Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Blast Injuries: Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: Chronic refractory anemia with granulocytopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. Myeloblasts and progranulocytes constitute 5 to 40 percent of the nucleated marrow cells.Anemia, Refractory: A severe sometimes chronic anemia, usually macrocytic in type, that does not respond to ordinary antianemic therapy.Fanconi Anemia: Congenital disorder affecting all bone marrow elements, resulting in ANEMIA; LEUKOPENIA; and THROMBOPENIA, and associated with cardiac, renal, and limb malformations as well as dermal pigmentary changes. Spontaneous CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE is a feature of this disease along with predisposition to LEUKEMIA. There are at least 7 complementation groups in Fanconi anemia: FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227650, August 20, 2004)Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Anemia, Hypochromic: Anemia characterized by a decrease in the ratio of the weight of hemoglobin to the volume of the erythrocyte, i.e., the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is less than normal. The individual cells contain less hemoglobin than they could have under optimal conditions. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by iron deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, lead poisoning, and other conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Miale, Laboratory Medicine: Hematology, 6th ed, p393)Anemia, Macrocytic: Anemia characterized by larger than normal erythrocytes, increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH).Anemia, Pernicious: A megaloblastic anemia occurring in children but more commonly in later life, characterized by histamine-fast achlorhydria, in which the laboratory and clinical manifestations are based on malabsorption of vitamin B 12 due to a failure of the gastric mucosa to secrete adequate and potent intrinsic factor. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anemia, Sideroblastic: Anemia characterized by the presence of erythroblasts containing excessive deposits of iron in the marrow.Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.Refractory Period, Electrophysiological: The period of time following the triggering of an ACTION POTENTIAL when the CELL MEMBRANE has changed to an unexcitable state and is gradually restored to the resting (excitable) state. During the absolute refractory period no other stimulus can trigger a response. This is followed by the relative refractory period during which the cell gradually becomes more excitable and the stronger impulse that is required to illicit a response gradually lessens to that required during the resting state.Anemia, Megaloblastic: A disorder characterized by the presence of ANEMIA, abnormally large red blood cells (megalocytes or macrocytes), and MEGALOBLASTS.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Infectious Anemia Virus, Equine: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus equine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, EQUINE), causing acute and chronic infection in horses. It is transmitted mechanically by biting flies, mosquitoes, and midges, and iatrogenically through unsterilized equipment. Chronic infection often consists of acute episodes with remissions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital: Hemolytic anemia due to various intrinsic defects of the erythrocyte.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Equine Infectious Anemia: Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.Chicken anemia virus: The type species of GYROVIRUS, a small, non-enveloped DNA virus originally isolated from contaminated vaccines in Japan. It causes chicken infectious anemia and may possibly play a key role in hemorrhagic anemia syndrome, anemia dermatitis, and blue wing disease.Anemia, Dyserythropoietic, Congenital: A familial disorder characterized by ANEMIA with multinuclear ERYTHROBLASTS, karyorrhexis, asynchrony of nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation, and various nuclear abnormalities of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors (ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS). Type II is the most common of the 3 types; it is often referred to as HEMPAS, based on the Hereditary Erythroblast Multinuclearity with Positive Acidified Serum test.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Anemia, Diamond-Blackfan: A rare congenital hypoplastic anemia that usually presents early in infancy. The disease is characterized by a moderate to severe macrocytic anemia, occasional neutropenia or thrombocytosis, a normocellular bone marrow with erythroid hypoplasia, and an increased risk of developing leukemia. (Curr Opin Hematol 2000 Mar;7(2):85-94)Leukemia, Myeloid: Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins: A diverse group of proteins whose genetic MUTATIONS have been associated with the chromosomal instability syndrome FANCONI ANEMIA. Many of these proteins play important roles in protecting CELLS against OXIDATIVE STRESS.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Anemia, Neonatal: The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Hematinics: Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that regulates the activities of CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE and GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE. It is found predominately in the CYTOPLASM, but moves to the CELL NUCLEUS in response to FANCE PROTEIN.Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group D2 Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that undergoes mono-ubiquitination by FANCL PROTEIN in response to DNA DAMAGE. Also, in response to IONIZING RADIATION it can undergo PHOSPHORYLATION by ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein. Modified FANCD2 interacts with BRCA2 PROTEIN in a stable complex with CHROMATIN, and it is involved in DNA REPAIR by homologous RECOMBINATION.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group A Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that is the most commonly mutated protein in FANCONI ANEMIA. It undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by PROTEIN KINASE B and forms a complex with FANCC PROTEIN in the CELL NUCLEUS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Erythrocyte Count: The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital Nonspherocytic: Any one of a group of congenital hemolytic anemias in which there is no abnormal hemoglobin or spherocytosis and in which there is a defect of glycolysis in the erythrocyte. Common causes include deficiencies in GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE; PYRUVATE KINASE; and GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE.Pallor: A clinical manifestation consisting of an unnatural paleness of the skin.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Erythrocyte Indices: ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).ExplosionsHemoglobinometry: Measurement of hemoglobin concentration in blood.Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive: Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Leukemia, Lymphoid: Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived: Antibodies obtained from a single clone of cells grown in mice or rats.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Thalidomide: A piperidinyl isoindole originally introduced as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, but withdrawn from the market due to teratogenic effects. It has been reintroduced and used for a number of immunological and inflammatory disorders. Thalidomide displays immunosuppressive and anti-angiogenic activity. It inhibits release of TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA from monocytes, and modulates other cytokine action.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group G Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE during MITOSIS. It forms a complex with other FANCONI ANEMIA PROTEINS and helps protect CELLS from DNA DAMAGE by genotoxic agents.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Reticulocyte Count: The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Iron Compounds: Organic and inorganic compounds that contain iron as an integral part of the molecule.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Hepcidins: Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Maximum Tolerated Dose: The highest dose of a biologically active agent given during a chronic study that will not reduce longevity from effects other than carcinogenicity. (from Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Erythrocytes, Abnormal: Oxygen-carrying RED BLOOD CELLS in mammalian blood that are abnormal in structure or function.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Vidarabine: A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.Boronic Acids: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain the basic structure RB(OH)2.PyrazinesSequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Splenomegaly: Enlargement of the spleen.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Refractory Period, Psychological: A delayed response interval occurring when two stimuli are presented in close succession.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Erythroblasts: Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Arabinonucleosides: Nucleosides containing arabinose as their sugar moiety.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Erythrocyte Aging: The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Vitamin B 12 Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN B 12 in the diet, characterized by megaloblastic anemia. Since vitamin B 12 is not present in plants, humans have obtained their supply from animal products, from multivitamin supplements in the form of pills, and as additives to food preparations. A wide variety of neuropsychiatric abnormalities is also seen in vitamin B 12 deficiency and appears to be due to an undefined defect involving myelin synthesis. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p848)beta-Thalassemia: A disorder characterized by reduced synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. There is retardation of hemoglobin A synthesis in the heterozygous form (thalassemia minor), which is asymptomatic, while in the homozygous form (thalassemia major, Cooley's anemia, Mediterranean anemia, erythroblastic anemia), which can result in severe complications and even death, hemoglobin A synthesis is absent.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Benzamides: BENZOIC ACID amides.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Pyrimidines: A family of 6-membered heterocyclic compounds occurring in nature in a wide variety of forms. They include several nucleic acid constituents (CYTOSINE; THYMINE; and URACIL) and form the basic structure of the barbiturates.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Bone Marrow DiseasesLeukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Isavirus: A genus in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE containing one species: Infectious salmon anemia virus.Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Thalassemia: A group of hereditary hemolytic anemias in which there is decreased synthesis of one or more hemoglobin polypeptide chains. There are several genetic types with clinical pictures ranging from barely detectable hematologic abnormality to severe and fatal anemia.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.PiperazinesT-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Bombs: A weapon designed to explode when deployed. It frequently refers to a hollow case filled with EXPLOSIVE AGENTS.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Phenylhydrazines: Diazo derivatives of aniline, used as a reagent for sugars, ketones, and aldehydes. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pain, Intractable: Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.Erythroid Precursor Cells: The cells in the erythroid series derived from MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS or from the bi-potential MEGAKARYOCYTE-ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS which eventually give rise to mature RED BLOOD CELLS. The erythroid progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by ERYTHROPOIETIN, and then further differentiate into ERYTHROBLASTS when stimulated by other factors.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Granulocytes: Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Fetal Hemoglobin: The major component of hemoglobin in the fetus. This HEMOGLOBIN has two alpha and two gamma polypeptide subunits in comparison to normal adult hemoglobin, which has two alpha and two beta polypeptide subunits. Fetal hemoglobin concentrations can be elevated (usually above 0.5%) in children and adults affected by LEUKEMIA and several types of ANEMIA.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group F Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein. It is an essential component of a nuclear core complex that protects the GENOME against CHROMOSOMAL INSTABILITY. It interacts directly with FANCG PROTEIN and helps stabilize a complex with FANCA PROTEIN and FANCC PROTEIN.Colony-Forming Units Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group E Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that interacts with FANCC PROTEIN and FANCD2 PROTEIN. It promotes the accumulation of FANCC protein in the CELL NUCLEUS.Dexamethasone: An anti-inflammatory 9-fluoro-glucocorticoid.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Epilepsies, Partial: Conditions characterized by recurrent paroxysmal neuronal discharges which arise from a focal region of the brain. Partial seizures are divided into simple and complex, depending on whether consciousness is unaltered (simple partial seizure) or disturbed (complex partial seizure). Both types may feature a wide variety of motor, sensory, and autonomic symptoms. Partial seizures may be classified by associated clinical features or anatomic location of the seizure focus. A secondary generalized seizure refers to a partial seizure that spreads to involve the brain diffusely. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317)Folic Acid Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of FOLIC ACID in the diet. Many plant and animal tissues contain folic acid, abundant in green leafy vegetables, yeast, liver, and mushrooms but destroyed by long-term cooking. Alcohol interferes with its intermediate metabolism and absorption. Folic acid deficiency may develop in long-term anticonvulsant therapy or with use of oral contraceptives. This deficiency causes anemia, macrocytic anemia, and megaloblastic anemia. It is indistinguishable from vitamin B 12 deficiency in peripheral blood and bone marrow findings, but the neurologic lesions seen in B 12 deficiency do not occur. (Merck Manual, 16th ed)Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3: A 67-kDa sialic acid binding lectin that is specific for MYELOID CELLS and MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGE PRECURSOR CELLS. This protein is the smallest siglec subtype and contains a single immunoglobulin C2-set domain. It may play a role in intracellular signaling via its interaction with SHP-1 PROTEIN-TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE and SHP-2 PROTEIN-TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE.Idarubicin: An orally administered anthracycline antineoplastic. The compound has shown activity against BREAST NEOPLASMS; LYMPHOMA; and LEUKEMIA.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Iron Overload: An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)Vitamin B 12: A cobalt-containing coordination compound produced by intestinal micro-organisms and found also in soil and water. Higher plants do not concentrate vitamin B 12 from the soil and so are a poor source of the substance as compared with animal tissues. INTRINSIC FACTOR is important for the assimilation of vitamin B 12.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl: Translation products of a fusion gene derived from CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION of C-ABL GENES to the genetic locus of the breakpoint cluster region gene on chromosome 22. Several different variants of the bcr-abl fusion proteins occur depending upon the precise location of the chromosomal breakpoint. These variants can be associated with distinct subtypes of leukemias such as PRECURSOR CELL LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA-LYMPHOMA; LEUKEMIA, MYELOGENOUS, CHRONIC, BCR-ABL POSITIVE; and NEUTROPHILIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC.Piracetam: A compound suggested to be both a nootropic and a neuroprotective agent.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Receptors, Transferrin: Membrane glycoproteins found in high concentrations on iron-utilizing cells. They specifically bind iron-bearing transferrin, are endocytosed with its ligand and then returned to the cell surface where transferrin without its iron is released.Ferrous Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain divalent iron.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).LeukopeniaSoftware: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.

Human herpes virus-6 seroprevalence and leukaemias: a case-control study. GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell' Adulto). (1/109)

The relationships between acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and refractory anaemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) and human herpes virus (HHV)-6 antibody level were investigated in a multicentre case-control study. An association between increased HHV-6 seropositivity and geometric mean titre ratio with AML was shown: P for trend = 0.022, adjusted odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.33 respectively. No association was found between HHV-6 and ALL, CML or RAEB.  (+info)

A new recurrent translocation, t(5;11)(q35;p15.5), associated with del(5q) in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. The UK Cancer Cytogenetics Group (UKCCG) (2/109)

Partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the cytogenetic hallmark of the 5q-syndrome, a distinct subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome-refractory anemia (MDS-RA). Deletions of 5q also occur in the full spectrum of other de novo and therapy-related MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) types, most often in association with other chromosome abnormalities. However, the loss of genetic material from 5q is believed to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of all del(5q) disorders. In the present study, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies using a chromosome 5-specific whole chromosome painting probe and a 5q subtelomeric probe to determine the incidence of cryptic translocations. We studied archival fixed chromosome suspensions from 36 patients with myeloid disorders (predominantly MDS and AML) and del(5q) as the sole abnormality. In 3 AML patients studied, this identified a translocation of 5q subtelomeric sequences from the del(5q) to the short arm of an apparently normal chromosome 11. FISH with chromosome 11-specific subtelomeric probes confirmed the presence of 11p on the shortened 5q. Further FISH mapping confirmed that the 5q and 11p translocation breakpoints were the same in all 3 cases, between the nucleophosmin (NPM1) and fms-related tyrosine kinase 4 (FLT4) genes on 5q35 and the Harvey ras-1-related gene complex (HRC) and the radixin pseudogene (RDPX1) on 11p15.5. Importantly, all 3 patients with the cryptic t(5;11) were children: a total of 3 of 4 AML children studied. Two were classified as AML-M2 and the third was classified as M4. All 3 responded poorly to treatment and had short survival times, ranging from 10 to 18 months. Although del(5q) is rare in childhood AML, this study indicates that, within this subgroup, the incidence of cryptic t(5;11) may be high. It is significant that none of the 24 MDS patients studied, including 11 confirmed as having 5q-syndrome, had the translocation. Therefore, this appears to be a new nonrandom chromosomal translocation, specifically associated with childhood AML with a differentiated blast cell phenotype and the presence of a del(5q).  (+info)

Prognostic significance of magnetic resonance imaging of femoral marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. (3/109)

PURPOSE: To investigate whether the abnormalities observed on femoral marrow magnetic resonance images are related to the development of leukemia and survival of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The findings on magnetic resonance images of the femoral marrow were evaluated over periods of 1 to 92 months (median, 18 months) in 42 consecutive adult patients with newly diagnosed MDS. Magnetic resonance images were obtained by the T1-weighted spin echo method and the short T1 inversion recovery technique. RESULTS: Magnetic resonance images showed that the femoral marrow patterns changed from fatty, faint, or nodular to scattered or uniform as the disease progressed. Development of acute myeloid leukemia was observed in only 13 patients whose marrow exhibited a scattered or uniform pattern. The overall survival of the 29 patients with a scattered or uniform marrow pattern was significantly shorter than that of the 13 patients with a fatty, faint, or nodular marrow pattern (10.7% v 73.3% at 7 years; P < .01). The period of leukemia-free survival was also significantly shorter in the patients with a scattered or uniform marrow pattern versus a fatty, faint, or nodular pattern (37.7% v 100% at 7 years; P < .01). CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance images of the femoral marrow can provide valuable information for assessing the prognosis and determining the most appropriate management of patients with MDS.  (+info)

Topotecan and cytarabine is an active combination regimen in myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. (4/109)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination of topotecan and cytarabine in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-nine patients with MDSs and 27 with CMML were enrolled. They were either previously untreated (66%) or had received only biologic agents (14%) or chemotherapy with or without biologic agents (20%). Treatment consisted of topotecan 1.25 mg/m(2) by continuous intravenous infusion daily for 5 days and cytarabine 1. 0 g/m(2) by infusion over 2 hours daily for 5 days. Prophylaxis included antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral agents. At a median follow-up of 7 months, all 86 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. RESULTS: Complete remission (CR) was observed in 48 patients (56%; 61% with MDSs, 44% with CMML; P =.15). Similar CR rates were observed for patients with good-risk and poor-risk MDS (70% and 56%, respectively). The treatment effectively induced CR in patients with a poor-prognosis karyotype involving chromosomes 5 and 7 (CR, 71%) and secondary MDSs (CR, 72%). Fifty-four patients received one induction course, 25 patients received two, and the rest received more than two. The median number of continuation courses was two. The median overall duration of CR was 34 weeks (50 weeks for MDSs and 33 weeks for CMML). The median survival was 60 weeks for MDS and 44 weeks for CMML patients. CR and survival durations were longer in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB). Grade 3 or 4 mucositis or diarrhea was observed in three patients each. Fever was observed in 63%, and infections in 49% of patients. Six patients (7%) died during induction therapy. CONCLUSION: Topotecan and cytarabine induced high CR rates in unselected patients with MDSs and CMML, particularly among patients with poor-prognosis cytogenetics and secondary MDSs. Topotecan-cytarabine is an active induction regimen in MDS and CMML patients, is well tolerated, and is associated with a low mortality rate.  (+info)

Effect of time to complete remission on subsequent survival and disease-free survival time in AML, RAEB-t, and RAEB. (5/109)

The authors examined the relationship between the time required to enter complete remission (CR) after a first course of chemotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML), refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEB-t), or refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB). They also examined subsequent survival time and disease-free survival time after accounting for cytogenetic status, age, and treatment. The data set consisted of 1101 patients with these diagnoses treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1980 and 1996 for whom outcomes were established after first-course therapy. Of the 1101 patients, 740 (67%) were in CR after this time; 508 of these 740 (69%) have died (80% had disease recurrence before death). The authors used the parametric model of Shen and Thall to estimate, in particular, T(C) (time to CR), T(C,D) (time from CR to death = residual survival after CR), and T(C,R) (residual disease-free survival [DFS] after CR) as functions of the covariates noted above and to estimate the dependence of T(C,D) and T(C,R) on T(C). There was a strong inverse association between T(C) and both T(C,D) and T(C,R) (P <.001 for both) that was independent of cytogenetic status, age, or treatment. The residual survival time of patients who required >50 days to enter CR was closer to the residual survival time of resistant patients than to that of patients known to be in CR within approximately 30 days of the start of treatment. Time to CR is an independent predictor of residual survival and disease-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed AML who achieve CR after 1 course of chemotherapy. (Blood. 2000;95:72-77)  (+info)

Successful peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome. (6/109)

Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene expression is increased in patients with leukemia as well as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and is useful for detection of minimal residual disease (MRD). A 47-year-old man given a diagnosis of refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-T) received myeloablative therapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). MRD by WT1 expression was not detected in the graft. The patient has been in CR for 25 months after PBSCT. These observations suggest that PBSCT is feasible for patients with RAEB-T and analysis of WT1 expression can be applied for patients with high risk MDS.  (+info)

Allogeneic and syngeneic marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome in patients 55 to 66 years of age. (7/109)

We carried out bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who were 55.3 to 66.2 years of age (median, 58.8 years). According to the criteria of the French-American-British (FAB) classification, 13 patients had refractory anemia (RA), 19 had RA with excess blasts (RAEB), 16 had RAEB in transformation or acute myelogenous leukemia (RAEB-T/AML), and 2 had chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). According to the recently established International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), available for 45 patients, 2 patients were considered low risk; 14, intermediate 1 risk; 19, intermediate 2 risk; and 10, high risk. Conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide (CY) (120 mg/kg of body weight) plus 12-Gy fractionated total-body irradiation (FTBI) (n = 15), CY plus FTBI with lung and liver shielding (n = 4), busulfan (7 mg/kg) plus FTBI (n = 4), or busulfan (16 mg/kg) plus CY (n = 27). The busulfan-plus-CY group included 16 patients in whom busulfan was targeted to plasma levels of 600 to 900 ng/mL. In these 16 patients, steady-state levels of busulfan actually achieved were 714 to 961 ng/mL (mean +/- SD, 845 +/- 64 ng/mL; median, 838 ng/mL). The donors were HLA-identical siblings for 34 patients, HLA-nonidentical family members for 4, identical twins for 4, and unrelated volunteers for 6. All 46 patients surviving > 21 days had engraftment, and 22 patients (44%) are surviving 9 to 80 months after BMT. Specifically, among 13 patients with RA, 1 had relapse (cumulative incidence [CI] at 3 years, 8%) and 8 are surviving, for a Kaplan-Meier (KM) estimate of survival at 3 years of 59% (disease-free survival [DSF], 53%). Among 19 patients with RAEB, 3 had relapse (CI at 3 years, 16%), and 8 are surviving disease free (KM estimate at 3 years, 46%). Among 18 patients with RAEB-T/AML or CMML, 6 had relapse (CI at 3 years, 28%), and the KM estimate of DSF at 3 years is 33%. Relapse-free survival had an inverse correlation with cytogenetic risk classification and with the risk score according to the IPSS. Survival in all FAB categories was highest among patients enrolled in a protocol in which busulfan plasma levels were targeted to 600 to 900 ng/mL. These data indicate that BMT can be carried out successfully in patients with MDS who are older than 55 years of age. (Blood. 2000;95:1188-1194)  (+info)

Deletions of chromosome 5q13.3 and 17p loci cooperate in myeloid neoplasms. (8/109)

Nonrandom interstitial deletions and monosomy of chromosomes 5, 7, and 17 in refractory myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) suggest a multistep pathway that culminates in aggressive clinical course. Because cytogenetic studies frequently identify chromosome 5 and 17 deletions within a single clone, we searched for allele loss for 5q loci and TP53 gene mutations in the same leukemic samples. Cosegregating deletions of chromosomes 5 and 17 were found to specifically include the 5q13.3 interval between the loci D5S672 and D5S620/D5S626, a locus hypothesized to harbor a tumor suppressor gene(1) and the TP53 gene on 17p. A rare patient with secondary refractory MDS and an unbalanced translocation [der(5;17)], which resulted in deletions of the 5q13.3-qter and 17p loci, provided clues on the sequence of genetic alterations. Serial molecular analysis of this patient revealed a dysplastic clone with der(5;17), which gave rise to a leukemic clone on acquiring an inactivating mutation of TP53. Our findings are consistent with functional cooperation between a putative tumor suppressor gene at 5q13.3 that contributes toward the progression of early stages of MDS, and the TP53 gene when mutated, causes transformation to AML. (Blood. 2000;95:2138-2143)  (+info)

*Refractory anemia with excess of blasts

... refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, or acute myeloid leukemia [AML]) ... Refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) is a type of myelodysplastic syndrome with a marrow blast percentage of 5% to 19 ... July 2006). "An antecedent diagnosis of refractory anemia with excess blasts has no prognostic relevance in acute myeloid ...

*CD7

... can be aberrantly expressed in refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and may confer a worse prognosis. Also, a lack ... "Differences in blast immunophenotypes among disease types in myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter validation study". ...

*Auer rod

They are also used to distinguish the pre-leukemia myelodysplastic syndromes: refractory anemia with excess blasts 2 (which has ... They can be seen in the leukemic blasts of acute myeloid leukemia with maturation and acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... rods are clumps of azurophilic granular material that form elongated needles seen in the cytoplasm of myeloid leukemic blasts. ...

*International Classification of Diseases for Oncology

... anemia M9982/3 Refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts with sideroblasts M9983/3 Refractory anemia with excess blasts RAEB ... NOS Blast cell leukemia Undifferentiated leukemia Stem cell leukemia M9805/3 Acute biphenotypic leukemia Acute leukemia of ... RAEB I RAEB II M9985/3 Refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia M9986/3 Myelodysplastic syndrome associated with ... unclassifiable M9980/3 Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or Refractory ...

*Decitabine

... refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in ...

*MN1 (gene)

... bone marrow of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes with the highest expression in refractory anemia with excess of blasts ...

*List of MeSH codes (C15)

... anemia, refractory MeSH C15.378.071.400.080 --- anemia, refractory, with excess of blasts MeSH C15.378.071.419 --- anemia, ... anemia, refractory MeSH C15.378.190.625.062.080 --- anemia, refractory, with excess of blasts MeSH C15.378.190.625.070 --- ... anemia, diamond-blackfan MeSH C15.378.071.085.080.280 --- fanconi anemia MeSH C15.378.071.141 --- anemia, hemolytic MeSH ... anemia, hypochromic MeSH C15.378.071.196.300 --- anemia, iron-deficiency MeSH C15.378.071.252 --- anemia, macrocytic MeSH ...

*Sideroblastic anemia

Three forms exist and include refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS), refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts and ... Excess zinc can indirectly cause sideroblastic anemia by decreasing absorption and increasing excretion of copper. ... blast) are atypical, abnormal nucleated erythroblasts (precursors to mature red blood cells) with granules of iron accumulated ... Sideroblastic anemia or sideroachrestic anemia is a form of anemia in which the bone marrow produces ringed sideroblasts rather ...

*Iron

Medieval blast furnaces were about 10 feet (3.0 m) tall and made of fireproof brick; forced air was usually provided by hand- ... In excess carbon dioxide this forms the slightly soluble bicarbonate, which occurs commonly in groundwater, but it oxidises ... It is used to fortify foods and treat iron deficiency anemia. Iron(III) sulfate is used in settling minute sewage particles in ... Iron is the sixth most abundant element in the Universe, and the most common refractory element. Although a further tiny energy ...
OBJECTIVES:. I. Determine the maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat (SAHA) when given in combination with flavopiridol (alvocidib) in patients with advanced solid tumors.. II. Obtain preliminary data on the therapeutic activity of SAHA and flavopiridol in these patients.. III. Evaluate the role of p21, p53, and apoptotic markers relative to treatment response in patients treated with this regimen.. OUTLINE: This is a multicenter, open label, non-randomized, dose-escalation study of vorinostat (SAHA).. Before beginning course 1 of study therapy, patients receive oral SAHA on days 1-3 in order to ensure tolerability of the drug. Beginning 1 week later, patients receive oral SAHA once daily on days 1-3 and 8-10 and fixed-dose alvocidib intravenously (IV) over 1 hour on days 2 and 9. Treatment repeats every 21 days in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.. Cohorts of 3-6 patients receive escalating doses of SAHA until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is determined. The MTD is ...
[RAEB in transformation in continuing complete remission by small doses of cytarabin]. - T Yamada, N Sueoka, Y Tanabe, K Dan, S Kuriya, T Nomura, T Shiomura
Alvocidib is a synthetic flavonoid based on an extract from an Indian plant for the potential treatment of cancer. It works by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases, arresting cell division and causing apoptosis in non-small lung cancer cells.
Flavopiridol (Alvocidib)はATPと一緒に、CDKs(CDK1、CDK2、CDK4とCDK6を含める)を競争性的に抑制して、このIC50値が約40nMになりますが、CDK1、2、4と6に作用する選択性はCDK7に作用する選択性より7.5倍が高くなって、最初に発見したことは EGFRとPKAを抑制することができるということです。臨床 1/2。
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Learn in-depth information on Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts, its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, and prognosis.
Immunohistochemistry has become a very important, and in some cases indispensable, tool in diagnostic pathology, enabling the precise identification of tumours, the detection of micrometastases in a given sample, and the evaluation of various prognosis factors. However, in some cases, the use of multiple but distinct immunostains can lead to some unforeseen results-for example, the expression of an apparently aberrant marker by a neoplasm can sometimes be seen. In this context, we report our experience with a case of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t) in which the blasts were unexpectedly found to express cytokeratin (CK).. An 86 year old woman with a past medical history of breast carcinoma treated by mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy was admitted to our institution because of worsening anaemia. The following haematological indices were noticed: haemoglobin, 8.6 g/litre; erythrocytes, 2.5 × 1012/litre; white blood cells, 3 × 109/litre; and platelets, 465 × ...
Question - Refractory anaemia,very low counts,works as a builder,has pacemaker,ulcerated leg after fall,treatment and prognosis?. Ask a Doctor about Blood transfusion, Ask a General & Family Physician
Because of the diversity of clinical symptoms, the diagnosis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion disorders can be difficult. Here, we describe an 8-month-old boy presenting clinically exclusively with refractory anemia. Mutation analysis in our pat
The primary objective of this study is to compare overall survival (OS) in patients receiving ON 01910.Na + best supportive care (BSC) to OS of patients
Patients. We searched the AML database for patients who presented to The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with newly diagnosed AML (≥20% myeloblasts) from 1990 through 2005. This database includes consecutive patients with AML or MDS seen at M. D. Anderson in the Department of Leukemia since 1985. Patients previously classified with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation were reclassified as AML. A total of 2,014 patients were identified, and pretreatment levels of β2M were available in 64% (i.e., 1,293 patients). Serum β2M levels were quantified by RIA (Pharmacia β-2 Micro Ria; Pharmacia Diagnostic; reference range, 0.7-2.0 mg/L). Treatment for AML varied during the 16 years depicted here, and for convenience we divided the patients into those who were given 1-β-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) and those who were not. All patients included in the prognostic models received remission induction therapy with high-dose ara-C, defined as ,0.5 g daily for 3 to ...
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Researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center have discovered a control mechanism that can trigger the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a group of blood cancers. This finding may lead to therapies capable of preventing the progression of these diseases.. MDS primarily affects older individuals, with approximately 12,000 new cases diagnosed each year. In MDS, a persons blood is not able to make one or more types of healthy blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets. Instead, the patient has a high number of immature stem cells that do not develop properly. This can lead to anemia and a higher risk of infection and bleeding. MDS patients also have an increased risk of developing leukemia. Unfortunately, there is no effective therapy for MDS and scientists do not have a clear answer on how MDS develops.. In their translational study, Moffitt clinical and basic science researchers found that MDS patients have a higher number of suppressor cells in their bone marrow. ...
Garcia-Manero G, Roboz G, Walsh K, Kantarjian H, Ritchie E, Kropf P, OConnell C, Tibes R, Lunin S, Rosenblat T, Yee K, Stock W, Griffiths E, Mace J, Podoltsev N, Berdeja J, Jabbour E, Issa JJ, Hao Y, Keer HN, Azab M, Savona MR. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) in patients with intermediate or high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: phase 2 results from a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 1/2 trial. Lancet Haematol. 2019 Jun; 6(6):e317-e327 ...
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Looking for online definition of refractory anemia with excess blasts in the Medical Dictionary? refractory anemia with excess blasts explanation free. What is refractory anemia with excess blasts? Meaning of refractory anemia with excess blasts medical term. What does refractory anemia with excess blasts mean?
MGI Pharma, Inc, and SuperGen, Inc, recently announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the hypomethylating agent decitabine (Dacogen) for injection. Decitabine is indicated for treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) including previously treated and untreated, de novo, and secondary MDS of all French-American-British (FAB) subtypes (refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia), and intermediate-1, intermediate-2, and high-risk International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) groups. 1
Refractory anemia (RA): cytopenia of one PB lineage; normo- or hypercellular marrow with dysplasias; < 1% PB blasts and <5% BM blasts Refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS): cytopenia, dysplasia and the same % blasts involvement in BM and PB as RA. Ringed sideroblasts account for > 15% of nucleated cells in marrow. Refractory anemia with excess of blasts (REAEB): Cytopenia or two or more PB lineages; dysplasia involving all 3 lineages; < 5% PB blasts and 5-20% BM blasts Refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation: (REAEB- t): hematologic features identical to RAEB. >5% blasts in PB or 21-30% blasts in BM, or the presence of Auer rods in the blasts Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML):monocytosis in PB>10 9 /L; < 5% blast in PB and up to 20% BM balsts Myelodysplastic syndromes FAB classification system
OUTLINE: This is a multicenter study. Patients are stratified according to myelodysplastic syndrome subclassification (refractory anemia [RA] vs RA with ringed sideroblasts vs RA with excess blasts).. Patients receive induction therapy comprising anti-thymocyte globulin IV over 6-12 hours on days 1-4 and oral cyclosporine twice daily on days 5-94 followed by a taper until day 124. Patients who relapse after a response of at least 60 days may receive reinduction therapy comprising oral cyclosporine twice daily on days 1-90 followed by a taper until day 120. Treatment continues in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.. Patients are followed monthly for 6 months, every 2 months for 2 years, and then every 6 months for 3 years.. PROJECTED ACCRUAL: A total of 130 patients (53 with refractory anemia [RA], 33 with RA with ringed sideroblasts, and 44 with RA with excess blasts) will be accrued for this study within 14-22 months. ...
in Blood (1998), 92(1), 68-75. Treatment with erythropoietin (epo) may improve the anemia of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in approximately 20% of patients. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with the combination of ... [more ▼]. Treatment with erythropoietin (epo) may improve the anemia of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in approximately 20% of patients. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with the combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and epo may increase this response rate. In the present phase II study, patients with MDS and anemia were randomized to treatment with G-CSF + epo according to one of two alternatives; arm A starting with G-CSF for 4 weeks followed by the combination for 12 weeks, and arm B starting with epo for 8 weeks followed by the combination for 10 weeks. Fifty evaluable patients (10 refractory anemia [RA], 13 refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts [RARS], and 27 refractory anemia with excess blasts [RAEB]) were included ...
Refractory Anaemia (RA) is part of the heterogeneous group of diseases that affects normal blood cell production in the bone marrow and a category of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) . One example of RA is the 5q-syndrome. In RA, marrow blood cells fail to mature properly and are unable to work properly. They often die before they leave the marrow, or shortly after reaching the bloodstream (ineffective erythropoiesis or dyserythropoiesis). There are few data on the epidemiology of RA, which may account for 30-40% of all MDS cases. MDS is predominantly diagnosed in the elderly population. The global incidence of all MDS was comprised between 3,5 and 12,6 new cases / year / per 100,000 in some studies. ...
The British Society for Haematology is registered in England and Wales as a Company Limited by Guarantee, No 2645706 and as a Charity, No 1005735 Registered Office and correspondence address: 100 White Lion Street London N1 9PF. Phone: 020 7713 0990 ...
The FDA has granted orphan drug designation to Alvocidib (flavopiridol) to treat patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Alvocidib, a potent c...
What is myelodysplastic syndromes mds? Learn about myelodysplastic syndromes mds symptoms, myelodysplastic syndromes mds causes, diagnosis, and more.
What is myelodysplastic syndromes mds? Learn about myelodysplastic syndromes mds symptoms, myelodysplastic syndromes mds causes, diagnosis, and more.
Get online consultation for best treatment of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS), Get a free 2nd opinion on Your Medical Problem, connect to the best doctors and hospitals for Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) Treatment cost in India, Save upto 70-80% on cost of your treatment. ihealthkonnect
FYI - According to a recent article in the Journal of Clinical Oncology re: myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): April 30, 2010 - Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) appear to be nearly 5 times more common...
Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a condition that affects the bone marrow and the blood cells it produces. Myelodysplastic syndromes rarely cause signs or
Keyword View: myelodysplastic syndrome. News Robin Roberts rare blood disorder: What is myelodysplastic syndrome? Fox News. Posted by: News Editor - June 11, 2012, 10:55 am - News ...
The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) encompass a series of hematologic conditions characterized by chronic cytopenias (anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia) accompanied by abnormal cellular maturation. As a result, patients with MDS are at risk for s
For more videos by Vernon Louw MedEd, go to: http://www.youtube.com/user/Legomed/videos?view_as=public This video explains the natural course of disease in patients with MDS and the principles ...
Learn more about Cancer In Depth: Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Coliseum Health System Main Page Risk Factors ...
Learn more about Other Treatments for Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Grand Strand Medical Center Main Page Risk Factors ...
Characteristic features of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in humans. MDS is thought to originate from a mutated Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Approximately 30%
The long-term goal of this project is to identify and characterize genes that contribute to the development and progression of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)....
For more videos by Vernon Louw MedEd, go to: http://www.youtube.com/user/Legomed/videos?view_as=public This video explains the natural course of disease in patients with MDS and the principles ...
The purpose of this study is to determine the overall response rate in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) given a daily dosing schedule of de
Knowing what to expect if you have MDS can help. Learn about myelodysplastic syndromes, including risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
Here is some information from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - (OSUCCC - James) I wanted to share with you.
Stevenson, W. and Garcia-Manero, G. (2010) Myelodysplastic Syndromes, in Leukemias: Principles and Practice of Therapy (eds S. Faderl and H. Kantarjian), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444327359.ch8 ...
Deletion 5q is a rare form of Myeldysplastic Syndrome (MDS) which can remain stable for many years with few symptoms, or progress rapidly into a different MDS subtype.
Selected genes are highlighted in orange, bookmarked genes are green. - Chemical increases gene, - Chemical decreases gene, - Chemical increases and decreases gene simultaneosly, No arrows - gene doesnt interact with the chemical. - Gene should be increased/decreased most of the time and the chemical does it. - Gene should be increased/decreased most of the time but the chemical does the opposite. ...
I had been ill for sometime and when I went to hospital, the blood test showed something wrong, then a spinal tap was done and that confirmed it. I had chemo first and have had rituximab off and o ...
The haematological features of 118 cases of primary myelodysplastic syndromes (PMDS) were reviewed to see how these could be related and classified according to the recent FAB proposals. A majority of the cases were elderly who presented with a macrocytic or normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia. Cases of acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia (AISA) usually had normal leucocyte and platelet counts, erythroid hyperplasia, marked dyserythropoiesis and more than 20% ringed sideroblasts. Cases of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) had frequent neutropenia and thrombopenia usually with prominent dysgranulopoiesis and dysthrombopoiesis. Refractory anaemia or refractory cytopenia appeared morphologically to be a heterogeneous group. Leukaemic transformation did not occur in any of these 16 cases of AISA whereas six of the 34 cases of RAEB transformed into acute leukaemia. It appears that the cases of PMDS present with well defined haematological features which permit recognition of ...
A 60-year-old woman presented with weakness and a history of multiple blood transfusions in the past 6 months. A complete blood count showed the following: hemoglobin concentration, 7.8 g/dL; platelet count, 30×109/L; and leucocyte count, 23.1×109/L. The peripheral blood smear showed the presence of dysplastic eosinophils (50%) with abnormally large purple-black basophilic granules, hypogranular neutrophils with pseudo-Pelger-Hüet anomaly (A, arrow; May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain, ×1,000), and 2% blasts. The bone marrow was hypercellular and showed features of refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB-2) with 15% blasts, dysplastic megakaryocytes (B, arrow), and numerous eosinophilic precursors with abnormally large granules (C) with strong myeloperoxidase positivity, hence confirming that these were dysplastic eosinophils (D). Conventional cytogenetics revealed major karyotype abnormalities (MAKA) with monosomy in chromosomes 5, 7, 8, 20, and 21, deletion in the short arm of 11, t(2;6), and ...
This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab in treating patients with high-riskmyelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or no longer responds to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
The goal of this clinical research study is to learn if the combination of vosaroxin and decitabine can help to control AML or MDS. The safety of these drugs will also be studied.
1 of 2 NCCN QUICK GUIDE tm Myelodysplastic Syndromes, 2018 This NCCNQUICK GUIDE tm sheet summarizes key points from the complete NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® : Myelodysplastic Syndromes . T hese guidelines explain which tests and treatments are recommended by experts in cancer. To view and download the guidelines, visit NCC N.or g/patients or, to order printed copies, visit Amazon.com What is MDS (myelodysplastic syndromes)? MDS is a group of cancers that affect blood cells in the bloodstream and bone marrow. In MDS, the bone marrow isnt able to make enough normal, healthy blood cells that the body needs. 9 Do I have MDS? MDS often causes a low number of one or more types of blood cells. Another key feature is that the defective blood cells have an abnormal size, shape, or look. This is called dysplasia. 12 Blood tests are done along with other initial tests to help diagnose MDS. 16 Your bone marrow must be tested to confirm if you have MDS. 18 How do doctors group MDS for treatment ...
The British Society for Haematology is registered in England and Wales as a Company Limited by Guarantee, No 2645706 and as a Charity, No 1005735 Registered Office and correspondence address: 100 White Lion Street London N1 9PF. Phone: 020 7713 0990 ...
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Clinical trial for MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROME | Preleukemia | Refractory Anemia with Excess of Blasts | miller-dieker syndrome , Controlled Study of Rigosertib Versus Physicians Choice of Treatment in MDS Patients After Failure of an HMA
PLOS ONE 2010;5(12):e14398-. Gene expression profiling of day 7 erythroblasts from refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS) and microarray-based identification of erythroid granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) targets ...
SALT LAKE CITY, June 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the Company will present preclinical data from its alvocidib program at the European Hematology Association (EHA) 22nd Annual Congress, June 22-25 in Madrid. Alvocidib is an investigational inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), which is in Phase II development for the treatment of MCL-1-dependent relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML).. The preclinical findings elucidate alvocidibs mechanism of action in AML, support the rationale for evaluating alvocidib and 7+3 (ACD) versus 7+3 alone in newly diagnosed AML patients, and suggest it has potential utility in high-risk AML. The posters will be displayed on e-poster screens throughout the Poster Session, spanning Friday, June 23, 09:30 CEST - Saturday, June 24, 19:00 CEST. "These additional data add to our growing body of evidence which supports the ...
To estimate the market of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) Treatment all over the world, market.us presents a report titled Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) Treatment Market : Global Industry Analysis (2012 - 2018) and Opportunity Assessment (2019 - 2029). The research report offers a quantitative analysis of the my...
In the original study of the alvocidib/bortezomib regimen initiated in March 2004, 29 patients were first enrolled to the nonhybrid schedule at dose levels 1 to 7 without reaching the MTD. In 2007, the protocol underwent a CTEP-recommended amendment to proceed to a hybrid schedule based on promising data in CLL (19). Results from the hybrid schedule trial have been published (28). A total of 16 patients were treated, consisting of 11 male and 5 female patients. Nine patients had NHL (6 patients had MCL subtype), 6 had multiple myeloma, and 1 had an extramedullary plasmacytoma. Treatment was on a 21-day cycle: bortezomib by intravenous push on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 and alvocidib on days 1 and 8 by 30-minute bolus infusion followed by a 4-hour continuous infusion. The MTD was established as 1.3 mg/m2 for bortezomib and 30 mg/m2 for alvocidib (both the 30-minute bolus and 4-hour infusions). There were 2 CRs (12%) and 5 PRs (31%) observed (overall response rate = 44%). After determining the MTD for ...
Azacitidine (5-azacytidine) myelodysplastic syndrome drug molecule. Atoms are represented as spheres with conventional colour coding: hydrogen (white), carbon (grey), oxygen (red), nitrogen (blue). - Stock Image F011/3912
Chemotherapy and immunotherapy of myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) (costs for program #83641) ✔ University Hospital Düsseldorf ✔ Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Learn more about Risk Factors for Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Sky Ridge Medical Center Main Page Risk Factors Reducing Your Risk ...
Learn more about Reducing Your Risk of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Medical City Dallas Main Page Risk Factors ...
Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is another type of disease that starts in the bone marrow. Spectrum Health bone oncologists are experts in their field. Well develop a plan specific to your case.
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Learn more about Myelodysplastic Syndromes at Regional Medical Center of San Jose DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Congratulations to Allison Greenplate & Brent Ferrell (co-corresponding) and co-authors on this publication! Greenplate AR, Johnson DB, Roussel M, Savona MR, Sosman JA, Puzanov I, Ferrell PB*, Irish JM*. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Revealed by Systems Immunology in a Melanoma Patient Undergoing Anti-PD-1 … Continue reading →. ...
H. Joachim Deeg, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, 2nd edition English | ISBN: 3642362281 | 2013 | 220 pages | PDF | 4 MB The diagnosis of myelodysplastic
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Pgreater thanThis prospective Phase II study is the first to assess the feasibility and efficacy of maintenance 5-azacytidine for older patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and MDS-acute myeloid leukaemia syndromes in complete remission (CR) after induction chemotherapy. Sixty patients were enrolled and treated by standard induction chemotherapy. Patients that reached CR started maintenance therapy with subcutaneous azacytidine, 5/28 d until relapse. Promoter-methylation status of CDKN2B (P15 ink4b), CDH1 and HIC1 was examined pre-induction, in CR and 6, 12 and 24 months post CR. Twenty-four (40%) patients achieved CR after induction chemotherapy and 23 started maintenance treatment with azacytidine. Median CR duration was 13 center dot 5 months, greater than 24 months in 17% of the patients, and 18-30 center dot 5 months in the four patients with trisomy 8. CR duration was not associated with CDKN2B methylation status or karyotype. Median ...
In refractory anemia (RA) and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS) a discrepancy is observed between the decreased in vitro erythroid colony formation and the normal or increased number of normoblasts in the bone marrow. To study the in
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Title. Comparing Combination Chemotherapy To Combination Chemotherapy Plus a Drug Called PSC 833 In Patients With Poor-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia and High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome (A Phase III Trial). Sponsor. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group through the NCI-sponsored Cancer Cooperative Group Program. Purpose of the Study. To find out whether the addition of PSC-833 to a standard chemotherapy drug combination is beneficial in treating patients with poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) that has returned or is resistant to treatment and in patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Laboratory studies have shown that PSC-833 may decrease the resistance of leukemia cells to combination chemotherapy, and enhance the effectiveness of treatment.. Results. The study did not show improved anti-leukemia effects in combination chemotherapy plus PSC-833 compared with combination chemotherapy alone in patients with poor-risk AML or high-risk MDS.. Conclusion. No other studies are ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - MicroRNA-205-5p is upregulated in myelodysplastic syndromes and induces cell proliferation via PTEN suppression. AU - Jang, Sook Jin. AU - Choi, In Sun. AU - Park, Geon. AU - Moon, Dae Soo. AU - Choi, Ji Seon. AU - Nam, Myung-Hyun. AU - Yoon, Soo-Young. AU - Choi, Cheol Hee. AU - Kang, Seong Ho. PY - 2016/8/1. Y1 - 2016/8/1. N2 - Micro (mi)RNA dysregulation is implicated in the development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Chromosomal abnormalities on 1q are frequently detected in Korean patients with MDS; however, how these are related to disease development is unknown. The present study compared the expression profiles of miRNAs encoded by chromosome 1q between 65 MDS patients and 11 controls. We found that miR-205-5p levels were 12.5 fold higher in the former (P = 0.001). miR-205-5p level was increased in 44.7% of patients when an arbitrary 2−ΔCt cut-off value of 1.25 was used. miR-205-5p expression data were used to generate a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve ...
The Myelodysplastic syndrome is a group of diseases and conditions that affect how blood is made. These diseases were formerly known as preleukemia, mostly because sometimes they can lead to leukemia. Often, its name is shortened to MDS.. Myelodysplastic syndromes affect the bone marrow stem cells. The production of blood does not rely on good stem cells, but ones that have been modified genetically. This means that the production of red blood cells, sometimes of white blood cells and blood platelets changed. The production becomes inefficient, or goes wrong altogether. Most of the time, this manifests in anemia - not having enough blood. Depending on the severity of the condition, it can also cause hemorrhages and infections with fever.. Most of the people who have these conditions are 60 years or older, but younger people can get it too, especially if they went through a form of chemotherapy. Most of the suffers die from the disease, usually after six to thirty months. The only known cure is a ...
Looking for online definition of myelodysplastic in the Medical Dictionary? myelodysplastic explanation free. What is myelodysplastic? Meaning of myelodysplastic medical term. What does myelodysplastic mean?
PBMC from 43 MDS patients and 15 healthy donors (controls for γ δ expansion), were cultured with BrHPP (3 μM) and IL-2 (100 U/mL) for 8 to 18 days. Consistent with previous reports,24, 26 the percentage of Vδ 2 T cells gradually increased in in vitro PBMC cultures from controls, accompanied by an exponential proliferation of the responding cells (,70% of Vδ 2 T cells at 14-18 days, defining high responders) in all cases (Figure 2A).. A response to BrHPP stimulation was obtained in 60% of MDS patients. In detail, 12 of the 43 (28%) cultures displayed high Vδ 2 T-cell expansion generating , 70% of Vδ 2 T cells, 14 (32%) displayed intermediate expansion (between 30 and 70%), and 17 (40%) did not respond to BrHPP (, 30% Vδ 2 T cells). Most MDS patients who did not respond to BrHPP had associated AID (7 of 10 patients, 70%) (Figure 2B). Of the 33 MDS patients without AID, 11 (33%) did not respond to BrHPP and IL-2; 12 were high responders, and ten cultures displayed intermediate expansion ...
Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) describe a heterogeneous and complex group of clonal bone marrow failure disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, morphologic dysplasia, and cellular dysfunction, often leading to increased risk of infection and transfusion requirements. They typically represent diseases of the elderly, and, while sometimes linked to known environmental exposures, are usually characterized as idiopathic. Understanding MDS pathogenesis is crucial to the development of biologically targeted therapies. This chapter explores MDS pathogenesis theories in terms of (1) the MDS cell of origin; (2) genetic alterations within the cell of origin; (3) alterations in bone marrow microenvironment and apoptosis; (4) alterations in immune surveillance; and (5) functional cellular abnormalities. ...
Klara Pecankova, Pavel Majek, Jaroslav Cermak, Jan E. Dyr. Posttranslational Modifications of Red Blood Cell Ghost Proteins as Signatures for Distinguishing between Low- and High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients. Turk J Hematol. 2017; 34(1): 111- ...
Treatments for Myelodysplastic syndrome associated with isolated del(5q) chromosome abnormality including drugs, prescription medications, alternative treatments, surgery, and lifestyle changes.
Aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are rare disorders that affect the bone marrow and blood. Causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
Chemotherapy and immunotherapy of myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) (costs for program #82159) ✔ University Hospital Düsseldorf ✔ Department of Hematology, Oncology and Clinical Immunology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Learn more about Diagnosis and Prognosis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Lake City Medical Center Main Page Risk Factors ...
OBJECTIVE: The current therapy of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is unsatisfactory and comprises mainly supportive treatment or antileukemic chemotherapy. Recent studies about successful immunosuppressive therapy suggest an autoimmune mechanism in subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: To investigate this hypothesis, bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) from 15 patients with low-grade MDS, refractory anemia, and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RA and RARS), and from 7 normal donors were depleted of CD2(+), CD5(+), and CD7(+) lymphocytes using magnetic cell sorting. Depleted and nondepleted MNC were seeded onto irradiated allogeneic bone marrow stroma and the generation of colony-forming-cells (CFC), the clonal origin of hemopoietic progenitor cells in long-term bone marrow culture (LTC), was compared. RESULTS: The capacity of MNC from 7 healthy donors to generate hemopoiesis remained unchanged in the lymphocyte-depleted LTC. In contrast, cultures initiated with ...
... Primary Hereditary Sideroblastic Anemia. Primary Acquired Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts (RARS). Sideroblastic Anemia Information Including: BASIC INFORMATION, SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS, EPIDEMIOLOGY & DEMOGRAPHICS, PHYSICAL FINDINGS & CLINICAL PRESENTATION, LABORATORY TESTS. DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT and more
This single-arm, phase 2 part of the phase 1-2 study of nivolumab in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine was done at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, USA). Eligible patients were aged 18-60 years (or ,60 years if suitable for intensive chemotherapy), and had newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2. Induction included cytarabine 1·5 g/m2 by 24-h continuous infusion daily on days 1-4 (3 days in patients ,60 years) and idarubicin 12 mg/m2 daily on days 1-3. Nivolumab 3 mg/kg was started on day 24 (range 22-26) and continued every 2 weeks for up to a year in responders. Responders received either up to five consolidation cycles of attenuated doses of idarubicin and cytarabine, or allogeneic stem cell transplantation if eligible. The primary endpoint was event-free survival. Efficacy and safety analyses were done in all patients who received at least one ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Neurofibromatosis 1 gene (NF1) mutation is a rare genetic event in myelodysplastic syndrome regardless of the disease progression. AU - Kaneko, Hiroto. AU - Horiike, Shigeo. AU - Nakai, Hiroyuki. AU - Ueda, Yutaka. AU - Nakao, Makoto. AU - Hirakawa, Kouichi. AU - Yokota, Shohei. AU - Taniwaki, Masafumi. AU - Misawa, Shinichi. AU - Kashima, Kei. PY - 1995/4. Y1 - 1995/4. N2 - Neurofibromatosis 1 gene (NF1) is a tumor suppressor gene and the product of which down-regulates Nras protein by its GTPase activating protein-related domain (NF1-GRD). Although the incidence of NF1 mutation was reported to be rare in the chronic phase of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), there have been no previous reports on its configuration in patients showing the disease progression. We examined NF1 in 50 patients with MDS including 9 who had progressed to more advanced stages and 16 to acute leukemia. Six patients had an Nras mutation. We carried out allele specific restriction analysis (ASRA) to detect ...
Perspective article on myelodysplastic syndrome with deltion 5q. In 1974 Herman van den Berghe et al. reported a distinct hematologic disorder associated with acquired deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 [del(5q)]. This novel nosological entity was described in more detail one year later by Sokal, van den Berghe, and coworkers. Patients with del(5q) had macrocytic anemia with oval macrocytes, normal to slightly reduced white blood cell counts, and normal to elevated platelet counts. With respect to the bone marrow, there was erythroid hypoplasia but the most striking abnormality concerned the megakaryocytes and especially their nuclei, which were generally small, round or oval, and nonlobulated. Until that time, the only specific chromosomal abnormality in hematologic disorders was the Philadelphia chromosome associated with chronic myeloid leukemia. Sokal et al. concluded that del(5q) represented a novel specific chromosomal abnormality associated with refractory anemia, although they ...

RAEB/t - refractory anemia with excess blasts-transformation | AcronymAtticRAEB/t - refractory anemia with excess blasts-transformation | AcronymAttic

RAEB/t stands for refractory anemia with excess blasts-transformation. RAEB/t is defined as refractory anemia with excess ... How is refractory anemia with excess blasts-transformation abbreviated? ... www.acronymattic.com/refractory-anemia-with-excess-blasts_transformation-(RAEB%2ft).html,RAEB/t,/a,. ... www.acronymattic.com/refractory-anemia-with-excess-blasts_transformation-(RAEB%2ft).html ...
more infohttps://www.acronymattic.com/refractory-anemia-with-excess-blasts_transformation-

Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2018Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2018

2018 Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2018 Summary GlobalDatas clinical trial report ... Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, ... Proportion of Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts to Oncology Clinical Trials*Table Figure 8: Proportion of Refractory Anemia ... "Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2018 provides an overview of Refractory Anemia With ...
more infohttps://www.marketresearch.com/GlobalData-v3648/Refractory-Anemia-Excess-Blasts-Global-11850900/

Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation Completed Phase 1 / 2 Trials for Idarubicin (DB01177) - DrugBankRefractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation Completed Phase 1 / 2 Trials for Idarubicin (DB01177) - DrugBank

Refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation / Acute myeloblastic leukemia, minimal differentiation / Refractory ... DBCOND0028567 (Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation). Completed. 1 / 2. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier. Title ... Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation Completed Phase 1 / 2 Trials for Idarubicin (DB01177). Back to ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/indications/DBCOND0028567/clinical_trials/DB01177?phase=1%2C2&status=completed

Refractory anemia with excess blasts | definition of refractory anemia with excess blasts by Medical dictionaryRefractory anemia with excess blasts | definition of refractory anemia with excess blasts by Medical dictionary

... refractory anemia with excess blasts explanation free. What is refractory anemia with excess blasts? Meaning of refractory ... anemia with excess blasts medical term. What does refractory anemia with excess blasts mean? ... Looking for online definition of refractory anemia with excess blasts in the Medical Dictionary? ... refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts, and refractory anemia with excess blasts in ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/refractory+anemia+with+excess+blasts

Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation Active Not Recruiting Phase 2 Trials for Cyclophosphamide (DB00531) -...Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation Active Not Recruiting Phase 2 Trials for Cyclophosphamide (DB00531) -...

Refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation / Acute myeloblastic leukemia, minimal differentiation / Refractory ... Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation Active Not Recruiting Phase 2 Trials for Cyclophosphamide (DB00531). ... DBCOND0028567 (Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation). Active Not Recruiting. 2. ... Back to Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation. Also known as: ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/indications/DBCOND0028567/clinical_trials/DB00531?phase=2&status=active_not_recruiting

Refractory anemia with excess of blasts - WikipediaRefractory anemia with excess of blasts - Wikipedia

... refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, or acute myeloid leukemia [AML]) ... Refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) is a type of myelodysplastic syndrome with a marrow blast percentage of 5% to 19 ... July 2006). "An antecedent diagnosis of refractory anemia with excess blasts has no prognostic relevance in acute myeloid ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refractory_anemia_with_excess_of_blasts

Irene Lorand-Metzes Research on Refractory Anemia with Excess of Blasts (RAEM)
     | CureHunterIrene Lorand-Metze's Research on Refractory Anemia with Excess of Blasts (RAEM) | CureHunter

Refractory Anemia with Excess of Blasts (RAEM). 1/2013. Immunophenotyping in myelodysplastic syndromes can add prognostic ... Sickle Cell Anemia (Hemoglobin S Disease) 01/2005. Drug/Important Bio-Agent (IBA). 4. imatinib (Gleevec)FDA Link 08/2015 - 01/ ... Refractory Anemia with Excess of Blasts (RAEM) 01/2013 - 02/2004. 4. Sepsis (Septicemia) 01/2013 - 01/2010. ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/authorSummary-Lorand-Metze,%20Irene.do?keywordId=D000754

Increased iron stores in refractory anaemia with excess of blasts | British Society for HaematologyIncreased iron stores in refractory anaemia with excess of blasts | British Society for Haematology

The British Society for Haematology is registered in England and Wales as a Company Limited by Guarantee, No 2645706 and as a Charity, No 1005735 Registered Office and correspondence address: 100 White Lion Street London N1 9PF. Phone: 020 7713 0990 ...
more infohttp://b-s-h.org.uk/education/haematology-images/myeloid-malignancies/increased-iron-stores-in-refractory-anaemia-with-excess-of-blasts/

Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts (RAEB)Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts (RAEB)

Learn in-depth information on Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts, its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, ... How can Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts be Prevented?. Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts may be avoided by:. *Limiting ... RAEB (Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts). What is Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts? (Definition/Background Information) ... Worsening of anemia. How is Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Treated?. Treatment measures for Refractory Anemia with Excess ...
more infohttps://www.dovemed.com/diseases-conditions/refractory-anemia-with-excess-blasts-raeb/

A micromegakaryocyte in a child with refractory anaemia with excess of blasts-2 (RAEB2). | British Society for HaematologyA micromegakaryocyte in a child with refractory anaemia with excess of blasts-2 (RAEB2). | British Society for Haematology

The British Society for Haematology is registered in England and Wales as a Company Limited by Guarantee, No 2645706 and as a Charity, No 1005735 Registered Office and correspondence address: 100 White Lion Street London N1 9PF. Phone: 020 7713 0990 ...
more infohttp://b-s-h.org.uk/education/haematology-images/pediatrics/a-micromegakaryocyte-in-a-child-with-refractory-anaemia-with-excess-of-blasts-2-raeb2/

Cytokeratin expression by CD34 positive blasts in a case of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t)...Cytokeratin expression by CD34 positive blasts in a case of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t)...

Cytokeratin expression by CD34 positive blasts in a case of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t) ... Cytokeratin expression by CD34 positive blasts in a case of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t) ... we report our experience with a case of refractory anaemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t) in which the blasts ... Blasts were also found in peripheral blood (11%). Both bone marrow aspirate and biopsy demonstrated features suggestive of a ...
more infohttp://jcp.bmj.com/content/54/9/735.1

Best Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts Specialist in Chennai - Book Appointment Online at Top Hospitals | CredihealthBest Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts Specialist in Chennai - Book Appointment Online at Top Hospitals | Credihealth

Get help from medical experts to select the right refractory anemia with excess blasts doctor from top hospitals in Chennai. ... Get upto 25% discount on OPD fees of refractory anemia with excess blasts doctors at hospitals near you. ... View profile, fees, educational qualification, feedback and reviews of top refractory anemia with excess blasts specialists ... Best refractory anemia with excess blasts specialist in Chennai. ... Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts Doctors in Chennai Matches ...
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Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts: Opportunity Assessments, Epidemiology Forecast, Market Dynamics, Pipeline Analysis, H2...Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts: Opportunity Assessments, Epidemiology Forecast, Market Dynamics, Pipeline Analysis, H2...

5.1.5. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS EARLY R&D MOLECULES. 5.1.6. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS INACTIVE AND ... 5.1.1. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS PHASE 3 MOLECULES. 5.1.2. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS PHASE 2 MOLECULES. ... 7. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS CLINICAL TRIALS SUMMARY. 7.1. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS PIPELINE ANALYSIS BY ... 5.1.3. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS PHASE 1 MOLECULES. 5.1.4. REFRACTORY ANEMIA WITH EXCESS BLASTS PRECLINICAL ...
more infohttps://www.gervanora.com/gerph515/

Patient Stories | Childrens Mercy Kansas CityPatient Stories | Children's Mercy Kansas City

Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts: McKenzies Story. A winning athlete on the tennis court, McKenzie Haynes used that same ... spirit to meet the challenge of her young life-refractory anemia with excess blasts Type 1. Treatment at Childrens Mercy ... Aplastic Anemia: Nicks Story. One day Little League pitcher, Nick, just wasnt himself on the field. After a visit with his ...
more infohttps://www.childrensmercy.org/patient-stories/

Myelodysplastic syndromes - Canadian Cancer SocietyMyelodysplastic syndromes - Canadian Cancer Society

Refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB). RAEB means there is a low number of red blood cells in the blood and there may ... Refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RAEB) are least likely to ... Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). RARS means there is a low number of red blood cells in the blood. The counts ... Refractory anemia (RA) means there is a low number of red blood cells in the blood. ...
more infohttps://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia/leukemia/myelodysplastic-syndromes/?region=ab

Myelodysplastic syndromes - Canadian Cancer SocietyMyelodysplastic syndromes - Canadian Cancer Society

Refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB). RAEB means there is a low number of red blood cells in the blood and there may ... Refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RAEB) are least likely to ... Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). RARS means there is a low number of red blood cells in the blood. The counts ... Refractory anemia (RA) means there is a low number of red blood cells in the blood. ...
more infohttps://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia/leukemia/myelodysplastic-syndromes/?region=nb&p=1

Pediatric Myelodysplastic Syndromes Pathology: Overview, Epidemiology, Clinical FeaturesPediatric Myelodysplastic Syndromes Pathology: Overview, Epidemiology, Clinical Features

... increased marrow blasts in some cases, frequent characteristic cytogenetic abnormalities, and frequent progression to a subset ... Refractory anemia with excess blasts vs MDS-related AML. Distinguishing between RAEB and MDS-related AML (MDR-AML) is often ... 5q- in a child with refractory anemia with excess blasts: similarities to 5q- syndrome in adults. Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1998 ... High-grade MDS in older patients includes refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), RA with excess blasts (RAEB ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1976592-overview

Ch. 6 - MDS Flashcards by Colt Williams | BrainscapeCh. 6 - MDS Flashcards by Colt Williams | Brainscape

Refractory anemia with excess blasts has (blank)cytopenia pancytopenia 15 Auer rods immediately classifies the disorder as RAEB ... In what two types of MDS do you see nomral WBCs and platelets with blasts less than 1% of peripheral blood? ... Describe the differences in blast percentages in both the peripheral blood and bone marrow for RAEB 1 and 2 ... What IPSS MDS category is this?5-10% marrow blasts.variable karyotype2-3 peripheral cytopenias ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/ch-6-mds-3691947/packs/5512683

Vidaza New FDA Drug Approval | CenterWatchVidaza New FDA Drug Approval | CenterWatch

For the treatment of several myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes including refractory and chronic myelomonocytic leukemias. New ... Refractory anemia with excess blasts. *Refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation ... Refractory anemia. *Refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (if accompanied by neutropenia or thrombocytopenia or requiring ... Suwanawiboon B, Sumida KN. 5-azacitidine: An alternative treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes in patient with refractory ...
more infohttp://www.centerwatch.com/drug-information/fda-approved-drugs/drug/860/

Intensive Compared With Nonintensive Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic...Intensive Compared With Nonintensive Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic...

Refractory anemia with excess blasts. *Refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation ... Patients with refractory disease after the first course of induction chemotherapy may continue with the intensive protocol arm ... Sequential influences of leukemia-specific and genetic factors on p-glycoprotein expression in blasts from 817 patients entered ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00005823

Intensive Compared With Nonintensive Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic...Intensive Compared With Nonintensive Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic...

refractory anemia with excess blasts. refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation. chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. ... Refractory anemia with excess blasts. *Refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation ... Sequential influences of leukemia-specific and genetic factors on p-glycoprotein expression in blasts from 817 patients entered ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00005823

JCI -
The homeobox gene CDX2 is aberrantly expressed in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemogenesisJCI - The homeobox gene CDX2 is aberrantly expressed in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemogenesis

One patient had refractory anemia with excess blasts-2 (RAEB-2; CDX2 expression level, 66), and 1 patient had refractory ... refractory anemia with excess blasts; RNAi, RNA interference; RQ-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR; shRNA, short hairpin RNA; T- ... No CDX2 transcripts were detected in 1 patient with refractory anemia, 1 patient with RAEB-1, and 1 patient with RAEB-2. ... Excess cells from the fourth plating were continuously propagated in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 20% FBS and 10 μg/ml IL-3 (R&D ...
more infohttps://www.jci.org/articles/view/30182

Is pancytopenia resulting from chemotherapy is same as aplastic anemia - New Doctor InsightsIs pancytopenia resulting from chemotherapy is same as aplastic anemia - New Doctor Insights

Luca on is pancytopenia resulting from chemotherapy is same as aplastic anemia: Aplastic anemia means something is wrong with ... trusted information on the use of Chemotherapy for Anemia: Dr. ... What is refractory anemia with excess of blasts? Dr. Michael ... A type of MDS: Refractory anemia with excess blasts is a type of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The bone marrow will have ... Is anemia a symptom of Sickle Cell Anemia, or is Sickle Cell Anemia a type of anemia and if so do you have the same number of ...
more infohttps://www.healthtap.com/topics/is-pancytopenia-resulting-from-chemotherapy-is-same-as-aplastic-anemia

KAKEN - Research Projects | Establishment of hemopoietic cytokine therapy with a combination of hemopoietic factors for...KAKEN - Research Projects | Establishment of hemopoietic cytokine therapy with a combination of hemopoietic factors for...

Publications] Endo,Y.: Trisomy 14 in refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation. Cancer Genet.Cytogenet.59. 9-11 ... Publications] Endo, Y., et al: Trisomy 14 in refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation. Cancer Genetics ... Publications] Endo,Y.: Trisomy 14 in refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation. Cancer Genet.Cytogenet.59. 9-11 ... 2) The effect of EPO to increase platelet counts was confirmed in the EPO therapy for anemia of prematurity. ...
more infohttps://kaken.nii.ac.jp/grant/KAKENHI-PROJECT-04454277/

Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic SyndromesVaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes

refractory anemia with excess blasts. *refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. *refractory anemia ... RA with excess blasts 1 (5-9% blasts). - RA with excess blasts 2 (10-19% blasts). - Must have poor-risk MDS, defined by the ... Refractory anemia (RA). - RA with ringed sideroblasts. - Refractory cytopenias with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD). - RCMD with ... Autoimmune hemolytic anemia. - Idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura. - Inflammatory bowel disease. - Vasculitis. - Thyroiditis. ...
more infohttp://www.knowcancer.com/cancer-trials/NCT00361296/
  • 4) IL-3, IL-6, IL-11, GM-CSF, M-CSF or EPO alone or in combination could increase the megakaryocyte colony formation in some children with aplastic anemia. (nii.ac.jp)
  • 1) The administration of G-CSF, G-CSF + GM-CSF or G-CSF + EPO increased the number of platelets in some patients with aplastic anemia. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Which is the connection between hypoxia or sickle cell anemia and pica for foam? (healthtap.com)
  • 2) The effect of EPO to increase platelet counts was confirmed in the EPO therapy for anemia of prematurity. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The patient experienced a relapse of AML 17 months after the CBT and showed 20% leukemic blasts in the BM. (hindawi.com)