Anetoderma: Benign DERMATOSIS caused by a loss of dermal ELASTIC TISSUE resulting in localized sac-like areas of flaccid skin. It can be either primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other skin conditions, PENICILLAMINE use, or premature birth.Lichen Planus: An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.Elastic Tissue: Connective tissue comprised chiefly of elastic fibers. Elastic fibers have two components: ELASTIN and MICROFIBRILS.Skin DiseasesInfant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Penicillamine: 3-Mercapto-D-valine. The most characteristic degradation product of the penicillin antibiotics. It is used as an antirheumatic and as a chelating agent in Wilson's disease.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Antibodies, Antinuclear: Autoantibodies directed against various nuclear antigens including DNA, RNA, histones, acidic nuclear proteins, or complexes of these molecular elements. Antinuclear antibodies are found in systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease.Lupus Nephritis: Glomerulonephritis associated with autoimmune disease SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS. Lupus nephritis is histologically classified into 6 classes: class I - normal glomeruli, class II - pure mesangial alterations, class III - focal segmental glomerulonephritis, class IV - diffuse glomerulonephritis, class V - diffuse membranous glomerulonephritis, and class VI - advanced sclerosing glomerulonephritis (The World Health Organization classification 1982).Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Lupus Erythematosus, Discoid: A chronic form of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, CUTANEOUS) in which the skin lesions mimic those of the systemic form but in which systemic signs are rare. It is characterized by the presence of discoid skin plaques showing varying degrees of edema, erythema, scaliness, follicular plugging, and skin atrophy. Lesions are surrounded by an elevated erythematous border. The condition typically involves the face and scalp, but widespread dissemination may occur.Cystinuria: An inherited disorder due to defective reabsorption of CYSTINE and other BASIC AMINO ACIDS by the PROXIMAL RENAL TUBULES. This form of aminoaciduria is characterized by the abnormally high urinary levels of cystine; LYSINE; ARGININE; and ORNITHINE. Mutations involve the amino acid transport protein gene SLC3A1.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Hepatolenticular Degeneration: A rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by the deposition of copper in the BRAIN; LIVER; CORNEA; and other organs. It is caused by defects in the ATP7B gene encoding copper-transporting ATPase 2 (EC 3.6.3.4), also known as the Wilson disease protein. The overload of copper inevitably leads to progressive liver and neurological dysfunction such as LIVER CIRRHOSIS; TREMOR; ATAXIA and intellectual deterioration. Hepatic dysfunction may precede neurologic dysfunction by several years.Gold Sodium Thiomalate: A variable mixture of the mono- and disodium salts of gold thiomalic acid used mainly for its anti-inflammatory action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is most effective in active progressive rheumatoid arthritis and of little or no value in the presence of extensive deformities or in the treatment of other forms of arthritis.Drug Eruptions: Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).Antibodies, Antiphospholipid: Autoantibodies directed against phospholipids. These antibodies are characteristically found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; related autoimmune diseases, some non-autoimmune diseases, and also in healthy individuals.Morning Sickness: Symptoms of NAUSEA and VOMITING in pregnant women that usually occur in the morning during the first 2 to 3 months of PREGNANCY. Severe persistent vomiting during pregnancy is called HYPEREMESIS GRAVIDARUM.Physician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Antibodies, Anticardiolipin: Antiphospholipid antibodies found in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; and in a variety of other diseases as well as in healthy individuals. The antibodies are detected by solid-phase IMMUNOASSAY employing the purified phospholipid antigen CARDIOLIPIN.beta 2-Glycoprotein I: A 44-kDa highly glycosylated plasma protein that binds phospholipids including CARDIOLIPIN; APOLIPOPROTEIN E RECEPTOR; membrane phospholipids, and other anionic phospholipid-containing moieties. It plays a role in coagulation and apoptotic processes. Formerly known as apolipoprotein H, it is an autoantigen in patients with ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES.Nurse Practitioners: Nurses who are specially trained to assume an expanded role in providing medical care under the supervision of a physician.Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor: An antiphospholipid antibody found in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; and in a variety of other diseases as well as in healthy individuals. In vitro, the antibody interferes with the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin and prolongs the partial thromboplastin time. In vivo, it exerts a procoagulant effect resulting in thrombosis mainly in the larger veins and arteries. It further causes obstetrical complications, including fetal death and spontaneous abortion, as well as a variety of hematologic and neurologic complications.Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome: Clinically atypical nevi (usually exceeding 5 mm in diameter and having variable pigmentation and ill defined borders) with an increased risk for development of non-familial cutaneous malignant melanoma. Biopsies show melanocytic dysplasia. Nevi are clinically and histologically identical to the precursor lesions for melanoma in the B-K mole syndrome. (Stedman, 25th ed)Nevus, Pigmented: A nevus containing melanin. The term is usually restricted to nevocytic nevi (round or oval collections of melanin-containing nevus cells occurring at the dermoepidermal junction of the skin or in the dermis proper) or moles, but may be applied to other pigmented nevi.Nevus: A circumscribed stable malformation of the skin and occasionally of the oral mucosa, which is not due to external causes and therefore presumed to be of hereditary origin.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Nevus of Ota: A macular lesion on the side of the FACE, involving the CONJUNCTIVA and EYELIDS, as well as the adjacent facial skin, SCLERA; OCULOMOTOR MUSCLES; and PERIOSTEUM. Histological features vary from those of a MONGOLIAN SPOT to those of a BLUE NEVUS.Microsporidia, Unclassified: Includes newly defined organisms as well as some that will never be classified to the genus and/or species level because of loss of the specimen or other information.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.

Circumscribed lenticular anetoderma in an HIV-infected man with a history of syphilis and lichen planus. (1/3)

Anetoderma is an uncommon dermatosis that manifests as discrete foci of well-circumscribed, atrophic skin. The condition can be idiopathic or can be secondary to a number of associated cutaneous diseases. Whereas the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown, anetoderma results from diminished elastic fibers in the dermis. We present an unusual case of localized, lenticular anetoderma in a man with HIV, a history of syphilis, and lichen planus. Both of these infections have been associated with anetoderma. Although his lesions are vaguely reminiscent of a variant of syphilitic anetoderma described in the 1930s, they are confined to a smaller anatomic distribution, differ in size, and have a papular appearance. As anetoderma can develop in the context of infectious disease, a diagnosis of anetoderma should trigger a thorough examination and evaluation for treatable concomitant illnesses.  (+info)

Papillary dermal elastosis. (2/3)

There are numerous acquired disorders of elastic tissue that are distinguished by a combination of clinical appearance, location, gender, age of onset, and characteristic histopathologic findings. We present a case of a 36-year-old man with multiple confluent, hypopigmented papules that coalesced into plaques with prominent follicular ostia over the dorsal aspects of the forearms, shoulders, upper chest, and upper back. Histologically there was selective loss of papillary dermal elastic fibers. The clinical and histopathologic findings in this case are consistent with an acquired disorder of elastic tissue which we believe represents the second reported case of papillary dermal elastosis.  (+info)

Anetoderma secondary to antiphospholipid antibodies. (3/3)

Anetoderma is an elastolytic disorder that is associated with a number of infectious and autoimmune disorders. We present a case of a patient with generalized anetoderma, who was later found to have positive antinuclear antibodies and antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs). Numerous other cases have been reported in literature and some authors have suggested that anetoderma is a highly specific sign of APAs, with or without other manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome [14]. Thus, work up for connective-tissue disorders should be considered in any patients who present with this skin finding.  (+info)

*Pseudomelanoma

The second issue with the shave excision is fat herniation, iatrogenic anetoderma, and hypertrophic scarring. As the deep shave ...

*Skin biopsy

The second issue with the shave excision is fat herniation, iatrogenic anetoderma, and hypertrophic scarring. As the deep shave ...

*LTBP1 (gene)

... accumulation in actinic damage and absence in anetoderma". Br. J. Dermatol. 137 (1): 51-58. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1997. ...

*ICD-10 Chapter XII: Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue

Anetoderma of Schweninger-Buzzi (L90.2) Anetoderma of Jadassohn-Pellizzari (L90.3) Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini (L90.4) ...

*List of cutaneous conditions

Anetoderma (anetoderma maculosa, anetoderma maculosa cutis, atrophia maculosa cutis, macular atrophy) Blepharochalasis Cutis ... Elastosis perforans serpiginosa Homocystinuria Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma Linear focal elastosis (elastotic striae) Loeys- ... Reactive perforating collagenosis Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma Sclerotic fibroma Striae atrophicans Striae distensae Ullrich ...

*Anetoderma

... comes in three types: Primary anetoderma Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma is a benign condition with focal loss of ... Anetoderma (also known as "Anetoderma maculosa," "Anetoderma maculosa cutis," "Atrophia maculosa cutis," and "Macular atrophy ... Secondary anetoderma Familial anetoderma List of cutaneous conditions Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L ... Jadassohn-Pellizzari is one of two major classifications of primary anetoderma, the other being Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. ...

*Anetoderma

... Other names. (Anetoderma maculosa,[1] Anetoderma maculosa cutis,[1] Atrophia maculosa cutis,[1] and Macular atrophy ... Anetoderma comes in three types: *Primary anetoderma *Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma is a benign condition with focal loss of ... the other being Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. The difference between the two is that Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma is ... Anetoderma is a localized laxity of the skin with herniation or outpouching resulting from abnormal dermal elastic tissue.[2] ...

*Keloid

Anetoderma *Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. *Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma. *Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini ...

*തൊലിയിലെ അൾസർ - വിക്കിപീഡിയ

Anetoderma *Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. *Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma. *Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini ...
Isolated, small lesions of anetoderma presenting at birth have been reported in twins born at 25 weeks of gestational age. We report the first case of widespread congenital anetoderma occurring in an infant born at 24 weeks of gestation weighing 640
Anetoderma: Benign DERMATOSIS caused by a loss of dermal ELASTIC TISSUE resulting in localized sac-like areas of flaccid skin. It can be either primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other skin conditions, PENICILLAMINE use, or premature birth.
Humorous views on interesting, bizarre and amusing articles, submitted by a community of millions of news junkies, with regular Photoshop contests.
我々の皮膚は常に外界からの様々な刺激にさらされている.その刺激の代表的なものとして太陽光線中の紫外線があげられる.紫外線は皮膚癌の発生の誘因となる他に,紫外線の曝露により皮膚には光老化と称される変化が生じてくる.光老化の特徴的な変化として皮膚表面のびまん性の色素沈着と深い皺があげられるが,その変化を特徴づけるものとして皮膚真皮におけるsolar elastosisと称される膠原線維・弾性線維の変化がある.この皮膚光老化には紫外線による酸化ストレスが深く関与していると考えられている.一方,酸化ストレスが関与する全身疾患の一つとしてとして全身性強皮症(systemic sclerosis ; ...

Anetoderma - WikipediaAnetoderma - Wikipedia

Anetoderma comes in three types: Primary anetoderma Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma is a benign condition with focal loss of ... Anetoderma (also known as "Anetoderma maculosa," "Anetoderma maculosa cutis," "Atrophia maculosa cutis," and "Macular atrophy ... Secondary anetoderma Familial anetoderma List of cutaneous conditions Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L ... Jadassohn-Pellizzari is one of two major classifications of primary anetoderma, the other being Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anetoderma

Anetoderma - WikipediaAnetoderma - Wikipedia

Anetoderma. Other names. (Anetoderma maculosa,[1] Anetoderma maculosa cutis,[1] Atrophia maculosa cutis,[1] and Macular atrophy ... Anetoderma comes in three types: *Primary anetoderma *Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma is a benign condition with focal loss of ... the other being Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. The difference between the two is that Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma is ... Anetoderma is a localized laxity of the skin with herniation or outpouching resulting from abnormal dermal elastic tissue.[2] ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadassohn%E2%80%93Pellizzari_anetoderma

Congenital anetoderma in a preterm infant.Congenital anetoderma in a preterm infant.

We report the first case of widespread congenital anetoderma occurring in an infant born at 24 weeks of gestation weighing 640 ... small lesions of anetoderma presenting at birth have been reported in twins born at 25 weeks of gestational age. ... Isolated, small lesions of anetoderma presenting at birth have been reported in twins born at 25 weeks of gestational age. We ... report the first case of widespread congenital anetoderma occurring in an infant born at 24 weeks of gestation weighing 640 g ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Congenital-anetoderma-in-preterm-infant/19067869.html

Anetoderma
     Summary Report | CureHunterAnetoderma Summary Report | CureHunter

Anetoderma: Benign DERMATOSIS caused by a loss of dermal ELASTIC TISSUE resulting in localized sac-like areas of flaccid skin. ... Anetoderma. Subscribe to New Research on Anetoderma Benign DERMATOSIS caused by a loss of dermal ELASTIC TISSUE resulting in ... Primary Anetoderma; Primary Anetodermas; Secondary Anetoderma; Secondary Anetodermas; Anetoderma, Primary ... Drugs and Important Biological Agents (IBA) related to Anetoderma: 1. AntibodiesIBA 01/01/1995 - "The finding of anetoderma in ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD057088-Anetoderma.do

Primary anetoderma with undifferentiated connective tissue diseasePrimary anetoderma with undifferentiated connective tissue disease

Although the histopathologyof her axillary lesions was consistent with anetoderma, her clinical presentation is unusual given ... Anetoderma is a rare benign elastolytic disorder that is characterized by focal loss of elastin fibers on histopathology and is ... Anetoderma is a rare benign elastolytic disorder that is characterized by focal loss of elastin fibers on histopathology and is ... Although the histopathologyof her axillary lesions was consistent with anetoderma, her clinical presentation is unusual given ...
more infohttps://escholarship.org/uc/item/57z528kx

Anetoderma  =ضمور الجلد البقعيAnetoderma =ضمور الجلد البقعي

Anetoderma is rare, but the incidence is unknown. Anetoderma has been reported in several hundred cases since the original ... The pathogenesis of anetoderma is unknown. The key defect is damage to the dermal elastic fibers. Anetoderma might be ... Primary anetoderma occurs when there is no underlying associated skin disease (i.e., it arises on clinically normal skin). It ... True secondary anetoderma implies that the characteristic atrophic lesion has appeared in the exact same site as a previous ...
more infohttps://www.dermaamin.com/site/atlas-of-dermatology/1-a/98-anetoderma-.html

Post-traumatic arthritis in patient with Jadassohns anetoderma
							| Reumatismo
			Post-traumatic arthritis in patient with Jadassohn's anetoderma | Reumatismo

... in a young man with clinical and histopathologic features of primary anetoderma (Jadassohn type) of 13 years duration. ... Post-traumatic arthritis in patient with Jadassohns anetoderma DOI https://doi.org/10.4081/reumatismo.2003.48 ... Post-traumatic arthritis in patient with Jadassohns anetoderma. Reumatismo, 55(1), 48-51. https://doi.org/10.4081/reumatismo. ...
more infohttps://www.reumatismo.org/index.php/reuma/article/view/reumatismo.2003.48

Differential Diagnosis: Arm, Multiple skin lesionsDifferential Diagnosis: Arm, Multiple skin lesions

You can now download VisualDx for your iOS and Android devices. Launch the VisualDx app from your device and sign in using your VisualDx personal account username and password.. ...
more infohttps://www.visualdx.com/visualdx/differential/arm/multiple%20skin%20lesions?moduleId=100&findingId=1216,25221&reqFId=1216

Nihal M[au] - PubMed - NCBINihal M[au] - PubMed - NCBI

Anetoderma arising in cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disease.. Kasper RC, Wood GS, Nihal M, LeBoit PE. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Nihal+M%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50

DailyMed - CUPRIMINE- penicillamine capsuleDailyMed - CUPRIMINE- penicillamine capsule

... anetoderma (cutaneous macular atrophy); and Goodpastures syndrome, a severe and ultimately fatal glomerulonephritis associated ...
more infohttps://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=80e736d3-2017-4d68-94b4-38255c3c59c6

Pseudomelanoma - WikipediaPseudomelanoma - Wikipedia

The second issue with the shave excision is fat herniation, iatrogenic anetoderma, and hypertrophic scarring. As the deep shave ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudomelanoma

Dermatologic Manifestations of Juvenile Xanthogranuloma: Background, Pathophysiology, EpidemiologyDermatologic Manifestations of Juvenile Xanthogranuloma: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology

Hyperpigmentation, mild atrophy, or anetoderma may persist.. Lesions can recur after resection. The relapse rate is ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1111629-overview

Sclerodactyly | Technology TrendsSclerodactyly | Technology Trends

Anetoderma *Schweninger-Buzzi anetoderma. *Jadassohn-Pellizzari anetoderma. *Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini ...
more infohttp://www.primidi.com/sclerodactyly

Elastolysis | definition of elastolysis by Medical dictionaryElastolysis | definition of elastolysis by Medical dictionary

The differential diagnoses mainly include anetoderma, mid-dermal elastolysis, focal dermal hypoplasia, lupus panniculitis, and ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/elastolysis

Atrophoderma | definition of atrophoderma by Medical dictionaryAtrophoderma | definition of atrophoderma by Medical dictionary

The clinical differential diagnosis includes aplasia cutis, anetoderma and atrophoderma, and atrophic DFSP.. Cutaneous and ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/atrophoderma

Dermatofibroma PresentationDermatofibroma Presentation

It may be confused with a scar, basal cell carcinoma or anetoderma. ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/health/Dermatofibroma-Presentation.aspx

Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome - The Clinical AdvisorAntiphospholipid antibody syndrome - The Clinical Advisor

anetoderma-like lesions. Catastrophic APS (CAPS) is a rare (1%) but very serious presentation of APS, which results in ...
more infohttp://www.clinicaladvisor.com/dermatology/antiphospholipid-antibody-syndrome/article/593082/

Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome - Oncology Nurse AdvisorAntiphospholipid antibody syndrome - Oncology Nurse Advisor

anetoderma-like lesions. Catastrophic APS (CAPS) is a rare (1%) but very serious presentation of APS, which results in ...
more infohttps://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/home/decision-support-in-medicine/dermatology/antiphospholipid-antibody-syndrome-2/

Nadolol Versus Propranolol in Children With Infantile Hemangiomas - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govNadolol Versus Propranolol in Children With Infantile Hemangiomas - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Percentage of patients with residual changes (telangiectasias, discoloration, fibro-fatty changes, anetoderma) [ Time Frame: 52 ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02505971

Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD)Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD)

Case Report: Primary anetoderma with undifferentiated connective tissue disease. The diagnosticuncertainty of this case led to ...
more infohttps://www.sclero.org/scleroderma/types/systemic/overlap/undifferentiated-connective-tissue-disease/a-to-z.html

2018/2019 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code L90.6: Striae atrophicae2018/2019 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code L90.6: Striae atrophicae

L90.1 Anetoderma of Schweninger-Buzzi L90.2 Anetoderma of Jadassohn-Pellizzari L90.3 Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini ...
more infohttps://www.icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/L00-L99/L80-L99/L90-/L90.6
  • Although most cases are sporadic, rare cases of familial anetoderma have been recently described and are usually not associated with preexisting lesions. (dermaamin.com)
  • Various autoimmune ocular bony botched fat grafting jobs highly phenotypically variable disease anetoderma including the familial. (gillbergdesign.com)
  • Her skin lesions began to slowly fade 6 years after disease onset, eventually resolving spontaneously and completely, but leaving an atrophic scar, frank anetoderma, and persisting diabetes insipidus. (figshare.com)
  • We present a typical case of anetoderma which was observed in a 34-year-old male who presented with one-year history of increasing in number of well-circumscribed, normal skin-colored, soft bladder-like pouches over the back and some atrophic patches on bilateral flexor aspect of the forearms. (dermatol-sinica.com)
  • The second issue with the shave excision is fat herniation, iatrogenic anetoderma, and hypertrophic scarring. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congenital anetoderma in a preterm infant. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We report the first case of widespread congenital anetoderma occurring in an infant born at 24 weeks of gestation weighing 640 g and discuss the potential factors in its etiology. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Perivascular lymphocytes are often present in all types of anetoderma and do not correlate with clinical inflammatory findings. (dermaamin.com)
  • It may be confused with a scar, basal cell carcinoma or anetoderma. (news-medical.net)
  • Although the histopathologyof her axillary lesions was consistent with anetoderma, her clinical presentation is unusual given the extent of involvement, reported pain and pruritus, and sharp demarcation of the distribution. (escholarship.org)
  • Anetoderma might be considered to be unusual scars, because scars also have decreased elastic tissue. (dermaamin.com)
  • All types of anetoderma are characterized by a circumscribed loss of normal skin elasticity. (dermaamin.com)
  • Association of anetoderma with hepatitis B vaccination is speculated here, as suggested by history of vaccination two weeks prior to the onset of skin eruption and ruling out other possible causes of anetoderma. (medscienceresearch.com)
  • pits, dimples), anetoderma (localised loss of elastic tissue presenting as a soft protuberance), bleeding, infection, calcified nodules and aplasia cutis (absence of skin). (spotidoc.com)
  • Anetoderma must be differentiated from other disorders of elastic tissue as well as atrophies of the connective tissue. (dermaamin.com)
  • Anetoderma has been reported in several hundred cases since the original report. (dermaamin.com)
  • Anetoderma is rare, but the incidence is unknown. (dermaamin.com)