Acquired degenerative dilation or expansion (ectasia) of normal BLOOD VESSELS, often associated with aging. They are isolated, tortuous, thin-walled vessels and sources of bleeding. They occur most often in mucosal capillaries of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT leading to GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE and ANEMIA.
Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.
A method of tissue ablation and bleeding control that uses ARGON plasma (ionized argon gas) to deliver a current of thermocoagulating energy to the area of tissue to be coagulated.
A distinct vascular lesion in the PYLORIC ANTRUM that is characterized by tortuous dilated blood vessels (ectasia) radiating outward from the PYLORUS. The vessel pattern resembles the stripes on the surface of a watermelon. This lesion causes both acute and chronic GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE.
Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.
The segment of GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the ESOPHAGUS; the STOMACH; and the DUODENUM.
Control of bleeding performed through the channel of the endoscope. Techniques include use of lasers, heater probes, bipolar electrocoagulation, and local injection. Endoscopic hemostasis is commonly used to treat bleeding esophageal and gastrointestinal varices and ulcers.
An autosomal dominant vascular anomaly characterized by telangiectases of the skin and mucous membranes and by recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. This disorder is caused by mutations of a gene (on chromosome 9q3) which encodes endoglin, a membrane glycoprotein that binds TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.
Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.

The efficacy of octreotide therapy in chronic bleeding due to vascular abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract. (1/43)

BACKGROUND: The treatment of angiodysplasia and watermelon stomach, vascular abnormalities implicated in gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, is a major clinical problem. AIM: To determine the efficacy of octreotide in patients with long-standing gastrointestinal bleeding due to acquired angiodysplasia and watermelon stomach, resistant to previous treatments and not suitable for surgery because of old age and/or concomitant disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We treated 17 patients (seven had isolated angiodysplasia, seven had multiple upper and lower gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, and three had watermelon stomach) with octreotide (0. 1 mg subcutaneous t.d.s. for 6 months). Six of the patients had liver cirrhosis, one had Glanzmann-type platelet derangement, two had cardiovascular diseases and one had chronic uraemia. RESULTS: Octreotide treatment stopped bleeding in 10 patients. A transient improvement was observed in four, who needed subsequent cyclical retreatment to correct low haemoglobin levels. No effect was observed in three, probably due to the severity of the concomitant disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Octreotide is a safe drug that may be useful to control the recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding due to acquired angiodysplasia and watermelon stomach, especially in patients who are not candidates for surgery due to old age and/or concomitant disorders.  (+info)

Diffuse angiodysplasia of the upper gastrointestinal tract in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. (2/43)

A 64-year-old woman with a known history of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy presented with severe anemia of unknown origin. She had also suffered from repeated episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding for the previous 3 years. Despite bone marrow examination and panendoscopic and angiographic studies, the origin of anemia remained undefined until a small bleeding site was found during a duodenoscopic examination. The lesion proved to be angiodysplasia. This case report is interesting in that angiodysplasia elicited gastrointestinal bleeding and was the cause of anemia. In the international literature, there are very few reported cases of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasia in association with subvalvular aortic obstruction.  (+info)

Skeletal angiomatosis in association with gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia and paraproteinemia: a case report. (3/43)

Skeletal-extraskeletal angiomatosis is defined as a benign vascular proliferation involving the medullary cavity of bone and at least one other type of tissue. It has also been known as cystic angiomatosis in which multiple cystic lesions are scattered diffusely throughout the skeleton often with similar angiomatous changes in other tissues, usually the spleen. A case of skeletal angiomatosis in association with gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia and paraproteinemia is reported.  (+info)

Rate and predictive factors of rebleeding with obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding. (4/43)

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Little information is available on the rate and predictive factors of rebleeding of unknown cause, which is very important in deciding further investigations on obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rebleeding rate and related factors in obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding patients who revealed normal gastroscopic and colonoscopic findings. METHODS: A total of 69 patients with negative first-line gastroscopy and colonoscopy were enrolled in this study as obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding cases. The relationships between rebleeding and clinical characteristics were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: The causes of obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding were confirmed in 30 cases among the 69 cases. Small bowel tumors (14 cases) were the most common cause, followed by vascular lesions (6 cases). The mean follow-up period was 28 months and rebleeding was noticed in 19 patients (27.5%). Among these rebleeding patients, 14 cases (73.7%) occurred within 6 months. The past experience of previous bleeding was significantly related with rebleeding (p=0.0009). CONCLUSIONS: Close observation and detailed investigations are needed for obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding patients with bleeding history, especially during 6 months follow-up.  (+info)

Persistent anemia in otherwise asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a possible indication for valve replacement? (5/43)

BACKGROUND: The indication for aortic valve replacement in patients with significant aortic stenosis is symptomatology. Aortic stenosis may be associated with bleeding from colonic angiodysplasia, resulting in anemia. Persistent anemia in such patients, despite lack of an identifiable source of bleeding, is not considered an indication for valve replacement. OBJECTIVES: To report our experience with two elderly female patients who suffered from severe asymptomatic aortic stenosis, low levels of large von Willebrand factor multimer (10% and 5% respectively) and persistent anemia requiring multiple blood transfusions. METHODS: Both patients underwent an intensive work-up, but a source of bleeding could not be identified. Aortic valve replacement was performed in both patients. RESULTS: Aortic valve replacement abolished the need for further blood transfusions during a follow-up period of 20 months with normalization of the vWF multimer level (20% and 30% respectively). CONCLUSION: We suggest that aortic valve replacement be considered in selected patients with severe, otherwise asymptomatic aortic stenosis, who suffer from persistent anemia requiring multiple blood transfusions, lack an identifiable source of bleeding and have low levels of large vWF multimers.  (+info)

Myelofibrosis and angiodysplasia of the colon: another manifestation of portal hypertension and massive splenomegaly? (6/43)

Bleeding owing to portal hypertensive colopathy, a form of large bowel angiodysplasia, as a cause of increased blood transfusion requirement is described in a 74 year old man with idiopathic myelofibrosis. The proposed mechanism and the potential therapeutic options for this rare complication of myelofibrosis are discussed.  (+info)

Infective endocarditis from Enterococcus faecalis complicating colonoscopy in Heyde's syndrome. (7/43)

A case of infective endocarditis from Enterococcus faecalis after colonoscopy in a patient with aortic stenoinsufficiency and bleeding intestinal angiodysplasia (Heyde's syndrome) is reported.A 77 year old man with aortic stenoinsufficiency presented with enterorrhagia and underwent a colonoscopy, which showed normal findings. Fifteen days later he developed a moderate degree of fever. Blood cultures were positive for E faecalis. An echocardiogram showed aortic valve vegetations, and infective endocarditis was diagnosed and successfully treated by antibiotics. Some months later, intestinal bleeding recurred and intestinal resection was performed. Histopathology showed angiodysplasia. In patients with Heyde's syndrome antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered before colonoscopy.  (+info)

Successful colectomy for the treatment of repetitive bleeding from colonic angiodysplasia in a patient with Heyde syndrome. (8/43)

A 64-year-old man with repetitive gastrointestinal bleeding was admitted to our hospital. Colonic artery angiography revealed angiodysplasia as the bleeding site, and echocardiography showed aortic valve stenosis. A decrease in the high molecular weight von Willebrand factor multimers, which are known to play an important role in hemostasis, was observed, and Heyde syndrome was diagnosed. We selected colectomy instead of aortic valve replacement because the patient had undergone two open heart surgeries. Following colectomy, the patient showed a good clinical course without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. Colectomy might serve as a therapeutic option for Heyde syndrome after the precise site of angiodysplasia is detected by angiography.  (+info)

Angiodysplasia is a vascular disorder characterized by the dilation and abnormal formation of blood vessels, particularly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These abnormal blood vessels are prone to leakage or rupture, which can lead to bleeding. Angiodysplasia is most commonly found in the colon but can occur in other parts of the GI tract as well. It is more common in older adults and can cause symptoms such as anemia, fatigue, and bloody stools. The exact cause of angiodysplasia is not known, but it may be associated with chronic low-grade inflammation or increased pressure in the blood vessels. Treatment options include endoscopic therapies to stop bleeding, medications to reduce acid production in the stomach, and surgery in severe cases.

Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a term used to describe any bleeding that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. The bleeding can range from mild to severe and can produce symptoms such as vomiting blood, passing black or tarry stools, or having low blood pressure.

GI hemorrhage can be classified as either upper or lower, depending on the location of the bleed. Upper GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs above the ligament of Treitz, which is a point in the small intestine where it becomes narrower and turns a corner. Common causes of upper GI hemorrhage include gastritis, ulcers, esophageal varices, and Mallory-Weiss tears.

Lower GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs below the ligament of Treitz. Common causes of lower GI hemorrhage include diverticulosis, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and vascular abnormalities such as angiodysplasia.

The diagnosis of GI hemorrhage is often made based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as endoscopy, CT scan, or radionuclide scanning. Treatment depends on the severity and cause of the bleeding and may include medications, endoscopic procedures, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) is a medical procedure that uses ionized argon gas to deliver electrical current and heat to tissue, resulting in coagulation. It is commonly used in the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as for cutting and coagulating during surgical procedures. The argon plasma is created by passing argon gas through a high-voltage electrical field, which ionizes the gas and creates a highly precise and controllable plasma beam. This beam can be directed at the tissue to achieve hemostasis (stopping bleeding) or to cut tissue with minimal thermal damage to surrounding structures. The procedure is often performed under endoscopic guidance.

Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia (GAVE) is a condition characterized by abnormal, dilated blood vessels in the antrum, which is the lower part of the stomach. These blood vessels can become fragile and prone to bleeding, leading to symptoms such as vomiting blood or having dark, tarry stools. GAVE is also sometimes referred to as "watermelon stomach" because the appearance of the affected area can resemble the stripes on a watermelon when viewed during endoscopy.

The exact cause of GAVE is not well understood, but it has been associated with conditions such as autoimmune disorders and chronic kidney disease. Treatment for GAVE typically involves addressing any underlying conditions and using various techniques to control bleeding, such as argon plasma coagulation or surgery.

Colonic diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the colon, also known as the large intestine or large bowel. The colon is the final segment of the digestive system, responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes, and storing and eliminating waste products.

Some common colonic diseases include:

1. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): This includes conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause inflammation and irritation in the lining of the digestive tract.
2. Diverticular disease: This occurs when small pouches called diverticula form in the walls of the colon, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements.
3. Colorectal cancer: This is a type of cancer that develops in the colon or rectum, often starting as benign polyps that grow and become malignant over time.
4. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): This is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements, but without any underlying structural or inflammatory causes.
5. Constipation: This is a common condition characterized by infrequent bowel movements, difficulty passing stools, or both.
6. Infectious colitis: This occurs when the colon becomes infected with bacteria, viruses, or parasites, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Treatment for colonic diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Capsule endoscopy is a medical procedure that uses a small, pill-sized camera to capture images of the digestive tract. The capsule is swallowed and transmits images wirelessly as it moves through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, allowing doctors to examine the lining of the small intestine, which can be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes.

The procedure is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as Crohn's disease, celiac disease, obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, and tumors in the small intestine. The images captured by the capsule are transmitted to a recorder worn by the patient, and then reviewed and analyzed by a healthcare professional.

Capsule endoscopy is generally considered safe and non-invasive, with few risks or side effects. However, it may not be suitable for everyone, including patients with swallowing difficulties, pacemakers, or certain gastrointestinal obstructions. It's important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine if capsule endoscopy is the right diagnostic tool for a particular condition.

The Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract refers to the segment of the digestive system that includes the mouth, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This region is responsible for the initial stages of digestion, such as mechanical breakdown of food by chewing and churning, and chemical breakdown through enzymes and acids. It's also where the majority of nutrient absorption occurs. Various medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, and cancers, can affect the upper GI tract.

Hemostasis, in general, refers to the process of stopping bleeding or hemorrhage, either naturally or through medical intervention. In the context of endoscopy, endoscopic hemostasis is the use of endoscopic techniques and devices to control gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding.

Endoscopes are flexible tubes with a light and camera at the tip, which are inserted into the body to visualize internal organs. In the case of GI endoscopy, the endoscope is inserted through the mouth or rectum to examine the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, or rectum.

Endoscopic hemostasis techniques can be broadly categorized into two types:
- Mechanical methods: These involve the use of devices that physically occlude or constrict blood vessels to stop bleeding. Examples include hemoclips, which are metal clips that are deployed through the endoscope to grasp and compress a bleeding vessel, and band ligation, where a rubber band is used to strangulate a bleeding vessel.
- Thermal methods: These use heat to coagulate (seal) blood vessels and stop bleeding. Examples include monopolar and bipolar electrocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and laser coagulation.

Endoscopic hemostasis is an important tool in the management of acute GI bleeding, as well as prevention of rebleeding in patients with chronic or recurrent GI bleeding.

Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a rare genetic disorder that affects the blood vessels. It is also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. This condition is characterized by the formation of abnormal blood vessels called telangiectases, which are small red spots or tiny bulges that can be found in the skin, mucous membranes (like those inside the nose, mouth, and GI tract), and sometimes in vital organs like the lungs and brain.

These telangiectases have a tendency to bleed easily, leading to potentially serious complications such as anemia due to chronic blood loss, and in some cases, strokes or brain abscesses if the telangiectases in the brain rupture. HHT is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning that a child has a 50% chance of inheriting the gene from an affected parent. There are several genes associated with HHT, the most common being ACVRL1, ENG, and SMAD4.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a medical procedure that allows direct visualization of the inner lining of the digestive tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and sometimes the upper part of the small intestine (duodenum). This procedure is performed using an endoscope, a long, thin, flexible tube with a light and camera at its tip. The endoscope is inserted through the mouth for upper endoscopy or through the rectum for lower endoscopy (colonoscopy), and the images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor for the physician to view.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy can help diagnose various conditions, such as inflammation, ulcers, tumors, polyps, or bleeding in the digestive tract. It can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps, taking tissue samples (biopsies), treating bleeding, and performing other interventions to manage certain digestive diseases.

There are different types of gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures, including:

1. Upper Endoscopy (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure examines the colon and rectum.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: A limited examination of the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) using a shorter endoscope.
4. Enteroscopy: An examination of the small intestine, which can be performed using various techniques, such as push enteroscopy, single-balloon enteroscopy, or double-balloon enteroscopy.
5. Capsule Endoscopy: A procedure that involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera, which captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is generally considered safe when performed by experienced medical professionals. However, like any medical procedure, there are potential risks and complications, such as bleeding, infection, perforation, or adverse reactions to sedatives used during the procedure. Patients should discuss these risks with their healthcare provider before undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy.

A colonoscopy is a medical procedure used to examine the large intestine, also known as the colon and rectum. It is performed using a flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end, called a colonoscope, which is inserted into the rectum and gently guided through the entire length of the colon.

The procedure allows doctors to visually inspect the lining of the colon for any abnormalities such as polyps, ulcers, inflammation, or cancer. If any polyps are found during the procedure, they can be removed immediately using special tools passed through the colonoscope. Colonoscopy is an important tool in the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide.

Patients are usually given a sedative to help them relax during the procedure, which is typically performed on an outpatient basis in a hospital or clinic setting. The entire procedure usually takes about 30-60 minutes to complete, although patients should plan to spend several hours at the medical facility for preparation and recovery.

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are abnormal tangles of blood vessels that directly connect arteries and veins, bypassing the capillary system. This results in a high-flow and high-pressure circulation in the affected area. AVMs can occur anywhere in the body but are most common in the brain and spine. They can vary in size and may cause symptoms such as headaches, seizures, or bleeding in the brain. In some cases, AVMs may not cause any symptoms and may only be discovered during imaging tests for other conditions. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, or embolization to reduce the flow of blood through the malformation and prevent complications.

In medicine (gastroenterology), angiodysplasia is a small vascular malformation of the gut. It is a common cause of otherwise ... Although angiodysplasia is probably quite common, the risk of bleeding is increased in disorders of coagulation. A classic ... Festa, V.; Garrone, C.; Simone, P.; Morino, M.; Toppino, M.; Miglietta, C.; Casassa Vigna, M. (May 1989). "[Angiodysplasia of ... If bleeding is intermittent the test may be negative at times.[citation needed] Diagnosis of angiodysplasia is often ...
Lewis, BS; Kornbluth, A (1990). "Hormonal therapy for bleeding from angiodysplasia: Chronic renal failure, et al??". The ... "Does Hormonal Therapy Have Any Benefit for Bleeding Angiodysplasia?". Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 15 (2): 99-103. doi ... Long-term follow-up of 83 patients with bleeding small intestinal angiodysplasia". Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 43 (6): 580-3. ...
Other causes include Mallory-Weiss tears, cancer, and angiodysplasia. A number of medications are found to cause upper GI ... Common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding include hemorrhoids, cancer, angiodysplasia, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's ...
Gostout CJ (1995). "Angiodysplasia and aortic valve disease: let's close the book on this association". Gastrointestinal ... This hypothesis is complicated by the extremely high rates of intestinal angiodysplasia in older people (who also have the ... The exact prevalence of the syndrome is unknown, because both aortic stenosis and angiodysplasia are common diseases in the ... They also noted that von Willebrand's disease is known to cause bleeding from angiodysplasia. Based on these facts, they ...
Its principal use is in providing haemostasis in gastrointestinal bleeding; angiodysplasia, GAVE, bleeding malignant tumours ...
... aortic stenosis is associated with gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasia of the colon. Recent research has shown that ...
Angiodysplasia could be an underlying cause of Hughes-Stovin as it can account for the vascular changes. As Hughes-Stovin ... It has been presumed that the possible causes of this syndrome include presence of infections and/or possibly angiodysplasia, ... characterize the severity and prognosis of the disease by evaluating the pulmonary aneurysms and assessing the angiodysplasia ...
... and angiodysplasia. If anemia is present, other potential causes should be considered. Other conditions that produce an anal ...
"In-hospital weekend outcomes in patients diagnosed with bleeding gastroduodenal angiodysplasia: a population-based study, 2000 ...
In angiodysplasia, a form of telangiectasia of the colon, shear stress is much higher than in average capillaries, and the risk ...
... such as colorectal cancer Angiodysplasia Bleeding from a site where a colonic polyp was removed Inflammatory bowel disease such ...
Following are the most common diseases or disorders of the colon: Angiodysplasia of the colon Appendicitis Chronic functional ...
Salmonellosis Upper gastrointestinal bleeding Peptic ulcer disease Esophageal varices Gastric cancer Angiodysplasia Intense ...
Slow, chronic blood loss within the body - such as from a peptic ulcer, angiodysplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, a colon ...
The singer Maurice Gibb is understood to have died from this.) Angiodysplasia of the colon Constipation Diarrhea Hirschsprung's ...
Finally, since the link between aortic valve stenosis and angiodysplasia was proven to be due to high shear stress (Heyde's ...
... angiodysplasia) Gynecologic disturbances, also generally causing chronic blood loss From menstruation, mostly among young women ...
Angiodysplasia intestine w/ hemorrhage 570 Acute and subacute necrosis of liver 570.0 Hepatic failure, acute 571 Chronic liver ...
... adenoma or polyps Diverticular disease Hemorrhoids Inflammatory bowel disease Angiodysplasia of the colon Sickle cell anemia In ...
... enterica Shigella dysenteriae see also dysentery Staphylococcus aureus Entamoeba histolytica Radiation enteritis Angiodysplasia ...
In medicine (gastroenterology), angiodysplasia is a small vascular malformation of the gut. It is a common cause of otherwise ... Although angiodysplasia is probably quite common, the risk of bleeding is increased in disorders of coagulation. A classic ... Festa, V.; Garrone, C.; Simone, P.; Morino, M.; Toppino, M.; Miglietta, C.; Casassa Vigna, M. (May 1989). "[Angiodysplasia of ... If bleeding is intermittent the test may be negative at times.[citation needed] Diagnosis of angiodysplasia is often ...
Angiodysplasia of the colon is swollen, fragile blood vessels in the colon. These can result in bleeding and blood loss from ... Angiodysplasia of the colon is swollen, fragile blood vessels in the colon. These can result in bleeding and blood loss from ... angiodysplasia; Gastrointestinal bleeding - angiodysplasia; G.I. bleed - angiodysplasia ... Angiodysplasia of the colon is mostly related to the aging and breakdown of the blood vessels. It is more common in older ...
Angiodysplasia is the most common vascular lesion of the gastrointestinal tract, and this condition may be asymptomatic, or it ... encoded search term (Angiodysplasia of the Colon) and Angiodysplasia of the Colon What to Read Next on Medscape ... In most persons with angiodysplasia, cardiac findings have no importance in the development of angiodysplasia, although in ... Angiodysplasia of the colon: a report of two cases and review of literature. Niger J Clin Pract. 2012 Jan-Mar. 15(1):101-3. [ ...
Angiodysplasia is a rare, but important, cause of both overt and occult GI bleeding especially in the older patients. Advances ... Conclusions: Angiodysplasia is a rare, but important, cause of both overt and occult GI bleeding especially in the older ... Review article: gastrointestinal angiodysplasia - pathogenesis, diagnosis and management Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Jan;39(1 ... Background: Angiodysplasia (AD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an important condition that can cause significant ...
Exploratory laparotomy revealed angiodysplasia of the terminal ileum, which was resected. We report this case to draw attention ... Fatal post-operative gastro intestinal hemorrhage because of angio-dysplasia of small intestine in aortic regurgitation. ... HomePublicationsFatal post-operative gastro intestinal hemorrhage because of angio-dysplasia of small intestine in aortic ... Abstract : Gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasia of the large intestine associated with calcific aortic stenosis is a ...
EFFICACY OF ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION IN PREVENTION OF BLEEDING RECURRENCE FROM GASTROINTESTINAL ANGIODYSPLASIA. ...
"Angiodysplasia" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Angiodysplasia" by people in this website by year, and whether ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Angiodysplasia" by people in Profiles. ... "Angiodysplasia" was a major or minor topic of these publications. To see the data from this visualization as text, click here. ...
Angiodysplasia is an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding. What is it, and how may it be treated? ... Angiodysplasia is a condition that may cause rectal bleeding or anaemia, in which abnormal and often fragile blood vessels ( ...
Angiodysplasia is the most common vascular lesion of the gastrointestinal tract, and this condition may be asymptomatic, or it ... encoded search term (Angiodysplasia of the Colon) and Angiodysplasia of the Colon What to Read Next on Medscape ... Angiodysplasia of the Colon Differential Diagnoses. Updated: Dec 23, 2014 * Author: Andrea Duchini, MD; Chief Editor: BS Anand ... Angiodysplasia of the colon: a report of two cases and review of literature. Niger J Clin Pract. 2012 Jan-Mar. 15(1):101-3. [ ...
Gastrointestinal Tract Hemorrhage due to Angiodysplasia in Hutchinson Gilfort Progeria Syndrome ... Usually, bleeding angiodysplasia stops by itself [6]. This case is presented to underline HGPS associated angiodysplasia as a ... Angiodysplasia is usually localized to the cecum and right colon and bleeding usually stops by itself. Angiodysplasia formation ... Gastrointestinal Tract Hemorrhage due to Angiodysplasia in Hutchinson Gilfort Progeria Syndrome. Serife Aktasa, Mevlut Kiyaka, ...
Angiodysplasia. 5. Blood donation. 5. Gastric carcinoma. 5. Peptic ulcer disease4. 5. ...
We report here on an unusual case of bleeding from angiodysplasia at the ampulla of Vater in a 58-aged woman with end stage ... A Case of Bleeding on the Ampulla of Vater Due to Angiodysplasia in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease. ... Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia is one of the causes of acute and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding, and gastrointestinal ... angiodysplasia makes up 2∼6% of all the cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Bleeding from the ampulla of Vater is very ...
A coloskopie showed signs of angiodysplasia in the descending colon. A capsule endoskopie showed signs of angiodysplasia in the ...
Angiodysplasia of the colon. *Blood vessel rupture from injury Other abnormal results may be due to:. *Blood clots ...
Angiodysplasia of Intestine (Without Mention of Hemorrhage) * Atrophic Gastritis without Mention of Hemorrhage ...
Aric J Hui, James Y Lau, Phyllis P Y Lam, Alman O M Chui, Alice S H Fan, Thomas Y T Lam, Yee-kit Tse, Raymond S Y Tang, Siew C Ng, Justin C Y Wu, Jessica Y L Ching, Martin C S Wong, Francis K L Chan, Joseph Sung ...
Ning Ding, Xin Zhang, Xue Di Zhang, Jun Jing, Shan Shan Liu, Yun Ping Mu, Li Li Peng, Yun Jing Yan, Geng Miao Xiao, Xin Yun Bi, Hao Chen, Fang Hong Li, Bing Yao, Allan Z Zhao ...
The Difference between Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleed The gastrointestinal tract is prone to serious tissue damage caused by trauma and certain GI diseases, which can lead to bleeding. It is a major concern that should not be taken for granted. It requires prompt treatment once diagnosed otherwise this can lead to hypovolemic shock and even death. The bleeding can be chronic or
Capsule endoscopy is superior to radiographic techniques in the detection of mucosal disease and angiodysplasia. [9] ... argon plasma coagulation for angiodysplasia), capsule endoscopy does not allow immediate intervention. However, capsule ...
All significant endoscopic co-findings (diverticuli, polyps, cancer, angiodysplasia and varices, or colitis) were recorded. ...
S. Ueno, H. Nakase, K. Kasahara et al., "Clinical features of Japanese patients with colonic angiodysplasia," Journal of ... J. MacDonald, V. Porter, N. W. Scott, and D. McNamara, "Small bowel lymphangiectasia and angiodysplasia: a positive association ... C. Balzer, E. Lotterer, G. Kleber, and W. E. Fleig, "Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for bleeding angiodysplasia- ... M. S. Cappell and A. Gupta, "Changing epidemiology of gastrointestinal angiodysplasia with increasing recognition of clinically ...
... angiodysplasia, cancers, and surgical anastomoses. Bleeding was spurting in 13 of the 77 patients and oozing in 64. PuraStat ...
Persistent Gastrointestinal Angiodysplasia in Heyde's Syndrome after Aortic Valve Replacement ... However, capsule endoscopy still revealed gastrointestinal angiodysplasia six months later. This case shows that minute ... and implies that gastrointestinal angiodysplasia can be attributed to unknown factors other than decreased VWF multimers. ... woman with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and aortic valve stenosis presented with spurting bleeding from angiodysplasia ...
Angiodysplasia of the colon: Symptoms & Signs, Diagnosis.... December 28, 2010 Exfoliative dermatitis : Definition. April 9, ...
Angiodysplasia is diagnosed by early and then persistent filling of a draining vein and by an abnormal cluster of vessels in ... Because angiodysplasia is relatively common in elderly patients and may be an incidental finding, other sources of bleeding ... In the case of right-sided angiodysplasia, a right hemicolectomy is performed to eliminate the bleeding lesion and any other ... angiodysplasia, vascular ectasia of the colon, vascular dysplasia of the colon) Dilatation and ectasia of veins, venules, and ...
Angiodysplasia as a source of gastrointestinal bleeding detected by scintigraphy - case report Petra Stelmachová, Otto Lang ... Angiodysplasia as a source of gastrointestinal bleeding detected by scintigraphy - case report ...
It may require differentiation from lipedema, complex angiodysplasia, and other potential causes of elephantiasis such as ...
angiodysplasia Small vascular abnormalities; such as, of the intestinal tract. angiodystrophia (s) (noun), angiodystrophias (pl ...
  • An association between colonic angiodysplasia and aortic stenosis was described by Heyde in 1958. (medscape.com)
  • In a recent retrospective colonoscopic analyses, it was shown that 12.1% of 642 persons without symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) , and 11.9% of those with IBS had colonic angiodysplasia. (medscape.com)
  • Unlike small vascular ectasia or angiodysplasia, colonic AVM tends to be solitary, large in size, and identified endoscopically as flat or as an elevated bright red lesion. (medscape.com)
  • Mudhar HS, Balsitis M. Colonic angiodysplasia and true diverticula: is there an association? (medscape.com)
  • Prevalence and natural history of colonic angiodysplasia among healthy asymptomatic people. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical features of Japanese patients with colonic angiodysplasia. (medscape.com)
  • MGIB from colonic angiodysplasia was increased with dabigatran versus warfarin (P (mcmaster.ca)
  • OBJECTIVES: Colonic angiodysplasia is a rare disease, it is nevertheless a common cause of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in older adults. (bvsalud.org)
  • The study summarized the colonoscopic and clinical features of colonic angiodysplasia to raise awareness among endoscopists regarding this disease. (bvsalud.org)
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of enrolled patients diagnosed with colonic angiodysplasia between September 2013 and April 2022. (bvsalud.org)
  • The comparisons were also conducted between the patients with active lower GI bleeding caused by colonic angiodysplasia and those by other diseases. (bvsalud.org)
  • Ten patients (3 men and 7 women) with colonic angiodysplasia suffered from active lower GI bleeding, which was mainly located in the left and total colon. (bvsalud.org)
  • The duration between bleeding and admission was longer in the colonic angiodysplasia group than in the other diseases group ( P = 0.043). (bvsalud.org)
  • In the colonic angiodysplasia group, bleeding relapsed in 3 patients, and the recurrence rate was higher than in the other diseases group ( P (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSION: Endoscopists should perform colonoscopy scrupulously and consider colonic angiodysplasia as a differential diagnosis in patients with lower GI bleeding, especially for older women and adults with chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. (bvsalud.org)
  • A classic association is Heyde's syndrome (coincidence of aortic valve stenosis and bleeding from angiodysplasia). (wikipedia.org)
  • argue that apart from aortic valve stenosis, some other conditions that feature high shear stress might also increase the risk of bleeding from angiodysplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Background: The Heyde syndrome consists of the association of gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia with aortic valve stenosis. (unicatt.it)
  • Patient Case: We report the case of a patient with severe recurrent small- intestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, diagnosed by a videocapsule, and aortic valve stenosis. (unicatt.it)
  • The search strategy used the keywords 'angiodysplasia' or 'arteriovenous malformation' or 'angioectasia' or 'vascular ectasia' or 'vascular lesions' or 'vascular abnormalities' or 'vascular malformations' in the title or abstract. (nih.gov)
  • Angiodysplasia of the colon is swollen, fragile blood vessels in the colon. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Angiodysplasia of the colon is mostly related to the aging and breakdown of the blood vessels. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Rarely, angiodysplasia of the colon is related to other diseases of the blood vessels. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Angiodysplasia is a degenerative lesion of previously healthy blood vessels found most commonly in the cecum and proximal ascending colon. (medscape.com)
  • Biss T, Hamilton P. Myelofibrosis and angiodysplasia of the colon: another manifestation of portal hypertension and massive splenomegaly? (medscape.com)
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding, angiodysplasia of the colon and acquired von Willebrand's disease. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia of the colon: a report of two cases and review of literature. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia (vascular malformations) of the colon presenting as an acute abdomen. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia of the colon: Symptoms & Signs, Diagnosis. (health32.com)
  • Recently, multiphase CT angiography (without positive oral contrast) has been shown to play a promising role in the diagnoses of small and large bowel angiodysplasia, especially when associated with active hemorrhage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiodysplasia in the gastrointestinal (GIS) tract can be seen as a cause of hemorrhage, rarely. (journalmc.org)
  • Diverticuli and angiodysplasia/varices occurred significantly more often in group 2. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Fressinaud E, Meyer D. International survey of patients with von Willebrand disease and angiodysplasia. (medscape.com)
  • In the absence of direct evidence of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) or angiodysplasia, her long-standing gastrointestinal bleeding was finally stopped after receiving transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). (bvsalud.org)
  • In medicine (gastroenterology), angiodysplasia is a small vascular malformation of the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiodysplasia" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (ucdenver.edu)
  • It may require differentiation from lipedema, complex angiodysplasia, and other potential causes of elephantiasis such as Recklinghausen's diseases and lepra tuberose. (hpathy.com)
  • citation needed] Diagnosis of angiodysplasia is often accomplished with endoscopy, either colonoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Capsule endoscopy is superior to radiographic techniques in the detection of mucosal disease and angiodysplasia. (medscape.com)
  • Hirri HM, Green PJ, Lindsay J. Von Willebrand's disease and angiodysplasia treated with thalidomide. (medscape.com)
  • Hormone therapy, somatostatin analogs, thalidomide and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing antibodies have been reported to reduce gastrointestinal angiodysplasia (GIAD) bleeding. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The visible characteristics of angiodysplasia or a shortage of HMWM-vWFs should not be indispensable for the clinical diagnosis of Heyde's syndrome. (bvsalud.org)
  • Angiodysplasia is the most common vascular lesion of the gastrointestinal tract, and this condition may be asymptomatic, or it may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia is the most common vascular abnormality of the GI tract. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia (AD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an important condition that can cause significant morbidity and -rarely - mortality. (nih.gov)
  • Gastrointestinal tract bleeding of unknown cause, is responsible for 30% to 40 small bowel angiodysplasia. (journalmc.org)
  • Small bowel angiodysplasia may account for 30%-40% of cases of GI bleeding of obscure origin. (medscape.com)
  • Small bowel angiodysplasia (SBAD) is reported to account for nearly 50% of cases of small bowel bleeding. (bvsalud.org)
  • TAVI was consequently performed when the patient was in a relatively stable condition even though the predisposition to bleed, but there was no evidence of angiodysplasia and AVWS during angiography at that time. (bvsalud.org)
  • Although angiodysplasia is probably quite common, the risk of bleeding is increased in disorders of coagulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estrogens can be used to stop bleeding from angiodysplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiodysplasia may account for approximately 6% of cases of lower GI bleeding. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia is a rare, but important, cause of both overt and occult GI bleeding especially in the older patients. (nih.gov)
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasia of the large intestine associated with calcific aortic stenosis is a well-known entity. (amrita.edu)
  • Angiodysplasia is a condition that may cause rectal bleeding or anaemia, in which abnormal and often fragile blood vessels (vascular malformations) may bleed from time to time. (rectalbleedingclinic.com)
  • We report here on an unusual case of bleeding from angiodysplasia at the ampulla of Vater in a 58-aged woman with end stage renal failure. (e-ce.org)
  • At both dabigatran doses, increased bleeding from the colorectum, in particular from angiodysplasia, is seen. (mcmaster.ca)
  • Clinical presentation in patients with angiodysplasia is usually characterized by maroon-colored stool, melena, or hematochezia. (medscape.com)
  • A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial of hormonal therapy in the prevention of rebleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasia. (keywen.com)
  • Angiodysplasia identified on the cecum wall during colonoscopy. (medscape.com)
  • The exact mechanism of development of angiodysplasia is not known, but chronic venous obstruction may play a role. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia formation mechanism is not clear, but is thought to be due to aging effects of the changes in the vascular bed. (journalmc.org)
  • Iron deficiency anemia and stools that are intermittently positive for occult blood can be the only manifestations of angiodysplasia in 10%-15% of patients. (medscape.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Angiodysplasia" by people in this website by year, and whether "Angiodysplasia" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (ucdenver.edu)
  • In this episode, we review the high-yield topic of Angiodysplasia from the Gastrointestinal section. (medbullets.com)
  • In medicine (gastroenterology), angiodysplasia is a small vascular malformation of the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apparent deficiency of mucosal vascular collagen type IV associated with angiodysplasia of the colon. (medscape.com)
  • Other rarer causes include congenital vascular malformations such as angiodysplasia, and also radiation proctitis can follow treatment for prostate cancer. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Previously referred to as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, this autosomal dominant vascular anomaly is characterized by red-to-violet capillary angiodysplasia, which are often initially located on the lips, tongue and nasal mucosa ( see the photograph to the right ). (aafp.org)
  • Moreover, the possibility of Angiodysplasia and polyps of the rectum leading to blood in bowel or on toilet paper can not be ruled out. (speedyremedies.com)
  • Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia in chronic renal failure. (medscape.com)
  • Schwartz J, Rozenfeld V, Habot B. Cessation of recurrent bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, after beta blocker treatment in a patient with hypertrophic subaortic stenosis--a case history. (medscape.com)
  • Hormonal therapy for gastrointestinal angiodysplasia. (nih.gov)
  • A classic association is Heyde's syndrome (coincidence of aortic valve stenosis and bleeding from angiodysplasia). (wikipedia.org)
  • argue that apart from aortic valve stenosis, some other conditions that feature high shear stress might also increase the risk of bleeding from angiodysplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aortic stenosis, idiopathic gastrointestinal bleeding, and angiodysplasia: is there an association? (medscape.com)
  • Intestinal angiodysplasia and aortic valve stenosis: let's not close the book on this association. (medscape.com)
  • Angiodysplasia or Arteriovenous malformations refer to abnormal collections of blood vessels. (speedyremedies.com)
  • Angiodysplasia is when you have abnormal or enlarged blood vessels in your GI tract. (nih.gov)
  • Efficacy of estrogens and progestational hormones in persistent hemorrhagic recurrences in digestive angiodysplasia after discontinuation of hormone therapy]. (nih.gov)
  • Surgical isolation in diagnosing angiodysplasia, and psychosis. (ankurdrugs.com)
  • Su aparición más frecuente se da en los capilares de la mucosa del TRACTO GASTROINTESTINAL, lo que conduce a HEMORRAGIA GASTROINTESTINAL y ANEMIA. (bvsalud.org)
  • Estrogens can be used to stop bleeding from angiodysplasia. (wikipedia.org)