A benign neoplasm of fibrous tissue in which there are numerous small and large, frequently dilated, vascular channels. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.
Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.
Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.
Facial neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the facial region, which can be benign or malignant, originating from various cell types including epithelial, glandular, connective tissue, and neural crest cells.
The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.
Bleeding from the nose.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
A small space in the skull between the MAXILLA and the SPHENOID BONE, medial to the pterygomaxillary fissure, and connecting to the NASAL CAVITY via the sphenopalatine foramen.
A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Tumors or cancer of the OROPHARYNX.

Overgrowth of oral mucosa and facial skin, a novel feature of aspartylglucosaminuria. (1/70)

Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA). The main symptom is progressive mental retardation. A spectrum of different mutations has been reported in this disease, one missense mutation (Cys163Ser) being responsible for the majority of Finnish cases. We were able to examine 66 Finnish AGU patients for changes in the oral mucosa and 44 of these for changes in facial skin. Biopsy specimens of 16 oral lesions, 12 of them associated with the teeth, plus two facial lesions were studied histologically. Immunohistochemical staining for AGA was performed on 15 oral specimens. Skin was seborrhoeic in adolescent and adult patients, with erythema of the facial skin already common in childhood. Of 44 patients, nine (20%) had facial angiofibromas, tumours primarily occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis. Oedemic buccal mucosa (leucoedema) and gingival overgrowths were more frequent in AGU patients than in controls (p<0.001). Of 16 oral mucosal lesions studied histologically, 15 represented fibroepithelial or epithelial hyperplasias and were reactive in nature. Cytoplasmic vacuolisation was evident in four. Immunohistochemically, expression of AGA in AGU patients' mucosal lesions did not differ from that seen in corresponding lesions of normal subjects. Thus, the high frequency of mucosal overgrowth in AGU patients does not appear to be directly associated with lysosomal storage or with alterations in the level of AGA expression.  (+info)

Genetic alterations in Ki-ras and Ha-ras genes in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas and head and neck cancer. (2/70)

CONTEXT: Ras gene mutations have been associated to a wide range of human solid tumors. Members of the ras gene family (Ki-ras, Ha-ras and N-ras) are structurally related and code for a protein (p21) known to play an important role in the regulation of normal signal transduction and cell growth. The frequency of ras mutations is different from one type of tumor to another, suggesting that point mutations might be carcinogen-specific. OBJECTIVES: To study the occurrence of Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations. We also studied the relative level of Ha-ras mRNA in 32 of the head and neck tumors. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: University referral unit. PARTICIPANTS: 60 head and neck tumors and in 28 Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibromas (JNA). DIAGNOSTIC TEST: Using PCR-SSCP we examined the occurrence of Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations. The relative level of Ha-ras mRNA was examined by Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: None of the head and neck tumors or JNA samples showed evidence of mutations within codons 12, 13, 59 and 61 of Ki-ras or Ha-ras genes. However, 17 (53%) of the tumors where gene expression could be examined exhibited increased levels of Ha-ras mRNA compared with the normal tissue derived from the same patient. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate for the first time that mutations of Ki-ras and Ha-ras genes are not associated with the development of JNA and confirm previous reports indicating that activating ras mutations are absent or rarely involved in head and neck tumors from western world patients. Furthermore, our findings suggest that overexpression of Ha-ras, rather than mutations, might be an important factor in the development and progression of head and neck tumors.  (+info)

Tonsillar lymphangiomatous polyps: a clinicopathologic series of 26 cases. (3/70)

BACKGROUND: Lymphangiomatous polyps are uncommon benign tumors of the tonsils. METHODS: Twenty-six cases of lymphangiomatous polyps diagnosed between 1980 and 1999 were retrieved from the files of the Otorhinolaryngic-Head and Neck Tumor Registry of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed to characterize the histologic features of these tumors. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 15 cases. Clinical follow-up data were obtained. RESULTS: The patients included 13 males and 13 females, ages 3 to 63 years (mean, 25.2 years). Patients experienced dysphagia, sore throat, and the sensation of a mass in the throat. Symptoms were present from a few weeks to years. The tonsillar masses were unilateral in all cases. Clinically, the lesions were frequently mistaken for a neoplasm (n = 18 patients). Grossly, all of the lesions were polypoid and measured 0.5 to 3.8 cm (mean, 1.6 cm). Histologically, the polyps were covered by squamous epithelium showing variable epithelial hyperplasia, dyskeratosis, and lymphocytic epitheliotropism. The masses showed a characteristic submucosal proliferation of small to medium-sized, endothelial-lined, lymph-vascular channels lacking features of malignancy. Collagen, smooth muscle, and adipose tissue were present in the stroma. Intravascular proteinaceous fluid and lymphocytes were noted. Immunohistochemical findings confirmed the endothelial origin of the vascular proliferation and a mixed lymphoid population. The differential diagnosis included fibroepithelial polyp, lymphangioma, juvenile angiofibroma, and squamous papilloma. In all patients with follow-up, complete surgical excision was curative (mean follow-up, 5.4 years; range, 1 mo to 14 years). CONCLUSIONS: We detail the clinical and pathologic features of tonsillar lymphangiomatous polyps. These tumors are uncommon and may clinically be mistaken for a malignant neoplasm. The characteristic histologic features should allow for its correct diagnosis and differentiation from similar appearing tonsillar lesions.  (+info)

Frequency of facial angiofibromas in Japanese patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. (4/70)

The high frequency of cutaneous manifestations in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) has recently been reported. Since prevalence of some cutaneous diseases varies among different ethnic groups, we examined the frequency of facial angiofibromas in Japanese patients with familial MEN 1. Among 27 patients with germline MEN1 gene mutation and one asymptomatic gene carrier, angiofibromas were identified in 43% (12/28) of the subjects. This frequency was significantly lower than that of Caucasian patients, but nonetheless almost equaled those of pituitary tumors and pancreas endocrine tumors. Angiofibromas should be considered as one of major manifestations in MEN 1 regardless of patients' ethnic origin, and clinicians should pay careful attention to the cutaneous lesions in patients with endocrine tumors.  (+info)

Frequent beta-catenin mutations in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. (5/70)

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) are locally aggressive vascular tumors occurring predominantly in adolescent males. The pathogenesis of JNAs is unknown. Recently, JNAs have been reported to occur at increased frequency among patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, suggesting that alterations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/beta-catenin pathway might also be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic JNAs. We analyzed somatic beta-catenin and APC gene mutations in 16 sporadic JNAs from nonfamilial adenomatous polyposis patients using immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin, and direct DNA sequencing for exon 3 of the beta-catenin gene and the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was diffusely present in the stromal cells but not in the endothelial cells of all 16 JNAs. Activating beta-catenin gene mutations were present in 75% (12 of 16) of JNAs. Six JNA patients also had recurrent tumors after surgery, and in all cases the beta-catenin gene status of the recurrent JNA was identical to the initial tumor. No mutations in the mutation cluster region of the APC gene were detected in the four JNAs without beta-catenin mutations. The high frequency of beta-catenin mutations in sporadic JNAs and the presence of identical beta-catenin gene mutations in recurrent tumors indicates that activating beta-catenin gene mutations are important in the pathogenesis of JNAs. The immunohistochemical localization of beta-catenin only to the nuclei of stromal cells further suggests that the stromal cells, rather than endothelial cells, are the neoplastic cells of JNAs.  (+info)

Clinicopathologic analysis of angiomyofibroblastoma of the female genital tract. (6/70)

OBJECTIVE: To study the clinicopathologic features and immunoprofile of angiomyofibroblastoma (AMF) with emphasis on differential diagnosis. METHODS: Seven vulvar, two vaginal and one perineal angiomyofibroblastomas were evaluated by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemical studies were performed on paraffin-embedded sections using the standard ABC method with a panel of antibodies. RESULTS: Angiomyofibroblastoma predominantly occurred in middle-aged women in the genital region, especially in the superficial area of the vulva. Clinically, most of the tumors presented as slowly growing painless masses and were often diagnosed as Bartholin's gland cysts. Histologically, the tumors were all well-circumscribed and characterized by alternating hypocellular and hypercellular areas with abundant thin-walled blood vessels. The tumor cells were bland and spindle-shaped or epithelioid and tended to concentrate around the vessels or cluster in small nests. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells expressed vimentin and estrogen receptor protein in all 10 cases and desmin in 9 cases. Three cases showed weak or focal immunoreactivity to alpha-smooth muscle actin and muscle specific actin. All ten patients were treated by local excision. Follow-up showed a benign course with no signs of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Angiomyofibroblastoma is a distinctive neoplasm that has a propensity to occur in the female genital tract. Recognition of this entity is important to avoid misdiagnosis with other vulvar angiomyxoid neoplasms.  (+info)

Risks of tumor embolization in the presence of an unrecognized patent foramen ovale: case report. (7/70)

A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a fairly common septal defect in the general population. Paradoxical embolization through a PFO is a known cause of stroke. Preprocedural recognition of a PFO in a patient undergoing particulate arterial embolization can help reduce the risk of cerebral infarction.  (+info)

Recurrent angiofibroma invading the skull base--case report. (8/70)

A 16-year-old male presented with a massive nasopharyngeal angiofibroma arising in the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa, and eroding the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone. Neuroimaging showed the tumor had infiltrated the parasellar region from the middle cranial fossa and reached the cavernous sinus. The tumor was almost completely removed macroscopically by a modified transbasal approach.  (+info)

Angiofibroma is a benign tumor that most commonly occurs in the nasopharynx (the upper part of the throat behind the nose) in adolescents and young adults, particularly males. It is composed of blood vessels and fibrous tissue. Angiofibromas are also known as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas because they often occur in young people and originate in the nasopharynx.

These tumors can cause symptoms such as nosebleeds, nasal congestion, and difficulty breathing through the nose. In some cases, they may also cause hearing problems or double vision. Angiofibromas are typically treated with surgery to remove the tumor. Radiation therapy may also be used in some cases.

It is important to note that angiofibroma is a specific type of tumor that has distinct characteristics and is treated differently from other types of tumors. If you have any concerns about this condition or if you are experiencing symptoms that you think may be related to an angiofibroma, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Nasopharyngeal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the nasopharynx, which is the upper part of the pharynx (throat) behind the nose. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Malignant nasopharyngeal neoplasms are often referred to as nasopharyngeal carcinoma or cancer. There are different types of nasopharyngeal carcinomas, including keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, non-keratinizing carcinoma, and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma.

The risk factors for developing nasopharyngeal neoplasms include exposure to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), consumption of certain foods, smoking, and genetic factors. Symptoms may include a lump in the neck, nosebleeds, hearing loss, ringing in the ears, and difficulty swallowing or speaking. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these treatments.

Nose neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and have the potential to metastasize.

Nose neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as nasal congestion, nosebleeds, difficulty breathing through the nose, loss of smell, facial pain or numbness, and visual changes if they affect the eye. The diagnosis of nose neoplasms usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging studies (such as CT or MRI scans), and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Neoplasms in muscle tissue refer to abnormal and excessive growths of muscle cells that can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from any of the three types of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle. Neoplasms in muscle tissue are classified based on their origin, behavior, and histological features.

Benign neoplasms in muscle tissue include leiomyomas (smooth muscle), rhabdomyomas (skeletal muscle), and myxomas (cardiac muscle). These tumors are usually slow-growing and do not invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body.

Malignant neoplasms in muscle tissue, also known as sarcomas, include leiomyosarcoma (smooth muscle), rhabdomyosarcoma (skeletal muscle), and angiosarcoma (cardiac muscle). These tumors are aggressive, invasive, and have the potential to metastasize to other parts of the body.

Symptoms of neoplasms in muscle tissue depend on their location, size, and type. They may include a painless or painful mass, weakness, fatigue, weight loss, and difficulty swallowing or breathing. Treatment options for neoplasms in muscle tissue include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. The choice of treatment depends on the type, stage, location, and patient's overall health condition.

Nasal obstruction is a medical condition that refers to any blockage or restriction in the normal flow of air through the nasal passages. This can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, swelling, or physical abnormalities in the nasal cavity. Common causes of nasal obstruction include allergies, sinusitis, deviated septum, enlarged turbinates, and nasal polyps. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing through the nose, nasal congestion, and nasal discharge. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Facial neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the tissues of the face. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Facial neoplasms can occur in any of the facial structures, including the skin, muscles, bones, nerves, and glands.

Benign facial neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. Examples include papillomas, hemangiomas, and neurofibromas. While these tumors are usually harmless, they can cause cosmetic concerns or interfere with normal facial function.

Malignant facial neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and invasive. They can spread to other parts of the face, as well as to distant sites in the body. Common types of malignant facial neoplasms include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma.

Treatment for facial neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you notice any unusual growths or changes in the skin or tissues of your face.

A "cheek" is the fleshy, muscular area of the face that forms the side of the face below the eye and above the jaw. It contains the buccinator muscle, which helps with chewing by moving food to the back teeth for grinding and also assists in speaking and forming facial expressions. The cheek also contains several sensory receptors that allow us to perceive touch, temperature, and pain in this area of the face. Additionally, there is a mucous membrane lining inside the mouth cavity called the buccal mucosa which covers the inner surface of the cheek.

Epistaxis is the medical term for nosebleed. It refers to the bleeding from the nostrils or nasal cavity, which can be caused by various factors such as dryness, trauma, inflammation, high blood pressure, or use of blood-thinning medications. Nosebleeds can range from minor nuisances to potentially life-threatening emergencies, depending on the severity and underlying cause. If you are experiencing a nosebleed that does not stop after 20 minutes of applying direct pressure, or if you are coughing up or vomiting blood, seek medical attention immediately.

Endoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the use of an endoscope, which is a flexible tube with a light and camera at the end, to examine the interior of a body cavity or organ. The endoscope is inserted through a natural opening in the body, such as the mouth or anus, or through a small incision. The images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor, allowing the physician to visualize the internal structures and detect any abnormalities, such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors. Endoscopy can also be used for diagnostic purposes, such as taking tissue samples for biopsy, or for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps or performing minimally invasive surgeries.

The pterygopalatine fossa is a small, irregularly shaped space located in the skull, lateral to the nasal cavity and inferior to the orbit. It serves as a critical communications center for several important nerves, arteries, and veins that provide sensory innervation, vasomotor control, and blood supply to various structures in the head and neck region.

The following are some key components of the pterygopalatine fossa:

1. Nerves: The pterygopalatine ganglion is a major component of this fossa, which contains postganglionic parasympathetic fibers, sympathetic fibers, and sensory fibers from various nerves, including the maxillary nerve (V2), greater petrosal nerve, deep petrosal nerve, and nerve of the pterygoid canal.

2. Arteries: The maxillary artery, a branch of the external carotid artery, enters the fossa through the foramen rotundum and divides into several branches that supply various structures in the head and neck region, such as the sphenopalatine artery, posterior superior alveolar artery, infraorbital artery, and greater palatine artery.

3. Veins: The pterygoid venous plexus is a complex network of veins located in and around the fossa that communicates with various venous systems, including the facial vein, cavernous sinus, and inferior ophthalmic vein.

The pterygopalatine fossa plays an essential role in several physiological functions, such as lacrimation, salivation, and vasodilation of blood vessels in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Additionally, it is a potential site for the spread of infection or neoplasm from the oral cavity, nasal cavity, or paranasal sinuses to other regions of the head and neck.

A lipoma is a common, benign (non-cancerous) soft tissue growth. It is composed of adipose or fatty tissue and typically found just beneath the skin, but they can also occur deeper within the body. Lipomas are usually round, moveable, and painless, although they may cause discomfort if they grow large enough to put pressure on nearby nerves or if they're located in a sensitive area. They generally grow slowly over time. Surgical removal is an option if the lipoma becomes bothersome or grows significantly in size. It's important to note that while lipomas are typically harmless, any new lumps or bumps should be evaluated by a healthcare professional to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other more serious conditions.

Therapeutic embolization is a medical procedure that involves intentionally blocking or obstructing blood vessels to stop excessive bleeding or block the flow of blood to a tumor or abnormal tissue. This is typically accomplished by injecting small particles, such as microspheres or coils, into the targeted blood vessel through a catheter, which is inserted into a larger blood vessel and guided to the desired location using imaging techniques like X-ray or CT scanning. The goal of therapeutic embolization is to reduce the size of a tumor, control bleeding, or block off abnormal blood vessels that are causing problems.

Oropharyngeal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the oropharynx, which is the middle part of the pharynx (throat) that includes the back one-third of the tongue, the soft palate, the side and back walls of the throat, and the tonsils. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Oropharyngeal cancer is a significant global health concern, with squamous cell carcinoma being the most common type of malignant neoplasm in this region. The primary risk factors for oropharyngeal cancers include tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Early detection and treatment are crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

... of soft tissue is also named angiofibroma, not otherwise specified, by the World Health Organization, 2020. The ... "Picture of Angiofibroma (Facial) on MedicineNet". Macri, A.; Kwan, E.; Tanner, L. S. (2021). "Cutaneous Angiofibroma". ... Angiofibroma (AGF) is a descriptive term for a wide range of benign skin or mucous membrane (i.e. the outer membrane lining ... Cellular angiofibroma is usually a small, slow-growing tumor arising in the vulva-vaginal areas of adult woman and the inguinal ...
... is an angiofibroma also known as juvenile nasal angiofibroma, fibromatous hamartoma, and ... Mortality is not associated with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. 00021 at CHORUS "Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma" at ... If nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is suspected based on physical examination (a smooth vascular submucosal mass in the posterior ... Prognosis for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is favorable. Because these tumors are benign, metastasis to distal sites does not ...
... (CAF) is a rare, benign tumor of superficial soft tissues that was first described by M. R. Nucci et al. ... Mandato VD, Santagni S, Cavazza A, Aguzzoli L, Abrate M, La Sala GB (July 2015). "Cellular angiofibroma in women: a review of ... Bloom J, Jordan E, Baratta VM, Zhang X, Saha A, Yavorek G, Kurbatov V (November 2020). "Cellular Angiofibroma Presenting as a ... In 2020, the World Health Organization classified cellular angiofibroma tumors in the category of benign fibroblastic and ...
... (AFST), also termed angiofibroma, not otherwise specified, is a recently recognized and rare ... Among benign tumors, cellular angiofibroma and solitary fibrous tumor may be confused with AFST. Cellular angiofibroma differs ... Xu XL, Liu JG, Sun M, Yu L, Liu QY, Bai QM, Wu LJ, Wang J (August 2018). "[Angiofibroma of soft tissue: a clinicopathologic ... Ali Z, Anwar F (November 2019). "Angiofibroma of Soft Tissue: A Newly Described Entity; A Case Report and Review of Literature ...
Tuberous sclerosis is also associated with a second type of angiofibroma, adenoma sebaceum, also termed facial angiofibroma, in ... Cutaneous angiofibroma". Soft Tissue Tumors: A Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Sarcomas and Benign Neoplasms. Switzerland ... Koenen's tumor (KT), also commonly termed periungual angiofibroma,: 668 is a subtype of the angiofibromas. Angiofibromas are ... and skin features typical of angiofibroma viz., spindle-shaped or star-shaped fibroblasts and ectatic blood vessels in a dense ...
Kumar A, Deka RC & Jha D. (2002). Endoscopic removal of localised angiofibroma. J Otolaryngol. 31:41-4. Jha D, Deka RC & Sharma ... 2011). Adjuvant therapy with flutamide for presurgical volume reduction in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Head Neck. 33: ...
PPPs are a type of angiofibroma. Their function is not well-understood. They are usually considered as vestigial remnants of ...
"Seizure after local anesthesia for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma". The Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences. 23 (2): 97-100. doi ...
Hyftor was approved for treatment of facial angiofibroma in the European Union in May 2023. Sirolimus is indicated for the ... "FDA Approves Nobelpharma's Topical Treatment for Facial Angiofibroma". FDAnews. 7 April 2022. Archived from the original on 1 ... intended for the treatment of angiofibroma. The applicant for this medicinal product is Plusultra pharma GmbH. Hyftor was ... is indicated for the treatment of facial angiofibroma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex. The chief advantage sirolimus ...
The papular rash is now known as facial angiofibroma. 1885 French dermatologists François Henri Hallopeau and Émile Leredde ... 1982 Kenneth Arndt successfully treated facial angiofibroma with an argon laser. 1983 Positron emission tomography (PET, ...
Angiofibroma of soft tissue, also termed angiofibroma NOS (NOS indicates Not Otherwise Specified), an angiofibroma that ... Angiomyofibroblastoma Cellular angiofibroma, an angiofibroma that is a benign, usually small, slow-growing tumor arising in the ... Purkait S, Mitra S, Adhya AK, Sethy M, Mishra TS (July 2021). "Cytology of angiofibroma of soft tissue of the inguinal region ...
"Exclusively Endoscopic Removal of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Trends and Limits", Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. ... "Exclusively Endoscopic Removal of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Trends and Limits", Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. ... "Exclusively Endoscopic Removal of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma: Trends and Limits". Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & ... "Exclusively endoscopic removal of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: trends and limits". Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & ...
It is a type of angiofibroma which originates in a dendrocyte in skin. It is common, usually appearing in young adults and then ...
Cutaneous and visceral lesions may occur, including angiofibroma, cardiac rhabdomyomas, and renal angiomyolipomas. The central ... benign growths such as facial angiofibroma and subependymal nodules), and very rarely, cancerous hamartoblastomas. The effect ...
The cellular angiofibroma tentative variant's neoplastic cells also lack pRb in most cases and express CD34 but express desmin ... Tumor tissues in the tentative cellular angiofibroma variant of MFB contain spindle cells in all cases, fat cells in ~50& of ... Finally, studies suggest that spindle cell lipoma and cellular angiofibroma are variants of MFB. Here, the latter two tumors ... The tentatively classified cellular angiofibroma variant of MFB typically occurs in adults (women 40-50 years old, men 60-70 ...
Head, Neck, and Skullbase Tumors - Includes angiofibroma, desmoid tumors, fibrosarcomas, hemangiomas, lymphomas and lymphatic ...
Now known as facial angiofibroma, this papular facial rash, of distinctive butterfly distribution, was first described in ...
... copy number profiling using a 100K SNP array reveals novel disease-related genes BORIS and TSHZ1 in juvenile angiofibroma". ...
Abnormal causes of asymmetry included invasion by nasopharyngeal melanoma, angiofibroma, carotid-cavernous fistula with ...
The fibroma cavernosum or angiofibroma, consists of many often dilated vessels, it is a vasoactive tumor occurring almost ...
... is known for his work on endoscopic management of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) and for his work in ...
Arteriovenous fistula Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma It could be useful for managing malignant hypertension due to end ...
... acral angiofibroma and desmoplastic fibroblastoma (Swan, 1988; Pitt et al., 1993; Karabela-Bouropoulou et al., 1999; Jang et al ...
... juvenile angiofibroma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma, and lymphoma. The first recorded mention of the foramen ...
... and plan for embolisation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma before operation. Although computed tomography angiography ( ...
Angiofibromas are papules, types of which include the usually solitary fibrous papule of the nose and periungual angiofibroma, ...
Angiofibroma Angiokeratoma Angiokeratoma of Fordyce (angiokeratoma of the scrotum and vulva) Angiokeratoma of Mibelli ( ... Capillary aneurysms Carcinoid Cellular angiofibroma Cherry angioma (De Morgan spot, senile angioma) Chondrodermatitis nodularis ...
Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans Deep angiomyxoma Superficial angiomyxoma Angiomyofibroblastoma Cellular angiofibroma Leiomyoma ...
Neoplastic Squamous cell carcinoma Adenoid cystic carcinoma Melanoma Nasopharyngeal carcinoma Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma ...
... angiofibroma MeSH C04.557.645.115 - angiokeratoma MeSH C04.557.645.350 - glomus tumor MeSH C04.557.645.375 - hemangioma MeSH ...
Angiofibroma of soft tissue is also named angiofibroma, not otherwise specified, by the World Health Organization, 2020. The ... "Picture of Angiofibroma (Facial) on MedicineNet". Macri, A.; Kwan, E.; Tanner, L. S. (2021). "Cutaneous Angiofibroma". ... Angiofibroma (AGF) is a descriptive term for a wide range of benign skin or mucous membrane (i.e. the outer membrane lining ... Cellular angiofibroma is usually a small, slow-growing tumor arising in the vulva-vaginal areas of adult woman and the inguinal ...
Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. It is most often seen in boys and ... Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. It is most often seen in boys and ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains many blood vessels and ... Juvenile angiofibroma. In: Meyers EN, Snyderman CH, eds. Operative Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 3rd ed. Philadelphia ...
Although 1% rapamycin ointment has been reported to be effective in one case of TSC-related angiofibroma,[9] another case ... A Topical Combination of Rapamycin and Tacrolimus for the Treatment of Angiofibroma Due to Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). A ... Objectives The efficacy of rapamycin-tacrolimus ointment was examined for TSC-related angiofibroma.. Methods Left-right ... Conclusions Topical application of rapamycin-tacrolimus ointment is a safe and useful treatment for TSC-related angiofibroma. ...
Juvenile angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign tumor that tends to bleed and occurs in the nasopharynx of prepubertal and adolescent ... encoded search term (Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma) and Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma What to Read Next on ... Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Workup. Updated: Feb 10, 2021 * Author: Ted L Tewfik, MD; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD ... Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is usually encapsulated and composed of vascular tissue and fibrous stroma with coarse or fine ...
Angiofibroma / fibrous papule is a benign fibrohistiocytic tumor consisting of dermal dendritic cells ... PubMed Search: Angiofibroma[TI] OR fibrous papule[TI] review[PT]. See Also: Soft tissue - cellular angiofibroma ... Adenoma sebaceum (angiofibroma of tuberous sclerosis): *Fewer bizarre dermal stromal cells than in fibrous papule *Vessels are ... Angiofibroma / fibrous papule. Authors: Said Albahra, M.D., Gregory A. Hosler, M.D., Ph.D. ...
Cellular angiofibroma of the vulva: a clinicopathological study of two cases with documentation of some unusual features and ... Background: Cellular angiofibroma (CA) of the vulva is a recently described condition, whose clinical and pathological features ...
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: diagnosis and treatment. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1988;97 (6): 534-40. Pubmed citation ... A: No! This is a case of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with classical clinical and imaging findings. These highly ... This is a classical presentation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. This is a histologically benign lesion with very ... 1. Schick B, Kahle G. Radiological findings in angiofibroma. Acta Radiol. 2000;41 (6): 585-93. Pubmed citation ...
Angiofibroma affects 70-80% of patients with TSC, typically on the face. We report a patient with TSC with recurrent life- ... The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin significantly improves facial angiofibroma lesions in a patient with tuberous sclerosis G F L ... The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin significantly improves facial angiofibroma lesions in a patient with tuberous sclerosis G F L ... A topical combination of rapamycin and tacrolimus for the treatment of angiofibroma due to tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC): a ...
"However, the combination approach is likely to be more effective for treating the papular fibrotic angiofibroma," they wrote. ...
Extra nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENA) is a term used for fibrous nodules that are located outside the nasopharynx. Location ... Extra nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENA) is a term used for fibrous nodules that are located outside the nasopharynx. Location ... We are presenting a nasal septum-originated angiofibroma case in a 26-year old pregnant woman, together with literature data. ...
Angiofibroma, also known as fibrous papule, is a relatively common lesion seen in males and females after puberty. ... Angiofibroma, also known as fibrous papule, is a relatively common lesion seen in males and females after puberty. ...
Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, also known as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, is a benign tumor ...
Diagnosis: Angiofibroma Week 69: Case 4. Diagnosis: Angiofibroma Week 44: Case 1. Diagnosis: Angiofibroma Week 2: Case 2. ... Search by Diagnosis: "Angiofibroma". Show Diagnoses. Week 487: Case 2. ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign yet aggressive and destructive vascular lesion of head and neck tumor affecting ... Incidence of Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in Pakistan. Abstract. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign yet aggressive and ... Juvenile angiofibroma though rare yet an aggressive disease in view of excessive bleeding mainly occurring at puberty with ... In Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma mass arise from nasopharynx close to sphenopalatine foramina accounts for 0.5 % of all head neck ...
Keywords: angiofibroma, juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, nasopharyngeal tumour. Singapore Med J 2009; 50(3): 261-264. ... is a retrospective study that aimed to examine the outcomes of patients presenting with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma ( ...
Based on endoscopic examination and imaging, a nasopharyngeal angiofibroma was diagnosed. The patient underwent an endoscopic ... The definitive treatment of angiofibroma is surgical excision. Different surgical approaches are used but nowadays endoscopic ... has not reported yet in angiofibroma. In this article we present a case of extensive angiofoibroma with intraluminal ... Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare, hypervascular, benign tumor which is mainly seen among male adolescents. ...
OR angiofibroma [tw]. OR angiofibromas [tw]. OR angiofibrosarcoma [tw]. OR angiogenesis factor [tw]. OR angiokeratoma [tw]. OR ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, transpalatal removal. 41767. Nasopharynx, fibreoptic examination of. 41764. Neck, deep-seated ...
Angiofibroma (fibrous papule of nose). *Junctional and compound nevi. *Lentigo simplex. *Small syringomas ...
Facial angiofibroma dosing for Hyftor (sirolimus topical), frequency-based adverse effects, comprehensive interactions, ... Facial Angiofibroma. Indicated for treatment of facial angiofibroma associated with tuberous sclerosis in children aged ≥6 ... Facial Angiofibroma. Indicated for treatment of facial angiofibroma associated with tuberous sclerosis ... Limit application to areas of involvement with angiofibroma. Do not use with occlusive dressing; safety of gel under occlusion ...
Objective: To publish this rare case of Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a 24year old adult male with no epistaxis. ... An Unusual Presentation of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma- A Case Report. Vaishnavi B, Vani Padmasri M, Lakshmi Sowmya CS ... Conclusion: It is an unusual presentation of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in an adult with 9 months history of nasal obstruction ... Reshma B, Sudarshan Reddy L. Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma - A Case Report. Am J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2020; 3(7): 1113.. ...
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is an infrequent, highly vascular tumor that predominantly affects male adolescents ... MRI features of sinonasal tract angiofibroma/juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: Case series and systematic review. J ... Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare tumor that may present with invasive growth and cause significant morbidity in ... Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare tumor with an incidence of approximately 1:150,000, accounting for about ...
An example is juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.. *Enlarged adenoids: Repeat infections, allergies or irritants can make ...
Melanocytic angiofibroma.. Reed RJ. Am J Dermatopathol; 1979; 1(4):343-4. PubMed ID: 232378. [No Abstract] [Full Text] [Related ...
Table 3: Improvement in Facial Angiofibroma Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis in Patients Aged 6 Years and Older at Week 12 ... In this trial, subjects applied either HYFTOR or vehicle twice daily to the skin of their face affected with angiofibroma for ... Apply HYFTOR to the skin of the face affected with angiofibroma 2 times a day, in the morning and at bedtime. ... Apply HYFTOR to the skin of the face affected with angiofibroma twice daily in the morning and at bedtime. ...
up of fibrous tissue (angiofibroma) and occur with tuberous sclerosis. Tuberous sclerosis affects both the nervous system and ...
Angiofibroma Juvenile,l,,,1,0,1,,, 1977,9907,Hammer Toe,r,7880,TOE;TOES,0,0,0,,, 1978,9897,Spinal Stenosis,r,7639,SPINE;SPINAL; ...
Anesthetic Management of Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Resection with Carotid Invasion in a Pediatric Patient (Articles) ...
  • Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Bowing of the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus and maxillary sinus opacification is very suggestive of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). (medscape.com)
  • Breen M, Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (radiopaedia.org)
  • This is a case of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with classical clinical and imaging findings. (radiopaedia.org)
  • This is a classical presentation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, also known as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, is a benign tumor in the nose usually found in adolescent boys. (uvnn.com)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign yet aggressive and destructive vascular lesion of head and neck tumor affecting predominately male between the age group of 15 to 20, also called Juvenile Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (scitechnol.com)
  • The present study is retrospective of surgically treated patients of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (scitechnol.com)
  • In this study we discuss major presenting complaints, correlation of radiological and intra operative methods along with the factors affecting the recurrence of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (scitechnol.com)
  • A study of 35 cases of juvenile angiofibroma was conducted from year 2000 to 2015 at Karachi, Pakistan, mostly male adolescent with age ranging from 15 to 20 years Introduction. (scitechnol.com)
  • Juvenile angiofibroma though rare yet an aggressive disease in view of excessive bleeding mainly occurring at puberty with predominantly male involvement. (scitechnol.com)
  • This is a retrospective study that aimed to examine the outcomes of patients presenting with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) at a tertiary centre in Malaysia. (smj.org.sg)
  • Intraluminal growth of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma" by Mojtaba Mohammadi Ardehali, Shirin Irani et al. (biomedicinej.com)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare, hypervascular, benign tumor which is mainly seen among male adolescents. (biomedicinej.com)
  • Objective: To publish this rare case of Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a 24year old adult male with no epistaxis. (remedypublications.com)
  • With all the above evaluations, diagnosis was concluded as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (remedypublications.com)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is an infrequent, highly vascular tumor that predominantly affects male adolescents. (springeropen.com)
  • An example is juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma . (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Newly detected DNA viruses in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and oral and oropharyngeal squamous and West Africa. (cdc.gov)
  • Summary: Given the vascular nature of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA), the ability to achieve hemostasis and tissue ablation with a single device is theoretically beneficial during tumor resection. (childrenshospital.org)
  • How can doctors tell if my child has a juvenile angiofibroma? (msdmanuals.com)
  • Alternative names for this tumour include juvenile angiofibroma and nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (mypathologyreport.ca)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare, benign, vascular neoplasm. (actascientific.com)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is usually encapsulated and composed of vascular tissue and fibrous stroma with coarse or fine collagen fibers. (medscape.com)
  • Different staging systems exist for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (medscape.com)
  • Extra nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENA) is a term used for fibrous nodules that are located outside the nasopharynx. (ejgm.org)
  • In Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma mass arise from nasopharynx close to sphenopalatine foramina accounts for 0.5 % of all head neck tumor. (scitechnol.com)
  • Based on endoscopic examination and imaging, a nasopharyngeal angiofibroma was diagnosed. (biomedicinej.com)
  • Conclusion: It is an unusual presentation of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in an adult with 9 months history of nasal obstruction without epistaxis. (remedypublications.com)
  • Reshma B, Sudarshan Reddy L. Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma - A Case Report. (remedypublications.com)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in an adult with Proteus syndrome. (hippokratia.gr)
  • 5.Euswas C.A result of sublabial transnasomaxillary approach for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma - Retrospective study. (mahidol.ac.th)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare and benign tumor that has a fibrovascular feature. (bvsalud.org)
  • HYFTOR is an mTOR inhibitor immunosuppressant indicated for the treatment of facial angiofibroma associated with tuberous sclerosis in adults and pediatric patients 6 years of age and older. (nih.gov)
  • We are presenting a nasal septum-originated angiofibroma case in a 26-year old pregnant woman, together with literature data. (ejgm.org)
  • Sinonasal angiofibroma, a locally aggressive but benign tumour originating in the nasal cavity or nasopharynx, exclusively affects males. (mypathologyreport.ca)
  • Nasal papules that are histologically indistinguishable from angiofibroma may be a sequela of acne. (dermatologytimes.com)
  • Albahra S, Hosler GA. Angiofibroma / fibrous papule. (pathologyoutlines.com)
  • Angiofibroma, also known as fibrous papule, is a relatively common lesion seen in males and females after puberty. (salon-compass.com)
  • [ 3 ] An angiofibroma before and after embolization can be seen in the images below. (medscape.com)
  • Angiogram depicting angiofibroma before embolization. (medscape.com)
  • There are some reports of atypical growth of this tumor in literature but the intraluminal growth, which could be seen in paraganglioma and glomus tumors, has not reported yet in angiofibroma. (biomedicinej.com)
  • Immunosuppressive treatment with rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, initiated because of renal transplantation, reduced facial angiofibroma dramatically. (nih.gov)
  • Is facial contraindicated for angiofibroma? (salon-compass.com)
  • The study was focused on the analysis of TSC facial angiofibroma. (nih.gov)
  • The impact of a 6-month course of Sirolimus ointment 0.1% was assessed using digital photography and blinded dermatological review, and using the Facial Angiofibroma Severity Index (FASI). (bmj.com)
  • White arrows indicate angiofibromas on the nasolabial folds while black arrow shows gingival angiofibroma. (ispub.com)
  • Cellular angiofibroma (CA) of the vulva is a recently described condition, whose clinical and pathological features are poorly known. (nih.gov)
  • Although 1% rapamycin ointment has been reported to be effective in one case of TSC-related angiofibroma, [ 9 ] another case needed co-treatment with orally administered rapamycin. (medscape.com)
  • The definitive treatment of angiofibroma is surgical excision. (biomedicinej.com)
  • In addition, these tumors were formerly regarded as a type of acral angiofibroma (see below description). (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiofibroma affects 70-80% of patients with TSC, typically on the face. (nih.gov)
  • You will need treatment if the angiofibroma is growing larger, blocking the airways, or causing repeated nosebleeds. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Conclusions Topical application of rapamycin-tacrolimus ointment is a safe and useful treatment for TSC-related angiofibroma. (medscape.com)
  • In inclusion criteria, all patient diagnosed as angiofibroma with or without intracranial extension, while the exclusion criteria was considered in patients having bleeding disorder or unfit for surgery. (scitechnol.com)
  • Apply to the skin of the face affected with angiofibroma twice daily. (nih.gov)
  • However, the combination approach is likely to be more effective for treating the papular fibrotic angiofibroma," they wrote. (dermatologytimes.com)