fluorescein Angiography. The fluorescein angiography provides doctors with information about the retina. It can ... Fluorescein angiography is a diagnostic procedure used to evaluate the blood vessels in the following parts of the eye:. * ... After the Fluorescein Angiography Procedure. There is a risk of complications with any procedure. Some of the risks that ... The Fluorescein Angiography Procedure. *The patients pupils are dilated with eye drops ...
Fluorescein angiography is an important technique used when first diagnosing eye diseases that affect the retina. It is ... What happens when you have fluorescein angiography?. Fluorescein angiography involves having an injection of dye into one of ... Fluorescein angiography is an important technique used when first diagnosing eye diseases that affect the retina. It is ... In the first one to two minutes, the images produced by fluorescein angiography show how the dye passes through the arteries ...
Unwanted Effects of Fluorescein Angiography in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetics J Dolben; J Dolben ... J Dolben, S Young, D R Owens, J Vora; Unwanted Effects of Fluorescein Angiography in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetics. Clin Sci ... 5′- S -(2-aminoethyl)- N 6 -(4-nitrobenzyl)-5′-thioadenosine (SAENTA)- x 2 -fluorescein Biochem J (February,1991) ...
... Lindberg, Charlotte LU ; Andréasson, ... Multifocal electroretinography and fluorescein angiography in retinal vein occlusion.}, volume = {26}, year = {2006}, } ...
Velez-Montoya R, Olson JL, Mandava N. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. ... Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood flow in the retina and choroid . ... An abnormal value on a fluorescein angiography may be due to:. *Blood flow (circulatory) problems, such as blockage of the ... Intravenous fluorescein angiography. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duanes Ophthalmology 2013 edition . Philadelphia, PA: ...
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
Fluorescein angiographies were performed in 65 patients with peripheral uveitis. 34 subjects (52%) showed pathologic dye ... Fluorescein Angiography*. Humans. Male. Retina / blood supply. Retinitis / diagnosis*. Uveitis / diagnosis*, etiology. ... 4000639 - Fluorescein angiography in inflammation of the peripheral fundus: involvement of the ch.... 20190989 - The role of ... Fluorescein angiography was able to detect minute lesions and corresponded with the activity of the inflammation.. ...
... described and demonstrated the technique of retinal fluorescein angiography (FA) in 1961.[1] John Donald McIntyre Gass began ... Interpretation of fundus fluorescein angiography. St. Louis:Mosby-Year Book:1978. *↑ Gass JDM. Stereoscopic atlas of macular ... Fluorescein angiography complication survey. Ophthalmology 1986;93:611-7. *↑ Halperin LS, Olk J, Soubrane G, Coscas G. Safety ... Abnormal Fluorescein Angiography. Deviations from the normal FA are most often described in terms of relative fluorescence. ...
Ultra-Widefield Fluorescein Angiography in Children Using Oral Fluorescein Administration Andrew Schneier; David Kim; Deborah ... Ultra-Widefield Fluorescein Angiography in Children Using Oral Fluorescein Administration You will receive an email whenever ... Ultra-Widefield Fluorescein Angiography in Children Using Oral Fluorescein Administration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013; ... Early results with oral fluorescein angiography (OFA) using conventional fundus photography systems were disappointing due to ...
Fluorescein Angiography. Definition. Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood ... Intravenous fluorescein angiography. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duaneâ  s Ophthalmology. 15th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ... The use of fluorescein angiography in acquired macular diseases. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Foundations of Clinical ... An abnormal value on a fluorescein angiography may be due to:. *Blood flow (circulatory) problems, such as blockage of the ...
Ultra-wide Field Fluorescein Angiography Guided Targeted Retinal Photocoagulation in Diabetic Retinopathy ... Ultra-wide Field Fluorescein Angiography Guided Targeted Retinal Photocoagulation in Diabetic Retinopathy ... We performed a prospective interventional study to assess the effects of ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography (UWFFA) ... Pallavi Singh, Atul Kumar, Parijat Chandra, Vinod Kumar; Ultra-wide Field Fluorescein Angiography Guided Targeted Retinal ...
Fluorescein angiography during the first month of the initial visual symptoms was of prognostic value only in those cases with ... To determine the prognostic value of fluorescein angiograms in central retinal occlusion 75 patients presenting within the ...
Measured by Fluorescein Video Angiography Anthony W. B. Stanton, Simon B. Drysdale, Reena Patel, Russell H. Mellor, Michael J. ... Total fluorescein mass in a field of unit area is the sum of the fluorescein in the interstitial fluid (volume Vi) and in the ... Rate Constants for Fluorescein Clearance in Phase III. The gradual clearance of fluorescein from the tissue in Phase III showed ... As the fluorescein bolus passed through the microcirculation, fluorescein rapidly diffused into the interstitium and FI of the ...
Yannuzzi LARohrer KTTindel LJSobel RSCostanza MAShields W: Fluorescein angiography complication survey. Ophthalmology 93:611- ... aneurysm surgery; blood flow insufficiency; fluorescein cerebral angiography; fluorescein sodium; perforating artery Page Count ... Friberg TRExamination of the retina: principles of fluorescein angiography. Albert DMJakobiec FA: Principles and Practice of ... Evidence from fluorescein angiography and microregional blood flow by radioisotopes during excision of an angioma. J Neurosurg ...
Fluorescein angiography (FA) is a diagnostic imaging modality to visualize abnormalities in retinal and choroidal circulation ... Kesav N, Yang Q, Losert W, Kim J, Jaeger S, Sen HN Novel automated processing techniques of fluorescein angiography (FA) images ... Novel automated processing techniques of fluorescein angiography (FA) images in patients with Uveitis.. Kesav N, Yang Q, Losert ...
The use of ultra wide field fluorescein angiography in evaluation and management of uveitis ... Comparison between wide-angle OCT angiography and ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography for detecting non-perfusion areas ... Comparison of wide-field fluorescein angiography and 9-field montage angiography in uveitis. American Journal of Ophthalmology ... Ultra-wide Field Fluorescein Angiography in Retinitis Pigmentosa with Intermediate Uveitis. Journal of Ophthalmic and Vision ...
The combination of fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography using the Heidelberg Retina Angiograph ... The combination of fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography using the Heidelberg Retina Angiograph ... Windisch, R; Windisch, B K; Cruess, A F (2008). Use of fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography in polypoidal choroidal ... Use of fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy patients following photodynamic ...
  • Velez-Montoya R, Olson JL, Mandava N. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography. (scripps.org)
  • Evaluation of Idiopathic Choroidal Neovascularization with Indocyanine Green Angiography in Patients Undergoing Bevacizumab Therapy. (nih.gov)
  • The fluorescein angiography (a) and indocyanine green angiography (b) images of the same subject presented in Figures 1 and 2 two months after two consecutive monthly bevacizumab injections were given. (nih.gov)
  • The choroidal neovascularization has decreased 45.3% ((0.86 − 0.47)/0.86) from its baseline value on indocyanine green angiography. (nih.gov)
  • Simultaneous confocal scanning laser fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Indocyanine green angiography determines the vascular abnormalities associated with respective tissue. (targetwoman.com)
  • On the other hand recently introduced Indocyanine green angiography mainly explores the pathology affecting the choroid. (quotery.com)
  • Indocyanine green angiography is similar to fluorescein angiography. (healthline.com)
  • Indocyanine green angiography is a diagnostic test that involves taking photographs of the blood vessels in the eye with the help of a contrast dye. (midhudsonretina.com)
  • From the PublisherPrice: $ Fundus Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green Angiography: A Textbook and Atlas is a complete and detailed reference that comprehensively covers fluorescein angiography, the more recent and advancing indocyanine green angiography and their effectiveness in identifying and evaluating various retinal diseases. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Analysis Methods Adverse effects of fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography Age-related macular degeneration and chorioidal neovascularisation of other etiologies Hereditary and toxic retinal diseases Tumors Diabetic rertinopathy Other retinal vascular diseases Diseases of the macula and central retina Inflammatory and autoimmune diseases Disorders of the optic nerve. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Both fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography are considered very safe and serious side-effects from these tests are uncommon. (bronx-optical.com)
  • To examine the clinical implications of change in choroidal neovascularization (CNV) size on indocyanine green (ICG) angiography in subjects with idiopathic CNV undergoing bevacizumab therapy. (nih.gov)
  • The combination of fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography using the Heidelberg Retina Angiograph II (HRA 2) should make a delineation of distinct pattern(s) possible in order to better select and assess therapy.Methods: This is a retrospective, case-control, single-centre study. (uzh.ch)
  • Two different dyes are commonly used: fluorescein and indocyanine green. (neretina.com)
  • Two different dyes can be injected into the vein: Fluorescein or Indocyanine Green (ICG). (launcestoneye.com.au)
  • Indocyanine is especially helpful when there is a leakage of blood, which makes interpretation of fluorescein studies difficult. (southeastretina.com)
  • Fluorescein and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography are diagnostic tests which use special cameras to photograph the structures in the back of the eye. (bronx-optical.com)
  • Fluorescein dye is best for studying the retinal circulation (below) while indocyanine green is often better for studying the deeper choroidal blood vessel layer (below). (bronx-optical.com)
  • While fluorescein contains no iodine and is safe in patients known to be allergic, indocyanine green is currently formulated with iodine and should not be used in these individuals. (bronx-optical.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography (AGF) is a diagnostic test used in ophthalmology to aid interpretation of retinal pathology. (ophthalmicphotography.net)
  • Fluorescein angiography is an indispensable tool in modern ophthalmology. (readrate.com)
  • fluorescein angiography technique and interpretation ophthalmology monographs 5 Oct 08, 2020 Posted By Jackie Collins Media TEXT ID 079a0f07 Online PDF Ebook Epub Library fluorescein angiography technique and interpretation ophthalmology monographs 5 posted by barbara cartlandltd text id 079a0f07 online pdf ebook epub library does It's a way of studying what is happening at the back of your eye. (quotery.com)
  • PDF Fluorescein Angiography Technique And Interpretation Ophthalmology Monographs 5 " Uploaded By James Michener, fluorescein angiography technique and interpretation ophthalmology monographs 5 joseph w md berkow david h orth james s kelley isbn 9781560550099 fluorescein angiography technique and interpretation ophthalmology monographs 5 author wikictsnetorg sophia m ller 2020 09 22 05 56 … If blue light reflected from nonfluorescent fundus structures penetrates the green-yellow filter, pseudo fluorescence occurs. (quotery.com)
  • Divided into five sections, it covers interpretation, general principles for interpreting a pathological fluorescein angiography, pathological fluorescein angiography analytical study, pathological fluorescein angiography and major fluorescein angiography syndromes, including diabetic retinopathy, vascular occlusions, age related macular degeneration and inflammatory disorders. (waterstones.com)
  • Ciardella AP, Kaufman SR, Yannuzzi LA. The use of fluorescein angiography in acquired macular diseases. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • Abnormal results of fluorescein angiography test may indicate diabetic retinopathy , macular degeneration , or cancer . (targetwoman.com)
  • They can use this test to confirm the results of fluorescein angiography and to diagnose your type of macular degeneration. (healthline.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography, a clinical test to look at blood circulation inside the back of the eye, aids in the diagnosis of retinal conditions associated with diabetes, age-related macular degeneration, and other eye abnormalities. (maculaandretinainstitute.com)
  • Fluorescein Angiography is a valuable test that provides valuable information about many eye diseases including Diabetic Retinopathy, Macular Degeneration, Retinal Vascular Disease such as Retinal Artery Occlusion and Retinal Vein Occlusion, as well as other types of Macular Disease. (bweyecenter.com)
  • Macular Degeneration - What is Fluorescein Angiography? (eye-socal.com)
  • For example, fluorescein angiography is commonly used to guide treatment for age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal vascular occlusions. (hretina.com)
  • Sodium fluorescein is added into the systemic circulation, the retina is illuminated with blue light at a wavelength of 490 nanometers, and an angiogram is obtained by photographing the fluorescent green light that is emitted by the dye. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 6-second bolus injection of 2-5 cc of sodium fluorescein into a vein in the arm or hand A series of black-and-white or digital photographs are taken of the retina before and after the fluorescein reaches the retinal circulation (approximately 10 seconds after injection). (wikipedia.org)
  • The fluorescent dye used is sodium fluorescein injected intra venously. (vin.com)
  • Fluorescein sodium has been widely used for decades. (koreamed.org)
  • RESULTS: The skin prick test showed a positive reaction to fluorescein sodium. (koreamed.org)
  • Oral administration of fluorescein sodium is a safe alternative to intravenous administration and may be indicated in pediatric patients deemed unsuitable for venipuncture. (arvojournals.org)
  • Five to 10 ml of 10% fluorescein sodium mixed in juice were administered orally. (arvojournals.org)
  • Sodium fluorescein accumulation/clearance was recorded for 30 min, and fluorescence intensity (FI) was quantified by computer analysis of videotape image gray levels. (aacrjournals.org)
  • In all patients, after intravenous administration of 5 ml of 10% fluorescein sodium, fluorescence in the vessels was clearly observed through a microscope and recorded on videotape. (thejns.org)
  • The perforating artery is illuminated by the probe's excitatory beam (B). After the intravenous administration of 5 ml of 10% fluorescein sodium, the increase of fluorescence in the perforating artery is observed under a microscope through a barrier filter (C) that facilitates the collection of only fluorescein sodium-induced fluorescence. (thejns.org)
  • The AGF consists of intravenous injection in the dye, fluorescein sodium, which is transported in the blood of both freeform As bound to albumin. (ophthalmicphotography.net)
  • It is intravenous injection of a dye, fluorescein sodium, which is carried in the blood both free form and bound to albumin. (ophthalmicphotography.net)
  • Discuss possible side effects from sodium fluorescein. (jcahpo.org)
  • FLUORESCENCE C20H12O5 Refers to fluorescein sodium (C20H10Na2O5) A brown or … Fluorescein- is an organic compound and dye. (quotery.com)
  • The Fluorescein Angiography study is performed by injecting a sodium-based dye, called Sodium Fluorescein, into an arm vein. (bweyecenter.com)
  • As its name suggests, a special colorant is used to carry this out, called sodium fluorescein, which is injected into the patient and travels via the bloodstream to the circulation of the ocular fundus . (institutmacula.com)
  • Sodium fluorescein angiography is a widely used routine ophthalmological diagnostic procedure which enables the study of chorioretinal microcirculation and consists of the injection of sodium fluorescein into the systemic bloodstream. (iospress.com)
  • Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), anterior segment optical coherence tomography angiography (AS-OCTA), anterior segment intravenous fluorescein angiography (AS-IVFA) and ultrasound biomicroscopy were performed when possible. (octnews.org)
  • Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) allows noninvasive visualization of retinal vessels in vivo. (arvojournals.org)
  • Fluorescein dye is injected intravenously, usually through an antecubital vein with sufficient speed to produce high contrast images of the early phases of the angiogram. (aao.org)
  • Most patients who undergo fluorescein angiogram do not experience significant side effects. (cityeye.com.au)
  • An eye angiogram uses fluorescein dye and a camera to take pictures and evaluate the blood flow through the vessels in the back of the eye (retina). (legazpieye.com)
  • The process of the fluorescein angiogram process will be covered including the dosage, injection, and possible adverse reactions from the injection. (jcahpo.org)
  • The fluorescein angiogram sequencing and steps for completing the photography side of the procedure. (jcahpo.org)
  • The course will finish with the phases of the angiogram and descriptive terminology used to describe fluorescein angiography photographs. (jcahpo.org)
  • The precise location of these abnormalities can be determined by a careful interpretation of the fluorescein angiogram by your ophthalmologist. (drrobpiemontesi.com)
  • What to expect on the day of your fluorescein angiogram? (drrobpiemontesi.com)
  • A fluorescein angiogram is a picture of the retina and helps show abnormal blood vessel growth and other conditions. (retinaoc.com)
  • An ICG angiogram can sometimes locate abnormal choroidal vessels better than a fluorescein angiogram however an ICG is not recommended for patients with an allergy to iodine. (launcestoneye.com.au)
  • A Fluorescein Angiogram (FA) or Intravenous Fluorescein Angiogram (IVF) is a diagnostic test that is used to study the retinal blood vessels and circulation of blood in the retina. (bweyecenter.com)
  • Fluorescein angiogram of left macula in patient with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. (buyflagylcheap.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography is the practice of taking photographs of blood vessels inside the eye (an angiogram) with the help of a contrast dye (fluorescein dye). (midhudsonretina.com)
  • Radial access technique for angiography can be traced back to 1953, where Eduardo Pereira[clarification needed] first cannulated the radial artery to perform a coronary angiogram. (wikipedia.org)
  • We performed a prospective interventional study to assess the effects of ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography (UWFFA) guided targeted retinal photocoagulation (TRP) in diabetic retinopathy. (arvojournals.org)
  • Among the common groups of ophthalmologic disease, fluorescein angiography can detect diabetic retinopathy (neovascularization), vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, edema of the optic disc, and tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers examined 124 eyes (63 patients) with diabetic retinopathy and 23 control eyes with fluorescein angiography (FA) and high-speed Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Among the 62 eyes with diabetic retinopathy and FA evidence of either foveal avascular zone (FAZ) damage higher than grade 1 or FAZ capillary loss, OCT detected damage with a positive predictive value of 84.5 percent and negative predictive value of 72.9 percent. (aao.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is a great way to look at the vasculature in retinopathy of prematurity, but it has its limitations: the expense of the machine, the necessity of having intravenous access on the infant, the systemic stability of the infant and the presence of a well-formed tunica vasculosa. (healio.com)
  • It is certainly possible to perform thorough retinopathy of prematurity follow-up exams without the assistance of intravenous fluorescein angiography. (healio.com)
  • Color photography vs fluorescein angiography in the detection of diabetic retinopathy in the diabetes control and complications trial. (nih.gov)
  • During eligibility screening for the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, we compared stereoscopic color fundus photography and stereoscopic fluorescein angiography in the detection of diabetic retinopathy in 320 patients (mean age, 24 years [SD, eight years]) with insulin-dependent diabetes (mean duration, 7.0 years [SD, 4.0 years]) and no or mild diabetic retinopathy. (nih.gov)
  • Of 153 patients classified as having no retinopathy according to color photographs of seven standard 30 degrees fields of both eyes, 21% of the patients had evidence of retinopathy (mostly one or two microaneurysms in one eye) on review of fluorescein angiograms, including two standard 30 degrees fields in each eye. (nih.gov)
  • When used in conjunction with color photography, angiography allows a modest increase in sensitivity to the earliest signs of retinopathy, a gain potentially useful in some research applications, although not of demonstrated value in patient management. (nih.gov)
  • Figure 2: Ultra-widefield oral fluorescein angiographic image (right eye) demonstrating mid-peripheral neovascularization and avascular peripheral retina in a 12-year-old girl with Sickle Cell Retinopathy. (arvojournals.org)
  • Purpose To examine the influence of fluorescein angiography (FA) on the diagnosis and management of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). (elsevier.com)
  • Certain eye disorders, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular occlusive disease affect primarily the retinal circulation and are usually imaged with fluorescein dye. (bronx-optical.com)
  • The maculas of patients with chloroquine retinopathy exhibit a dramatic fluorescence when studied by intravenous fluorescein angiography. (jamanetwork.com)
  • We think that fluorescein fundus angiography is a new and valuable adjunct in the diagnosis and evaluation of chloroquine retinopathy. (jamanetwork.com)
  • In a group of 37 patients, 26 with non‐insulin‐dependent diabetes mellitus (DM) with and without retinopathy, and 11 without diabetes mellitus (non‐DM) although affected by other ophthalmological diseases, all undergoing routine angiography, blood samples were drawn before (T_0) and 30 min (T_{30}) after fluorescein injection. (iospress.com)
  • This is a technique that enables the observation of the vessels of the retina using a series of photographs taken after an intravenous injection of fluorescein. (specsavers.co.uk)
  • The intravenous injection of fluorescein is done just after having changed the color camera by the black and white one. (vin.com)
  • CASE HISTORY: A 64-year-old woman experienced erythema on her face and neck, dyspnea, hypotension and loss of consciousness immediately after injection of fluorescein for angiography. (koreamed.org)
  • It is a test that involves the intravenous injection of fluorescein dye, followed by imaging of the dye's passage through the blood vessels inside the eye. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Fluorescein angiography involves having an injection of dye into one of your veins (usually your arm) before scanning equipment takes a series of time-lapse photographs of the back of your eye. (thelondonclinic.co.uk)
  • The recirculation phase occurs approximately 3-5 minutes after injection of fluorescein. (aao.org)
  • The microcirculation of BCC and a normal (control) skin site was studied in 15 patients by laser Doppler fluximetry and videoangiography after rapid i.v. fluorescein injection. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is a photographic test performed to examine the retina at the back of your eyes using a special camera and taking multiple, serial photographs, coupled with a small injection of a special fluorescein dye into a vein in your arm. (cityeye.com.au)
  • Angiography requires the injection of a contrast dye that makes the blood vessels visible to x ray. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Syringe 5 cc., one for the injection of fluorescein and another to fill it with 5 ml. of saline (to happen later fluorescein injection, so there are no crystals of the above product. (ophthalmicphotography.net)
  • After fluorescein injection there was no statistical change in EAI and erythrocyte membrane fluidity in either group. (iospress.com)
  • Because the fluorescein angiography procedure described here allows intraoperative confirmation of the patency of perforating arteries located deep inside the surgical field, it can be practically used for preventing unexpected cerebral infarction during aneurysm surgery. (thejns.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is a medical procedure used in the diagnosis of retinal problems. (legazpieye.com)
  • Patients who have blood clotting problems, have a known allergy to contrast mediums, or are allergic to iodine, a component of some contrast mediums, may also not be suitable candidates for an angiography procedure. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Depending on the type of angiography procedure being performed, the contrast medium is either injected by hand with a syringe or is mechanically injected with an automatic injector connected to the catheter. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Awareness of the side effects, adverse reactions, and complications of the contrast agent allow the ophthalmic healthcare team to anticipate, respond quickly, and support the patient before, during, and following the angiographic procedure using fluorescein. (jcahpo.org)
  • While serious reactions are very rare, at Eye Care on 5th we believe in ensuring that our patients are fully aware of all risks, however minor, when it comes to the Fluorescein Angiography procedure. (eyecarenewyork.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography (FA) is a diagnostic imaging modality to visualize abnormalities in retinal and choroidal circulation such as vascular leakage. (nih.gov)
  • Doctors choose fluorescein angiography to study diseases of the retinal and choroidal blood vessels within the eye. (neretina.com)
  • The next step is to stimulate the contents of the blood mixed with the fluorescein, emitting an intense light that allows a photograph to be taken of the circulation of the retinal and choroidal blood vessels. (institutmacula.com)
  • A fine network of choroidal vessels is made out nasal to the polyps 58 The Sankara Nethralaya Atlas of Fundus Fluorescein Angiography The Sankara Nethralaya Atlas of Fundus Fluorescein Angiography 59 Red free photograph of the right eye showing the dark subretinal nodule in the inferotemporal macula Late phase shows staining of the scar. (profiteroltarifi.net)
  • Ischaemia or edema in the retina circulation can be detected with the help of fluorescein angiography. (targetwoman.com)
  • Without the help of fluorescein angiography, your ophthalmologist would not be able to throughly diagnose these and other abnormalities. (drrobpiemontesi.com)
  • Quantitative analysis of peripheral vasculitis, ischemia, and vascular leakage in uveitis using ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Fluorescein angiography (FA) has long been the gold standard for vascular imaging of the retina and choroid. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Figure 1: Ultra-widefield oral fluorescein angiographic image (left eye) demonstrating peripheral vascular telangiectasias and leakage in a 6-year-old boy with Coats' Disease. (arvojournals.org)
  • Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (UWFA) is an emerging imaging modality used to characterise pathology in the retinal vasculature such as microaneurysms (MAs) and vascular leakage. (ovid.com)
  • OCT-A was used to characterize the vascular network of the mouse retina and was compared with fluorescein angiography (FA) and histology. (arvojournals.org)
  • Fundus fluorescein angiography was used as an important diagnostic tool to show exact location and extent of vascular changes of PPDR. (quotery.com)
  • The term angiography has been applied to radionuclide angiography and newer vascular imaging techniques such as CO2 angiography, CT angiography and MR angiography. (wikipedia.org)
  • Written by one of the world's leading ophthalmologists, Atlas of Fundus Florescein Angiography provides a comprehensive look at fluorescein angiographic findings in different disorders. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Written via one of many world's major ophthalmologists, Atlas of Fundus Florescein Angiography offers a accomplished examine fluorescein angiographic findings in numerous issues. (profiteroltarifi.net)
  • The fluorescein is administered intravenously in intravenous fluorescein angiography (IVFA) and orally in oral fluorescein angiography (OFA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Early results with oral fluorescein angiography (OFA) using conventional fundus photography systems were disappointing due to lack of contrast and resolution in the images produced. (arvojournals.org)
  • A bright yellow- green dye, called 'fluorescein' is injected into a vein in the arm. (tripod.com)
  • After the first group of pictures is taken, a dye called fluorescein is injected into a vein. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Multifocal electroretinography and fluorescein angiography in retinal vein occlusion. (lu.se)
  • Fluorescein is a water-soluble dye that is injected into a vein in the patient's arm. (targetwoman.com)
  • A special camera is used to take a series of photographs of the retina after a small amount of yellow dye (fluorescein) is injected into a vein in your arm. (seebetterbrevard.com)
  • 5 ml of fluorescein solution are injected intravenously 10-20% one catheter through the vein. (ophthalmicphotography.net)
  • A yellowish colored dye (fluorescein) is injected in a vein, usually in your arm. (retinaoc.com)
  • The next step involves the fluorescent dye (fluorescein), which is injected into a vein to enter your bloodstream. (comprehensiveretinaconsultants.com)
  • During the test, a harmless orange-red dye called Fluorescein will be injected into a vein in your arm. (centerforeyecare.com)
  • Then, after a harmless dye (fluorescein) has been injected into a vein, another set of photos will be taken. (eyecarenewyork.com)
  • Fluorescein is injected into a vein in the arm and circulates quickly to the eye. (hretina.com)
  • This course will discuss the basics of fluorescein angiography starting with luminescence and fluorescence and how it can be used in the eye. (jcahpo.org)
  • Describe fluorescence with respect to fluorescein angiography. (jcahpo.org)
  • These are descriptive terms that refer to the relative brightness of fluorescence in comparison with a normal retinal angiography study. (bweyecenter.com)
  • With the latest technology, digital angiography and photography provide instant and accurate results viewable on a computer monitor or by hard copy from a photographic printer. (hretina.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography (FA), fluorescent angiography (FAG), or fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) is a technique for examining the circulation of the retina and choroid (parts of the fundus) using a fluorescent dye and a specialized camera. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dye used in fluorescein angiography is a fluorescent substance that passes through your blood circulation, including through the blood vessels in the retina. (thelondonclinic.co.uk)
  • Angiographically positive, but not negative, areas demonstrated intrascleral lumens with anterior segment OCT. Aqueous angiography with fluorescent dextrans led to their trapping in AHO pathways. (arvojournals.org)
  • 4 - 18 Aqueous angiography is a form of anterior segment fluorescent angiography 19 that has been reported recently as a real-time AHO imaging method in model pig and human eyes. (arvojournals.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography Fluorescein angiography is a test which allows the blood vessels in the back of the eye to be photographed as a fluorescent dye is injected into the bloodstream via your hand or arm. (arizonaretinalspecialists.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography (IVFA) or fluorescent angiography is another specialized eye test offered by opthalmologists at Eye Care on 5th , and is an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of retinal disorders. (eyecarenewyork.com)
  • Aqueous angiography in cow eyes with fluorescein and ICG yielded high-quality images with segmental patterns. (arvojournals.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography was pioneered by German ophthalmologist Achim Wessing, who published his findings in 1969. (wikipedia.org)
  • If after examining your eyes, your ophthalmologist suspects abnormalities in the back of the eye, he or she may recommend fluorescein angiography. (drrobpiemontesi.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography (FA) is when your ophthalmologist uses a special camera to take pictures of your retina . (retinaoc.com)
  • Causes of hyperfluorescence: window/transmission (filling) defects leaking defects (i.e. capillary leakage, aneurysm, neovascularization) pooling defects staining abnormal vasculature Causes of hypofluorescence: blocking defect (i.e. blood) filling defect (capillary nonperfusion/blockage) Fluorescein angiography is used by physicians specializing in the treatment of eye diseases (ophthalmologists) to evaluate the vasculature of the retina, choroid, optic disc, and iris. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to find abnormal blood vessels under the retina and/or to identify conditions that can cause retinal swelling and reduced vision, it is sometimes necessary to perform a test called angiography. (neretina.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography records the dynamic interaction of fluorescein with both normal and abnormal anatomic structures of the ocular fundus. (quotery.com)
  • Fluorescein angiographies were performed in 65 patients with peripheral uveitis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Novel automated processing techniques of fluorescein angiography (FA) images in patients with Uveitis. (nih.gov)
  • Kesav N, Yang Q, Losert W, Kim J, Jaeger S, Sen HN Novel automated processing techniques of fluorescein angiography (FA) images in patients with Uveitis. (nih.gov)
  • Optos PLC, Dunfermline, Scotland, United Kingdom) performs ultra wide angle fluorescein angiography and its benefit in uveitis was reviewed. (eurekamag.com)
  • In this division ultra wide field angiography has become the investigation of choice (over traditional angiography) in cases of intermediate and posterior uveitis. (eurekamag.com)
  • Fluorescein Angiography enables location of the exact point of fluid leakage. (targetwoman.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography may demonstrate leakage in areas remote from the retinal infarctions. (wikipedia.org)
  • This book is a practical guide to fluorescein angiography. (waterstones.com)
  • This atlas is a comprehensive guide to fluorescein angiographic findings of ocular disorders. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Fluorescein dye will also turn a patient's urine orange and may slightly discolor the skin as well for a brief period. (bronx-optical.com)
  • In summary, Atlas of Fundus Angiography is an up-to-date and lavishly illustrated book that is an indispensable tool for clinicians of all levels seeking to master a fundamental technique. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • The authors performed fluorescein cerebral angiography in patients after aneurysm clip placement to confirm the patency of the parent artery, perforating artery, and other arteries around the aneurysm. (thejns.org)
  • Illustration and photographs showing the setup for intraoperative fluorescein cerebral angiography. (thejns.org)
  • Play media The technique was first developed in 1927 by the Portuguese physician and neurologist Egas Moniz at the University of Lisbon to provide contrasted X-ray cerebral angiography in order to diagnose several kinds of nervous diseases, such as tumors, artery disease and arteriovenous malformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography: basic principles and interpretation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • All patients in the group with better visual outcome needed fewer PDT treatments compared with our control group of patients with an exudative AMD.Interpretation: Simultaneous FA/ICG angiography using the HRA 2 allowed delineation of a subgroup of patients with PCV who showed a better visual outcome compared with those with other types of exudative AMD, after treatment with PDT. (uzh.ch)
  • visualisation, perception, and appreciation of fundus fluorescein angiography interpretation process in order to facilitate the novice ophthalmologists to follow a systematic, orderly and logical line of reasoning that leads to a proper diagnosis. (quotery.com)
  • 1. Fluorescein angiography of the fundus: a schematic approach to interpretation. (quotery.com)
  • Fluorescein Angiography: Technique, Interpretation, and Application (Oxford Medical Publications) by Nanjiani, Max and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at This unique atlas provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of FAF imaging in retinal diseases. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Angiography is used to detect abnormalities or blockages in the blood vessels (called occlusions) throughout the circulatory system and in some organs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Angiography can be used to detect abnormalities in the performance of the blood vessels, structural defects in their walls, the appearance of new vessels and incipient retinal detachment. (institutmacula.com)
  • Mar 01, 2011 Fluorescein angiography demonstrated bilateral bull's eye-type pigmentary abnormalities Figures 7-8. (buyflagylcheap.com)
  • A newer method called ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography can provide more information about certain diseases than regular angiography. (medlineplus.gov)
  • BACKGROUND: Fluorescein angiography is the standard tool for the diagnosis of vitreoretinal diseases. (koreamed.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is an important technique used when first diagnosing eye diseases that affect the retina. (thelondonclinic.co.uk)
  • This course will provide an overview of the use of fluorescein for diagnosing eye related diseases and conditions and include appropriate doses for adult and pediatric patients. (jcahpo.org)
  • Fluorescein angiographic patterns reveal a wide variety of anatomical, pathological and physiological information which, correctly interpreted, contributes to the differential diagnosis of fundus diseases and to the evaluation of appropriate therapeutic approaches. (quotery.com)
  • Fluorescein (a yellow synthetic dye) angiography may also be used to enhance the digital photographs in certain retinal diseases. (hretina.com)
  • Clinical decision making for a variety of retinal diseases depends on fluorescein angiography. (hretina.com)
  • In the first one to two minutes, the images produced by fluorescein angiography show how the dye passes through the arteries that supply your retina. (thelondonclinic.co.uk)
  • Arteriography is a type of angiography that involves the study of the arteries. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Catheter - A long, thin, flexible tube used in angiography to inject contrast material into the arteries. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Angiography or arteriography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize the inside, or lumen, of blood vessels and organs of the body, with particular interest in the arteries, veins, and the heart chambers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since its introduction in the early 1960's, fluorescein angiography has proved to be an essential tool for diagnosis of many retinal disorders. (jcahpo.org)
  • During fluorescein angiography, there are many steps Dr. Kaushal will take to make a diagnosis. (comprehensiveretinaconsultants.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography is a dynamic method to explore the fundus vasculature and tissues. (vin.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine whether phase variance optical coherence tomography (PV-OCT), a software-based optical coherence tomography(OCT) image processing technology, can be used to generate angiographic images of the retinochoroidal vasculature that are comparable to those produced by fluorescein angiography (FA), the current gold standard diagnostic test. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 2017. https://nursing.unboundmedicine.com/nursingcentral/view/Davis-Lab-and-Diagnostic-Tests/425360/all/Fluorescein_Angiography. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye and camera to look at blood flow in the retina and choroid . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Fluorescein angiography in inflammation of the peripheral fundus: involvement of the choroid and retina. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Fluorescein Angiography is a diagnostic test that aids visualization of the blood circulation in the retina and choroid. (targetwoman.com)
  • 0000003078 00000 n For nearly 50 years, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography have been valuable in expanding our knowledge of the anatomy, pathology, and pathophysiology of the retina and choroid. (quotery.com)
  • When diagnosing problems with the choroid or the retina, fluorescein and ICG angiography are effective tools that Dr. Kaushal uses for his Ocala, FL patients. (comprehensiveretinaconsultants.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that is used to detect blood circulation problems in the retina and choroid, structures that are located in the back of your eyes. (wellingtonvision.com)
  • In the year 1969, F. Lescure presented the first results concerning fluorescein angiography of the ocular fundus in animals. (vin.com)
  • Two medical students from Indiana University, H.R. Novotny and D.L. Alvis, described and demonstrated the technique of retinal fluorescein angiography (FA) in 1961. (aao.org)
  • Attention2AngioGAN: Synthesizing Fluorescein Angiography from Retinal Fundus Images using Generative Adversarial Networks Sharif Amit Kamran , Khondker Fariha Hossainy, Alireza Tavakkolizand Stewart Lee Zuckerbrodx z University of Nevada, Reno NV, USA yDeakin University Melbourne, Australia xHouston Eye Associates Houston, TX, USA [email protected] , [email protected] , … Fig.3 Principles of Fluorescein Angiography: Equipment and Technique. (quotery.com)
  • Free Download Link: Fluorescein Angiography - EyeWiki e-book description Fundus fluorescein angiography is a technique for examining the circulation of the retina using a dye tracing method. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Two medical students from Indiana University, H.R. Novotny and D.L. Alvis, described and demonstrated the technique of retinal fluorescein angiography (FA) in [1] John Donald McIntyre Gass began publishing his experience with FA in and his efforts led to the wider acceptance of the technique in the evaluation of retinal disease. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • For all structures except the heart, the images are usually taken using a technique called digital subtraction angiography or DSA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is carried out to help diagnose problems with the eye. (moorfields.nhs.uk)
  • What are the risks of fluorescein angiography? (drrobpiemontesi.com)
  • Are There Side Effects and Risks from Fluorescein Angiography? (retinaoc.com)
  • Our staff will review the potential risks and complications of Fluorescein Angiography with you and answer all of your questions prior to your study. (bweyecenter.com)
  • What Are The Risks Of Eye Angiography? (bronx-optical.com)
  • After your angiography, your skin and urine may appear discolored for a short time until the Fluorescein is completely out of your system. (centerforeyecare.com)
  • Patients with kidney disease or injury may suffer further kidney damage from the contrast mediums used for angiography. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In this case report, three adult patients (ages 39 years, 62 years, and 64 years) with a history of prematurity underwent imaging with ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (UWFFA). (elsevier.com)
  • Fluorescein is reported to be safe in pregnancy, but we prefer to avoid this test in pregnant patients where possible. (launcestoneye.com.au)
  • In conclusion, fluorescein administration for angiographic procedures seems to interact with erythrocyte membrane, namely, in diabetic patients, which may interfere with the blood flow in the microcirculation. (iospress.com)
  • Both patients underwent fluorescein retinal angiography that demonstrated multifocal retinal artery occlusions without evidence of embolic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Full title and Atlas of Fundus Fluorescein Angiography book is FLUORESCEIN AND ICG ANGIOGRAPHY TEXTBOOK AND ATLAS written by Gisbert Richard with the cooperation of Gisele Soubrane and Lawrence A. Yannuzzi, 2nd revised and expanded edition, Pub by Thieme. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • For the realization of fluorescein angiography, the first is to ask the patient if one has been subjected some other angiography or contrast test, inquiring about possible allergic Likewise Background and Adverse Reactions. (ophthalmicphotography.net)
  • Allergic reactions to fluorescein dye are rare. (drrobpiemontesi.com)
  • Although it is rare, there is a risk that you could have an allergic reaction to the fluorescein dye. (retinaoc.com)
  • There is little risk in having fluorescein angiography, though some people may have mild allergic reactions to the dye. (maculaandretinainstitute.com)
  • Being allergic to X-ray dyes with iodine does not mean you will be allergic to fluorescein. (maculaandretinainstitute.com)
  • There is little risk in having fluorescein angiography, though some people may have mild allergic reactions to the dye that can cause itching, excessive sneezing, flushing of skin and nausea. (centerforeyecare.com)
  • Administering fluorescein orally greatly reduces the risk of allergic reactions. (hey.nhs.uk)
  • CONCLUSION: Based on her symptoms and the skin prick test result, the patient was diagnosed with fluorescein-induced anaphylaxis. (koreamed.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is a clinical test to look at blood circulation in the retina at the back of the eye. (centerforeyecare.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography is a simple and short test that is performed in your doctor's office. (wellingtonvision.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography is an eye test which uses a specialized fundus camera system to take a series of photographs of the retina. (specialtyretina.com)
  • Fluorescein angiography, sometimes referred to as a 'dye test', is an investigation where a series of photos are taken prior to and following a drink containing orange juice and a small amount of yellow dye. (hey.nhs.uk)
  • Since fluorescein angiographic (FA) criteria for differentiating optic disc drusen (ODD) from optic disc edema (ODE) have been unclear, the authors of this study reviewed FA findings in ODD cases to identify distinguishing features. (aao.org)
  • In addition, posterior pole findings, including vessels encroaching on or crossing the fovea, have also been demonstrated on intravenous fluorescein angiography. (healio.com)
  • The ability to describe the natural history of both treated and untreated ROP and combining clinical findings and fluorescein angiography and OCT all provide important information. (healio.com)
  • It also compares FAF findings with other imaging techniques such as fundus photograph, fluorescein- and ICG angiography as well as optical coherence tomography. (driftwood-dallas.com)
  • Blood flow problems shown on fluorescein angiography may suggest blood flow problems in other parts of the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Angiography is the x-ray study of the blood vessels. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Fluorescein dye - An orange dye used to illuminate the blood vessels of the retina in fluorescein angiography. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When the digital camera is used with certain light filters, fluorescein will highlight blood vessels and most areas of retinal disease. (hretina.com)
  • Coronary angiography can visualize coronary artery stenosis, or narrowing of the blood vessel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography does not involve the use of ionizing radiation. (wikipedia.org)