The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.
Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
A clinical syndrome characterized by the development of CHEST PAIN at rest with concomitant transient ST segment elevation in the ELECTROCARDIOGRAM, but with preserved exercise capacity.
Persistent and reproducible chest discomfort usually precipitated by a physical exertion that dissipates upon cessation of such an activity. The symptoms are manifestations of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA.
ANGINA PECTORIS or angina-like chest pain with a normal coronary arteriogram and positive EXERCISE TEST. The cause of the syndrome is unknown. While its recognition is of clinical importance, its prognosis is excellent. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed, p1346; Jablonski Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed). It is different from METABOLIC SYNDROME X, a syndrome characterized by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA, that has increased risk for cardiovascular disease.
Severe cellulitis of the submaxillary space with secondary involvement of the sublingual and submental space. It usually results from infection in the lower molar area or from a penetrating injury to the mouth floor. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Spasm of the large- or medium-sized coronary arteries.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
An ergot alkaloid (ERGOT ALKALOIDS) with uterine and VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE contractile properties.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).
Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.
A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
A technique for assisting the circulation by decreasing the afterload of the left ventricle and augmenting the diastolic pressure. It may be achieved by intra-aortic balloon, or by implanting a special pumping device in the chest, or externally by applying a negative pressure to the lower extremities during cardiac systole.
Compounds based on N-phenylacetamide, that are similar in structure to 2-PHENYLACETAMIDES. They are precursors of many other compounds. They were formerly used as ANALGESICS and ANTIPYRETICS, but often caused lethal METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.
A vasodilator used in the treatment of ANGINA PECTORIS. Its actions are similar to NITROGLYCERIN but with a slower onset of action.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Percutaneous transluminal procedure for removing atheromatous plaque from the coronary arteries. Both directional (for removing focal atheromas) and rotational (for removing concentric atheromatous plaque) atherectomy devices have been used.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
Agents that affect the rate or intensity of cardiac contraction, blood vessel diameter, or blood volume.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.
A derivative of the NIACINAMIDE that is structurally combined with an organic nitrate. It is a potassium-channel opener that causes vasodilatation of arterioles and large coronary arteries. Its nitrate-like properties produce venous vasodilation through stimulation of guanylate cyclase.
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.
A plasma protein that circulates in increased amounts during inflammation and after tissue damage.
One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
A characteristic symptom complex.
A potent vasodilator agent with calcium antagonistic action. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure.
A class of drugs that act by selective inhibition of calcium influx through cellular membranes.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.
A drug used in the treatment of angina pectoris, heart failure, conduction defects, and myocardial infarction. It is a partial agonist at beta adrenergic receptors and acts as a coronary vasodilator and cardiotonic agent.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.
Use of HIRUDINS as an anticoagulant in the treatment of cardiological and hematological disorders.
The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.
Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.
A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
A cardioselective beta-1 adrenergic blocker possessing properties and potency similar to PROPRANOLOL, but without a negative inotropic effect.
The use of photothermal effects of LASERS to coagulate, incise, vaporize, resect, dissect, or resurface tissue.
A vasodilator used in angina of effort or ischemic heart disease.
A phosphodiesterase inhibitor that blocks uptake and metabolism of adenosine by erythrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Dipyridamole also potentiates the antiaggregating action of prostacyclin. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p752)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery performed on the interior of blood vessels.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
A selective adrenergic beta-1 blocking agent that is commonly used to treat ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.
A benzothiazepine derivative with vasodilating action due to its antagonism of the actions of CALCIUM ion on membrane functions.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
Exposure of myocardial tissue to brief, repeated periods of vascular occlusion in order to render the myocardium resistant to the deleterious effects of ISCHEMIA or REPERFUSION. The period of pre-exposure and the number of times the tissue is exposed to ischemia and reperfusion vary, the average being 3 to 5 minutes.
The hospital unit in which patients with acute cardiac disorders receive intensive care.
Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Inorganic or organic salts and esters of nitric acid. These compounds contain the NO3- radical.
A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.
Unstable isotopes of thallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Tl atoms with atomic weights 198-202, 204, and 206-210 are thallium radioisotopes.
A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.
A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.
Agents that prevent clotting.
Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.
An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
Low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, having a 4-enopyranosuronate sodium structure at the non-reducing end of the chain. It is prepared by depolymerization of the benzylic ester of porcine mucosal heparin. Therapeutically, it is used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
One of the minor protein components of skeletal muscle. Its function is to serve as the calcium-binding component in the troponin-tropomyosin B-actin-myosin complex by conferring calcium sensitivity to the cross-linked actin and myosin filaments.
A heparin fraction with a mean molecular weight of 4500 daltons. It is isolated from porcine mucosal heparin and used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
A beta-1 adrenergic antagonist that has been used in the emergency treatment of CARDIAC ARRYTHMIAS.
Compounds possessing both a hydroxyl (-OH) and an amino group (-NH2).
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
Application of electric current to the spine for treatment of a variety of conditions involving innervation from the spinal cord.
An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the CARDIAC MUSCLE.
Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.
Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.
Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.
2-(2,2-Dicyclohexylethyl)piperidine. Coronary vasodilator used especially for angina of effort. It may cause neuropathy and hepatitis.

Elevated levels of C-reactive protein at discharge in patients with unstable angina predict recurrent instability. (1/1246)

BACKGROUND: In a group of patients admitted for unstable angina, we investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels remain elevated at discharge and whether persistent elevation is associated with recurrence of instability. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured plasma levels of CRP, serum amyloid A protein (SAA), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, and Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody titers in 53 patients admitted to our coronary care unit for Braunwald class IIIB unstable angina. Blood samples were taken on admission, at discharge, and after 3 months. Patients were followed for 1 year. At discharge, CRP was elevated (>3 mg/L) in 49% of patients; of these, 42% had elevated levels on admission and at 3 months. Only 15% of patients with discharge levels of CRP <3 mg/L but 69% of those with elevated CRP (P<0.001) were readmitted because of recurrence of instability or new myocardial infarction. New phases of instability occurred in 13% of patients in the lower tertile of CRP (/=8.7 mg/L, P<0.001). The prognostic value of SAA was similar to that of CRP; that of fibrinogen was not significant. Chlamydia pneumoniae but not Helicobacter pylori antibody titers significantly correlated with CRP plasma levels. CONCLUSIONS: In unstable angina, CRP may remain elevated for at >/=3 months after the waning of symptoms and is associated with recurrent instability. Elevation of acute-phase reactants in unstable angina could represent a hallmark of subclinical persistent instability or of susceptibility to recurrent instability and, at least in some patients, could be related to chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.  (+info)

A role for changes in platelet production in the cause of acute coronary syndromes. (2/1246)

Platelets are heterogeneous with respect to their size, density, and reactivity. Large platelets are more active hemostatically, and platelet volume has been found to be increased both in patients with unstable angina and with myocardial infarction. Furthermore, platelet volume is a predictor of a further ischemic event and death when measured after myocardial infarction. Platelets which are anucleate cells with no DNA are derived from their precursor, the megakaryocyte. Therefore, it is suggested that changes in platelet size are determined at thrombopoiesis in the megakaryocyte and that those changes might precede acute cardiac events. Understanding of the signaling system that controls platelet production may also further elucidate the cascade of events leading to acute vascular occlusion in some patients.  (+info)

Cardioprotection by opening of the K(ATP) channel in unstable angina. Is this a clinical manifestation of myocardial preconditioning? Results of a randomized study with nicorandil. CESAR 2 investigation. Clinical European studies in angina and revascularization. (3/1246)

AIMS: To assess the anti-ischaemic and anti-arrhythmic effects and overall safety of nicorandil, an ATP sensitive potassium (K+) channel opener, with 'cardioprotective' effects, in patients with unstable angina. METHODS: In a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study, oral nicorandil 20 mg twice daily or a matching placebo was administered for a minimum of 48 h to patients admitted with unstable angina. Treatment was standardized to include, where tolerated, oral aspirin, a beta-blocker and diltiazem. Continuous Holter ECG monitoring was performed for 48 h to assess the frequency and duration of transient myocardial ischaemia and any tachyarrhythmia, as the predefined end-points of the study. A pain chart recorded the incidence and severity of chest pain throughout the study period. Patients with myocardial infarction identified retrospectively from troponin-T analysis were excluded. RESULTS: Two hundred and forty-five patients were recruited into the study. Forty-three patients were excluded with an index diagnosis of myocardial infarction, two were not randomized and 12 had unsatisfactory tape data. In the remaining 188 patients, six out of 89 patients (6.7%) on nicorandil experienced an arrhythmia, compared with 17 out of 99 patients (17.2%) on placebo (P=0.04). Three nicorandil patients experienced three runs of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia compared to 31 runs in 10 patients on placebo (P=0.087 patients; P<0.0001 runs). Three nicorandil patients had four runs of supraventricular tachycardia, compared to 15 runs in nine patients on placebo (P=0.14 patients; P=0.017 runs). Eleven (12.4%) patients on nicorandil had 37 episodes of transient myocardial ischaemia (mostly silent) compared with 74 episodes in 21 (21.2%) patients on placebo (P=0.12 patients; P=0.0028 episodes). In the overall safety analysis, which included all patients who received at least one dose of study medication, there were no significant differences in the rates of myocardial infarction or death between the nicorandil or placebo-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Nicorandil, added to aggressive anti-anginal treatment for unstable angina, reduces transient myocardial ischaemia, non-sustained ventricular, and supraventricular arrhythmia compared to placebo. The anti-arrhythmic activity with nicorandil is probably a secondary effect resulting from its anti-ischaemic action and we suggest that this may be related to its effect on the ATP sensitive potassium channel causing pharmacological preconditioning.  (+info)

Platelet activation in patients after an acute coronary syndrome: results from the TIMI-12 trial. Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction. (4/1246)

This study was designed to determine the magnitude and time course of platelet activation during therapy of acute coronary syndromes with an oral platelet antagonist. BACKGROUND: Platelet activation and aggregation are central to the pathogenesis of the acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, few data are available on levels of platelet activation over time in patients with ACS, especially in the setting of chronic glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibition. METHODS: The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 12 trial was a phase II, double-blind trial evaluating the effects of sibrafiban, an oral, selective antagonist of the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor in patients stabilized after an ACS. A subset of 90 of the 329 patients in the study had measurement of platelet activation as assessed by the expression of platelet associated P-Selectin on days 0, 7 and 28. Platelet activation was measured in blood samples that were fixed either immediately (spontaneous activation) or after 5 minute incubation with 0, 1 microM or 5 microM ADP in order to assess platelet responsiveness to very low or moderate stimulation. RESULTS: At baseline there was a significant elevation of spontaneous platelet activation as compared to samples obtained from normal donors or from patients who did not have acute coronary syndromes (ACS patients 27.6+/-18.7%, Normal controls 8.5+/-4.4%, Patient controls 10.9+/-7.1%, p < 0.005 for both). In addition, there was a significant decrease in the levels of platelet activation with time during the 28 days of treatment with sibrafiban. Nevertheless, even on day 28, the TIMI-12 patients continued to show elevated platelet activation in comparison to the control groups (p < 0.05 for both). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that platelets remain activated long after clinical stabilization post ACS. Although platelet activation decreased after one month of oral GPIIb/IIIa inhibition, levels remained higher than normal, suggesting the need for long-term antiplatelet therapy following ACS.  (+info)

Does coronary artery morphology predict favorable results of intracoronary thrombolysis in patients with unstable angina pectoris? (5/1246)

The efficacy of intracoronary thrombolysis (ICT) for unstable angina pectoris (UAP) has been limited, despite the similar pathogenesis between UAP and acute myocardial infarction. To ascertain the subset of UAP suitable for ICT, the clinical responses to ICT were assessed in patients with UAP. Eighty-2 patients with medically refractory angina were divided into 2 groups according to the coronary artery morphology of the culprit lesion before ICT: (1) lesions with acute cut off and/or filling defects (AC) and (2) lesions with a tapered shape (TA). The TIMI flow grade was determined from coronary angiograms before and immediately after ICT. The diameter stenosis (%DS) and minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of the culprit lesion were determined using quantitative coronary angiographic analysis before and immediately after ICT. In addition, inhospital cardiac event rates including urgent/emergency coronary angioplasty or bypass surgery, nonfatal myocardial infarction or cardiac death were compared between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed using 13 clinical factors contributing to successful ICT. The results showed that all 3 coronary angiographic parameters (TIMI flow, %DS, and MLD) significantly improved in the AC group (p<0.01, p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively), whereas none of these parameters improved in the TA group. The inhospital cardiac event rate after ICT was significantly higher in the TA group (76%) than in the AC group (48%; p=0.016). Odds ratio predicting successful ICT was 7.09 (p<0.01) for the AC lesion, and 2.54 (p<0.01) for new angina. In conclusion the AC lesions are more commonly associated with coronary thrombosis that responds to ICT than are the TA lesions. Thus, the coronary angiographic morphology may be an important predictor for a successful ICT in patients with medically refractory UAP.  (+info)

Coronary artery stenting in unstable angina pectoris: a comparison with stable angina pectoris. (6/1246)

OBJECTIVE: To compare early complication rates in unselected cases of coronary artery stenting in patients with stable v unstable angina. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: 390 patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) and 306 with unstable angina (UAP). Patients treated for acute myocardial infarction (primary angioplasty) or cardiogenic shock were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: 268 coronary stents were attempted in 211 patients (30.3%). Stents used included AVE (63%), Freedom (14%), NIR (7%), Palmaz-Schatz (5%), JO (5%), and Multilink (4%). Intravascular ultrasound was not used in any of the cases. All stented patients were treated with ticlopidine and aspirin together with periprocedural unfractionated heparin. RESULTS: 123 stents were successfully deployed in 99 SAP patients v 132 stents in 103 UAP patients. Failed deployment occurred with nine stents in SAP patients, v four in UAP patients (NS). Stent thrombosis occurred in four SAP patients and 11 UAP patients. Multivariate analysis showed no relation between stent thrombosis and clinical presentation (SAP v UAP), age, sex, target vessel, stent length, or make of stent. Stent thrombosis was associated with small vessel size (p < 0.001) and bailout stenting (p = 0.01) compared with elective stenting and stenting for suboptimal PTCA, with strong trends toward smaller stent diameter (p = 0.052) and number of stents deployed (p = 0.06). Most stent thromboses occurred in vessels < 3 mm diameter. CONCLUSIONS: Coronary artery stenting in unstable angina is safe in vessels >/= 3 mm diameter, with comparable initial success and stent thrombosis rates to stenting in stable angina.  (+info)

Treatment with the antibiotic roxithromycin in patients with acute non-Q-wave coronary syndromes. The final report of the ROXIS Study. (7/1246)

AIMS: Mounting evidence suggests infection, specifically Chlamydia pneumoniae, plays a role in atherosclerosis. We tested whether antibiotic treatment with the macrolide roxithromycin improves clinical outcome in patients with acute non-Q-wave coronary syndromes. Preliminary reports revealed a reduction in events in the roxithromycin group at 30 days. We now report the long-term follow-up results. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty-four per cent of the initial 202 patients with unstable angina who were randomly assigned to receive either roxithromycin or placebo for 30 days completed the active treatment period. At day 30, the primary triple and double end-point rates were 9% and 4% in the placebo group compared to 2% and 0% in the roxithromycin group (unadjusted P = 0.032 and 0.058, respectively). The secondary triple and double end-point rates were again higher in the placebo group at day 90 (12.5% and 6.25% vs 4.37% and 0%, unadjusted P = 0.065 and 0.029, respectively), and at day 180 (14.6% and 7.29% vs 8.69% and 2.17%, unadjusted P = 0.259 and 0.17, respectively). Anti-C, pneumoniae IgG titres were unchanged in both groups while C-reactive protein levels decreased in both strategies, with a more significant decrease in the roxithromycin arm (P = 0.03). Elevated C-reactive protein levels predicted the need for revascularization. CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot trial, roxithromycin appears to extend the clinical benefit of preventing death and re-infarction for at least 6 months after initial treatment.  (+info)

Diagnostic marker cooperative study for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. (8/1246)

BACKGROUND: Millions of patients present annually with chest pain, but only 10% to 15% have myocardial infarction. Lack of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of clinical and conventional markers prevents or delays treatment and leads to unnecessary costly admissions. Comparative data are lacking on the new markers, yet using all of them is inappropriate and expensive. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Diagnostic Marker Cooperative Study was a prospective, multicenter, double-blind study with consecutive enrollment of patients with chest pain presenting to the emergency department. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and frequency of increase in patients with unstable angina were determined for creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) subforms, myoglobin, total CK-MB (activity and mass), and troponin T and I on the basis of frequent serial sampling for +info)

Anderson JL, Adams CD, Antman EM, et al. ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines for the management of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines (Writing Committee to Revise the 2002 Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unstable Angina/Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction) developed in collaboration with the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons endorsed by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. J Am Coll Cardiol . 2007;50(7):e1-e157. PMID: 17692738 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17692738 . Antman EM, Hand M, Armstrong PW, et al. 2007 Focused Update of the ACC/AHA 2004 Guidelines for the Management of Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: a report of the American College of ...
Background: The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or cerebrovascular disease (CVD) increases the likelihood of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). The impact of PAD, CVD, prior CAD, or pre-existent disease in multiple arterial territories (polyvascular disease) in patients presenting with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has not been well studied.. Methods: A total of 95,749 patients enrolled from February 15, 2003 to September 30, 2006 at 484 sites in the Can Rapid Risk Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes With Early Implementation of the ACC/AHA Guidelines (CRUSADE) registry were analyzed. Patients were categorized as having prior 0, 1, 2, or 3 affected arterial beds. The rates of in-hospital mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and congestive (CHF) were analyzed, as were the rates of non-bypass surgery red blood cell transfusions.. Results: On presentation, a total of 11,345 (11.9%) patients had established PAD, ...
The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) have issued an update to their Unstable Angina/ Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (UA/NSTEMI) guidelines, last published in 2002.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Pentraxin 3 in unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. AU - Matsui, Shigeru. AU - Ishii, Junichi. AU - Kitagawa, Fumihiko. AU - Kuno, Atsuhiro. AU - Hattori, Kousuke. AU - Ishikawa, Makoto. AU - Okumura, Masanori. AU - Kan, Shino. AU - Nakano, Tadashi. AU - Naruse, Hiroyuki. AU - Tanaka, Ikuko. AU - Nomura, Masanori. AU - Hishida, Hitoshi. AU - Ozaki, Yukio. PY - 2010/5/1. Y1 - 2010/5/1. N2 - Purpose: We prospectively investigated the prognostic value of pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI). Background: PTX3 may be a useful marker for localized vascular inflammation and damage to the cardiovascular system. Recent studies have shown that plasma PTX3 is elevated in patients with UA/NSTEMI; however, its prognostic value in UA/NSTEMI remains unclear. Methods: PTX3, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and cardiac ...
It has long been recognized that coronary artery disease comprises a wide spectrum of conditions, ranging from chronic stable angina to acute myocardial infarction. Unstable angina, in the middle of this spectrum is a heterogeneous syndrome with widely variable symptoms and prognosis. In 1989, a classification of unstable angina was introduced1 ; this classification is based on the clinical history (accelerated exertional angina or rest pain, the timing of the latter in respect to presentation, and the clinical circumstances in which unstable angina developed), on the presence or absence of ECG changes, and on the intensity of anti-ischemic therapy.. Although the development of this classification was based on clinical experience, it has been validated in a number of prospective studies. For example, Calvin et al2 studied 393 patients with unstable angina and reported that a history of a myocardial infarction within 14 days (class C) and ST-segment depression on the presenting ECG were both ...
This study sought to identify differences in coronary anatomic pathology in patients with unstable angina and elevated versus nonelevated serum troponin T values. Previous studies have shown a worse prognosis in unstable angina patients with elevated
Video 24.8. Acute pulmonary embolism. TTE. Note dilated right heart with McConnells sign and paradoxical septal movements in a patient referred to the ER from the regional hospital due to suspected unstable angina. Echo-free space in front of the heart represents pericardial fat pad. Reproduced from Chapter 24: Echocardiography in the emergency room, in The EAE Textbook of Echocardiography. Edited by Leda Galiuto, Luigi Badano, Kevin Fox, Rosa Sicari, and Jose Luis Zamorano. © European Society of Cardiology. DOI: 10.1093/med/9780199599639.001.0001 The optimal therapy of patients presenting with unstable angina with or without enzyme rise but without ST elevation (UA/NSTEMI) is still debatable. Several (FRISC II, TACTICS-TIMI 18, RITA 3, ISAR-COOL, TIMACS), although not all (ICTUS, ELISA, OPTIMA, ABOARD, LIPSIA-NSTEMI), randomized trials have provided evidence in favour of an invasive strategy compared to conservative medical therapy in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). ...
Eugene Braunwald: Maestro Of American Cardiology pg. 7. For five nail-biting years, Braunwalds team waited for the results, which ultimately showed that patients who took pravastatin to lower serum cholesterol indeed reduced their risk for having another heart attack, stroke, or dying of cardiovascular causes.. More recent TIMI trials have examined the effect of driving cholesterol levels even lower, and have found not only that lower is better, but that much lower is much better. TIMI investigators are currently studying the effects of reducing a patients LDL to a level in the 50s, levels undreamed of ten years ago.. Weve followed all of these patients extremely carefully and we dont see any serious side effects with even extreme cholesterol lowering, says Braunwald. We have not yet reached the (LDL-concentration) floor.. For more than a half century as an academic physician-scientist, Braunwald has been instrumental in numerous discoveries that have saved millions of lives, and, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Postinfarction unstable angina. Pathophysologic basis for current modalities. AU - Becker, R. C.. AU - Gore, J. M.. AU - Alpert, J. S.. PY - 1989/1/1. Y1 - 1989/1/1. N2 - Unstable angina is an acute coronary syndrome characterized by the rapid progression of clinical symptoms which may culminate in acute myocardial infarction, infarct extension or sudden death. The pathologic substrate involves atherosclerotic plaque rupture with platelet deposition, thrombus formation and coronary arterial spasm. Patients with postinfarction angina represent a high-risk subgroup with severe multivessel disease, compromised collateral vessels and/or partially occlusive thrombi; their risk of infarct extension and death is significantly increased. Initial therapy includes nitrates, beta-adrenergic blockers, calcium channel antagonists, aspirin and possibly i.v. heparin, as well as prompt identification and control of exacerbating factors. Thrombolytic therapy may assume a more central role based ...
ABOARD: Angioplasty to Blunt the rise Of troponin in Acute coronary syndromes Randomized for an immediate or Delayed intervention. -Immediate versus Delayed Invasive Strategies in Patients with Non-ST Elevation ACS by Dr. Gilles Montalescot. ICTUS: Invasive Versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable Coronary Syndromes. -Early invasive strategy vs conservative, selective invasive strategy in troponin positive patients with non-STEMI ACS by Dr. Robbert J. De Winter. MATE: Medicine versus angiography in thrombolytic exclusion. -Triage angiography in suspected acute MI patients considered ineligible for reperfusion therapy by Dr. Peter A. McCullough. NRMI: National Registry of Myocardial Infarction. -Outcomes Among NSTEMI Patients Presenting to Hospitals With and Without Backup Cardiac Surgery by Dr. Yuri B. Pride. TACTICS TIMI 18: Treat Angina with Aggrastat + Determine Cost of Therapy with an Invasive or Conservative Strategy. -Treat Angina with Aggrastat + Determine Cost of Therapy with an ...
Learn and reinforce your understanding of Unstable angina. Check out our video library. Unstable angina is a type of angina pectoris that is unpredictable
This is the first UK study to show that patients admitted to DGHs with unstable angina or NSTEMI and who are stratified at high risk wait significantly longer for angiography and revascularisation than similar patients admitted to a hospital containing a tertiary centre for cardiac services. Specifically, DGH patients were found to wait over two and a half times longer for angiography and over twice as long for revascularisation. The study hypothesis has therefore been proved.. The baseline characteristics of the MRI and DGH groups of patients were well matched except that more MRI than DGH patients had previously undergone coronary revascularisation. This is probably due to the fact that patients who have had a coronary procedure tend to represent to the hospital where they had it done and often remain under regular follow up at the tertiary centre. It is not clear why significantly more DGH patients had raised cholesterol.. If the hit list for invasive assessment and treatment of patients ...
An increased tissue endothelin-1 (ET-1) immunoreactivity has been demonstrated at the site of the culprit lesion (CL) in patients with unstable angina (UA) thus suggesting that ET-1 may be involved in the abnormal vasoreactivity of the CL in UA. The aim of this study was to establish whether an enhanced local release of ET-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of the enhanced vasoreactivity of the unstable plaque in patients with UA. We studied 9 patients with UA and 9 patients with stable angina (SA) with a single proximal lesion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Luminal diameter of the CL and of the proximal, middle and distal normal-appearing coronary segments were measured by quantitative coronary angiography at baseline, during cold pressor test (CPT) and after intracoronary administration of nitroglycerine (NTG). ET-1 levels were measured in blood samples obtained proximally and distally to the coronary CL before and after successful stent implantation. During CPT, the CL in ...
Another name for Unstable Angina is Angina. The long-term treatment of angina depends on the severity of the coronary artery disease, the condition of ...
Among elderly patients with NSTE-ACS, invasive therapy was beneficial at reducing adverse cardiovascular events compared with conservative therapy. This was due to a reduction in recurrent MI and urgent revascularization procedures. There was suggestion of harm for patients ,90 years of age; however, definitive conclusions in this group were not possible due to the limited number of patients. This trial is unique in that no crossovers occurred between the treatment groups, unlike previous trials in which a large proportion of conservative patients underwent angiography. Elderly patients are at high risk for adverse events after a NSTE-ACS, and invasive therapy remains the optimal treatment to reduce this risk.. ...
The Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction, or TIMI Study Group is an Academic Research Organization (ARO) affiliated with Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The group has its headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts, and a satellite location in Quincy. The TIMI Study Group was founded by Eugene Braunwald, MD in 1984. Dr. Braunwald held the chairmanship until 2010, when he appointed Marc Sabatine, MD to the position. The group has conducted numerous practice-changing clinical trials in patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Among the groups most important contributions to medicine is the TIMI Risk Score, which assess the risk of death and ischemic events in patients experiencing unstable angina (UA) or a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). In patients with UA/NSTEMI, the TIMI risk score is a simple prognostication scheme that categorizes a patients risk of death and ischemic events and provides a basis for therapeutic ...
New life-saving treatments for Angina in clinical trial on Seeking Oklahomans who have been diagnosed with chronic or unstable angina.
Diabetes mellitus is an etiologically and clinically heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders that share the commonality of hyperglycemia. Long-term hyperglycemia produces tissue damage, which ultimately manifests as microvascular and macrovascular disease, and neuropathy. The presence of macrovascular disease should alert clinicians to the possibility that the patient may have coronary artery disease, particularly because coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia are likely to be silent. Elderly patients with diabetes mellitus are also more likely to develop congestive heart failure. Patients with unstable coronary syndromes, decompensated heart failure, and symptomatic cardiac arrhythmias are at increased risk of perioperative cardiovascular complications (myocardial infarction, heart failure, and sudden death) while undergoing noncardiac procedures. In addition, clinicians must avoid the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Oral health care providers can expect to be called upon to care for ...
Chest pain is a nonspecific symptom that can have cardiac or noncardiac causes (see DDx). Unstable angina belongs to the spectrum of clinical presentations referred to collectively as acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), which range from ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) to non-STEMI (NSTEMI).
Chest pain is a nonspecific symptom that can have cardiac or noncardiac causes (see DDx). Unstable angina belongs to the spectrum of clinical presentations referred to collectively as acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), which range from ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) to non-STEMI (NSTEMI).
The study included adult patients with established or known CAD, which was defined as having a diagnosis of at least one of the following on their medical problem list: Coronary artery disease, chronic angina, or atherosclerosis of the aorta. Exclusion criteria were unstable angina or acute coronary syndrome, both ST and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarctions within 60 days before the start of the program; current pregnancy; life expectancy less than 1 year such as in patients with terminal cancer or those under hospice care; current chemotherapy; advanced or end-stage organ disease; active alcohol or drug abuse problems; inability to tolerate a high-fiber diet secondary to active inflammatory bowel disease; inability to understand spoken English because the program includes videos that are available only in English; and previous participation in CHIP or the health education classes.. All patients were randomly assigned to either the CHIP group or HH group. In both groups, sessions ...
This guideline covers treatments for people aged 18 and over with unstable angina (recurring chest pain) or a type of heart attack called non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). It aims to ensure that people get treatment quickly.
Unstable angina or sometimes referred to as acute coronary syndrome causes unexpected chest pain, and usually occurs while resting. The most common cause is reduced blood flow to the heart muscle because the coronary arteries are narrowed by fatty buildups (atherosclerosis) which can rupture causing injury to the coronary blood vessel resulting in blood clotting which blocks the flow of blood to the heart muscle ...
Covers causes of heart attack (myocardial infarction) and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips. Covers diagnostic tests and treatment with medicines and surgery.
Covers causes of heart attack (myocardial infarction) and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips. Covers diagnostic tests and treatment with medicines and surgery.
Covers causes of heart attack (myocardial infarction) and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips. Covers diagnostic tests and treatment with medicines and surgery.
The choice of an invasive or conservative strategy for the initial management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) has been evaluated in 7 RCTs, the results of which have been summarized by 2 groups using meta-analysis. Although it seems that the 2 meta-analyses reached different conclusions, both groups supported the invasive strategy in their respective discussion sections. Several trial limitations have confused the debate on what used to be a contentious subject, but the evidence now favors percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for NSTEMI. First, the terms that describe the strategies need to be clarified. The invasive strategy refers to the routine use of cardiac catheterization, not coronary revascularization with PCI or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The conservative strategy limits the use of cardiac catheterization to patients with spontaneous or provokable ischemia, but the term does not convey the fact that 50% of patients allocated to this ...
Unstable angina is a potentially dangerous condition, and management should be tailored to prevent adverse outcomes. Patients should be admitted to the cardiac care unit, placed at bedrest, and begun on antianginal therapy with either P-blockers or calcium channel blockers, aspirin, and intravenous nitrates. (J-Blockers, when added to nitrates, have been shown to reduce symptoms […] Read more. ...
Unstable Angina and NSTEMIs: Management Principles. Meira Louis Lisa Campfens. Outline. Pick your/ cardios strategy Initial therapy...for everyone? Pick an anti-platelet...or two...or three... Protect the stomach??? PPI controversy Pick the right anti-coagulant Slideshow 2224058...
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Among patients with NSTEMI/UA, treatment with clopidogrel in addition to standard therapy was associated with a reduction in death, MI, or stroke at 30 days and from 31 days to 1 year. For the primary endpoint plus refractory or severe ischemia, benefit was seen by the first 24 hours. However, for the primary endpoint alone, benefit was not observed until after day 7. This substudy did not address how PCI use affected these outcomes and the timing of the events. Finally, approximately 21% of patients in CURE underwent PCI, a much lower rate of PCI than what is typically used in the US in NSTEMI/UA patients. It is therefore unclear how applicable the data would be in a population treated more aggressively with PCI.. ...
Find out all information about angina at rest also known as unstable angina. This condition is marked by chest pain which appears while person is at rest
Angina is chest pain or discomfort due to coronary heart disease. It occurs when the heart muscle doesnt get as much blood as it needs. This usually happens because one or more of the hearts arteries is narrowed or blocked, also called ischemia. Stable angina refers to predictable chest discomfort associated with exertion or stress. Unstable angina refers to unexpected chest pain and usually occurs at rest. It is typically more severe and prolonged. Unstable angina should be treated as an emergency.. ...
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My chest pains started up again about 2 months ago after 9 months without. I had one really bad attack, but then went for 10 days with hardly any. Thursday and Friday I had prolonged low-grade chest ...
To the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies investigating the association among diabetes, angiogenic factors, and oxidative stress in human heart tissue affected by ischemic insult. The main findings of our study demonstrate an association between diabetes, reduced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, and increment of iNOS, O2−, and nitrotyrosine levels in heart specimens of patients with unstable angina. Diabetes amplifies oxidative reaction and worsens the angiogenic process. In nondiabetic patients, we detected increased steady-state levels of HIF-1α and VEGF after unstable angina. This accumulation of both mRNA and protein was limited to the region of affected myocardium. No HIF-1α and VEGF transcripts or proteins were detectable in nonischemic specimens. In diabetic patients, the picture is quite different because both HIF-1α and VEGF levels were significantly lower than those in nondiabetic heart specimens. Thus, the roles of HIF-1α and VEGF in beginning angiogenic process ...
Decision Resources, Inc., one of the worlds leading research and advisory firms focusing on pharmaceutical and health care issues, announced today that robust growth is predicted for the unstable...
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Ke-Fei Dou, Bo-Qia Xie, Xiao-Jin Gao, Yan Li, Yue-Jin Yang, Zuo-Xiang He, Min-Fu Yang].
2006 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 103, no 30-31, 2240-1; discussion 2241 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published ...
Fibrin, Plasma, 1,4-butanediamine, Homocysteine, Plasminogen, Cardiac Death, Concentration, Death, Infarction, Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, Unstable Angina, Adp, ATP, Collagen, Estradiol, Estrogenic Effects, Hand, Methods, Orientation
Plavix is used for reducing the risk of stroke or heart attack in patients who have already had a heart attack or stroke, have other circulatory problems caused by narrowing and hardening of the arteries, or have certain other heart problems (eg, unstable angina ...
What is this medicine? DALTEPARIN (dal te PA rin) is used in combination with aspirin to prevent complications caused by unstable angina or heart attack.
In the span of just a few years, Customer Data Platform (CDP) technology has risen from niche solutions to almost a must-have in enterprise marketing technology stacks. Yet, many early implementations have proven frustratingly incomplete or misdirected. S...
BACKGROUND: The Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Risk Score has been shown to predict prognosis in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) comprised of unstable angina (UA) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We sought to evaluate the impact of newer antiplatelet and antithrombotic therapies for ACS, such as glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPI) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), on in-hospital outcomes over time in patients (pts) with similar TIMI risk scores.. METHODS: The baseline demographics and clinical outcomes of pts with ACS (UA and non-STEMI) in 1998 (Group 1998) and 2000 (Group 2000) at a single large university medical center were compared using a prospectively collected database. In-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE) included death, MI, or recurrent angina that resulted in urgent revascularization. Risk was estimated by utilizing the TIMI Risk Score, which uses 7 predictor variables: age , 65 years, at least 3 risk factors for coronary ...
References: Anderson JL, Adams CD, Antman EM, et al. ACC/AHA Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unstable Angina and Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Committee on the Management of Patients with Unstable Angina). Circulation. 2007;116:803-877.. Goldman L. Approach to the patient with possible cardiovascular disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 50.. Sabatine MS, Cannon CP. Approach to the patient with chest pain. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwalds Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 53.. Wright RS, Anderson JL, Adams CD, et al. 2011 ACCF/AHA Focused Update of the Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Unstable Angina/Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (Updating the 2007 Guideline). ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Electrocardiographic and clinical predictors of acute myocardial infarction in patients with unstable angina pectoris. AU - Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.. AU - Camargo, Carlos A.. AU - Lapuerta, Pablo. AU - Giugliano, Robert P.. AU - ODonnell, Christopher J.. N1 - Funding Information: Dr. Camargo was supported by grant HL-03533 and Dr. Giugliano was supported by grant HL-07575 from the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Copyright: Copyright 2007 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 1998/5/15. Y1 - 1998/5/15. N2 - Among patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP), those who have non- ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at higher risk for subsequent adverse events. To determine predictors of AMI in patients with UAP, we studied consecutive nonreferral patients with UAP or AMI admitted from the emergency department to the intensive care or telemetry units of an urban teaching hospital over 1 year. There were 280 study patients (mean age 66 years, 1/3 ...
Objectives: This study sought to investigate long-term outcomes after early or delayed angiography in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (nSTE-ACS) undergoing a routine invasive management. Background The optimal timing of angiography in patients with nSTE-ACS is currently a topic for debate.. Methods: Long-term follow-up after early (within 2 days) angiography versus delayed (within 3 to 5 days) angiography was investigated in the FRISC-II (Fragmin and Fast Revascularization During Instability in Coronary Artery Disease), ICTUS (Invasive Versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable Coronary Syndromes), and RITA-3 (Intervention Versus Conservative Treatment Strategy in Patients With Unstable Angina or Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction) (FIR) nSTE-ACS patient-pooled database. The main outcome was cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction up to 5-year follow-up. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated with Cox regression models. Adjustments were made for the FIR risk ...
This study demonstrates that UA/NSTEMI patients who would have been excluded from the randomized enoxaparin trials can be safely treated with a weight-adjusted regimen of subcutaneous enoxaparin, as long as particular attention is paid to age and renal function to further adjust the dosing regimen. The EP population represents a high-risk group of patients who had a fourfold increase in death or MI at 30 days. Hypertension and the use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors were the only predictors of bleeding found in our study population.. There is strong evidence that antithrombin therapy is beneficial in UA/NSTEMI patients and that subcutaneous enoxaparin is superior to UH in this setting (1-3). However, this demonstration has been obtained in selected populations, and it is not known whether these results can be applied to all comers who present with UA/NSTEMI, including those who would have been excluded from these randomized trials. Furthermore, the safety of enoxaparin in a population at a high risk ...
Background: In patients with acute non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) coronary arteriography is usually recommended however visual interpretation of the coronary angiogram is subjective. A complementary diagnostic approach involves measuring the pressure drop across a coronary stenosis (fractional flow reserve, FFR) with a pressure-sensitive guidewire.. Hypothesis: Routine FFR measurement is feasible in NSTEMI patients and has additive diagnostic, clinical and health economic utility, as compared to angiography-guided standard care.. Design: A prospective multi-center randomized controlled trial in 350 NSTEMI patients with ≥1 coronary stenosis ≥30% severity (threshold for FFR measurement). Patients will be randomized immediately after coronary angiography to the FFR-guided group or angiography-guided group (FFR measured, not disclosed). All patients will then undergo FFR measurement in all vessels with a coronary stenosis ≥30% severity. FFR will be measured in culprit and ...
The paradoxical use of cardiac catheterization in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: lessons from the Can Rapid Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes With Early Implementation of the ACC /AHA Guidelines (CRUSADE) Quality Improvement Initiative.
Most patients with a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) undergo coronary angiography and revascularization during the index hospitalization. This topic will summarize the evidence sup
Our finding that mean platelet component is lower in acute myocardial infarction than in unstable angina, reflecting greater platelet activation, confirms the central role of thrombogenicity in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes. Indeed, platelet activation was an independent predictor of the mode of presentation and, even in the subgroup of patients with unstable angina at high risk of future events, platelet activation was significantly lower than in those with myocardial infarction.. Some studies have not found a difference in platelet activation between unstable angina and myocardial infarction. However, Garlichs and colleagues2 found greater expression of the CD40 ligand in unstable angina than in myocardial infarction. This appears counterintuitive but may reflect greater hydrolysis and release of the ligand in myocardial infarction. Mathur and colleagues3 found a greater expression of P selectin in myocardial infarction than in unstable angina but also found that mean platelet ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Issues in antithrombin therapy for UA/NSTEMI. AU - Alpert, Joseph S.. AU - Budaj, A. J.. AU - Gurfinkel, E. P.. AU - Henry, T. D.. PY - 2001/8/27. Y1 - 2001/8/27. N2 - In September 2000, participants at the 4th Annual Experts Meeting of the International Cardiology Forum convened to discuss guidelines for the management of unstable angina/non-ST-elevation MI, recently published by North American and European task forces. Discussion of new recommendations for antithrombin therapy focused on the role of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). Although most participants found the new guidelines largely consistent with existing data, and sufficiently adaptable to most clinical settings, there was concern that neither task force specified LMWH as the antithrombin of choice for the medical management of these patients. The new guidelines continue to endorse the use of unfractionated heparin, particularly for high-risk patients, despite the evidence for the efficacy of LMWH in this ...
Objective: To analyse intensity of treatment of high-risk patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACS) included in the DESCARTES (Descripción del Estado de los Sindromes Coronarios Agudos en un Registro Temporal Español) registry.. Patients and setting: Patients with NSTEACS (n = 1877) admitted to 45 randomly selected Spanish hospitals in April and May 2002 were studied.. Design: Patients with ST segment depression and troponin rise were considered high risk (n = 478) and were compared with non-high risk patients (n = 1399).. Results: 46.9% of high-risk patients versus 39.5% of non-high-risk patients underwent angiography (p = 0.005), 23.2% versus 18.8% (p = 0.038) underwent percutaneous revascularisation, and 24.9% versus 7.4% (p , 0.001) were given glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. In-hospital and six-month mortality were 7.5% versus 1.1% and 17% versus 4.6% (p , 0.001), respectively. A treatment score (⩾ 4, 2-3 and , 2) was defined according to the number of class I ...
Although inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes, the extent of inflammation is not routinely assessed, and its prognostic implications in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome have not been investigated in depth. We analyzed the prognostic i …
During the past few decades two treatment strategies have evolved for patients with unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD). The non-invasive strategy uses clinical investigations and non-invasive stress tests to identify patients who need diagnostic catheterisation. The early invasive strategy uses coronary catheterisation as the diagnostic instrument. The new technologies have consequences not only for the clinical endpoints of death or myocardial infarction (MI), but also in terms of health-related quality of life and costs. The economic evaluations are of great importance due to the high incidence of the disease and high short-term costs of the invasive strategy. The early costly intervention may prevent later complications and thereby partly or completely offset the higher initial treatment costs. Even if longterm costs remain higher, they can be justified by improved survival or quality of life. Such clinical effects in the long-term follow-up need to be seen in relation to the cost of the ...
The number of patients living with co-existing diseases is growing. This study aimed to assess the extent of multimorbidity, medication use, and drug- and gene-based interactions in patients following a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). In 1456 patients discharged from hospital for a NSTE-ACS, comorbidities and multimorbidity (≥ 2 chronic conditions) were assessed. Of these, 698 had complete drug use recorded at discharge, and 652 (the interaction cohort) had drug use and actionable genotypes available for CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A5, DPYD, F5, SLCO1B1, TPMT, UGT1A1, and VKORC1. The following drug interactions were investigated: pharmacokinetic drug-drug (DDIs) involving CYPs (CYPs above, plus CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP3A4), SLCO1B1, and P-glycoprotein; drug-gene (DGIs); drug-drug-gene (DDGIs); and drug-gene-gene (DGGIs). Interactions predicted to be substantial were defined as follows: DDIs due to strong inhibitors/inducers, DGIs due to variant homozygous/compound
A 55-year-old woman developed unstable angina following an episode of severe anaphylaxis which was treated with 0.5 mg intramuscular epinephrine (adrenaline). The exact cause of her ongoing unstable angina was uncertain but may have reflected either
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The term angina pectoris refers to chest pain. Angina is classified into three groups: 1. Stable angina (or, effort angina); 2. Unstable angina (crescendo angina); and 3. Microvascular angina (syndrome X angina). The 3rd type is caused by narrowing of the tiny blood vessles supplying the heart muscle and the symptoms vary, making it less easy to identify, but the good news is that its usually easy to treat and not fatal. Stable or effort angina refers to the more common type of chest pain related to myocardial ischemia (starving the heart muscle of blood and therefore, oxygen). This type is brought on by some form of activity like running or walking with slight or no symptoms noted at rest. This type responds quickly to the use of nitroglycerine under the tongue, and symptoms usually only last a few minutes after discontinuing the activity and reoccurs when activity resumes. It can continue for a long time but may never progress into unstable angina, which is then treated surgically, ...
Chest pain is considered the major clinical presentation of patients with acute coronary syndromes. The significant number of patients with acute coronary syndrome who do not have chest pain on initial presentation are at risk for receiving less aggressive care. Improved recognition of atypical symptoms of acute coronary syndrome may lead to more rapid treatment. Canto and associates used a retrospective review to determine the proportion of patients admitted with unstable angina pectoris who presented with atypical symptoms and to better characterize atypical presentations of the condition.. The study used data from the Alabama Unstable Angina Study of Medicare beneficiaries, which included patients hospitalized from 1993 to 1999, to review the presenting characteristics of persons with confirmed unstable angina pectoris.. Typical presentation included substernal chest pain and chest pain aggravated by exercise or relieved with rest or nitroglycerin. Atypical presentation was defined as the ...
Abstract Background In patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS), coronary pa | Jesper J. Linde, Henning Kelbæk, Thomas F. Hansen, | Journal of the American College of Cardiology |
BACKGROUND: Data are limited on whether clinical trials have randomized higher-risk patients over time and how trends in risk profiles and evidence-based pharmacotherapies have influenced trial outcomes. We quantified changes in baseline risk, treatment, and outcomes of patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) randomized in 9 phase 3 clinical trials of antithrombotic therapy over 15years. METHODS: We studied 58,771 patients in GUSTO IIb, PURSUIT, PARAGON-A, PARAGON-B, PRISM, PRISM-PLUS, GUSTO IV-ACS, SYNERGY, and EARLY ACS. Patient-level data were mapped to 3 pre-specified 5-year randomization periods. Temporal trends in GRACE score-predicted mortality were compared with trends in observed mortality. RESULTS: Over time, in-hospital and discharge use of thienopyridines (p=0.001), statins (p,0.0001), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (p,0.0001) increased, and hospital length-of-stay decreased (p=0.024). Blood transfusion use increased (8.3% [1994-98], ...
Results Among 229 patients in the invasive group, 220 underwent immediate coronary angiography (90% performed via the radial artery). Of these patients, 48% had three-vessel disease or left main stenosis, 18% two-vessel disease, 16% one-vessel disease, 17% minor coronary vessel wall changes and two patients had normal coronary arteries. Six patients (3%) underwent coronary artery bypass graft. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed in 107 patients (49%), with 57% treated with bare metal stents, 37% drug-eluting stents and 6% balloon angioplasty. On average, 1.7 lesions were treated and 2 stents delivered per patient. Complications included 1 major PCI-related bleeding (successfully treated), 2 minor access site-related bleedings, 3 side branch occlusions during PCI and 11 periprocedural myocardial infarctions (considered end points). Sex, bundle branch block and smoking were independent predictors of revascularisation. ...
In the current propensity‐matched analysis of contemporary real‐life data, an early invasive strategy was associated with an increased in‐hospital survival in NSTE‐ACS patients with concomitant DM. These results support the 2014 ACCF/AHA guideline recommendations for an early invasive strategy in diabetics, especially those with high‐risk features (eg, NSTEMI and cardiogenic shock).10 Meanwhile, the use of this strategy in lower risk patients, such as those with UA, may not be associated with improved survival.. The survival benefit of an early invasive strategy in the NSTE‐ACS population remains a matter of ongoing debate.20, 21, 22 Whereas none of the landmark trials comparing an early invasive with an initial conservative strategy illustrated a statistically significant reduction in mortality, these trials were not statistically powered to answer that question.21, 22, 23, 24 We calculated the minimal sample size required by a randomized trial to detect the difference in ...
BACKGROUND: 12-lead ECG monitoring of the ST segment is more sensitive than patients symptoms for detecting ischemia after thrombolytic therapy or catheter-based interventions, but it is unclear whether monitoring of the single lead showing maximum ST deviation would be as efficacious. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether monitoring all 12 ECG leads for changes in the ST segment is necessary to detect ongoing ischemia in patients with unstable coronary syndromes. METHODS: Continuous 12-lead ST segment monitoring was performed in 422 patients from the onset of myocardial infarction or during balloon inflation in catheter-based interventions until the patients discharge from the cardiac care unit. Computer-assisted techniques were used to determine (1) which lead showed the maximum ST deviation at the onset of myocardial infarction or during balloon inflation and (2) what proportion of later ischemic events were associated with ST deviation in this lead. RESULTS: The lead with the maximum ST ...
The correlation between persistent negative T wave on basal electrocardiogram and coronary anatomy or global and regional left ventricular function was investigated in 34 patients with unstable angina defined as new onset (| 2 months), crescendo or rest angina. The patients with history of previous myocardial infarction, pathological Q waves on electrocardiogram or documented elevation of CPK were excluded. Eighteen patients (group A) showed T wave inversion (| 1 mV) in at least two leads on the basal electrocardiogram, persisting for at least 48 hours before coronary arteriography. In 16 patients (group B) the basal electrocardiogram was normal. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction were calculated and the regional systolic wall motion was analyzed using the area method in the 30 degrees right anterior oblique view. Hypokinesis was defined as more than 2 standard deviation below the mean value calculated in 24 normal subjects. No difference was present for age (A: 61 +/- 9 vs B: 57 +/- 9 yrs)
Enoxaparin; Major bleeding; Kidney dysfunction; GFR; Meta analysis; Bleeding; MOLECULAR-WEIGHT HEPARIN; UNSTABLE ANGINA PATIENTS; ACUTE-CORONARY-SYNDROME; RENAL-FUNCTION; UNFRACTIONATED HEPARIN; PHARMACOKINETICS; IMPAIRMENT; PHARMACODYNAMICS; ANTICOAGULATION; ...
Angina Pectoris Drugs Market research report provides the newest industry data and industry future trends, allowing you to identify the products and end users driving revenue growth and profitability. Angina pectoris is a clinical indication characterized by precordial heaviness or discomfort due to transient myocardial ischemia without infarction, elicited by physical exertion or psychological stress. Angina pectoris is categorized as - stable, unstable, microvascular and Prinzmetal / variant. Angina pectoris is an initial presentation of coronary heart disease (CHD) and exerts a major impact on quality of life (QOL), costs to the society and ability to work.. Chronic stable angina pectoris has a prevalence of 2.0 - 4.0% in the seven major markets (U.S., U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Japan). Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics from American Heart Association estimates indicate that over nine million adults in the U.S. have chronic angina pectoris.. Get Free Sample Copy of Report ...
文件下载-标题(title):Braunwalds Heart disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine Braunwald心脏病:心血管医学教科书 作者(author):Douglas P. Zipes, Peter Libby, Robert O. B
Looks at medicines to help people who have unstable angina or those having a heart attack. Lists generic and brand names such as metoprolol (Lopressor) and penbutolol (Levatol). Covers how they work and side effects.
The angina is the medical condition in which the person faces pain in the chest, and that pain may extend towards the left arm of the person. Angina also named angina pectoris is an initial level pain that lasts for quite some time. The main reason for such pain is the inadequate supply of the blood to the heart. It wont be wrong to say that ischemia causes angina. The ischemia is the condition of the short supply of the blood and angina comes out as the result of it. Many of the expert physicians term angina pectoris as the mini heart attack as it is often perceived as the alarm of the serious heart issues. In a maximum of the cases angina is nothing more than pain, means it doesnt lead to the death of the person. Angina indicates the heart trouble at the initial level when the person may undergo the ischemia. The inadequacy of the blood leads to the issues like angina pectoris, which are not much serious if treated at initial level properly. Mainly there are two types of angina, one is ...
I. INTRODUCTION: 1. Name: Unstable angina 2. Protocol code: 3. Code( s) MKB-10: 4. Abbreviations used in the protocol: CABG - aortocoronary bypass Air Force - first emerging angina WHO - World Health Organization IHD - ischemic heart disease IM - myocardial infarction HC - unstable angina ACS - acute coronary syndrome PSprogressive angina FC - functional class 5. The date of the protocol: 2013.. 6. Patient category: Patients with suspicion of ACS without ST segment elevation.. 7. Users of the protocol: ambulance doctors, resuscitators, therapists, cardiologists, interventional cardiologists, cardiosurgeons.. 8. Indication of the absence of a conflict of interest: is missing.. 9. Definition: 9. Definition: Unstable angina( H. Fovler, 1971 and C. Conty 1973) is the most difficult period of CHD, characterized by a rapid progression of coronary insufficiency and a high risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death( up to 15-20% during the year).. II.METHODS, APPROACHES AND PROCEDURES FOR ...
Despite the growing body of evidence supporting the benefit of DES in different patients/lesion subsets, information regarding their differential safety/efficacy profile in patients with stable versus unstable angina is scanty and in part contradictory. Patients undergoing coronary intervention for unstable atherosclerotic coronary lesions are known to present with a smaller atherosclerotic (18) but larger thrombotic burden as compared with patients who have stable angina. This justifies the need to evaluate whether these devices may perform differently in these 2 patient subsets. In the RESEARCH (Randomized Evaluation of Salvage Angioplasty with Combined Utilization of End points) registry, where 52% of the population presented with ACS, patients with and without ACS benefited equally from SES implantation, with a relative risk reduction in the need for target vessel revascularization at 1 year in both groups when compared with BMS of 70% and 61%, respectively (6).. Similar information has been ...
Angina is chest pain or uneasiness that occurs when an area of your heart muscle doesnt get enough oxygen-rich blood. Angina may feel like pressure or squeeze in your chest. The pain also may occur in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. Angina pain may even feel like indigestion.. Angina isnt a disease; its a symptom of an fundamental heart problem. Angina usually is a symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease.. Angina - or angina pectoris (Latin for squeezing of the chest) - is chest pain, discomfort, or tightness that occurs when an area of the heart muscle is receiving decreased blood oxygen supply.. It is not a disease itself, but rather a symptom of coronary artery disease, the most general type of heart disease. The lack of oxygen rich blood to the heart is usually a result of narrower coronary arteries due to plaque buildup, a state called atherosclerosis.. Angina is chest pain or uneasiness you get when your heart muscle does not get enough ...
...PARSIPPANY N.J. and INDIANAPOLIS March 29 2011 /- Oral... Class I means that a given procedure/treatment should be performed/...Effient tablets are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ...The guidelines also include the following recommendations for the use ...,Effient®,Added,to,Updated,ACCF/AHA,Clinical,Guidelines,for,ACS-PCI,Patients,with,Unstable,Angina,and,Non-ST,Segment,Myocardial,Infarction,medicine,advanced medical technology,medical laboratory technology,medical device technology,latest medical technology,Health
BACKGROUND: The long-term outcome of an interventional strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome is unknown. We tested whether an interventional strategy (routine angiography followed by revascularisation) was better than a conservative strategy (ischaemia-driven or symptom-driven angiography) over 5 years follow-up. METHODS: In a multicentre randomised trial, 1810 patients (from 45 hospitals in England and Scotland, UK) with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to receive an early intervention (n=895) or a conservative strategy (n=915) within 48 h of the index episode of cardiac pain. In each group, the aim was to provide the best medical treatment, and also to undertake coronary arteriography within 72 h in the interventional strategy with subsequent management guided by the angiographic findings. Analysis was by intention to treat and the primary outcome (composite of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction) had masked independent ...
The global angina pectoris drugs market is expected to be valued at USD 10.6 Billion by 2022, as per a new report by Grand View Research, Inc. The global angina pectoris market is collectively driven by demand for disease-modifying and targeted treatments, increased expenditure on healthcare and availability of effective treatment methods across the emerging markets.. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160524/371361LOGO ) Additionally, the rising prevalence and incidence of angina pectoris is anticipated to fuel the market growth. Chronic stable angina pectoris has a prevalence of 2.0-4.0% in developed markets such as the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Japan. The prevalence of angina pectoris rises sharply with age in both genders, ranging from 2.0- 5.0% in men aged 45-54 to 10.0-20.0% in men aged 65-74, and from 0.1-1.0% in women aged 45-54 to 10.0-15.0% in women aged 65-74. The disease symptoms can be managed by following a healthy lifestyle.. Browse full research ...
Angina is the medical term used to describe the sharp, crushing pain that one experiences when there is a limited supply of blood to the heart causing the latter to be deprived of much needed oxygen. In most cases, the angina can be felt in the chest and can radiate towards the limbs. Most medical professionals do not treat angina as a disease on its own. Instead, it is seen as a sign or a symptom of an even more serious heart condition such as Coronary Heart Disease, or what most people refer to as CHD. In a CHD, there is a build up of plaque along the walls of the arteries. This causes narrowing of the path where the oxygen-rich blood can pass through.. Although most people see angina as only one kind, there is actually four major types of angina that a person might suffer from. Of these four, it is the stable angina that is considered to be the most common. In a stable angina, the onset is pretty much predictable. For one, a stable angina typically takes place only after too much physical ...
A heart attack and myocardial infarction (MI) are commonly used terms, and mean the same thing. However, the term MI is used less often now by doctors. This is because there is actually a range of conditions that can be caused by a sudden reduction in blood flow in a coronary artery. This range of conditions has an overall term called acute coronary syndrome (ACS).. Two main sub types of ACS can be diagnosed by what is seen on your heart tracing (electrocardiograph, or ECG). The two main types are called ST-elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI). The ST elevation refers to a section on the ECG tracing.. NSTEMI can also include unstable angina. Most people with angina chest pains only have pain with a certain amount of exertion. This is called stable angina. If the pattern of your pain changes suddenly and the pains develop after minimal exertion, or while you are resting, this is called unstable angina. This is an emergency and needs immediate medical care. See separate leaflet ...
This guideline covers the early and longer-term (rehabilitation) management of acute coronary syndromes. These include ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and unstable angina. The guideline aims to improve survival and quality of life for people who have a heart attack or unstable angina. ...
This guideline covers the early and longer-term (rehabilitation) management of acute coronary syndromes. These include ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and unstable angina. The guideline aims to improve survival and quality of life for people who have a heart attack or unstable angina. ...
Preoperative use is suggested for high-risk patients such as those with unstable angina with stenosis greater than 70% of main ... Unstable angina pectoris benefits from counterpulsation. Post cardiothoracic surgery-most common and useful is counterpulsation ...
He is one of the pioneers in acute coronary syndromes (myocardial infarction and unstable angina) having published over 40 ... John A. Ambrose, Steven L. Winters, Audrey Stern et al ."Angiographic morphology and the pathogresis of unstable angina ... Thrombolysis and Angioplasty in Unstable Angina trial". Circulation. 90 (1): 69-77. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.90.1.69. PMID 8026054. ... John Ambrose conducted extensive research on the Pathogenesis of Acute coronary syndrome including unstable angina and ...
Clinical guideline cg94: Unstable angina and NSTEMI. London, 2010. "UOTW #36 - Ultrasound of the Week". Ultrasound of the Week ... Unlike the other type of acute coronary syndrome, unstable angina, a myocardial infarction occurs when there is cell death, ... Typically, chest pain because of ischemia, be it unstable angina or myocardial infarction, lessens with the use of ... Plaques can become unstable, rupture, and additionally promote the formation of a blood clot that blocks the artery; this can ...
... and unstable angina. Relief of the pain of angina is of paramount importance, not only for humane reasons but because the pain ... Unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction". In Bonow RO; Mann DL; Zipes DP; Libby P (eds.). Braunwald's heart ... The principal symptom is typically chest pain, known as angina pectoris; people who present with angina must prompt evaluation ... the latter includes unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Treatment is generally more aggressive ...
His team discovered the presence of small, partially occlusive blood clots in patients with unstable angina (now called acute ... Cohen M, Fuster V (1990). "Insights into the pathogenetic mechanisms of unstable angina". Haemostasis. 20 (Suppl 1): 102-12. " ...
Unstable cardiovascular status (angina, recent myocardial infarction, etc.). *Thoracic, abdominal, or cerebral aneurysms ...
placebo in a 2 x 2 factorial design among patients presenting with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction. ENTIRE- ... placebo on the culprit coronary lesion in patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction. TIMI 3 Registry ... conservative strategies among patients presenting with unstable angina and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction following treatment ... "The TIMI Risk Score for Unstable Angina/Non-ST Elevation MI", JAMA, 2000 Antman, Elliott M.; Cohen, Marc; Bernink, Peter J. L. ...
Unstable angina. *Refractory ventricular tachycardia. *Assessment of respiratory distress *Cardiogenic vs non-cardiogenic ...
Angina that changes in intensity, character or frequency is termed unstable. Unstable angina may precede myocardial infarction ... Types include stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. A common symptom is chest pain ... October 2002). "ACC/AHA guideline update for the management of patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation ... "unstable angina" is used. This process usually necessitates hospital admission and close observation on a coronary care unit ...
... or unstable angina (38%). Generally, when the symptom is of less than 30 minutes,it is Unstable Angina(UA).When symptom is ... "crescendo angina"). New-onset angina is also considered unstable angina, since it suggests a new problem in a coronary artery. ... In contrast with stable angina, unstable angina occurs suddenly, often at rest or with minimal exertion, or at lesser degrees ... Pollack CV, Sites FD, Shofer FS, Sease KL, Hollander JE (2006). "Application of the TIMI risk score for unstable angina and non ...
This is usually repeated every 8 to 12 weeks Contraindications: unstable angina; within 6 months of myocardial infarction; ...
First described by Hein J. J. Wellens and colleagues in 1982 in a subgroup of people with unstable angina, it does not seem to ... March 1989). "Angiographic and clinical characteristics of patients with unstable angina showing an ECG pattern indicating ... coronary artery stenosis in people with unstable angina. Originally thought of as two separate types, A and B, it is now ... "Anatomic and prognostic significance of new T-wave inversion in unstable angina". American Journal of Cardiology. 52 (1): 14-18 ...
Detection of silent myocardial ischemia in asymptomatic selected population and in unstable angina. Advances in Cardiology. 37 ...
Variant angina - it is effective owing to its direct effects on coronary dilation. Unstable angina (preinfarction, crescendo ... Each of these effects results in reduced oxygen consumption by the heart, reducing angina, typically unstable angina, symptoms ... Diltiazem is indicated for: Stable angina (exercise-induced) - diltiazem increases coronary blood flow and decreases myocardial ... angina, and certain heart arrhythmias. It may also be used in hyperthyroidism if beta blockers cannot be used. It is taken by ...
For example, the IP agonist iloprost is contraindicated in patients with unstable angina; decompensated cardiac failure (unless ... However, PGI2 is very unstable, spontaneously converting to a far less active derivative 6-keto-PGF1 alpha within 1 minute of ...
Stable or unstable angina. *Myocardial infarction ("heart attack") - People usually complained of a pressure or squeezing ... Prinzmetal's angina - Chest pain is caused by coronary vasospasm. More common in women younger than 50 years. Person usually ... Cardiac chest pain is called angina pectoris. Some causes of noncardiac chest pain include gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, ...
Specifically it is also used in the treatment of heart attacks and unstable angina. It is given by injection into a vein or ...
Absolute contraindications to cardiac stress test include: Acute myocardial infarction within 48 hours Unstable angina not yet ... responsible for recurrent symptoms of angina. Unstable atheroma produces "vulnerable plaques" hidden within the walls of ... Limitation in blood flow to the left ventricle can lead to recurrent angina pectoris. Cardiac steal syndrome Duke Treadmill ...
Angina that changes in intensity, character or frequency is termed unstable. Unstable angina may precede myocardial infarction ... Stable angina[edit]. Main article: Angina pectoris. In "stable" angina, chest pain with typical features occurring at ... refers to a group of diseases which includes stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death.[ ... "unstable angina" is used. This process usually necessitates hospital admission and close observation on a coronary care unit ...
Tryptase levels are elevated during spontaneous ischemic episodes in unstable angina but not after ergonovine test in variant ... Kounis syndrome (allergic angina and allergic myocardial infarction). Angina Pectoris. Etiology, Pathogenesis and Treatment. ... "Kounis syndrome (allergic angina and allergic myocardial infarction): A natural paradigm?" Kounis NG. International Journal of ... Kounis syndrome (allergic angina and allergic myocardial infarction): A natural paradigm? International Journal of Cardiology ...
These units typically serve patients who require cardiac telemetry, such as those with unstable angina. Coronary care units ... As arrhythmias are relatively common in this group, patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina are routinely ... unstable angina, cardiac dysrhythmia and (in practice) various other cardiac conditions that require continuous monitoring and ...
"Plasma N terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and cardiotrophin 1 are raised in unstable angina". Heart. 84 (4): 421-4. doi: ...
A rapid rise in blood levels can be seen in myocardial infarction and unstable angina. Other enzymes related to glycogen ...
Main contraindications for ketamine: Severe cardiovascular disease such as unstable angina or poorly controlled hypertension. ...
Direct evidence of endothelial injury in acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina by demonstration of circulating ... Direct evidence of endothelial injury in acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina by demonstration of circulating ... Researchers are hoping that the HD-CEC test will be used to predict cardiovascular diseases such as acute MI, angina and heart ... and crescendo angina. British Heart Journal. 53: 363. Li, C., Wu, Q., Liu, B., Yao, Y., Chen, Y., Zhang, H.,& Ge, S. (2013). ...
Unstable angina is chest pain that can occur at rest, feels more severe, and/or last longer than stable angina. It is caused by ... Coronary circulation Left coronary artery Right coronary artery Heart Cardiology Coronary artery disease Angina Unstable angina ... Therefore, any disorder or disease of the coronary arteries can have a serious impact on health, possibly leading to angina, a ... Stable angina is chest pain on exertion that improves with rest. ...
"Elevated levels of C-reactive protein at discharge in patients with unstable angina predict recurrent instability". Institute ...
... arterial endothelial function in patients with unstable angina". The Indian Journal of Medical Research. 129 (3): 279-84. PMID ...
Secondary prevention of myocardial infarction, stroke, unstable angina, and revascularization in people with established ...
... is contraindicated in people with cardiogenic shock, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and during pregnancy ... Nisoldipine is a pharmaceutical drug used for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris and hypertension. It is a calcium ... angina, and heart failure". Heart Dis. 1 (5): 279-88. PMID 11720635.. ...
Results from the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation ...
... although abdominal drains may be placed in very unstable infants as a temporizing measure. Surgery may require a colostomy, ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ... Unstable[edit]. In those that are unstable with a narrow complex tachycardia, intravenous adenosine may be attempted.[4] In all ... whether or not the person is stable or unstable, and whether the instability is due to the tachycardia.[4] Unstable means that ... However, unstable patients sometimes require synchronized cardioversion. Definitive care may include catheter ablation.[ ...
... which first was used to reveal the presence of a blood clot in the coronary arteries of patients with unstable angina and ...
Results from the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ... Since most cases of AF are secondary to other medical problems, the presence of chest pain or angina, signs and symptoms of ... However, cardioversion may be employed if the person is hemodynamically unstable, highly symptomatic, or persists for six weeks ... If cardiovascularly unstable due to uncontrolled tachycardia, immediate cardioversion is indicated.[21] Many antiarrhythmics, ...
Unstable in the presence of light and air. Indole acetic acid derivative.. Reversible COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor.. PO and topical.. ... Severe pain (including labour pain); cough due to terminal lung cancer; angina; left ventricular failure.. As per codeine. ... Comes in hydrochloride salt form; soluble in water, ethanol and methanol, fairly insoluble in acetone; unstable at temperatures ... unstable outside of 15 °C and 30 °C; phenanthrene derivative.. Mu opioid; NMDA antagonist; SNRI.[99]. PO, IM, IV, SC.. Protein ...
... unstable angina, ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack.[137] 40 mg of aspirin a day is able to inhibit a large ...
Results from the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation ...
Clopidogrel in Unstable angina to prevent Recurrent Events (CURE) Trial Investigators. (2003). "Effects of aspirin dose when ... "Circadian variation in the onset of unstable angina and non-Q-wave acute myocardial infarction (the TIMI III Registry and TIMI ... observations from the Clopidogrel in Unstable angina to prevent Recurrent Events (CURE) study". Circulation. 108 (14): 1682-7. ... results of the Proyecto de Estudio del Pronóstico de la Angina (PEPA)". Medicine (Baltimore). 81 (6): 434-42. doi:10.1097/ ...
Protective Effects of Aspirin against Acute Myocardial Infarction and Death in Men with Unstable Angina. New England Journal of ...
... s may not be safe in cases of unstable angina pectoris, a recent heart attack,[41] and severe aortic stenosis.[42] [43] ...
Unstable angina)、心肌梗塞和猝死的疾病[17]。冠狀動脈疾病是最常見的心臟血管疾病[18]。常見的症狀包括胸
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
Advances in technology and understanding of VT substrates now allow ablation of multiple and unstable VTs with acceptable ... or recent angina, the wide complex tachycardia is much more likely to be ventricular tachycardia.[8] ... Individuals suffering from pulseless VT or unstable VT are hemodynamically compromised and require immediate electric ... a precordial thump may be attempted in those on a heart monitor who are seen going into an unstable ventricular tachycardia.[5] ...
For example, the IP agonist iloprost is contraindicated in patients with unstable angina; decompensated cardiac failure (unless ... However, PGI2 is very unstable, spontaneously converting to a far less active derivative 6-keto-PGF1 alpha within 1 minute of ...
I20) Angina pectoris *(I20.0) Unstable angina. *(I20.1) Angina pectoris with documented spasm *Prinzmetal's angina ...
avgusta 1983). "Protective effects of aspirin against acute myocardial infarction and death in men with unstable angina. ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
Results from the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
... "unstable angina"), but cannot be used. As they are administered by injection (intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous), they ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ... A coronary thrombus is asymptomatic until it causes significant obstruction, leading to various forms of angina or eventually a ...
Angina pectoris *Prinzmetal's angina. *Stable angina. *Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina ...
... unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death.[58] It is within the group of cardiovascular diseases of ... Coronary artery disease, also known as "ischemic heart disease",[57] is a group of diseases that includes: stable angina, ... These relatively narrow vessels are commonly affected by atherosclerosis and can become blocked, causing angina or a heart ...
Unstable angina is a condition in which your heart doesnt get enough blood flow and oxygen. It may lead to a heart attack. ... New-onset angina; Angina - unstable; Progressive angina; CAD - unstable angina; Coronary artery disease - unstable angina; ... Unstable angina is chest pain that is sudden and often gets worse over a short period of time. You may be developing unstable ... Unstable angina is a warning sign that a heart attack may happen soon and needs to be treated right away. See your health care ...
Unstable angina belongs to the spectrum of clinical presentations referred to collectively as acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), ... encoded search term (Unstable%20Angina) and Unstable Angina What to Read Next on Medscape. Medscape Consult. ... Unstable Angina Differential Diagnoses. Updated: Dec 26, 2017 * Author: Walter Tan, MD, MS; Chief Editor: Eric H Yang, MD more ... Be aware that unstable angina can infrequently coexist or concurrently present with the following:. * Aortic dissection with ...
Unstable angina?. My chest pains started up again about 2 months ago after 9 months without. I had one really bad attack, but ...
Unstable angina belongs to the spectrum of clinical presentations referred to collectively as acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), ... Unstable angina and NSTEMI: the early management of unstable angina and non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. London ... and death in unstable angina varies because of the broad clinical spectrum that is covered by the term unstable angina. The ... nearly 1 million hospitalized patients have a primary diagnosis of unstable angina. A similar number of unstable angina ...
The pathophysiology of unstable angina is controversial. Until recently, unstable angina was assumed to be angina pectoris ... Unstable angina (UA), also called crescendo angina, is a type of angina pectoris that is irregular. It is also classified as a ... "unstable angina" at Dorlands Medical Dictionary Wiviott, S. D.; Braunwald, E (2004). "Unstable Angina and Non-ST-Segment ... the concept of unstable angina is being questioned with some calling for retiring the term altogether. Unstable angina is ...
unstable angina Unstable angina or sometimes referred to as acute coronary syndrome causes unexpected chest pain, and usually ...
The exact cause of her ongoing unstable angina was uncertain but may have reflected either ... A 55-year-old woman developed unstable angina following an episode of severe anaphylaxis which was treated with 0.5 mg ... Angina, Unstable / etiology*. Coronary Vasospasm / etiology. Epinephrine / administration & dosage*. Female. Food ... A 55-year-old woman developed unstable angina following an episode of severe anaphylaxis which was treated with 0.5 mg ...
Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips. Covers diagnostic tests and treatment with medicines and surgery. ... and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. ...
... or unstable angina.. Angioscopic studies have revealed that the thrombus responsible for unstable angina is more commonly white ... secondary unstable angina. Most frequently, unstable angina is caused by coronary plaques that have undergone repeated phases ... correlate with the clinical severity of unstable angina.7 The plaque morphology in patients with higher grades of unstable ... "24 in unstable angina may therefore reflect the presence of an unstable plaque containing platelet-rich thrombus in the ...
Effect of stopping smoking after unstable angina and myocardial infarction Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1984; 288 :146 ... Effect of stopping smoking after unstable angina and myocardial infarction. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1984; 288 doi: https://doi. ...
... and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips ... Unstable angina. Unstable angina symptoms are similar to a heart attack. Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if ... What is angina, and why is unstable angina a concern?. Angina (say "ANN-juh-nuh" or "ann-JY-nuh") is a symptom of coronary ... Unstable angina means that your symptoms have changed from your typical pattern of stable angina. Your symptoms do not happen ...
Patients presenting with symptoms consistent with unstable angina should generally receive medications and other therapies and ... What is the initial emergency department treatment of unstable angina in Wellens syndrome?. Updated: Jan 25, 2018 ... encoded search term (What is the initial emergency department treatment of unstable angina in Wellens syndrome?) and What is ... Patients presenting with symptoms consistent with unstable angina should generally receive medications and other therapies and ...
Unstable angina and NSTEMI: early management [CG94]. Measuring the use of this guidance. Recommendation: 1.5.1. Offer coronary ... Perform angiography as soon as possible for patients who are clinically unstable or at high ischaemic risk. ...
... unstable angina patient,/b, and gave me medicines to be used for 6 months, which I am using continuously, but I am feeling ... after doing angiography my doctor diagnosed that I am an unstable angina patient and gave me medicines to be used for 6 months ... Home » Frequently asked Questions on Health » Unstable angina. Unstable angina. Answered by: Dr U Kaul , Director,. Director of ...
The recurrence of angina soon after myocardial infarction is not uncommon and represents areas of viable myocardium at risk ... Angina Pectoris / therapy*. Angina, Unstable / physiopathology, therapy*. Angioplasty, Balloon. Anticoagulants / therapeutic ... The recurrence of angina soon after myocardial infarction is not uncommon and represents areas of viable myocardium at risk ...
Drug-Eluting Balloon in Stable and Unstable Angina (DEBUT). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Angina, Unstable. Heart Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Arteriosclerosis. Arterial Occlusive Diseases. Vascular Diseases. ... Drug-Eluting Balloon in Stable and Unstable Angina: a Randomized Controlled Non-inferiority Trial. ... Stable angina or dyspnea and a coronary narrowing causing myocardial ischemia detected in the angiogram. Ischemia is documented ...
People want answers to the question what is angina... ... Many sufferers of chest pain have asked what is angina and the ... There are two common types of angina, stable or unstable angina. Whether you experience stable or unstable angina the overall ... Unstable angina pain usually signals a possible heart attack. If you suspect stable or unstable angina it is best to have the ... Normally stable angina disappears when the person lies down and rests for a period of time. Unstable angina, however, is ...
Unstable angina. Unstable angina is a change in your usual pattern of stable angina. Your symptoms do not happen at a ... Unstable angina happens when blood flow to the heart is suddenly slowed by narrowed vessels or small blood clots that form in ... Unstable angina is an emergency. It may mean that you are having a heart attack. ... For example, you may feel angina when you are resting. Your symptoms may be more frequent, severe, or longer-lasting than your ...
... Xuelan Qiu, ... Xuelan Qiu, Andrew Miles, Xuehua Jiang, Xin Sun, and Nan Yang, "Sulfotanshinone Sodium Injection for Unstable Angina Pectoris: ...
... unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) undergo coronary angiography and revascularization during the index ... Unstable angina (UA) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are part of the continuum of acute coronary syndrome ( ... In unstable angina or non-ST-segment acute coronary syndrome, should patients with multivessel coronary artery disease undergo ... Coronary angiography and revascularization for unstable angina or non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction. Authors. ...
Late Results Following Emergency Saphenous Vein Bypass Grafting For Unstable Angina. LAWRENCE I. BONCHEK, SHAHBUDIN H. ... Late Results Following Emergency Saphenous Vein Bypass Grafting For Unstable Angina. LAWRENCE I. BONCHEK, SHAHBUDIN H. ... Late Results Following Emergency Saphenous Vein Bypass Grafting For Unstable Angina. LAWRENCE I. BONCHEK, SHAHBUDIN H. ... after extended follow-up indicate that emergency saphenous vein bypass grafting is an effective therapy for unstable angina. ...
The long-term treatment of angina depends on the severity of the coronary artery disease, the condition of ... ... Unstable Angina Long-Term Care. The long-term treatment of angina depends on the severity of the coronary artery disease, the ... PubMed Unstable Angina References *Abrams J. Clinical practice. Chronic stable angina. N Engl J Med. 2005 Jun 16;352(24):2524- ... Continue to Unstable Angina Diet Last Updated: Nov 7, 2007 References Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. Beckett, MD; D ...
Explains MI and angina differences. Offers prevention tips. Covers diagnostic tests and treatment with medicines and surgery. ... and unstable angina. Discusses symptoms like chest pain or pressure. ... Unstable angina. Unstable angina symptoms are similar to a heart attack.. Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if ... What is angina, and why is unstable angina a concern?. Angina (say "ANN-juh-nuh" or "ann-JY-nuh") is a symptom of coronary ...
Antman EM, Cohen M, Bernink PJ, McCabe CH, Horacek T, Papuchis G. The TIMI risk score for unstable angina/non-ST elevation MI: ... ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines for the management of patients with unstable angina/non ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report of ... Platelet Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in Unstable Angina: Receptor Suppression Using Integrilin Therapy. N Engl J Med. 1998 Aug 13. ... FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) to prevent heart attack, stroke and unstable angina requiring hospitalization [press release ...
Predictors of risk in patients admitted with unstable angina to a district general hospital.Br Heart J 1992;67: 395-401. ... Unstable angina represents a critical phase of ischaemic heart disease and is associated with a significant risk of subsequent ... Prospective study of the role of cardiac troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina BMJ 1996; 313 :262 ... Unstable angina: natural history and determinants of prognosis.Am J Cardiol 1981;48: 525-8. ...
Any change from usual angina symptoms must be evaluated for presence of unstable angina or more severe ACS. *New-onset angina: ... which would be consistent with NSTEMI or unstable angina. Unstable angina can present in a variety of ways. Classically, acute ... Related topic: Angina pectoris. Codes. ICD10CM:. I20.0 - Unstable angina. SNOMEDCT:. 4557003 - Preinfarction syndrome. Look For ... Unstable angina. Subscriber Sign In VisualDx Mobile Feedback Select Language Share Enter a Symptom, Medication, or Diagnosis. ...
The ECG in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Unstable Angina. Book Subtitle. Diagnosis and Risk Stratification. Authors. * Hein J ... The ECG in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Unstable Angina. Diagnosis and Risk Stratification. Authors: Wellens, Hein J.J., ...
i,Objective,/i,. Initial optimized prescription of Chinese herb medicine for unstable angina (UA). ,i ,Methods,/i,. Based on ... Unstable angina (UA) is the clinical status between exertional stable angina and acute myocardial infarction [1]. In recent ... Initial optimized prescription of Chinese herb medicine for unstable angina (UA). Methods. Based on partially observable Markov ... Optimizing Prescription of Chinese Herbal Medicine for Unstable Angina Based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Process, ...
... unstable, and variant. This article will focus primarily on unstable angina, which is when plaque in the blood vessels either ... Unstable angina is not relieved by your common medications-rather, it requires emergency treatment ... In unstable angina, pain and symptoms may appear even while resting.. Unstable angina is a sign that arteries are narrowing and ... Treating unstable angina. Treatment for unstable angina depends on the severity of the condition. For starters, you may be put ...
New life-saving treatments for Angina in clinical trial on Seeking Oklahomans who have been diagnosed with chronic or unstable ... Seeking Oklahomans who have been diagnosed with chronic or unstable angina. Detailed Study Description. Angina pectoris is the ... Seeking Oklahomans who have been diagnosed with chronic or unstable angina. Brief description of study. ... There are different degrees of angina, but all need to be taken seriously and treated. ...
  • Zhao YH, Xu Y, Gu YY, Li Y, Zhang JY, Su X. Functional effect of platelet membrane glycoprotein ia gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of unstable angina pectoris. (medscape.com)
  • Unstable angina (UA), also called crescendo angina, is a type of angina pectoris that is irregular. (wikipedia.org)
  • Until recently, unstable angina was assumed to be angina pectoris caused by disruption of an atherosclerotic plaque with partial thrombosis and possibly embolization or vasospasm leading to myocardial ischemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angina pectoris: a review of current and emerging therapies. (freemd.com)
  • According to the characteristics of angina pectoris, typical ECG changes, exercise treadmill ECG, Holter, cardiac scintigraphy, coronary angiography and risk elements to make the judgment in order to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. (hindawi.com)
  • Angina pectoris is the medical term for chest pain due to coronary heart disease. (centerwatch.com)
  • Resting myocardial F-FDG PET/CT imaging was performed 21 ± 9 h (2-46 h) after the latest onset of angina pectoris. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Unstable angina pectoris prior to ST elevation myocardial infarction in patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention has no influence on prognosis. (muni.cz)
  • Pre-infarction unstable angina pectoris (UAP) can be considered ischemic preconditioning. (muni.cz)
  • Unstable angina, also known as unstable angina pectoris, is a medical emergency with sudden chest pain or tightness that worsens over a short period of time. (ada.com)
  • The invention relates to the use of reconstituted HDL for improving the endothelial function in patients suffering from hypercholesterolaemia and for treating or preventing acute coronary diseases such as unstable angina pectoris. (patents.com)
  • 2. The method of claim 1, wherein said vascular disorder is unstable angina pectoris or myocardial infarction. (patents.com)
  • Two hundred consecutive catheterized patients with unstable angina pectoris were reviewed to find clinical and noninvasive indicators of left main coronary artery disease (≥ 50% lesion). (annals.org)
  • Crescendo angina pectoris (worsening of pre-existing angina), transient ST-segment depression with pain, simultaneous anterior and inferior ST changes during pain, and fluoroscopic calcification of the left main coronary artery were all significantly more common in patients with left main coronary artery disease. (annals.org)
  • Left main coronary artery disease cannot be reliably predicted in patients with unstable angina pectoris before coronary arteriography. (annals.org)
  • Invasive versus conservative strategy in patients aged 80 years or older with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris (After Eighty study): an open-label randomised controlled trial. (annals.org)
  • Short-, medium-, and long-term follow-up after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for stable and unstable angina pectoris. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Angioplasty for stable versus unstable angina pectoris: Are unstable patients more likely to get restenosis? (semanticscholar.org)
  • Coronary revascularization after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for unstable angina pectoris: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients with stable and unstable angina pectoris: analysis of early and late results. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Evaluation of the role of coronary angioplasty in patients with unstable angina pectoris. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Prospective study of medical and urgent surgical therapy in randomizable patients with unstable angina pectoris: results of in-hospital and chronic mortality and morbidity. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Objective To study the curative effect of sofren injection on unstable angina pectoris and its influence on platelet function. (cnki.com.cn)
  • Methods A total of 76 patients with unstable angina pectoris admitted to Henan Provincial People's Hospital from July of 2016 to December of 2017 were randomly divided into control group and observation group,38 cases in each group. (cnki.com.cn)
  • 05). Conclusion Sofren injection can effectively alleviate the symptoms of patients with unstable angina pectoris and improve platelet function,which is worthy of clinical promotion. (cnki.com.cn)
  • Methods Patients of ≥80 years old with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris were randomised to an invasive or conservative strategy. (bmj.com)
  • Unstable angina is a type of angina pectoris that is unpredictable. (osmosis.org)
  • Unstable angina (UA) is a type of angina pectoris that is irregular. (icd.codes)
  • DRG Group #311 - Angina pectoris. (icd.codes)
  • Among patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP), those who have non- ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at higher risk for subsequent adverse events. (northwestern.edu)
  • Angina pectoris, commonly referred to as just "angina", is chest pain caused by ischemia, or shortage of oxygenated blood supply, to the heart muscle. (answers.com)
  • Angina" is an abbreviation of angina pectoris, a Latin term for "squeezing of the chest. (answers.com)
  • Dr. William Heberden is credited with being the first to describe in a 1768 publication the occurrence of chest pain attacks (i.e. angina pectoris) that appeared due to pathologically occluded coronary arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to patients with angina pectoris secondary to coronary artery atherosclerosis, people with variant angina are generally younger and have fewer risk factors for coronary artery disease except for smoking, which is a common and very significant risk factor for both types of angina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sufferers usually have repeated episodes of unexplained (e.g., in the absence of exertion and occurring at sleep or in the early morning hours) chest pain, light-headedness, excessive sweating, and/or reduced exercise tolerance that, unlike atherosclerosis-related angina pectoris, typically does not progress to myocardial infarction (i.e. heart attack). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unstable angina belongs to the spectrum of clinical presentations referred to collectively as acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), which range from ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) to non-STEMI (NSTEMI). (medscape.com)
  • It can be difficult to distinguish unstable angina from non-ST elevation (non-Q wave) myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unstable angina (UA) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are part of the continuum of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), which also includes ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). (uptodate.com)
  • Which patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (unstable angina and NSTEMI) should receive anticoagulant therapy? (medscape.com)
  • Unstable angina is a form of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) along with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST elevation MI (STEMI). (visualdx.com)
  • Either outcome can lead to complete obstruction of the vessel with cardiac myocyte damage and changes to the ECG (consistent with STEMI) or transient or incomplete obstruction of the vessel with or without myocyte damage or ECG changes, which would be consistent with NSTEMI or unstable angina. (visualdx.com)
  • This guideline covers treatments for people aged 18 and over with unstable angina (recurring chest pain) or a type of heart attack called non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • It recommends that as soon as NSTEMI or unstable angina is diagnosed, healthcare professionals assess people for risk of more serious heart problems in the future to guide their treatment. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • Their place in the routine investigation of patients admitted with unstable angina and NSTEMI (particularly those who have not undergone angiography), as opposed to their selective use, is not clear. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • Management of unstable angina and NSTEMI would be enhanced if the relative place of these investigations was better understood and an assessment of their cost effectiveness made. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of the systematic use of risk scoring systems (in addition to clinical assessment) for ischaemic outcomes and bleeding complications in the management of unstable angina and NSTEMI (at all levels of risk) compared with clinical assessment alone? (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • For patients with unstable angina and NSTEMI (at differing levels of risk), how do clinical outcome data (adverse cardiovascular events and bleeding complications) collected in cardiac registries compare with data derived from randomised clinical trials (RCTs). (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • Often there is uncertainty about how the outcome data from RCTs can be applied to the much larger unselected population of patients admitted to UK hospitals with unstable angina or NSTEMI. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • Collection of well-validated registry data is essential if conclusions from RCTs are to be applied appropriately to all patients with unstable angina and NSTEMI, not just to patients who are comparable to trial populations. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • What is angina and NSTEMI? (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • This guideline addresses the early management of unstable angina and non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) once a firm diagnosis has been made and before discharge from hospital. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • Early Invasive Therapy or Conservative Management for Unstable Angina or NSTEMI? (aafp.org)
  • How effective is early invasive treatment of patients with unstable angina (UA) or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) compared with conservative management? (aafp.org)
  • Compared with conservative management, early invasive treatment of patients with UA or NSTEMI using coronary angiography with or without revascularization reduces rehospitalization and refractory angina within the first year and significantly reduces mortality and myocardial infarction at two to five years. (aafp.org)
  • In patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI), two strategies are possible. (aafp.org)
  • Do heparins (i.e., low-molecular-weight heparin [LMWH] and unfractionated heparin [UFH]) benefit patients with unstable angina and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)? (aafp.org)
  • Acute coronary syndrome represents a spectrum of disease that includes unstable angina and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). (aafp.org)
  • Despite treatment with aspirin, beta blockers, and nitroglycerin, unstable angina or NSTEMI are still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. (aafp.org)
  • Randomized controlled trials of parenteral UFH or LMWH versus placebo in persons with acute coronary syndrome (unstable angina or NSTEMI). (aafp.org)
  • Considerable attention has been given to the use of anticoagulants in conservative and invasive management of unstable angina or NSTEMI. (aafp.org)
  • Adults with non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina are assessed for their risk of future adverse cardiovascular events using an established risk scoring system that predicts 6-month mortality to guide clinical management. (nice.org.uk)
  • Assessing and categorising risk of future adverse cardiovascular events by formal risk assessment (for example, using the GRACE scoring system) in people who have been diagnosed with NSTEMI or unstable angina is important for determining early management strategies. (nice.org.uk)
  • Proportion of presentations for NSTEMI or unstable angina that had an assessment of the risk of future adverse cardiovascular events using an established risk scoring system that predicts 6-month mortality. (nice.org.uk)
  • Denominator - the number of presentations because of NSTEMI or unstable angina. (nice.org.uk)
  • Commissioners (clinical commissioning groups) ensure that they commission services with staff with the expertise to assess the risk of future adverse cardiovascular events in adults with NSTEMI or unstable angina using established risk scoring systems that predict 6-month mortality to guide clinical management. (nice.org.uk)
  • Adults with heart conditions called NSTEMI and unstable angina have their risk of another heart attack estimated to guide their treatment. (nice.org.uk)
  • Unstable angina and NSTEMI (NICE clinical guideline 94) recommendations 1.2.1 and 1.2.4. (nice.org.uk)
  • Between them, non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes, a group comprising unstable angina or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), account for at least 120 000 admissions to UK hospitals each year 2 and carry a prognosis that is far from benign. (bmj.com)
  • 3 Similarly, in the OASIS registry that included nearly 8000 patients with unstable angina and NSTEMI the rates for equivalent end points was 10.1% and 22% respectively. (bmj.com)
  • Patients with unstable angina/non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) (UA/NSTEMI) present with a wide spectrum of risk for death and cardiac ischemic events. (nih.gov)
  • PARSIPPANY, N.J. and INDIANAPOLIS, March 29, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Oral antiplatelet therapy Effient® (prasugrel) has been added to the updated clinical practice guidelines as a Class I recommended treatment option for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after experiencing heart-related chest pain at rest (unstable angina) or non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). (bio-medicine.org)
  • The new guidelines issued by the ACCF and AHA recognize Effient as an important treatment option for the population of ACS patients who receive PCI with or without a stent after experiencing unstable angina or NSTEMI, which is a type of heart attack that that does not need to be treated with emergent opening of a blocked coronary artery," said LeRoy LeNarz, MD, senior medical director, Cardiovascular, Eli Lilly and Company. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In patients ≥ 80 years of age with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina, what is the effect of an invasive compared with a conservative strategy on cardiovascular outcomes? (annals.org)
  • METHODS: This was a retrospective, registry-based analysis (SWEDEHEART) including 3204 unstable patients, 18,194 non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients, and 977 controls without acute cardiovascular disease. (diva-portal.org)
  • Only 1239 unstable angina patients (39.7%) had a peak cTnT level = 14 ng/L. Patients with unstable angina tended to be younger than those with NSTEMI but had higher prevalence of most cardiovascular risk factors and more advanced coronary artery disease. (diva-portal.org)
  • Minor cTnT elevation is common, which makes unstable angina difficult to distinguish from NSTEMI. (diva-portal.org)
  • In patients with unstable angina or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), is initial management with an invasive strategy better than a conservative strategy? (acpjc.org)
  • The latter include patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), who, by definition, have evidence of myocyte necrosis, and those with unstable angina (UA), who do not. (mhmedical.com)
  • The optimal therapy of patients presenting with unstable angina with or without enzyme rise but without ST elevation ( UA / NSTEMI ) is still debatable. (oxfordmedicine.com)
  • The term acute coronary syndrome encompasses the complete spectrum of clinical syndromes characterised by acute coronary ischaemia and includes unstable angina, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). (radcliffecardiology.com)
  • Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) represent a continuum of interrelated diseases including unstable angina (UA), non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). (neurologyadvisor.com)
  • At 4 months, 86 (9.6%) of 895 patients in the intervention group had died or had a myocardial infarction or refractory angina, compared with 133 (14.5%) of 915 patients in the conservative group (risk ratio 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.85, p=0.001). (nih.gov)
  • This difference was mainly due to a halving of refractory angina in the intervention group. (nih.gov)
  • 3 This is particularly true in high risk patients, i.e. those with features such as refractory angina , haemodynamic or electrical instability, marked enzyme rise, or dynamic ST-T changes. (oxfordmedicine.com)
  • Refractory angina seems to be the strongest predictor of acute myocardial infarction or death, but this marker is not available at admission, preventing an early assessment of risk [ 11 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Fifty percent of people with unstable angina will have evidence of necrosis of the heart's muscular cells based on elevated cardiac serum markers such as creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK)-MB and troponin T or I, and thus have a diagnosis of non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particularly, cardiac-specific troponin T and troponin I have been shown to represent the best predictors of early risk in patients with angina at rest. (ahajournals.org)
  • Troponin T in the serum of patients with unstable angina identifies a subgroup at higher risk of subsequent cardiac events and its measurement aids in risk factor stratification. (bmj.com)
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A subset of patients with unstable angina have raised concentrations of the cardiac specific protein troponin T 8 9 10 11 in their serum early in the admission period. (bmj.com)
  • ACS, including unstable angina, is most commonly caused by a cascade of chronic inflammatory processes in coronary vessels that leads to the development of stable and/or unstable plaques with or without embolisms, leading to a mismatch between cardiac myocyte demand and oxygenated blood delivery. (visualdx.com)
  • the other three studies included patients with angina and cardiac enzyme elevation, electrocardiography changes, or a history of CAD. (aafp.org)
  • We evaluated C-reactive protein (CRP) and troponin T (TnT) for predicting six-month cardiac risk in patients with unstable angina. (nih.gov)
  • Troponin T is predictive of cardiac risk in patients with unstable angina. (nih.gov)
  • In-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE) included death, MI, or recurrent angina that resulted in urgent revascularization. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • 65 years, at least 3 risk factors for coronary artery disease, prior coronary stenosis of 50%, ST segment deviation on EKG, severe angina, prior aspirin use, and elevated cardiac biomarkers. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • BACKGROUND: There is an expectation that with the adoption of more sensitive cardiac troponin (cTn) assays, unstable angina would become a rarity. (diva-portal.org)
  • What are the immediate clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics that are independently associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes in patients with either chest pain that raises suspicion of cardiac ischemia or diagnosed unstable angina? (vidyya.com)
  • Variant angina had been described twice in the 1930s by other authors and was referred to as cardiac syndrome X (CSX) by Kemp in 1973, in reference to patients with exercise-induced angina who nonetheless had normal coronary angiograms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac examination of individuals with variant angina is usually normal in the absence of current symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angina is a type of chest discomfort caused by poor blood flow through the blood vessels (coronary vessels) of the heart muscle (myocardium). (medlineplus.gov)
  • With stable angina, the chest pain or other symptoms only occur with a certain amount of activity or stress. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Unstable angina is chest pain that is sudden and often gets worse over a short period of time. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In one study, the unintentional failure to recognize or hospitalize patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina occurred in an average of 2.2 per 100 patients presenting to the emergency department with a chest pain syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • Unstable angina or sometimes referred to as acute coronary syndrome causes unexpected chest pain, and usually occurs while resting. (heart.org)
  • Symptoms of angina include chest pain or pressure, or a strange feeling in the chest. (cigna.com)
  • I had been treated as a heart patient after having chest pain 6 months ago, after doing angiography my doctor diagnosed that I am an unstable angina patient and gave me medicines to be used for 6 months, which I am using continuously, but I am feeling breathing problem - shortage of breath sometimes. (ndtv.com)
  • Many sufferers of chest pain have asked what is angina and the symptoms of angina attack . (nutralegacy.com)
  • Angina can be described as a squeezing and compressing chest pain that occurs when there is tightness in the heart muscle. (nutralegacy.com)
  • The angina medication can provide relief from the chest pain and eliminate the progression of a heart attack in the event of unstable angina. (nutralegacy.com)
  • The primary symptom of unstable angina is severe chest pain, but pain may also be experienced in the shoulders, neck, back, and arms . (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Other differences in symptoms of unstable angina compared to stable angina is that the chest pain begins to feel different, more severe, more reoccurring, lasts longer than 15 to 20 minutes, occurs without a cause, does not respond to medications, and appears with a drop in blood pressure and shortness of breath. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • The typical symptom of angina is a chest pressure or pain that radiates to the left arm, back, jaw or neck. (ada.com)
  • Angina is a type of chest discomfort or pain due to poor blood flow through the blood vessels (coronary vessels) of the heart muscle (myocardium). (stlukes-stl.com)
  • ACS, which includes heart attack and a type of chest pain called unstable angina, affects more than one million people in the United States annually. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The cardinal symptom of coronary artery disease (CAD) is angina, which classically presents as a squeezing or strangulating deep chest discomfort that may radiate to the arm or jaw. (vidyya.com)
  • Unstable angina is chest pain that occurs at rest and can be relieved by nitroglycerin . (osmosis.org)
  • Unstable angina is chest pain, usually without exertion, caused by ischemia. (osmosis.org)
  • Angina is a feeling of pain, squeezing, or pressure in the chest. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Angina is chest pain, discomfort, or tightness. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It may present in the form of an angina attack, pain, or discomfort in the chest that typically lasts from 1 to 15 minutes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Angina is a chest pain linked to heart disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Angina is a feeling of pain, tightness, pressure, or discomfort in and around your chest. (kramesonline.com)
  • The lower amount of oxygen can cause the chest pain of angina. (kramesonline.com)
  • Unstable angina is described as chest pain that occurs unpredictably even at rest. (kramesonline.com)
  • Angina is a heart condition that is typically manifested as chest pain and is more of a symptom of an underlying condition than a disease in itself. (news-medical.net)
  • Arteriosclerosis of the arteries that supply heart muscles called the coronary arteries thus gives rise to symptoms of chest pain termed angina. (news-medical.net)
  • Angina is manifested as a dull, aching, tightness or heavy weight like feeling over the chest. (news-medical.net)
  • Angina is the medical term meaning chest pain. (answers.com)
  • angina has to do with chest/heart, cataract has to do with the eye. (answers.com)
  • Angina is one of the serious causes of chest pain. (answers.com)
  • Some key features of variant angina are chest pain that is concurrently associated with elevations in the ST segment on electrocardiography recordings, that often occurs during the late evening or early morning hours in individuals who are at rest, doing non-strenuous activities, or asleep, and that is not associated with permanent occlusions of their coronary vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • A decade ago, a classification of unstable angina based on clinical symptoms was introduced. (ahajournals.org)
  • this classification is based on the clinical history (accelerated exertional angina or rest pain, the timing of the latter in respect to presentation, and the clinical circumstances in which unstable angina developed), on the presence or absence of ECG changes, and on the intensity of anti-ischemic therapy. (ahajournals.org)
  • Thus, Ahmed et al 5 reported that an "unstable angina score" based on the clinical classification was the most important predictor of intracoronary thrombus and lesion complexity. (ahajournals.org)
  • Owa et al 10 found that unstable angina class III was associated with both a higher incidence of coronary thrombi on angiography and an increased risk of clinical progression to myocardial infarction. (ahajournals.org)
  • Angiographic and clinical characteristics of patients with unstable angina showing an ECG pattern indicating critical narrowing of the proximal LAD coronary artery. (medscape.com)
  • 12 13 We evaluated the potential role of this marker in stratifying for risk patients with unstable angina admitted in routine clinical practice. (bmj.com)
  • Unstable angina (UA) is the clinical status between exertional stable angina and acute myocardial infarction [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • PLOTNICK GD, GREENE HL, CARLINER NH, BECKER LC, FISHER ML. Clinical Indicators of Left Main Coronary Artery Disease in Unstable Angina. (annals.org)
  • We suggest that the clinical management of patients presenting with unstable symptoms should depend on their estimated cardiovascular risk rather than on strictly applied diagnostic criteria. (diva-portal.org)
  • The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association developed a set of clinical practice guidelines on predicting and treating unstable angina, which are based in part on AHRQ's evidence report. (vidyya.com)
  • Because identification of patient risk is central to all further patient management in unstable angina, this evidence report focuses on clinical and laboratory markers of patient risk, such as results of diagnostic tests (troponin values, stress testing, echocardiography, and nuclear scintigraphy). (vidyya.com)
  • Unstable angina is common clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis. (vixra.org)
  • We sought to determine whether clinical risk stratification correlates with the angiographic extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patient with unstable angina. (onlinejacc.org)
  • If it could be shown that risk stratification based on clinical (AHCPR) criteria correlates with angiographic coronary disease in addition to prognosis, this could provide a useful method for determining which patients with unstable angina may be suitable for early coronary intervention. (onlinejacc.org)
  • To observe the relationship between the TCM syndrome type and coronary Gensini integral of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) instability angina for objective indicators of clinical syndrome differentiation type and to explore a new way to guide the clinical standard of syndrome differentiation. (onlinejacc.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an unfavorable clinical outcome in patients with unstable angina. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Unstable angina is characterized by at least one of the following: Occurs at rest or minimal exertion and usually lasts more than 20 minutes (if nitroglycerin is not administered) Being severe (at least Canadian Cardiovascular Society Classification 3) and of new onset (i.e. within 1 month) Occurs with a crescendo pattern (brought on by less activity, more severe, more prolonged or increased frequency than previously). (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors often prescribe nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, for angina. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Stable angina goes away when you rest or take nitroglycerin. (kramesonline.com)
  • Angina is often controlled by medication, most commonly with nitroglycerin. (answers.com)
  • Nitroglycerin is the classic treatment for angina. (answers.com)
  • Basra SS, Virani SS, Paniagua D, Kar B, Jneid H. Acute coronary syndromes: unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. (medscape.com)
  • See 'Initial evaluation and management of suspected acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina) in the emergency department' and 'Overview of the acute management of non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes' . (uptodate.com)
  • The term 'acute coronary syndromes' encompasses a range of conditions from unstable angina to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), arising from thrombus formation on an atheromatous plaque. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • The Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Risk Score has been shown to predict prognosis in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) comprised of unstable angina (UA) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Patients with ischemic heart disease fall into two large groups: patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD) who most commonly present with stable angina ( Chap. 293 ) and patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). (mhmedical.com)
  • Thrombosis after the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque often precipitates the acute coronary syndromes of unstable angina and myocardial infarction. (ovid.com)
  • Antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin and clopidogrel can reduce platelet aggregation at the unstable atherosclerotic plaque, as well as combining these with an anticoagulant such as a low molecular weight heparin, can reduce clot fomation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared with standard therapy with aspirin, the use of heparin does not reduce mortality, the need for revascularization, and recurrent angina. (aafp.org)
  • The purpose of this trial is to determine whether bivalirudin is non-inferior to unfractionated heparin in patients with stable angina, unstable angina, or non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. (clinicalconnection.com)
  • The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 11A trial compared the safety and tolerability of two weight-adjusted regimens of subcutaneous injections of enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin, in patients with unstable angina/non-Q wave myocardial infarction (NQMI). (timi.org)
  • Heparin and antiaggregating therapy represent an effective treatment of unstable angina. (elsevier.com)
  • Abstract -Unstable angina is a critical phase of coronary heart disease with widely variable symptoms and prognosis. (ahajournals.org)
  • abstract = "The effect of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function has not been systematically investigated in patients treated for unstable angina or ischemia after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "We assessed the long-term results of coronary bypass surgery performed for unstable angina in 1743 patients from 1970 to 1987. (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "Angina is the commonest manifestation of ischaemic heart disease and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. (elsevier.com)
  • Unstable angina is a sign of more severe heart disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A 55-year-old woman developed unstable angina following an episode of severe anaphylaxis which was treated with 0.5 mg intramuscular epinephrine (adrenaline). (biomedsearch.com)
  • They differ primarily in whether the ischemia is severe enough to cause sufficient damage to the heart's muscular cells to release detectable quantities of a marker of injury (typically troponin T or troponin I). Unstable angina is considered to be present in patients with ischemic symptoms suggestive of an ACS and no elevation in troponin, with or without ECG changes indicative of ischemia (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your symptoms may be more frequent, severe, or longer-lasting than your usual pattern of stable angina. (conehealth.com)
  • In patients presenting with unstable coronary-artery disease, an interventional strategy is preferable to a conservative strategy, mainly because of the halving of refractory or severe angina, and with no increased risk of death or myocardial infarction. (nih.gov)
  • Variant angina occurs at rest and is usually severe. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • You may also be diagnosed with unstable angina if you have stable angina that becomes more severe, lasts longer, or that is not relieved by rest or medicine. (kramesonline.com)
  • With unstable angina, the symptoms are more severe and last longer. (kramesonline.com)
  • To determine whether ischemia-reperfusion injury causes this acute-phase response, we studied the temporal relation between plasma levels of CRP and ischemic episodes in 48 patients with unstable angina and 20 control patients with active variant angina, in which severe myocardial ischemia is caused by occlusive coronary artery spasm. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The duration of these symptoms depends on the type of angina. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This type of angina can often be managed with medicine or rest. (kramesonline.com)
  • This type of angina occurs most often during exercise or times of stress. (kramesonline.com)
  • Stable means that this type of angina is consistent and predictable. (kramesonline.com)
  • This type of angina is caused when a piece of plaque breaks off (ruptures). (kramesonline.com)
  • This type of angina usually does not prove to be fatal but may be a prelude to a heart attack or a stroke and mandates medical attention. (news-medical.net)
  • This type of angina usually develops rapidly and the course is often unpredictable. (news-medical.net)
  • This type of angina is an emergency situation since the course of the angina is unpredictable and the heart function may rapidly deteriorate and this can increase the risk of stroke or a heart attack. (news-medical.net)
  • This type of angina is treated with medications and surgical techniques. (news-medical.net)
  • In 1959, Dr. Myron Prinzmetal described a type of angina that differed from the classic cases of Heberden angina in that it commonly occurred in the absence of exercise or exertion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coronary artery disease due to atherosclerosis is the most common cause of unstable angina. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hardening and narrowing of the heart blood vessels due to atherosclerosis is the most common cause of stable angina. (ada.com)
  • If we know the etiology of unstable angina as well as atherosclerosis better, we can have better methods to control and prevent this detrimental illness. (vixra.org)
  • Angina is caused by arteriosclerosis or atherosclerosis that causes hardening and narrowing of the coronary arteries. (news-medical.net)
  • In comparison, stable angina is due to the permanent occlusion of these vessels by atherosclerosis (i.e. buildup of fatty plaque and hardening of the arteries). (wikipedia.org)
  • This variant angina differed from the classical angina described by Dr. Heberden in that it appeared due to episodic vasospasm of coronary arteries that were typically not occluded by pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, emboli, or spontaneous dissection (i.e. tears in the walls of coronary arteries). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike cases of atherosclerosis-related stable angina, these symptoms are often unrelated to exertion and occur in night or early morning hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, individuals with atherosclerosis-related unstable angina may similarly exhibit night to early morning hour symptoms that are unrelated to exertion. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two common types of angina, stable or unstable angina . (nutralegacy.com)
  • In this article, learn about the types of angina, which doctors classify, at least in part, according to their pattern of occurrence. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • What are different types of angina? (news-medical.net)
  • Variant (Prinzmetal) angina is characterized by transient ST-segment elevation and can involve multiple coronary arterial territories. (medscape.com)
  • Most patients with a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) undergo coronary angiography and revascularization during the index hospitalization. (uptodate.com)
  • Interventional versus conservative treatment for patients with unstable angina or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the British Heart Foundat. (nih.gov)
  • An interventional strategy was better than a conservative strategy in unstable angina or non-ST-elevation MI. (nih.gov)
  • However, recent data from the SWEDEHEART registry demonstrated that 15% of patients admitted with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome still were regarded as having unstable angina. (diva-portal.org)
  • How should patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction be managed? (acpjc.org)
  • In patients with unstable angina or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI), an early invasive strategy reduces rates of fatal or nonfatal MI and rehospitalization more than a conservative strategy, but not all-cause mortality or the composite outcome of death or nonfatal MI. (acpjc.org)
  • Undergoing PCI for stable angina, unstable angina, or non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. (clinicalconnection.com)
  • The incidence of unstable angina and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction has increased greatly in recent years: primarily due to the widespread availability of sensitive and specific markers of myocardial cell necrosis. (elsevier.com)
  • Hillis, GS 2006, ' Management of stable angina and unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction ', Medicine , vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 181-187. (elsevier.com)
  • A high unstable angina class (IIIB or IIIC) led to a high rate of coronary revascularization. (ahajournals.org)
  • Scheidt S. Treatment of stable angina: medical and invasive therapy--implications for the elderly. (freemd.com)
  • Comparison of early invasive and conservative strategies in patients with unstable coronary syndromes treated with the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban. (clinicalcorrelations.org)
  • 183 patients had a final diagnosis of unstable angina. (bmj.com)
  • All selected subjects fulfilled the diagnosis of unstable angina. (hindawi.com)
  • CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of unstable angina is still commonly used, even in the era of more sensitive cTn assays. (diva-portal.org)
  • Temporal Trends in Unstable Angina Diagnosis Codes for Outpatient Percutaneous Coronary Interventions. (clinicalcorrelations.org)
  • In 1994, the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) published a definitive guideline for the diagnosis and management of unstable angina (1) . (onlinejacc.org)
  • Value of Apolipoprotein A I (ApoA-I), α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), actin α (ACTα), fibronectin (FN), haptoglobin (Hp) on the early diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) with unstable angina (UA) blood stasis syndrome was investigated. (alliedacademies.org)
  • We performed this study to develop a new scoring system to stratify different levels of risk in patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of unstable angina (UA), which is a complex syndrome that encompasses different outcomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • I20.0 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of unstable angina. (icd.codes)
  • A short cut review was carried out to establish whether clopidogrel and aspirin is better than aspirin alone in improving cardiovascular outcome in patients with unstable angina. (bmj.com)
  • It is concluded that clopidogrel together with aspirin gives a better cardiovascular outcome than aspirin alone in patients with unstable angina. (bmj.com)
  • VA pharmacy records were used to determine whether a prescription for aspirin was filled after the postoperative MI or unstable angina. (eurekamag.com)
  • Aspirin is able to prevent myocardial infarction and death in patients with unstable angina, but is not able to control myocardial ischemia. (elsevier.com)
  • For a portion of patients, variant angina may be a manifestation of a more generalized episodic smooth muscle-contractile disorder such as migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon, or aspirin-induced asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the detailed pathogenesis of unstable angina is still not known. (vixra.org)
  • The Role of C-Reactive Protein Activation of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B in the Pathogenesis of Unstable Angina**Editorials published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reflect the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of JACC or the American College of Cardiology. (elsevier.com)
  • Since unstable angina is assumed to occur in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia without troponin release, the concept of unstable angina is being questioned with some calling for retiring the term altogether. (wikipedia.org)
  • Accordingly, it is suggested that the original classification be extended by subclassifying one large group of unstable angina patients, ie, those with angina at rest within the past 48 hours (class IIIB), into troponin-positive (T pos ) and troponin-negative (T neg ) patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • To examine the prognostic significance and role in risk stratification of the biochemical marker troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina. (bmj.com)
  • 62 (34%) unstable angina patients were troponin T positive. (bmj.com)
  • Predictive value of C-reactive protein and troponin T in patients with unstable angina: a comparative analysis. (nih.gov)
  • AHRQ's UCSF-Stanford Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) was asked to conduct a systematic review of the current literature on unstable angina, including studies of the prognostic value of patient history, physical exam, electrocardiogram and other diagnostic tests such as troponin to identify a patient's risk for unstable angina. (vidyya.com)
  • Your doctor might also use the term acute coronary syndrome for your heart attack or unstable angina. (cigna.com)
  • The body often responds to the increased stress of a heart attack or unstable angina by increasing the heart rate and blood pressure. (wellspan.org)
  • Unstable angina was also diagnosed if there was evidence of myocardial ischaemia in the form of previous effort angina, previous myocardial infarction, or if transient electrocardiographic changes accompanied the pain. (bmj.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The normal levels of CRP in variant angina, despite a significantly larger number of ischemic episodes and greater total ischemic burden, and the failure of CRP values to increase in unstable angina indicate that transient myocardial ischemia, within the range of duration observed, does not itself stimulate an appreciable acute-phase response. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Unstable angina, in the middle of this spectrum is a heterogeneous syndrome with widely variable symptoms and prognosis. (ahajournals.org)
  • What is the initial emergency department treatment of unstable angina in Wellens syndrome? (medscape.com)
  • A 52-year-old male with unstable angina after acute myocardial infarction, and Leriche's syndrome was referred to our hospital for intensive care. (umin.ac.jp)
  • 212 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) instability angina were clinically investigated according to the CRF content, meanwhile the TCM syndrome type and coronary angiography results were processed. (onlinejacc.org)
  • 212 patients with unstable angina in this study were classified into three categories according to the actual situation of syndrome differentiation: the excess syndrome (106 cases), the deficiency syndrome (59 cases)and the mixed syndrome of deficiency and excess (47 cases). (onlinejacc.org)
  • The 212 patients of TCM syndromes with unstable angina in coronary heart disease were divided into blood stasis (149 cases) and non blood stasis syndrome (63 cases). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Variant angina also differs from the Kounis syndrome (also termed allergic acute coronary syndrome) in which coronary artery constriction and symptoms are caused by allergic or strong immune reactions to a drug or other substance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment of the Kounis syndrome very much differs from that for variant angina. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate patients with unstable angina (UA) and the predictive factors of these arrhythmias and to determine whether this complication behaves as an independent variable with regard to mortality, increased length of stay in an ICU/CCU, and the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (medscimonit.com)
  • Systemic and local inflammation in patients with unstable atherosclerotic plaques. (medscape.com)
  • The exact cause of her ongoing unstable angina was uncertain but may have reflected either vasospasm superimposed upon an area of atherosclerotic coronary disease, or vasospasm induced plaque rupture. (biomedsearch.com)
  • It is important to identify risk factors for atherosclerotic disease when assessing the likelihood of unstable angina. (visualdx.com)
  • The presence of CRP, complement, and oxLDL in a high proportion of plaque tissue from patients with unstable coronary artery disease implies that these surrogate markers have important proinflammatory effects inside atherosclerotic plaques. (bmj.com)
  • Yes it can if the atherosclerotic plaque causing stable angina ruptures blocking the coronary artery partially. (answers.com)
  • However, individuals exhibiting angina symptoms that are associated with depressions in their electrocardiogram ST segments, that are triggered by exertion, and/or who have atherosclerotic coronary artery disease are still considered to suffer variant angina if their symptoms are caused by coronary artery spasms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angina occurs when there is not enough blood flow to the heart. (cigna.com)
  • Angina occurs when the heart is temporarily not getting enough oxygen. (ada.com)
  • Unstable angina occurs when the vessels become very narrow. (ada.com)
  • Receive medical attention if angina occurs unexpectedly, does not go away, or does not respond to rest or medication. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Stable angina occurs when the heart is working harder than usual - for instance, during exercise. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Unstable angina does not follow a regular pattern and usually occurs during rest. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Unstable angina occurs at rest, is surprising, lasts longer, and may worsen over time. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Stable angina occurs at times you can predict. (kramesonline.com)
  • Anticoagulants are given in the hospital during unstable angina or a heart attack , because they can prevent clots from becoming larger and blocking coronary arteries. (healthmedicinet.com)
  • Group 1 consisted of 10 patients who had new onset of refractory rest angina and ischemic ST-T changes, but no infarction, single-vessel coronary disease without collateralization, and normal left ventricular (LV) angiograms. (ovid.com)
  • Plasma protein acute-phase response in unstable angina is not induced by ischemic injury. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Apolipoprotein E genotype and circulating interleukin-10 levels in patients with stable and unstable coronary artery disease. (medscape.com)
  • It has long been recognized that coronary artery disease comprises a wide spectrum of conditions, ranging from chronic stable angina to acute myocardial infarction. (ahajournals.org)
  • Angina (say "ANN-juh-nuh" or "ann-JY-nuh") is a symptom of coronary artery disease. (cigna.com)
  • The long-term treatment of angina depends on the severity of the coronary artery disease , the condition of the heart and the presence of other diseases . (freemd.com)
  • Unstable angina results from a restricted blood flow to the heart-for example, when a person has coronary artery disease (CAD). (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Current guidelines suggest that, for patients at moderate risk of death from unstable coronary-artery disease, either an interventional strategy (angiography followed by revascularisation) or a conservative strategy (ischaemia-driven or symptom-driven angiography) is appropriate. (nih.gov)
  • We studied 9 patients with UA and 9 patients with stable angina (SA) with a single proximal lesion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. (kup.at)
  • All residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, undergoing emergency department evaluation from January 1, 1985 through December 31, 1992 for unstable angina without a history of prior coronary artery bypass grafting, and who underwent early angiography (within seven days of presentation) were classified into low, intermediate and high risk subgroups based on AHCPR criteria. (onlinejacc.org)
  • In a stepwise approach, the guideline stratifies patients with unstable angina into low, intermediate and high risk subgroups, according to the likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the short-term risk of myocardial infarction (MI) or death. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Angina is not a disease in its own right but a probable symptom of coronary artery disease . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Variant or Prinzmetal's angina and microvascular angina are rare and can occur at rest without any underlying coronary artery disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Unstable angina is usually caused by coronary artery disease (CAD). (kramesonline.com)
  • People want answers to the question what is angina, and if the symptoms they experience are that of indigestion or symptoms of angina attack . (nutralegacy.com)
  • Symptoms of angina attack include radiating pain in the arms, shoulders, neck, back and even jaw. (nutralegacy.com)
  • When experiencing symptoms of angina or an attack, careful rest is needed and if symptoms continue, see your doctor right away. (nutralegacy.com)
  • Early symptoms of angina are pain and discomfort although the circumstances differ depending on the kind of angina. (answers.com)
  • Pain and discomfort are the main symptoms of angina. (answers.com)
  • People with unstable angina are at higher risk of having a heart attack. (medlineplus.gov)
  • For example, Calvin et al 2 studied 393 patients with unstable angina and reported that a history of a myocardial infarction within 14 days (class C) and ST-segment depression on the presenting ECG were both markers of increased risk. (ahajournals.org)
  • Perform angiography as soon as possible for patients who are clinically unstable or at high ischaemic risk. (nice.org.uk)
  • The recurrence of angina soon after myocardial infarction is not uncommon and represents areas of viable myocardium at risk from infarct extension and thus a worse prognosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Unstable angina represents a critical phase of ischaemic heart disease and is associated with a significant risk of subsequent myocardial infarction or death. (bmj.com)
  • Unstable angina is a sign that arteries are narrowing and that you are at a higher risk of a heart attack. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • What are the causes and risk factors of unstable angina? (belmarrahealth.com)
  • By controlling these risk factors, you can better prevent unstable angina or at least better manage the condition if already diagnosed. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Smoking also increases the risk of developing angina. (ada.com)
  • Treatment of unstable angina involves short-term measures to reduce pain and long-term measures to reduce the risk of a heart attack. (ada.com)
  • Predictors of risk in patients with unstable angina admitted to a district general hospital. (bmj.com)
  • OBJECTIVE--To observe the long-term prognosis of patients with unstable angina and select simple criteria to identify high and low risk subgroups. (bmj.com)
  • Patients with unstable angina have a nonneglectable cardiovascular risk. (diva-portal.org)
  • The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has released a summary of an evidence report on the prediction of risk for patients with unstable angina. (vidyya.com)
  • The Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) guidelines stratify patients with unstable angina according to short-term risk of myocardial infarction or death. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Among patients with unstable angina undergoing early coronary angiography, risk stratification according to the AHCPR guidelines correlates with the angiographic extent of CAD. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Unstable angina can indicate the risk of a heart attack . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Angina treatments aim to reduce pain, prevent symptoms, and prevent or lower the risk of heart attack. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Who is at risk of angina? (news-medical.net)
  • Patients presenting with symptoms consistent with unstable angina should generally receive medications and other therapies and measures that may help prevent myocardial infarction (MI). (medscape.com)
  • It says here that you can eliminate angina symptoms via the use of medications. (nutralegacy.com)
  • Unstable angina is not relieved by your common medications-rather, it requires emergency treatment. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Long-term treatment for unstable angina often involves medications to thin the blood, to control blood pressure and to reduce cholesterol levels. (ada.com)
  • Medications to manage high blood pressure may help manage angina. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The extremely low mortality early and late postop (7%), the low incidence of Ml (16%), and the excellent functional results after extended follow-up indicate that emergency saphenous vein bypass grafting is an effective therapy for unstable angina. (ahajournals.org)
  • Baseline TnT and CRP values were determined in 447 patients with unstable angina enrolled in the placebo group of the Chimeric c7E3 AntiPlatelet Therapy in Unstable angina REfractory to standard treatment trial (CAPTURE) trial. (nih.gov)
  • patients with medical therapy-refractory unstable angina undergoing PTCA while receiving abciximab have decreased short-term thrombotic complications and MI compared to placebo. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We conclude that coronary bypass surgery is an effective form of therapy (for up to 15 years) in patients with unstable angina. (elsevier.com)
  • Angina is treated with drug therapy and surgery. (answers.com)
  • Unstable angina happens when blood flow to the heart is suddenly slowed by narrowed vessels or small blood clots that form in the coronary arteries. (conehealth.com)
  • In unstable angina, the plaque along the arteries may rupture or form a blood clot, further decreasing the blood flow and triggering symptoms. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • CSX is now termed microvascular angina, i.e. angina caused by disease of the heart's small arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Variant angina is also the major complication of eosinophilic coronary periarteritis, an extremely rare disorder caused by extensive eosinophilic infiltration of the adventitia and periadventitia, i.e. the soft tissues, surrounding the coronary arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Variant angina is rare . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The condition is classified by the pattern of attacks into stable, unstable, and variant angina. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The term vasospastic angina is sometimes used to include all of these atypical cases with the more typical cases of variant angina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, variant angina is taken to include typical and atypical cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients in the conservative management groups had access to coronary angiography, but only if medication management failed, angina persisted, electrocardiography changes evolved, or stress testing results were positive. (aafp.org)
  • Blood thinners (antiplatelet drugs) are used to treat and prevent unstable angina. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Aside from a physical examination, your doctor will run other tests to better diagnose unstable angina. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • They may help diagnose unstable angina in the future. (blogspot.com)
  • In recent years, the pathophysiological roles of platelet activation and inflammation in unstable angina have been elucidated. (ahajournals.org)
  • In addition, H-ATPase, glycolytic genes, platelet and RBC related genes are also up-regulated in peripheral leukocytes of during unstable angina. (vixra.org)
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