A benign neoplasm of fibrous tissue in which there are numerous small and large, frequently dilated, vascular channels. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.
Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.
Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.
The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.
Bleeding from the nose.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
A small space in the skull between the MAXILLA and the SPHENOID BONE, medial to the pterygomaxillary fissure, and connecting to the NASAL CAVITY via the sphenopalatine foramen.
A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Tumors or cancer of the OROPHARYNX.
An autosomal dominant vascular anomaly characterized by telangiectases of the skin and mucous membranes and by recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. This disorder is caused by mutations of a gene (on chromosome 9q3) which encodes endoglin, a membrane glycoprotein that binds TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA.
Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.
Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.
One of the two types of ACTIVIN RECEPTORS. They are membrane protein kinases belonging to the family of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES. The major type II activin receptors are ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB.
Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
The mucous lining of the NASAL CAVITY, including lining of the nostril (vestibule) and the OLFACTORY MUCOSA. Nasal mucosa consists of ciliated cells, GOBLET CELLS, brush cells, small granule cells, basal cells (STEM CELLS) and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.
A benign tumor consisting of vascular and smooth muscle elements.
An odontogenic fibroma in which cells have developed into cementoblasts and which consists largely of cementum.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Hyaline cartilages in the nose. There are five major nasal cartilages including two lateral, two alar, and one septal.
A plastic surgical operation on the nose, either reconstructive, restorative, or cosmetic. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The partition separating the two NASAL CAVITIES in the midplane. It is formed by the SEPTAL NASAL CARTILAGE, parts of skull bones (ETHMOID BONE; VOMER), and membranous parts.
The scroll-like bony plates with curved margins on the lateral wall of the NASAL CAVITY. Turbinates, also called nasal concha, increase the surface area of nasal cavity thus providing a mechanism for rapid warming and humidification of air as it passes to the lung.
The numerous (6-12) small thin-walled spaces or air cells in the ETHMOID BONE located between the eyes. These air cells form an ethmoidal labyrinth.
A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.

Overgrowth of oral mucosa and facial skin, a novel feature of aspartylglucosaminuria. (1/70)

Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA). The main symptom is progressive mental retardation. A spectrum of different mutations has been reported in this disease, one missense mutation (Cys163Ser) being responsible for the majority of Finnish cases. We were able to examine 66 Finnish AGU patients for changes in the oral mucosa and 44 of these for changes in facial skin. Biopsy specimens of 16 oral lesions, 12 of them associated with the teeth, plus two facial lesions were studied histologically. Immunohistochemical staining for AGA was performed on 15 oral specimens. Skin was seborrhoeic in adolescent and adult patients, with erythema of the facial skin already common in childhood. Of 44 patients, nine (20%) had facial angiofibromas, tumours primarily occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis. Oedemic buccal mucosa (leucoedema) and gingival overgrowths were more frequent in AGU patients than in controls (p<0.001). Of 16 oral mucosal lesions studied histologically, 15 represented fibroepithelial or epithelial hyperplasias and were reactive in nature. Cytoplasmic vacuolisation was evident in four. Immunohistochemically, expression of AGA in AGU patients' mucosal lesions did not differ from that seen in corresponding lesions of normal subjects. Thus, the high frequency of mucosal overgrowth in AGU patients does not appear to be directly associated with lysosomal storage or with alterations in the level of AGA expression.  (+info)

Genetic alterations in Ki-ras and Ha-ras genes in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas and head and neck cancer. (2/70)

CONTEXT: Ras gene mutations have been associated to a wide range of human solid tumors. Members of the ras gene family (Ki-ras, Ha-ras and N-ras) are structurally related and code for a protein (p21) known to play an important role in the regulation of normal signal transduction and cell growth. The frequency of ras mutations is different from one type of tumor to another, suggesting that point mutations might be carcinogen-specific. OBJECTIVES: To study the occurrence of Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations. We also studied the relative level of Ha-ras mRNA in 32 of the head and neck tumors. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: University referral unit. PARTICIPANTS: 60 head and neck tumors and in 28 Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibromas (JNA). DIAGNOSTIC TEST: Using PCR-SSCP we examined the occurrence of Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations. The relative level of Ha-ras mRNA was examined by Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: None of the head and neck tumors or JNA samples showed evidence of mutations within codons 12, 13, 59 and 61 of Ki-ras or Ha-ras genes. However, 17 (53%) of the tumors where gene expression could be examined exhibited increased levels of Ha-ras mRNA compared with the normal tissue derived from the same patient. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate for the first time that mutations of Ki-ras and Ha-ras genes are not associated with the development of JNA and confirm previous reports indicating that activating ras mutations are absent or rarely involved in head and neck tumors from western world patients. Furthermore, our findings suggest that overexpression of Ha-ras, rather than mutations, might be an important factor in the development and progression of head and neck tumors.  (+info)

Tonsillar lymphangiomatous polyps: a clinicopathologic series of 26 cases. (3/70)

BACKGROUND: Lymphangiomatous polyps are uncommon benign tumors of the tonsils. METHODS: Twenty-six cases of lymphangiomatous polyps diagnosed between 1980 and 1999 were retrieved from the files of the Otorhinolaryngic-Head and Neck Tumor Registry of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed to characterize the histologic features of these tumors. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 15 cases. Clinical follow-up data were obtained. RESULTS: The patients included 13 males and 13 females, ages 3 to 63 years (mean, 25.2 years). Patients experienced dysphagia, sore throat, and the sensation of a mass in the throat. Symptoms were present from a few weeks to years. The tonsillar masses were unilateral in all cases. Clinically, the lesions were frequently mistaken for a neoplasm (n = 18 patients). Grossly, all of the lesions were polypoid and measured 0.5 to 3.8 cm (mean, 1.6 cm). Histologically, the polyps were covered by squamous epithelium showing variable epithelial hyperplasia, dyskeratosis, and lymphocytic epitheliotropism. The masses showed a characteristic submucosal proliferation of small to medium-sized, endothelial-lined, lymph-vascular channels lacking features of malignancy. Collagen, smooth muscle, and adipose tissue were present in the stroma. Intravascular proteinaceous fluid and lymphocytes were noted. Immunohistochemical findings confirmed the endothelial origin of the vascular proliferation and a mixed lymphoid population. The differential diagnosis included fibroepithelial polyp, lymphangioma, juvenile angiofibroma, and squamous papilloma. In all patients with follow-up, complete surgical excision was curative (mean follow-up, 5.4 years; range, 1 mo to 14 years). CONCLUSIONS: We detail the clinical and pathologic features of tonsillar lymphangiomatous polyps. These tumors are uncommon and may clinically be mistaken for a malignant neoplasm. The characteristic histologic features should allow for its correct diagnosis and differentiation from similar appearing tonsillar lesions.  (+info)

Frequency of facial angiofibromas in Japanese patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. (4/70)

The high frequency of cutaneous manifestations in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) has recently been reported. Since prevalence of some cutaneous diseases varies among different ethnic groups, we examined the frequency of facial angiofibromas in Japanese patients with familial MEN 1. Among 27 patients with germline MEN1 gene mutation and one asymptomatic gene carrier, angiofibromas were identified in 43% (12/28) of the subjects. This frequency was significantly lower than that of Caucasian patients, but nonetheless almost equaled those of pituitary tumors and pancreas endocrine tumors. Angiofibromas should be considered as one of major manifestations in MEN 1 regardless of patients' ethnic origin, and clinicians should pay careful attention to the cutaneous lesions in patients with endocrine tumors.  (+info)

Frequent beta-catenin mutations in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. (5/70)

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) are locally aggressive vascular tumors occurring predominantly in adolescent males. The pathogenesis of JNAs is unknown. Recently, JNAs have been reported to occur at increased frequency among patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, suggesting that alterations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/beta-catenin pathway might also be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic JNAs. We analyzed somatic beta-catenin and APC gene mutations in 16 sporadic JNAs from nonfamilial adenomatous polyposis patients using immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin, and direct DNA sequencing for exon 3 of the beta-catenin gene and the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was diffusely present in the stromal cells but not in the endothelial cells of all 16 JNAs. Activating beta-catenin gene mutations were present in 75% (12 of 16) of JNAs. Six JNA patients also had recurrent tumors after surgery, and in all cases the beta-catenin gene status of the recurrent JNA was identical to the initial tumor. No mutations in the mutation cluster region of the APC gene were detected in the four JNAs without beta-catenin mutations. The high frequency of beta-catenin mutations in sporadic JNAs and the presence of identical beta-catenin gene mutations in recurrent tumors indicates that activating beta-catenin gene mutations are important in the pathogenesis of JNAs. The immunohistochemical localization of beta-catenin only to the nuclei of stromal cells further suggests that the stromal cells, rather than endothelial cells, are the neoplastic cells of JNAs.  (+info)

Clinicopathologic analysis of angiomyofibroblastoma of the female genital tract. (6/70)

OBJECTIVE: To study the clinicopathologic features and immunoprofile of angiomyofibroblastoma (AMF) with emphasis on differential diagnosis. METHODS: Seven vulvar, two vaginal and one perineal angiomyofibroblastomas were evaluated by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemical studies were performed on paraffin-embedded sections using the standard ABC method with a panel of antibodies. RESULTS: Angiomyofibroblastoma predominantly occurred in middle-aged women in the genital region, especially in the superficial area of the vulva. Clinically, most of the tumors presented as slowly growing painless masses and were often diagnosed as Bartholin's gland cysts. Histologically, the tumors were all well-circumscribed and characterized by alternating hypocellular and hypercellular areas with abundant thin-walled blood vessels. The tumor cells were bland and spindle-shaped or epithelioid and tended to concentrate around the vessels or cluster in small nests. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells expressed vimentin and estrogen receptor protein in all 10 cases and desmin in 9 cases. Three cases showed weak or focal immunoreactivity to alpha-smooth muscle actin and muscle specific actin. All ten patients were treated by local excision. Follow-up showed a benign course with no signs of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Angiomyofibroblastoma is a distinctive neoplasm that has a propensity to occur in the female genital tract. Recognition of this entity is important to avoid misdiagnosis with other vulvar angiomyxoid neoplasms.  (+info)

Risks of tumor embolization in the presence of an unrecognized patent foramen ovale: case report. (7/70)

A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a fairly common septal defect in the general population. Paradoxical embolization through a PFO is a known cause of stroke. Preprocedural recognition of a PFO in a patient undergoing particulate arterial embolization can help reduce the risk of cerebral infarction.  (+info)

Recurrent angiofibroma invading the skull base--case report. (8/70)

A 16-year-old male presented with a massive nasopharyngeal angiofibroma arising in the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa, and eroding the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone. Neuroimaging showed the tumor had infiltrated the parasellar region from the middle cranial fossa and reached the cavernous sinus. The tumor was almost completely removed macroscopically by a modified transbasal approach.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Role of le Fort type i osteotomy approach in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. AU - Singh, R.. AU - Hazarika, P.. AU - Nayak, D. R.. AU - Balakrishnan, R.. AU - Pillai, S.. AU - Hazarika, M.. PY - 2011/11/1. Y1 - 2011/11/1. N2 - Le Fort type I osteotomy is a fracture that extends from the pyriform aperture to each of the pterygoid plates, resulting in the detachment of the upper jaw from the cranial base. A retrospective study was conducted on 12 patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) who underwent the Le Fort type I approach. Preoperatively, all cases were investigated with computed tomographic scans with contrast and angiography with embolisation. This paper highlights the surgical technique, results and treatment morbidity. The average age of the patients was 21 years, average duration of surgery was 3.2 h and average blood loss was 550 ml. All cases had significant symptomatic improvement postoperatively. At 1 year follow up, the authors encountered ...
Staging of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas is performed with cross-sectional imaging and relies on the identification of local tumor extent, and invasion of adjacent spaces. For a discussion of this entity please refer to the parent article...
Staging of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas is performed with cross-sectional imaging and relies on the identification of local tumour extent, and invasion of adjacent spaces. For a discussion of this entity please refer to the parent articl...
Medical information, Angiofibroma - juvenile. Definition of Angiofibroma - juvenile, symptoms of Angiofibroma - juvenile, treatment of Angiofibroma - juvenile, and prevention of Angiofibroma - juvenile. Exams and Tests Angiofibroma - juvenile.
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign neoplasm that occurs almost exclusively in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. Surgery remains the primary treatment of choice. JNA has always presented a management challenge to surgeons because of its vascular nature, site of occurrence, and local tissue destruction. The surgical approaches are either standard open method which include external or intraoral incisions, or the recent advanced approach, i.e. via using the endonasal endoscope. It is widely accepted that the use of preoperative angiographic embolization reduces the occurrence of intraoperative bleeding and facilitates tumour removal. However, angiographic embolization is not available at all centres. The purpose of this article is to present our experience with five patients diagnosed with JNA who were resected without embolization, using various surgical approaches. Two tumours were removed via endonasal endoscopic surgery. None of the tumours were embolized prior to ...
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ANGIOFIBROMA NASAL JUVENIL PDF - El Angiofibroma nasofaríngeo juvenil es un tumor benigno vascular (pero que tardíamente Se localiza en la pared posterolateral de la grita nasal a nivel
The present results demonstrate that the contrast-enhanced helical CT enabled the detection of RD in the early postoperative course after JNA involving the skull base was excise. Early postoperative scans had higher specificity (83%) than sensitivity (75%) and higher NPV (83%) than PPV (75%). The range of 95% CIs for the results was wide because of the small number of patients, which reflects the rare occurrence of the disease. The high κ values indicate high interreader consistency in the early detection of RD with CT (15).. When CT depicts RD, the finding should reliably correspond to a true RD at revision surgery. The specificity (83%) and PPV (75%) of early postoperative CT scan was relatively high. Therefore, contrast-enhanced CT may have diagnostic value, as it had relatively high accuracy in the diagnosis of RD while creating minimal patient discomfort.. The sensitivities and NPVs suggest that a patent RD can be detected in most cases. Potential RD may be missed during postoperative CT ...
Axial contrast enhanced CT of the face demonstrates the avidly enhancing mass in this particular case to have extending into the soft tissues of the face, an occasional and extreme finding.
Juvenile angiofibromas (JNA) are common benign tumors usually occurring in the nasopharynx of male adolescents. They represent 0.5% of head and neck neoplasms and very rarely they localize in extra-nasopharyngeal sites. Extra-nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENPA) is histologically similar to JNA. Due to its clinical and epidemiological characteristics, some authors identify the ENPA as a different disease from the typical JNA. Less than a hundred cases of ENPA are reported in literature. Maxillary and ethmoid sinus are the most commonly involved sites, whereas other localizations such as nasal septum and inferior turbinate are infrequent. We report the case of a ENPA arising from the lateral crus of the alar cartilage, the first described in literature, at the best of our knowledges.. ...
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a locally aggressive benign vascular neoplasm, composed of vasogenic and myofibroblastic elements, accounts for 0.05-0.5% of all the head and neck neoplasms. There are very few case reports of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma involving the oral cavity; we report a case involving both the maxilla and mandible in a 17-year-old patient who reported with a large firm swelling on right side of face with recurrent epistaxis and headache. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed a large lobulated enhancing soft tissue mass, which was hypointense on T1-weighted image and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image causing expansion of pterygopalatine fossa and sphenopalatine foramen with extension into the sphenoid sinus, ethmoid air cells, right nasal cavity, right infratemporal fossa and right maxillary sinus with remodeling of right zygomatic arch and part of body and ramus of mandible ...
Angiofibroma of nasopharynx in children is an aggressive tumor that can spread into the neighboring structures resulting in serious complications. Here describes diagnostic methods used and treatment options available.
Juvenile Angiofibromas - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version.
Juvenile Angiofibromas - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the Merck Manuals - Medical Consumer Version.
BACKGROUND: The TNM system is an established tool for classification of solid tumors by means of tumor size and extent, the involvement of local lymph nodes, and the presence of distant metastases. The classification was established in order to visualize prognostic implications and to allow establishment of systematic therapeutic algorithms. Since the beginning of 2017 a revised version of the classification has applied. Particularly the classification of otorhinolaryngologic tumors has been thoroughly revised in the 8th edition, partly on the basis of new prognostically relevant parameters, such as infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes ...
Abstract:A 26-year-old woman presented with a 7-month history of a slowly growing right-sided, well-circumscribed, subcutaneous, soft, painless, large vulvoinguinal lump that now measured up to 12 cm. Adjacent to but separate from this was a well-circumscribed, soft, painless, mobile, large inguinal
Flucke U, van Krieken JH, Mentzel T. Cellular angiofibroma: analysis of 25 cases emphasizing its relationship to spindle cell lipoma and mammary-type myofibroblastoma. Mod Pathol. 2011 Jan;24(1):82-9. doi: 10.1038/modpathol.2010.170. Epub 2010 Sep 17. PubMed PMID: 20852591 ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
If there is any doubt Page 123 Chapter 11. 9 18. Darling TN, Skarulis MC, Steinberg SM, et al Multiple facial angiofibromas and collagenomas in citraate with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. 12.
Rapamycin, also known as Sirolimus was first discovered in 1972 form a sample of bacterium found in the Easter Islands and was initially used as an anti-fungal agent. But after a while, it was discovered that the wonder drug had immunosuppressive and antiproliferative properties that were unmatched. This led to its use in the treatment of different conditions.Some of the ailments treated or managed by the drug include; Immunosuppressant properties, treating patients with Hemolytic- Urenal Syndrome, treatment of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), treatment of facial angiofibromas, treatment of Alzheimers disease (research ongoing), treatment of muscular dystrophy, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), coronary stent coating, treatment of lymphangioleiomyomatosis, treatment of cancer and increase longevity of a person.. One of the greatest advocates of this wonder drug is Mikhail Blagosklonny. Blagosklonny is a known Professor of Oncology at the Rosewell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York ...
MEN-1, which was first described as a clinical and genetic syndrome by Wermer in 1954, is an autosomal dominant cancer syndrome, characterized primarily by multiple neoplasias in the parathyroid glands, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary. Other endocrine tumors such as gastrinoma, carcinoid, adrenal cortical tumors and cutaneous tumors (angiofibroma, collagenoma and lipoma) may also occur. The genetic defect responsible for MEN-1 has been mapped to chromosome 11 q 13 . The MEN-1 gene consists of 10 exons which encodes a protein of 610 amino acids. Inactivation of MEN-1 gene mutations in both germline and sporadic tumors supports that MEN-1 is a tumor-suppessor gene. Germline MEN-1 gene mutation is responsible for the majority of MEN-1 syndrome cases. MEN-1 induces combinations of more than twenty various endocrine and non-endocrine tumors. A feasible definition of MEN-1 is a case with two of the three main MEN-1 related endocrine tumors (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic endocrine ...
Neonatal pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Koppen, S.; Korver, C. R. W.; Dalinghaus, M.; Westermann, C. J. J. // Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal & Neonatal Edition;Nov2002, Vol. 87 Issue 3, p226 Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is an autosomal dominant mucocutaneous and visceral vascular dysplasia, characterised by the occurrence of telangiectasia and arteriovenous malformations. Patients are usually recognised by the presence of... ...
Dr. Younis is currently the Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology at the University of Miami Department Otolaryngology University of Miami. He has built a world-wide reputation for his clinical and research activities. His primary areas of expertise are sinus diseases, sinus surgery, airway reconstruction, ear infections, and management of snoring and sleep disorders in children. He is one of only a few surgeons who can perform delicate endoscopic procedures in pediatric patients with rare head and neck tumors such as teratoma or juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Dr. Younis has published 49 scientific articles and 25 textbook chapters. He is also the Editor of a unique book on Sinus Disease in Children. Before joining the University of Miami, Dr. Younis was the Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology at Yale University and thereafter Interim Chairman of the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Mississippi, Jackson Mississippi ...
Angiomyofibroblastoma represents a rare, benign mesenchymal tumor with a predilection for the vulvovaginal region. Lipomatous change may occur but rarely comprises a substantial component of the lesion. There are only eight reports in the English lan
A 23 y/o male was brought to our Emergency Department after having a seizure. He was alert and his vital signs were stable. He is known to have epilepsy and is on regular anti-epileptic medication for three years. He is being followed up at a neighborhood medical center at his native village . On physical examination numerous brown papules were seen over his nose and both cheeks in a butterfly pattern which correspond to facial angiofibromas (Figure 1). Ash Leaf Hypomelanotic macules were seen over his extremities (Figure 2). Few hyperpigmented café au lait macules were observed over his trunk (Figure 3). A big fibroma was also seen over his scalp (Figure 4). Areas of thick leathery texture of orange peel known as Shagreen patches were observed on back (Figure 5).. Figure 1: Facial ...
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is characterized by endocrine tumors, particularly in the parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary, and pancreatic islet cells. Primary tumors may be found in more than one endocrine organ and/or multiple tumors may be found in the same organ. MEN1-associated endocrine tumors cause an array of clinical and biochemical manifestations secondary to hormone hypersecretion: hyperparathyroidism (the most frequent MEN1-symptom with potential effects on the central nervous system (CNS), hypercalcemia, gastrointestinal, renal cardiovascular, and skeletal involvement), hypercortisolism, gigantism and acromegaly, prolactinoma (with associated oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea, and galactorrhea in females and sexual dysfunction in males), gastrinoma, and insulinoma. Non-endocrine tumors also are common and can include facial angiofibromas and collagenomas of the skin, lipomas, meningioma and ependymoma of the CNS, and leiomyomas. MEN1 is caused by mutations in the menin ...
ICS: Intercostal Space, IC: Intercostal, IV: Intervertebral, CD,HV: Castlemans Disease, Hyaline Vascular Type. Several previous reports have demonstrated that Castlemans disease can mimic various tumors, for example: thymoma (1), angiofibroma (2), meningioma (8), pulmonary neoplasms (9), adnexal mass (10), and cervical mass (4). Many lesions exhibit a similar radiological appearance and only a pathologic examination allows an accurate diagnosis. Because Castlemans disease is a rare reactive entity, its diagnosis is generally overlooked by radiologists and clinicians.. In hyaline vascular Castlemans disease, the adherence by an involved lymph node to the adjacent soft tissue has been described (10), however encapsulation and self-limitation are constant features of hyaline vascular Castlemans disease. Hyaline vascular Castlemans disease usually does not invade and replace neighboring structures. Our case is unique because it exhibits local invasion of adjacent structures and questions the ...
Hirsuties coronae glandis (also known as hirsutoid papillomas[1] and pearly penile papules; PPP)[1] are small protuberances that may form on the ridge of the glans of the human penis. They are a form of acral angiofibromas.[2] They are a normal anatomical variation in humans and are sometimes described as vestigial remnants of penile spines, sensitive features found in the same location in other primates. In species in which penile spines are expressed, as well as in humans who have them, the spines are thought to contribute to sexual pleasure and quicker orgasms.[3][4] It has been theorized that pearly penile papules stimulate the vagina during sexual intercourse.[5] In addition, pearly penile papules secrete oil that moistens the glans of the penis.[6] The papules appear as one or several rows of small, pearly or flesh-colored, smooth, dome-topped bumps situated circumferentially around the corona or sulcus of the glans. They may range in size from less than 1 mm to 3 mm.[7] As of 1999, ...
Sonographically, AMFB has been reported to be well demarcated with inhomogeneous echogenicity and multiple hypoechoic areas within an echogenic stroma [12]. Wang and coworkers assessed 72 perineal tumors, two among which represented AMFB and were characterized as solid cystic masses on the basis of ultrasonography [13]. In contrast to these descriptions, we found the tumor in our patient to be of homogeneous, medium echogenicity without solid cystic features (see Additional file 1). Retrospectively, the obtained MR images did not add much information to what was already known based on the ultrasound studies.. To date, the exact pathogenesis of AMFB is not clear. Because many tumors express estrogen and progesterone receptors, it is likely that these hormones play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AMFB. Indeed, these tumors almost exclusively occur in women of reproductive age; two cases of postmenopausal women receiving tamoxifen therapy have been reported [14, 15]. Because many of the ...
Angiomyofibroblastoma is a rare, usually small benign mesenchymal tumor that occurs in vulvar lesions of premenopausal women. A case of angiomyofibroblastoma that arose as a unique pedunculated and particularly large mass in the left vulva of a 48-year-old woman is presented herein. The patient had been aware of a gradually enlarged mass of 7 years duration without any other gynecological symptoms or signs. The maximum dimension of the tumor measured 11 cm. The resected tumor was well circumscribed with a bulging and glistening cut surface. Histological examination revealed an admixture of irregularly distributed hypercellular and hypocellular areas with spindled, plump spindled, or plasmacytoid stromal cells and abundant venular or capillary-sized vessels. Stromal cells characteristically cluster around delicate vessels within an edematous to collagenous matrix. In the present case, intralesional adipose tissue was present throughout the tumor. There was no significant nuclear atypia, and ...
CASE SUMMARY A 70-year-old woman presented with solitary round mass of right lateral breast. The patient underwent an ultrasound-guided core biopsy of this m...
02BK4ZZ is a billable procedure code but might not be covered by Medicare. 02BK4ZZ is used to the performance of excision of right ventricle, percutaneous endoscopic approach. Code valid for the year 2020
0TPB4MZ is a billable procedure code but might not be covered by Medicare. 0TPB4MZ is used to the performance of removal of stimulator lead from bladder, percutaneous endoscopic approach. Code valid for the year 2020
Thiamylal (Surital) is a barbiturate derivative invented in the 1950s. It has sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypnotic effects, and is used as a strong but short acting sedative. Thiamylal is still in current use, primarily for induction in surgical anaesthesia or as an anticonvulsant to counteract side effects from other anaesthetics. It is the thiobarbiturate analogue of secobarbital. Hsieh MY, Hung GY, Hsieh YL, Chang CY, Hwang B. Deep sedation with methohexital or thiamylal with midazolam for invasive procedures in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Acta Paediatrica Taiwan. 2005 Sep-Oct;46(5):294-300. Tsai CJ, Wang HM, Lu IC, Tai CF, Wang LF, Soo LY, Lu DV. Seizure after local anesthesia for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences. 2007 Feb;23(2):97-100 ...
Case summary: (Case 1) A 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis and was referred for ophthalmologic examination. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.63 and macular edema with epiretinal membrane and retinal astrocytic hamartomas were observed on his right eye. And also fluorescent leakage was observed in fluorescein angiography. After one month of intravitreal ranibizumab injection, the BCVA in the right eye was 1.0. Amount of the macular edema was decreased in the optical coherence tomography and remained stable for 6 months. (Case 2) A 34-year-old female patient presented with sudden left visual loss. The patient had a history of 10 years old tuberous sclerosis and had facial angiofibroma. The BCVA was 1.0 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Bilateral retinal astrocytic hamartomas and vitreous hemorrhage in the left eye were observed. Intravitreal bevacizumab injection was performed twice at her left eye and then she recovered to the BCVA of 1.0 in ...
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports related to breast cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, skin cancer, head and neck cancer, paediatric oncology, neurooncology as well as genitourinary cancer.
ICD-10-PCS code 0CBR4ZX for Excision of Epiglottis, Percutaneous Endoscopic Approach, Diagnostic is a medical classification as listed by CMS under Mouth and Throat range.
ICD-10-PCS code 0LB94ZX for Excision of Right Trunk Tendon, Percutaneous Endoscopic Approach, Diagnostic is a medical classification as listed by WHO
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Explore oncology cases such as: Lymphoproliferative disorder, Histology of intranodal palisaded myofibroblastoma, Histology of metastatic adenocarcinoma from the colon
TY - JOUR. T1 - Transoral robotic surgery for huge spindle cell lipoma of the hypopharynx. AU - Lee, Hyoung Shin. AU - Koh, Myoung Ju. AU - Koh, Yoon Woo. AU - Choi, Eun Chang. PY - 2013/7. Y1 - 2013/7. N2 - Spindle cell lipoma is an uncommon histologic variant of lipoma, and reports at the larynx or hypopharynx are extremely rare. We present our experience with a 53-year-old man with a huge spindle cell lipoma of the pyriform sinus and tried to remove the tumor using a transoral robotic approach. The tumor was successfully removed with 3-dimensional visualization providing an excellent view of the resection margin and the dissection plane. Furthermore, geometric resection could be conducted in the narrow pharyngeal lumen and working space using the articulated robotic arms. We suggest that spindle cell lipoma should be considered for differential diagnosis in benign hypopharyngeal tumors and that transoral robotic surgery may be successfully used in huge benign tumors of the hypopharynx.. AB - ...
Patients will be those already diagnosed with TSC (definite, probable, or possible) based on clinical criteria and/or genetic testing, and ranging in age from 18 to 90 years old.. The clinical features of TSC considered of major significance are: facial angiofibromas or forehead plaque, nontraumatic periungual fibromas, three or more hypomelanotic macules, shagreen patch, multiple retinal nodular hamartomas, cortical tuber, subependymal nodule, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, cardiac rhabdomyoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and renal angiomyolipoma.. The minor features of TSC are: multiple randomly distributed pits in dental enamel, hamartomatous rectal polyps, bone cysts, cerebral white matter radial migration lines, gingival fibromas, nonrenal hamartoma, retinal achromic patch, confetti skin lesions, and multiple renal cysts (5). Definite TSC is diagnosed by the presence of two major features or one major feature plus two minor features. Probable TSC is diagnosed by the presence of one ...
Tuberous sclerosis or tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber (KTW) syndromes are phakomatoses which are believed to be inherited separately were associated in a 21 years old female, with no family history of similar illness presented with facial rash of reddish spots or bumps, facial angiofibroma (adenoma cebaceum), which appeared on the nose and cheeks in a butterfly distribution, and sub ependymal calcific nodules on brain CT, and multiple liver, pancreas hamartomas and multiple angiomyolipomas and cysts of both kidney on ultrasound, which is consistent with a sporadic TSC, in addition, the diagnostic triad of KTW involved the left upper limb : cutaneous naevi a vascular anomaly, soft tissue and osteohypertrophy ...
Tumors of the head and neck region that frequently require embolization include meningiomas, paragangliomas and angiofibromas, owing to their rich vascular
maintained in both captures. Chest CAT scan: The assessment of the mediastinum shows the presence of aortic and coronary ... should preferably be done by a minimally invasive endoscopic approach as opposed to an open thoracothomy. This will reduce soft .... ...
02UX4KZ ICD-10 PCS Code descriptor cic Aorta, Ascending/Arch with Nonautologous Tissue Substitute, Percutaneous Endoscopic Approach
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet and anterior pituitary tumors. Some patients may also develop carcinoid tumors, adrenocortical tumors, facial angiofibromas, collagenomas, and lipomas. MEN1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder, due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene MEN1, which encodes a 610 amino acid protein, menin. Thus, the finding of MEN1 in a patient has important implications for family members because first-degree relatives have a 50% risk of developing the disease and can often be identified by MEN1 mutational analysis. Patients with MEN1 have a decreased life-expectancy and the outcomes of current treatments, which are generally similar to that for the respective tumors occurring in non-MEN1 patients, are not as successful because of multiple tumors, which may be larger, more aggressive, and resistant to treatment, and the concurrence of metastases. The prognosis for MEN1 patients might be improved by pre
TY - JOUR. T1 - Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis in a man. AU - Aubry, M. C.. AU - Myers, J. L.. AU - Ryu, J. H.. AU - Henske, E. P.. AU - Logginidou, H.. AU - Jalal, S. M.. AU - Tazelaar, H. D.. PY - 2000. Y1 - 2000. N2 - Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is an uncommon disease reported to occur exclusively in women. We describe a pheno-typically normal man with pulmonary LAM. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies performed on the lung biopsy confirmed a normal XY genotype. Our patient also had stigmata of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), including facial angiofibromas and renal angiomyolipoma. Immunohistochemical stains of both Lam and renal angiomyolipoma showed positive immunoreactivity for hamartin (TSC1) and loss of immunoreactivity for tuberin (TSC2). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for TSC2 was further demonstrated in the renal angiomyolipoma. Coupled with the results of immunostains, these findings are consistent with TSC2 mutation.. AB - Pulmonary ...
The benign, non-invasive lesions of tuberous sclerosis can appear in any organ like the brain, heart, skin, eyes, kidney, lung, and liver. Therefore, TS has a wide clinical spectrum. The diagnosis of definitive TS is based on specific clinical features and requires the presence of two major criteria, or one major and two minor [3]. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, renal angiomyolipoma and facial angiofibroma are some of the major clinical features.. The most frequent cause of death in patients with TS is renal complication [3, 5]. Multifocal, bilateral angiomyolipomas are found in about 70-90% of adult patients [3], and the prevalence increases with age, being less frequent in children [3, 4]. These lesions are more often prevalent in women, suggesting a hormonal component to the tumor growth [6]. The angiomyolipomas are composed of varying amounts of mature adipose tissue, smooth muscle, and abnormal blood vessels [3, 6]. The demonstration of intratumoral fat with negative attenuation values ...
Kumar A, Deka RC & Jha D. (2002). Endoscopic removal of localised angiofibroma. J Otolaryngol. 31:41-4. Jha D, Deka RC & Sharma ... 2011). Adjuvant therapy with flutamide for presurgical volume reduction in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Head Neck. 33: ...
Angiofibroma 64%*[5] - - - Lipoma 17%*[5] - - - Parathyroid hyperplasia 90%[4] 50%[4] - - ...
"Seizure after local anesthesia for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma". The Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences. 23 (2): 97-100. doi ...
Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. Malignant hypertension[edit]. It could be useful for managing malignant hypertension due ...
The papular rash is now known as facial angiofibroma. 1885 French dermatologists François Henri Hallopeau and Émile Leredde ... 1982 Kenneth Arndt successfully treated facial angiofibroma with an argon laser. 1983 Positron emission tomography (PET, ...
"Exclusively Endoscopic Removal of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Trends and Limits", Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. ... "Exclusively Endoscopic Removal of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Trends and Limits", Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. ... "Exclusively Endoscopic Removal of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma: Trends and Limits". Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & ...
Cutaneous and visceral lesions may occur, including angiofibroma, cardiac rhabdomyomas, and renal angiomyolipomas. The central ... benign growths such as facial angiofibroma and subependymal nodules), and very rarely, cancerous hamartoblastomas. The effect ...
Medicine portal Human vestigiality Fordyce spots Smegma Angiofibroma Rapini RP, Bolognia JL, Jorizzo JL (2007). Dermatology: 2- ...
Head, Neck, and Skullbase Tumors - Includes angiofibroma, desmoid tumors, fibrosarcomas, hemangiomas, lymphomas and lymphatic ...
Now known as facial angiofibroma, this papular facial rash, of distinctive butterfly distribution, was first described in ...
... copy number profiling using a 100K SNP array reveals novel disease-related genes BORIS and TSHZ1 in juvenile angiofibroma". ...
Abnormal causes of asymmetry included invasion by nasopharyngeal melanoma, angiofibroma, carotid-cavernous fistula with ...
The fibroma cavernosum or angiofibroma, consists of many often dilated vessels, it is a vasoactive tumor occurring almost ...
Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma It could be useful for managing malignant hypertension due to end stage kidney failure. ...
... acral angiofibroma and desmoplastic fibroblastoma (Swan, 1988; Pitt et al., 1993; Karabela-Bouropoulou et al., 1999; Jang et al ...
Angiofibroma Angiokeratoma Angiokeratoma of Fordyce (angiokeratoma of the scrotum and vulva) Angiokeratoma of Mibelli ( ...
Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans Deep angiomyxoma Superficial angiomyxoma Angiomyofibroblastoma Cellular angiofibroma Leiomyoma ...
Neoplastic Squamous cell carcinoma Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Melanoma Nasopharyngeal carcinoma Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma ...
... angiofibroma MeSH C04.557.645.115 - angiokeratoma MeSH C04.557.645.350 - glomus tumor MeSH C04.557.645.375 - hemangioma MeSH ...
... may refer to: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Januaria Airport (IATA: JNA), an airport in Minas Gerais, Brazil Jinair ...
NOS Juvenile angiofibroma Fibrous papule of nose Involuting nevus Giant cell or cellular angiofibroma M9161/0 Acquired tufted ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Hand-Schüller-Christian disease Hemangioma, cavernous Cystic: Dermoid cyst Vascular: Carotid- ...
List of cutaneous conditions Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Tuberous sclerosis Freedberg, et al. (2003). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology ...
... , also known as juvenile nasal angiofibroma, is a histologically benign but locally aggressive ... Mortality is not associated with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. 00021 at CHORUS "juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma" at ... If nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is suspected based on physical examination (a smooth vascular submucosal mass in the posterior ... Prognosis for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is favorable. Because these tumors are benign, metastasis to distal sites does not ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Larynx. Laryngeal cancer. Laryngeal papillomatosis. Lower RT. Trachea. *Tracheal tumor ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Larynx. Laryngeal cancer. Laryngeal papillomatosis. Lower RT. Trachea. *Tracheal tumor ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Larynx. Laryngeal cancer. Laryngeal papillomatosis. Lower RT. Trachea. *Tracheal tumor ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Larynx. Laryngeal cancer. Laryngeal papillomatosis. Lower RT. Trachea. *Tracheal tumor ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Larynx. Laryngeal cancer. Laryngeal papillomatosis. Lower RT. Trachea. *Tracheal tumor ...
List of cutaneous conditions Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Tuberous sclerosis Freedberg, et al. (2003). Fitzpatricks Dermatology ...
Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. It is most often seen in boys and ... Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. It is most often seen in boys and ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains many blood vessels and ... Juvenile angiofibroma. In: Meyers EN, Snyderman CH, eds. Operative Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 3rd ed. Philadelphia ...
Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, also known as juvenile nasal angiofibroma, is a histologically benign but locally aggressive ... Mortality is not associated with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. 00021 at CHORUS "juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma" at ... If nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is suspected based on physical examination (a smooth vascular submucosal mass in the posterior ... Prognosis for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is favorable. Because these tumors are benign, metastasis to distal sites does not ...
A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a growth in the area behind the nose. Theyre benign but can damage nerves and bones ... Angiofibroma nasofaríngeo juvenil. What Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma?. A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA ... How Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Treated?. A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma may be hard to treat if it grows ... Doctors dont know for sure what causes a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (nay-zoe-fuh-RIN-jee-uhl an-jee-oh-fye-BROH-muh ...
... angiofibroma. My doctor said that it is benign and a good sign, but all of the information I find is for juvenile ang... ... angiofibroma of nipple stereosb Hello, I just had a biopsy of a painful red spot on my nipple that came back as angiofibroma ... angiofibroma of nipple. Hello, I just had a biopsy of a painful red spot on my nipple that came back as angiofibroma. My ... My doctor said that it is benign and a good sign, but all of the information I find is for juvenile angiofibroma in males. I am ...
... Chikoti Wheat,1,2 Ryan J. Bickley,3 Erik Cohen,4 ... Chikoti Wheat, Ryan J. Bickley, Erik Cohen, Danya Wenzler, Nancy Hunter, and Donna Astiz, "Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma ...
Angiofibroma is a relatively rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in adolescent boys. ...
Juvenile angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign tumor that tends to bleed and occurs in the nasopharynx of prepubertal and adolescent ... Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) occurs exclusively in males. Females with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA ... encoded search term (Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma) and Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma What to Read Next on ... Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. Updated: May 16, 2018 * Author: Ted L Tewfik, MD; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA ...
Orbital and Extraorbital Giant Cell Angiofibroma: A Giant Cell-Rich Variant of Solitary Fibrous Tumor? Clinicopathologic and ... A cutaneous case of giant cell angiofibroma occurring with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and showing bimodal CD34+ ... Giant cell angiofibroma of the nasolacrimal duct.. Yazici B, Setzen G, Meyer DR, Williams EF, McKenna BJ.. Department of ... Giant cell angiofibroma of the orbit.. Keyserling H, Peterson K, Camacho D, Castillo M.. Department of Radiology, University of ...
What Is Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA)?. JNAs are well-vascularized benign lesions typically occurring in ...
How Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Treated?. A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma may be hard to treat if it grows ... What Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma?. A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a growth in the area behind ... Doctors dont know for sure what causes a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (nay-zoe-fuh-RIN-jee-uhl an-jee-oh-fye-BROH-muh ... Surgeons might not be able to remove all of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma thats grown into the sinuses or the bones ...
This article describes a rare cause of orbital apex syndrome in a child--juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. A high level of ...
juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma listen (JOO-veh-nile NAY-zoh-fuh-RIN-jee-ul AN-jee-oh-fy-BROH-muh) A benign (not cancer) ...
Learn more about Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma testing and diagnosis from experts at Boston Childrens, ranked best ... Testing & Diagnosis for Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. How is JNA diagnosed?. There are several diagnostic procedures ...
Variable expression of molecular markers in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma - Volume 131 Issue 9 - A Mishra, A Pandey, S C ... 45 Schiff, M. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Laryngoscope 1959;69:981-1016. 46 Martin, H, Ehrlich, HE, Abels, JC. ... 41 Duerr, S, Wendler, O, Aigner, T, Karosi, S, Schick, B. Metalloproteinases in juvenile angiofibroma - a collagen rich tumor. ... 17 Zhang, M, Sun, X, Yu, H, Hu, L, Wang, D. Biological distinctions between juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and vascular ...
El Angiofibroma nasofaríngeo juvenil es un tumor benigno vascular (pero que tardíamente Se localiza en la pared posterolateral ... Nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx - Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a ... El Angiofibroma nasofaríngeo juvenil es un tumor benigno vascular (pero que tardíamente Se localiza en la pared posterolateral ... Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. We analyzed findings in 20 patients who underwent surgery between and Tumors may invade ...
Neel H, Whicker J, Devine K, Weiland L. Juvenile angiofibroma. Review of 120 cases. Am J Surg 1973;126:547-556. ... Lloyd G, Howard D, Phelps P, Cheesman A. Juvenile angiofibroma: the lessons of 20 years of modern imaging. J Laryngol Otol 1999 ... Angiofibroma: changes in staging and treatment. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1996;122:122-129. ... Lloyd G, Howard D, Lund VJ, Savy L. Imaging for juvenile angiofibroma. J Laryngol Otol 2000;114:727-730. ...
According to the available literature, this is the first case of synchronous presence of cellular angiofibroma and lipoma in ... Histologically, the first mass was consistent with cellular angiofibroma, whereas the second one had the typical features of ... Synchronous Presence of Cellular Angiofibroma and Lipoma in Vulvoinguinal Region: A Unique Case Report ...
Management of pterygoid venous plexus hemorrhage during resection of a large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: a review of ... Huge nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with intracranial extension: Change in the dura mater and choice of surgical management. J ... APA style: Management of pterygoid venous plexus hemorrhage during resection of a large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: a ... MLA style: "Management of pterygoid venous plexus hemorrhage during resection of a large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: ...
MalaCards based summary : Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma, also known as nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, is related to ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma:. Name: Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma 59 ... Articles related to Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma:. (show top 50) (show all 315) #. Title. Authors. Year. ... MGI Mouse Phenotypes related to Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma:. 46 (show all 20) #. Description. MGI Source Accession. ...
... is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. It is most often seen in boys and ... Juvenile angiofibroma Juvenile angiofibroma. Diseases and Conditions Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor; ... Juvenile nasal angiofibroma; JNA. Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains many blood vessels, ...
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Rev Cubana Med Gen Integr . , vol, n.2, pp. PDF , On Apr 2, , Luis ... ANGIOFIBROMA JUVENIL NASOFARINGEO PDF - Resumen. LESCAILLE TORRES, Juan Gualberto. ... Recent advances in the treatment of juvenile angiofibroma. Endoscopic Surgery for Juvenile Angiofibroma: Nasoangiofibroma ... Endoscopic Ressection of Juvenile Angiofibroma. Endoscopic Surgery in Treatment of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Inter ...
A rare location of angiofibroma in the lateral crus of the alar cartilage. Mario SANTAGATA, Atirge CECERE ✉, Salvatore DAMATO ... Santagata M, Cecere A, DAmato S, Corvo G, Colella G, Tartaro G. A rare location of angiofibroma in the lateral crus of the ... Extra-nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENPA) is histologically similar to JNA. Due to its clinical and epidemiological ...
Juvenile nasal angiofibroma (JNA) is a hypervascularised, benign, but locally aggressive tumour that grows in the posterior, ... Combined percutaneous and transarterial devascularisation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with protection of internal ...
Do Open and Endoscopic Resection Approaches to Juvenile Nasopharyngea Angiofibroma Result in Similar Blood Loss, Recurrence ... juvenile nasopharyngea angiofibroma, surgical approach, treatment, tumor, tumor recurrenceIssue: November 2016 ...
Giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: Management by skull-base surgery. Paul J. Donald, Danny Enepikedes, James E Boggan ... Giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: Management by skull-base surgery. Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck ... Giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma : Management by skull-base surgery. In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck ... Giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma : Management by skull-base surgery. / Donald, Paul J.; Enepikedes, Danny; Boggan, ...
502P - Study of VEGF-A gene polymorphism in the patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. ... In the patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma there was observed genotype CC of genetic marker С963T, increase in ... Study of VEGF-A gene polymorphism in the patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma ... in group of the patients with angiofibroma was observed, in comparison with the control (30.0 % and 10.0 %, respectively). The ...
... juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). Of this group, 16 patients had a type III JNA and 11 had a type IV tumor. The ... Management of pterygoid venous plexus hemorrhage during resection of a large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: a review of ... juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). Of this group, 16 patients had a type III JNA and 11 had a type IV tumor. The ... Management of pterygoid venous plexus hemorrhage during resection of a large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: a review of ...
Definition of Angiofibroma - juvenile, symptoms of Angiofibroma - juvenile, treatment of Angiofibroma - juvenile, and ... prevention of Angiofibroma - juvenile. Exams and Tests Angiofibroma - juvenile. ... Angiofibroma - juvenile. Definition. Juvenile angiofibroma is a benign growth of the back of the nose or upper throat ( ... Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor Causes. Juvenile angiofibroma is relatively uncommon. It typically is ...
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, highly .. Luiz A CR, Romualdo S LT, Fava A S. Angiofibroma nasofaríngeo: ... Introduction: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare, highly .. Luiz A CR, Romualdo S LT, Fava A S. Angiofibroma ... Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Intracranial juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Retrospective, descriptive study ... Endoscopic Surgery for Angiofbiroma Angiofibroma: Hormonal receptors in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.. A typical ...
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, also known as juvenile nasal angiofibroma, is a histologically benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor of the nasopharynx that arises from the superior margin of the sphenopalatine foramen and grows in the back of the nasal cavity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiofibroma is a relatively rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in adolescent boys. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign tumor that tends to bleed and occurs in the nasopharynx of prepubertal and adolescent males. (medscape.com)
  • Hippocrates described the tumor in the 5th century BC, but Friedberg first used the term angiofibroma in 1940. (medscape.com)
  • Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma is extremely rare and tends to occur in older patients, predominately in females, but the tumor is less vascular and less aggressive than juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). (medscape.com)
  • This rare soft tissue tumor was originally described as Giant Cell Angiofibroma of the Orbit, based upon its unique localization and distinctive histopathologic appearance. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • Giant cell angiofibroma, a recently proposed new clinicopathological entity, arises exclusively in the orbit in adults and histologically exhibits features intermediate between those of giant cell fibroblastoma and solitary fibrous tumor. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • A left nasolacrimal duct tumor was excised en bloc by lateral rhinotomy. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • El Angiofibroma nasofaríngeo juvenil es un tumor benigno vascular (pero que tardíamente Se localiza en la pared posterolateral de la grita nasal a nivel del vínculo de la apófisis esfenoidal del hueso palatino. (pangaia.cc)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a histologically and biologically benign tumor with aggressive behavior due to its location and associated symptoms including significant epistaxis and nasal angjofibroma Endoscopic Laser-assisted excision of aniofibroma nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. (pangaia.cc)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma NAJ is a tumor with vascular component, slow growing, benign but very aggressive because of its local invasiveness. (info-cascades.info)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. (sklj.info)
  • Many angiofibrona highlight the benefit of preoperative arterial embolization to control bleeding intraoperative 16,29, Examinations such as computed tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance and even nasal endoscopy can clearly establish the extent of the tumor, its pattern of spread, and consequently, surgical planning 10 11 12 16 17 18 Extended osteoplastic maxillotomy for total excision of giant multicompartmental juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (sklj.info)
  • Disease definition Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is a rare and benign but locally aggressive fibrovascular tumor arising from the posterolateral wall of the nasopharynx, which affects mainly young and adolescent males onset usually occurring between years of age and that presents as a mass in the nasopharynx and nasal cavity, leading to manifestations such as nasal obstruction, epistaxis, profound facial swelling, proptosis or diplopia. (cardcarrying.info)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a histologically benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor that grows in the back of the nasal cavity. (curuxa.info)
  • Coagulation of angiofibroma vessels followed by acquisition of a thick mantle of pericytes in a patient with a nasopharyngeal growth suggests that radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy could be a useful, palliative therapy for bleeding nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, supporting vessel maturation prior to surgical tumor removal. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma , also known as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, is a benign tumor in the nose usually found in adolescent boys. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a highly vascular tumor seen typically in young adolescent males. (heraldopenaccess.us)
  • Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in young males. (heraldopenaccess.us)
  • The pathogenesis of the angiofibroma has been a topic of much debate, but most authors agree that the tumor arises from the posterolateral wall of the nasal cavity and the adjoining supero-lateral nasopharyngeal wall and the sphenopalatine foramen is invariably involved. (heraldopenaccess.us)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a relatively uncommon vascular tumor affecting adolescent males and it characteristically originates in the posterior lateral wall of the nasopharynx. (iranjradiol.com)
  • juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma a benign tumor of the nasopharynx composed of fibrous connective tissue with abundant endothelium-lined vascular spaces, usually occurring during puberty in boys. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The earlier the rare tumor of the nose, also called juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA), is detected, the better the prognosis when appropriate treatments are provided promptly. (hkentspecialist.hk)
  • Angiofibroma is a benign vascular tumor that usually occurs in the nasopharynx, and extranasopharyngeal angiofibromas are rarely reported. (ovid.com)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is highly vascular tumor affecting predominantly young males. (ijmcr.com)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a highly vascular tumor of adolescent boys can be surgically excised through midface degloving approach that permit removal of tumor in toto by dissection in sub-periosteal plane and drilling the nests of tumor in basi-sphenoid and medial pterygoid plate which is mandatory to excise any residual disease and prevent recurrence of tumor. (ijmcr.com)
  • Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma is a relatively rare benign, but locally aggressive tumor of the nasopharynx afflicting the adolescent males. (elsevier.com)
  • Here we present a series of 19 patients of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (with CT Scan as the main stay of diagnosis) managed over the last 5 years at ENT and Head & Neck Surgery Department of S.S.G. Hospital, Vadodara, with intraoperative internal maxillary artery ligation via the transmaxillary approach permitting accurate removal of tumor with no major post operative complications, minimal blood loss, good cosmetic result and no recurrence till date. (elsevier.com)
  • Extra Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (ENPA) is very rare benign but locally destructive vascular tumor. (scitechnol.com)
  • One such rare condition is angiofibroma which is a noncancerous nasal cavity tumor. (thisweekindia.news)
  • However, the case of Angiofibroma- vascular tumor was not instantly detected. (thisweekindia.news)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a relatively uncommon, benign tumor occurring most often in adolescent males, presenting with spontaneous recurrent epistaxis. (entworld.org)
  • Cellular angiofibroma (CAF) is a rare soft tissue tumor characterized by random arrangement of spindle tumor cells in the stroma with short collagen bundles and thick- and hyalinized small vessels. (u-ryukyu.ac.jp)
  • Nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx - Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (pangaia.cc)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare and benign but locally in the nasopharynx and nasal cavity, leading to manifestations such as nasal. (pangaia.cc)
  • The classic triad of epistaxis, unilateral nasal obstruction, and a mass in the nasopharynx suggests a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and is supplemented by imaging 11,12,13,14, Moreover, the mean blood loss in these patients was mL. (pangaia.cc)
  • Nasal cavity Esthesioneuroblastoma Nasopharynx Nasopharyngeal carcinoma Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Larynx Laryngeal cancer Laryngeal papillomatosis. (pangaia.cc)
  • Juvenile angiofibroma is a benign growth of the back of the nose or upper throat (nasopharynx). (diseasereference.net)
  • Angiofibroma may be visible on examination of the nasopharynx. (diseasereference.net)
  • The authors discuss the incidence of angiofibroma in 380 cases of tumors arising from the paranasal sinuses and the nasopharynx, producing exophthalmos. (scienceopen.com)
  • I describe an extra-nasopharyngeal angiofibroma arising from the parapharyngeal space in a middle-aged woman without involvement of the sphenopalatine foramen or the nasopharynx. (iranjradiol.com)
  • If you wonder if your child suffers from angiofibroma of nasopharynx, it is suggested to consult an ENT Specialist for the appropriate ENT services as soon as possible. (hkentspecialist.hk)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign neoplasm that occurs almost exclusively in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. (iium.edu.my)
  • Angiofibroma of the head and neck are benign non-encapsulated lesions occurring predominantly in nasopharynx in adolescent males, accounting for 0.5% of all head and neck neoplasms. (ispub.com)
  • They may occur outside the nasopharynx (termed extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma) and can often be misdiagnosed. (ispub.com)
  • 1, 2 Angiofibroma outside nasopharynx behave differently from that of nasopharyngeal type in its clinical behavior and pathologic characteristics and hence it should be regarded as separate entity. (ispub.com)
  • Histologically, the first mass was consistent with cellular angiofibroma, whereas the second one had the typical features of lipoma. (ovid.com)
  • According to the available literature, this is the first case of synchronous presence of cellular angiofibroma and lipoma in one patient. (ovid.com)
  • Histologic examination suggested the diagnosis of angiofibroma. (ovid.com)
  • With a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (Radkowski's stage Ib), the patient was subjected to RFITT using a Celon AG medical instrument (radiofrequency power, 15 to 20 W and a 5-minute application time). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Operative treatment of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with intracranial extension is one of the major challenges of ENT and neurosurgical practice. (cardcarrying.info)
  • If further experience with this approach to management in a larger series of patients has the same results, surgery should be the gold standard in treatment of Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (elsevier.com)
  • Patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma usually present with one-sided nasal obstruction with profuse epistaxis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma presents with symptoms of nasal obstruction and epistaxis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A giant cell angiofibroma involving 6q. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • In a typical case of giant cell angiofibroma, abnormalities of chromosome 6 with a common pattern involving 6q13 were detected together with various other chromosomal aberrations. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of giant cell angiofibroma demonstrating chromosomal abnormalities. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • Giant cell angiofibroma of the orbit. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is a benign pathologic entity that has recently been reported in the literature. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • Extraorbital giant cell angiofibroma. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • We describe a case of giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) in extraorbital location. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • PURPOSE: To describe clinical and histologic features of the first case, to our knowledge, of giant cell angiofibroma located in the nasolacrimal duct region in a 28-year-old woman. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • A diagnosis of giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) was made on the basis of light microscopy and immunohistochemical studies. (utmb.edu)
  • Extra-nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENPA) is histologically similar to JNA. (minervamedica.it)
  • Primary extra-nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is very rare. (iranjradiol.com)
  • The occurrence of extra-nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is very rare ( 1 ). (iranjradiol.com)
  • Althbety M, Alkarzae M, Almubarak Z, Elbana A, Al-bulal L (2017) A Rare Case of Extra Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma of the Ethmoid Sinus with Orbital Extension. (scitechnol.com)
  • Definition: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a histologically benign , but locally invasive neoplasm occuring almost exclusively in adolescent males. (drtbalu.com)
  • Ten patients with histologically confirmed juvenile angiofibroma were included in this study. (bvsalud.org)
  • Endoscopic Surgery for Angiofbiroma Angiofibroma: Hormonal receptors in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (sklj.info)
  • A 52-year-old man underwent surgery for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma after adjuvant radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Surgery is the gold standard treatment for angiofibroma [1]. (heraldopenaccess.us)
  • Wasl H. Perioperative cell salvage blood transfusions in endonasal angiofibroma surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital. (uct.ac.za)
  • Adelaide Research & Scholarship: Endoscopic surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: where are the limits? (edu.au)
  • Endoscopic surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: where are the limits? (edu.au)
  • With this background, the present study was conducted to evaluate the role of Preoperative embolisation in surgery of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma cases attending a tertiary care hospital of Raipur city (C.G.), India. (ijrhs.org)
  • High recurrence rates and early recurrence have been reported for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) involving the skull base. (ajnr.org)
  • Do Open and Endoscopic Resection Approaches to Juvenile Nasopharyngea Angiofibroma Result in Similar Blood Loss, Recurrence Rates? (enttoday.org)
  • Evaluation of outcome of 10 patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma treated by midface degloving approach, regarding complications, blood loss and rate of recurrence. (ijmcr.com)
  • The endoscopic resection of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) emerges as an alternative approach to open surgical procedures due to reduced morbidity and comparable recurrence rates. (egms.de)
  • One of the most used is that of Radkowsky: Treatment for Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is primarily surgical. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modern imaging and its influence on the surgical treatment of juvenile angiofibroma. (curuxa.info)
  • To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of angiofibroma with clinical follow-up after thermocoagulation therapy supported by quantitative, double immunohistochemistry. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We found this case of angiofibroma to be of interest owing to the presentation of symptoms leading to biopsy, the pathohistological observations obtained with synchronous Ki67/cluster of differentiation 34 and Ki67/smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry and high pericyte proliferation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, I present a case of angiofibroma of the parapharyngeal space in a 53-year-old woman with CT and sonographic findings. (iranjradiol.com)
  • Management of pterygoid venous plexus hemorrhage during resection of a large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: a review of 27 cases. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 27 patients who experienced intraoperative bleeding during resection of a large (Fisch type III or IV) juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • In recent years, we began to study whether damage to the pterygoid venous plexus (PVP) during the resection of large juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNAs) in the infratemporal fossa is an important factor in blood loss. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) Diagnosis confirmed at histology after first resection. (nih.gov)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) accounts for 0.05% of all head and neck tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a relatively uncommon, benign vascular neoplasm accounting for less than 0.5%(1,4) of all head and neck tumors. (entworld.org)
  • A 13-year-old boy with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with skull base extension and invasion of the left cavernous sinus. (jamanetwork.com)
  • and Endoscopic skull base techniques for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (elsevier.com)
  • Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma: etiology, incidence and management. (qxmd.com)
  • Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma of nasal septum. (qxmd.com)
  • Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma originating from the nasal septum: a case report. (qxmd.com)
  • Immunohistochemistry in diagnosis of extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma originating from nasal cavity: case presentation and review of the literature. (qxmd.com)
  • Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a 15-month-old child. (qxmd.com)
  • A case of extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma of the ethmoid sinus: a distinct clinical entity at an unusual site. (qxmd.com)
  • Thus, extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bleeding anterior nasal masses in females and older individuals and the likely theory of origin is discussed. (ispub.com)
  • 1 Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENA) arising from nasal septum is extremely rare. (ispub.com)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is rare in patients older than 25 years. (medscape.com)
  • To retrospectively describe our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (pangaia.cc)
  • From May 2010 to June 2013, 30 patients of angiofibroma were operated, and are included in this study. (heraldopenaccess.us)
  • Eleven young male patients with angiofibroma underwent removal via the sublabial transnasomaxillary approach. (bvsalud.org)
  • A retrospective study was conducted on 12 patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) who underwent the Le Fort type I approach. (manipal.edu)
  • A result of sublabial transnasomaxillary approach for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma--retrospective study. (bvsalud.org)
  • To evaluate the result of sublabial transnasomaxillary approach (STA) as a route for removal of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). (bvsalud.org)
  • Juvenile angiofibroma is a noncancerous growth that causes bleeding in the nose and sinuses. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a growth in the area behind the nose. (kidshealth.org)
  • A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma may be hard to treat if it grows into the bone separating the back of the nose from the brain and into the sinuses or eye sockets (orbits). (kidshealth.org)
  • Surgeons might not be able to remove all of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma that's grown into the sinuses or the bones in the back of the nose. (kidshealth.org)
  • An X-ray or a CT scan of the head (nose area) confirms the presence of angiofibroma. (diseasereference.net)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) usually makes it difficult to breathe through the nose owing to the airway obstruction and also leads to nosebleeds and headaches. (thisweekindia.news)
  • This technique is useful for removal of angiofibroma because it enables the surgeon to gain extensive exposure of maxillary, ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses and to control sphenopalatine and internal maxillary arteries , without risk of palatal dysfunction or of oronasal fistula . (bvsalud.org)
  • There is extension of the patient's juvenile angiofibroma into the posterior ethmoid air cells and sphenoid sinus (arrows). (jamanetwork.com)
  • If nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is suspected based on physical examination (a smooth vascular submucosal mass in the posterior nasal cavity of an adolescent male), imaging studies such as CT or MRI should be performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Antral sign or Holman-Miller sign (forward bowing of posterior wall of maxilla) is pathognomic of angiofibroma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Juvenile nasal angiofibroma (JNA) is a hypervascularised, benign, but locally aggressive tumour that grows in the posterior, upper part of the nasal cavity and invades surrounding anatomical structures. (diva-portal.org)
  • To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented case of angiomyolipoma originating from the posterior end of the inferior turbinate, clinically mimicking juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). (ac.ir)
  • My doctor said that it is benign and a good sign, but all of the information I find is for juvenile angiofibroma in males. (medhelp.org)
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) occurs exclusively in males. (medscape.com)
  • The nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is largely limited to the adolescent males. (kjorl.org)
  • We report the first case of an angiofibroma arising from the inferior turbinate after CO2 laser turbinoplasty. (ovid.com)
  • What Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma? (kidshealth.org)
  • What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma? (kidshealth.org)
  • What Causes a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma? (kidshealth.org)
  • Doctors don't know for sure what causes a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (nay-zoe-fuh-RIN-jee-uhl an-jee-oh-fye-BROH-muh). (kidshealth.org)
  • How Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Diagnosed? (kidshealth.org)
  • How Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Treated? (kidshealth.org)
  • Females with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) should undergo genetic testing. (medscape.com)
  • This article describes a rare cause of orbital apex syndrome in a child--juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (ebscohost.com)
  • Molecular categorisation may explain the wide variation in the clinical characteristics of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (cambridge.org)
  • Variations in molecular markers in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in an Indian population were investigated and compared with global reports. (cambridge.org)
  • Research into the molecular epidemiology of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is still in its infancy. (cambridge.org)
  • Contrast-enhanced CT scanning and MR imaging are valuable imaging modalities in the work-up of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) ( 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma, also known as nasopharyngeal angiofibroma , is related to nasopharyngitis and vulvar syringoma , and has symptoms including dyspnea , headache and tinnitus . (malacards.org)
  • An important gene associated with Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma is VEGFA (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Akt Signaling and Endometrial cancer . (malacards.org)
  • Intracranial juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (sklj.info)
  • The nature of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (sklj.info)
  • Although it is a rare neoplasm, juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, with the potential for intracranial extension. (cardcarrying.info)
  • Extended osteoplastic maxillotomy for total excision of giant multicompartmental juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (cardcarrying.info)
  • Imaging in the diagnosis of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (curuxa.info)
  • History: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma has been documented since the time of Hippocrates (4 BC). (drtbalu.com)
  • In 1906 Chareau revived the interest in the study of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (drtbalu.com)
  • Shaheen in 1930 reported the first female patient with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (drtbalu.com)
  • Nasal Angiomyolipoma (AML) Mimicking Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma', Iranian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology , 31(3), pp. 191-195. (ac.ir)
  • 11. Onerci M, Oğretmenoğlu O, Yücel T. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: a revised staging system. (ac.ir)
  • 12. Garça MF, Yuca SA, Yuca K. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (ac.ir)
  • This study included 10 consecutive case series of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma over a period of 3 years from 2010-2013. (ijmcr.com)
  • Also referred to as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA), the condition almost exclusively affects adolescent boys between the age group of 7 to 19 years old, majority of who get diagnosed after the age of 10. (thisweekindia.news)
  • A 10-year-old boy with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Conclusion - In this study we conclude that Presurgical endovascular embolisation has definite role in the management of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. (ijrhs.org)
  • Treatment is required if the angiofibroma is enlarging, obstructing the airway, or causing chronic nosebleeds. (diseasereference.net)
  • Even though maxillary sinus is the most common site for the origin of this lesion, angiofibroma arising from the nasal septum is extremely rare. (ispub.com)
  • List of cutaneous conditions Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Tuberous sclerosis Freedberg, et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Santagata M, Cecere A, D'Amato S, Corvo G, Colella G, Tartaro G. A rare location of angiofibroma in the lateral crus of the alar cartilage. (minervamedica.it)