Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital: Hemolytic anemia due to various intrinsic defects of the erythrocyte.Hemodilution: Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital Nonspherocytic: Any one of a group of congenital hemolytic anemias in which there is no abnormal hemoglobin or spherocytosis and in which there is a defect of glycolysis in the erythrocyte. Common causes include deficiencies in GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE; PYRUVATE KINASE; and GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Hemolysis: The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Immune System Diseases: Disorders caused by abnormal or absent immunologic mechanisms, whether humoral, cell-mediated, or both.Immunotherapy: Manipulation of the host's immune system in treatment of disease. It includes both active and passive immunization as well as immunosuppressive therapy to prevent graft rejection.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Self-Help Groups: Organizations which provide an environment encouraging social interactions through group activities or individual relationships especially for the purpose of rehabilitating or supporting patients, individuals with common health problems, or the elderly. They include therapeutic social clubs.Psychotherapy, Group: A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.Reticulocyte Count: The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research program related to diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lung, and blood; blood resources; and SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS. From 1948 until October 10, 1969, it was known as the National Heart Institute. From June 25, 1976, it was the National Heart and Lung Institute. Since October 1997, the NHLBI has also had administrative responsibility for the NIH Woman's Health Initiative.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.United StatesTranscortin: A serpin family member that binds to and transports GLUCOCORTICOIDS in the BLOOD.Cortisone: A naturally occurring glucocorticoid. It has been used in replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency and as an anti-inflammatory agent. Cortisone itself is inactive. It is converted in the liver to the active metabolite HYDROCORTISONE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p726)Receptors, Glucocorticoid: Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind glucocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The glucocorticoid receptor-glucocorticoid complex acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of DNA. Glucocorticoids were named for their actions on blood glucose concentration, but they have equally important effects on protein and fat metabolism. Cortisol is the most important example.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Adrenal Cortex HormonesDexamethasone: An anti-inflammatory 9-fluoro-glucocorticoid.Rh-Hr Blood-Group System: Erythrocyte isoantigens of the Rh (Rhesus) blood group system, the most complex of all human blood groups. The major antigen Rh or D is the most common cause of erythroblastosis fetalis.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived: Antibodies obtained from a single clone of cells grown in mice or rats.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Blood Banks: Centers for collecting, characterizing and storing human blood.Blood DonorsTransfusion Medicine: The area of hematology that is concerned with the transfusion of blood and blood components, and in prevention and treatment of adverse effects from BLOOD TRANSFUSION errors.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Blood Grouping and Crossmatching: Testing erythrocytes to determine presence or absence of blood-group antigens, testing of serum to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to these antigens, and selecting biocompatible blood by crossmatching samples from the donor against samples from the recipient. Crossmatching is performed prior to transfusion.

Extraction of erythrocyte membrane proteins by sulfhydryl inhibitors. (1/616)

Human red cell membrane proteins were extracted by incubation of the ghost with hypotonic phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), N-ethylmaleimide and p-hydroxy-mercuribenzoate. In paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis, the amount of proteins extracted by these procedures was significantly less than the amount extractable from the ghost of normal and aplastic anemia red cells. Polypeptide patterns of red cell membranes in these hematological disorders were essentially similar to those of normal ghosts. Analysis of the supernatant by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that this reduction was mainly due to the reduced amount of peripheral proteins extracted. The extraction of peripheral proteins by sulfhydryl reagents was accompanied by shape changes resulting in the formation of membrane vesicles, suggesting an important role of peripheral proteins in the maintenance of ghost shape. It is also suggested that qualitative abnormalities of peripheral proteins such as altered reactivity to sulfhydryl reagents and/or strong binding to the membrane are present in PNH, HS and hereditary elliptocytosis red cells.  (+info)

Reduced glutathione accelerates the oxidative damage produced by sodium n-propylthiosulfate, one of the causative agents of onion-induced hemolytic anemia in dogs. (2/616)

The oxidative effects of sodium n-propylthiosulfate, one of the causative agents of onion-induced hemolytic anemia in dogs, were investigated in vitro using three types of canine erythrocytes, which are differentiated by the concentration of reduced glutathione and the composition of intracellular cations. After incubation with sodium n-propylthiosulfate, the methemoglobin concentration and Heinz body count in all three types of erythrocytes increased and a decrease in the erythrocyte reduced glutathione concentration was then observed. The erythrocytes containing high concentrations of potassium and reduced glutathione (approximately five times the normal values) were more susceptible to oxidative damage by sodium n-propylthiosulfate than were the normal canine erythrocytes. The susceptibility of the erythrocytes containing high potassium and normal reduced glutathione concentrations was intermediate between those of erythrocytes containing high concentrations of potassium and reduced glutathione and normal canine erythrocytes. In addition, the depletion of erythrocyte reduced glutathione by 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene resulted in a marked decrease in the oxidative injury induced by sodium n-propylthiosulfate in erythrocytes containing high concentrations of potassium and reduced glutathione. The generation of superoxide in erythrocytes containing high concentrations of potassium and reduced glutathione was 4.1 times higher than that in normal canine erythrocytes when the cells were incubated with sodium n-propylthiosulfate. These observations indicate that erythrocyte reduced glutathione, which is known as an antioxidant, accelerates the oxidative damage produced by sodium n-propylthiosulfate.  (+info)

Rumen bacteria are involved in the onset of onion-induced hemolytic anemia in sheep. (3/616)

The mechanism of onion-induced hemolytic anemia in ruminants was investigated. The ether-extract obtained from the mixture of rumen fluid and onion juice incubated at 38.5 degrees C for 9 hr induced oxidative damage in sheep erythrocytes in vitro, indicating the production of certain oxidants in the mixture. The increase of the oxidative effect in the mixture was inhibited completely by the removal of rumen microorganisms and partly by treatment with antibiotics and by oxygen gas. The sheep fed onions (50 g/kg body weight/day) for 15 days developed more severe Heinz body hemolytic anemia than did the sheep fed the equivalent amount of onions with 5 g/day ampicillin sodium salt. The results indicated that certain rumen bacteria appear to be involved in the onset of onion-induced hemolytic anemia in sheep.  (+info)

Erythroid accelerating activity of rat serum in early stage of drug induced hemolysis. (4/616)

An increase in the number of erythroblasts can be seen to some extent in the bone marrow of rats in the early stage of experimentally induced hemolytic anemia prior to any elevation in the plasma erythropoietin (Epo) level. This observation suggests that there is another erythroid stimulating factor present other than Epo. We studied the enhancing effect of serum, taken sequentially during experimentally induced hemolysis in rats, on erythroid proliferation, differentiation and maturation in vitro. Single intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg of acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) induced self-limited hemolytic anemia in rats, in which the hematocrit dropped rapidly with a nadir at day 4 after APH injection, followed by a gradual increase with return to normal level by day 8. Serum obtained consecutively every day after APH injection from day 1 to day 7 was applied to an in vitro culturing system of erythroid progenitors. Addition of day 1 serum, in which an elevation of Epo level had not occurred, to a conventional methyl-cellulose culture of rat bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) resulted in a significant increase in the number of colonies derived from colony forming unit erythroid, but not in burst forming unit erythroid. This erythropoietic activity of the serum was particularly evident in the presence of Epo. In the liquid culture of BM-MNCs, day 1 serum also showed some enhancing effect on erythroblast formation. We were able to see significant differences in these erythroid enhancing activities induced by serum drawn on day 1 in comparison to the serum drawn on subsequent days. These results suggest that an unknown erythroid enhancing factor besides Epo stimulates erythropoiesis in the early stage of hemolytic anemia or sudden hypoxia before there is a measurable rise in the serum Epo level. We propose that this factor be termed erythroid accelerating factor (EAF).  (+info)

Spur cell anaemia and hepatic iron stores in patients with alcoholic liver disease undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. (5/616)

BACKGROUND: Following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) histological examination of explant livers from patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) sometimes shows extensive iron deposits in a distribution suggestive of homozygous haemochromatosis. AIMS: To use haemochromatosis gene (HFE) assays to distinguish between ALD with notable siderosis and hereditary haemochromatosis. To evaluate the possible influence of spur cell haemolytic anaemia on hepatic iron loading. PATIENTS: Thirty seven patients with ALD were abstinent for at least six months prior to OLT. Twenty three patients had transferrin saturations greater than 55%, 16 also had increased serum ferritin (>350 micrograms/l). Eight of 37 (22%) explant livers had grade 3 or 4 hepatic iron deposition, predominantly in hepatocytes. Of these, four had a hepatic iron index greater than 1. 9 and most seemed to have spur cell haemolytic anaemia. METHODS: Mutation analysis for C282Y and H63D mutations was performed on DNA extracts from peripheral blood or explant liver. Spur cell haemolytic anaemia was diagnosed when the haemoglobin was 105 g/l in the presence of notable acanthocytosis. RESULTS: None of the eight patients with grade 3 or 4 hepatic iron had evidence of the C282Y mutation. Two of the eight were heterozygous for H63D. None of the remaining 28 patients tested showed homozygous HFE mutations. Spur cell anaemia was present in six of the eight patients with heavy iron deposition and only one of the remaining patients. CONCLUSIONS: The HFE mutation was not present in these patients with advanced ALD and heavy iron loading. Spur cell haemolytic anaemia provides an alternative potential mechanism for the heavy iron loading.  (+info)

The molecular basis of a case of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase deficiency. (6/616)

Gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase catalyzes the first step in glutathione synthesis. The enzyme consists of 2 subunits, heavy and light, with the heavy subunit serving as the catalytic subunit. A patient with hemolytic anemia and low red blood cell glutathione levels was found to have a deficiency of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity. Examination of cDNA from the patient and her mother showed that she was homozygous and that her mother was heterozygous for a A-->T transversion at nt1109 producing a deduced amino acid change of His370Leu. The partial genomic structure of the catalytic subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GLCLC) was determined, providing some intron/exon boundaries to make it possible to sequence an affected part of the coding region from genomic DNA. The 1109A-->T mutation was not present in the DNA of 38 normal subjects. In the course of these studies we found a diallelic polymorphism in nt +206 of an intron and another polymorphism that consisted of a duplication of a CAGC at cDNA nt1972-1975 in the 3' untranslated region. The 2 polymorphisms were found to be only in partial linkage disequilibrium.  (+info)

Molecular basis and enzymatic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase volendam, leading to chronic nonspherocytic anemia, granulocyte dysfunction, and increased susceptibility to infections. (7/616)

We have investigated the blood cells from a woman with a low degree of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia and frequent bacterial infections accompanied by icterus and anemia. The activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in her red blood cells (RBCs) was below detection level, and in her leukocytes less than 3% of normal. In cultured skin fibroblasts, G6PD activity was approximately 15% of normal, with 4- to 5-fold increased Michaelis constant (Km) for NADP and for glucose 6-phosphate. Activated neutrophils showed a decreased respiratory burst. Family studies showed normal G6PD activity in the RBCs from all family members, including both parents and the 2 daughters of the patient. Sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA showed a novel, heterozygous 514C-->T mutation, predicting a Pro172-->Ser replacement. Analysis of G6PD RNA from the patient's leukocytes and fibroblasts showed only transcripts with the 514C-->T mutation. This was explained by the pattern of X-chromosome inactivation, studied by means of the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay, which proved to be skewed in the patient, her mother, and one of the patient's daughters. Thus, the patient has inherited a de novo mutation in G6PD from her father and an X-chromosome inactivation determinant from her mother, causing exclusive expression of the mutated G6PD allele. Purified mutant protein from an Escherichia coli expression system showed strongly decreased specific activity, increased Km for NADP and for glucose 6-phosphate, and increased heat lability, which indicates that the defective phenotype is due to 2 synergistic molecular dysfunctions: decreased catalytic efficiency and protein instability.  (+info)

Reversal of metabolic block in glycolysis by enzyme replacement in triosephosphate isomerase-deficient cells. (8/616)

Inherited deficiency of the housekeeping enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is the most severe clinical disorder of glycolysis. Homozygotes manifest congenital hemolytic anemia and progressive neuromuscular impairment, which in most cases pursues an inexorable course with fatal outcome in early childhood. No effective therapy is available. Hitherto specific enzyme replacement has not been attempted in disorders of glycolysis. Primary skeletal muscle myoblasts and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines generated from homozygous TPI-deficient patients were cultured in the presence of exogenous enzyme or cocultured with human K562 erythroleukemia cells as an exogenous source of TPI. Uptake of active enzyme by TPI-deficient cells resulted in reversal of intracellular substrate accumulation, with a reduction in dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) concentration to levels seen in TPI-competent cells. Evidence of successful metabolic correction of TPI deficiency in vitro establishes the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy, and has important implications for the potential role of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy as a means of sustained delivery of functional enzyme in vivo.  (+info)

*Hemolysis

... in uncontrolled chronic or severe cases it can lead to hemolytic anemia. A hemolytic crisis, or hyperhemolytic crisis, is ... Note that these hemolytic properties do not necessarily present in vivo. Alpha-hemolytic species, including S. pneumoniae, ... drug-induced hemolytic anemia), some genetic disorders (e.g., Sickle-cell disease or G6PD deficiency), or blood with too low a ... Gamma-hemolytic, or non-hemolytic, species do not cause hemolysis and rarely cause illness. The genus Enterococcus includes ...

*Coombs test

Acute Anemia - emedicine.com Drugs that cause haemolytic anemia - Merck Manual. Coombs' Test at the US National Library of ... Anti-Kell hemolytic disease of the newborn Rh c hemolytic disease of the newborn Rh E hemolytic disease of the newborn Other ... Alloimmune hemolytic transfusion reactions Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia Idiopathic Systemic lupus erythematosus ... Hemolytic disease of the newborn (also known as HDN or erythroblastosis fetalis) Rh D hemolytic disease of the newborn (also ...

*LRBA deficiency

Predominant clinical problems include idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), and an ...

*Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

Hemolytic anemia is the hemolytic state in which anemia is present, and bone marrow function is inferentially unable to ... Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (or autoimmune haemolytic anaemia; AIHA) occurs when antibodies directed against the person's own ... AIHA is classified as either warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia or cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which includes cold ... The National Cancer Institute considers "immunohemolytic anemia", "autoimmune hemolytic anemia", and "immune complex hemolytic ...

*Mechanical hemolytic anemia

... is a form of hemolytic anemia due to mechanically induced damage to red blood cells. Red blood ... Mechanical damage can also be induced through the chronic condition microangiopathic hemolytic anemia or due to prosthetic ... Runner's anemia as a benefit versus runner's hemolysis as a detriment". The American Journal of Medicine. 78 (2): 321-5. doi: ... This is not a pathological condition but may indicate a propensity toward iron deficiency anemia due to high red blood cell ...

*Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia

... (WAIHA) is the most common form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. About half of the ... ISBN 0-7216-0187-1. AUTOIMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA (AIHA) By J.L. Jenkins. The Regional Cancer Center. 2001 Nowak-Wegrzyn A, King ... Contrary to cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (e.g., cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) which happens ... May 2002). "Mixed warm and cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia: complete recovery after 2 courses of rituximab treatment". Blood. ...

*Hemolytic anemia

... or haemolytic anaemia is a form of anemia due to hemolysis, the abnormal breakdown of red blood cells (RBCs), ... Low-grade hemolytic anemia occurs in 70% of prosthetic heart valve recipients, and severe hemolytic anemia occurs in 3%. ... In cold hemolytic anemia there is advantage in transfuse warmed blood In severe immune-related hemolytic anemia, steroid ... Similarly, poisoning by arsine or stibine also causes hemolytic anemia. Runners can suffer hemolytic anemia due to "footstrike ...

*Acquired hemolytic anemia

... can be divided into immune and non-immune mediated forms of hemolytic anemia. Immune mediated ... hemolytic anaemia (direct Coombs test is positive) Autoimmune hemolytic anemia Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia ... It can be divided in the following manner: Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia Drug-induced nonautoimmune hemolytic anemia ... Alloimmune hemolytic anemia Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) Rh disease (Rh D) ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn Anti- ...

*Congenital hemolytic anemia

... (or hereditary hemolytic anemia) refers to hemolytic anemia which is primarily due to congenital ... hemolytic) anemia, which is a term for a congenital hemolytic anemia without spherocytosis, and usually excluding hemoglobin ... medconditions.net > Hemolytic Congenital, Nonspherocytic Anemia Definition Retrieved April 15, 2011 Shah A (November 2004). " ... Basically classified by causative mechanism, types of congenital hemolytic anemia include: Genetic conditions of RBC Membrane ...

*Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia

... caused by cold-reacting autoantibodies. Autoantibodies that bind to the erythrocyte membrane ... Cold agglutinins develop in more than 60% of patients with infectious mononucleosis, but hemolytic anemia is rare. Classic ... Anemia is generally mild. Only patients who have serious symptoms related to anemia or have a Raynaud type syndrome that ... Transplantation: Cold agglutinin-mediated hemolytic anemia has been described in patients after living-donor liver ...

*Spur cell hemolytic anemia

... , is a form of hemolytic anemia that results secondary to severe impaired liver function or cirrhosis ... List of hematologic conditions "Spur-cell hemolytic anemia in severe alcoholic cirrhosis". Journal of the American Society of ...

*Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia

... is a form of hemolytic anemia. In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics) - most common cause[ ... Cefotetan-dependent hemolytic anemia mimicking an acute intravascular immune transfusion reaction". American Journal of ... MedlinePlus Encyclopedia Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia Stroncek, David; Procter, Jo L.; Johnson, Judy (2000). "Drug- ...

*Drug-induced nonautoimmune hemolytic anemia

... is a form of hemolytic anemia. Non-immune drug induced hemolysis can occur via ... Jollow, DJ; Bradshaw, TP; McMillan, DC (1995). "Dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia". Drug Metab. Rev. 27 (1-2): 107-24. doi: ... April 2004). "Primaquine-induced hemolytic anemia: Susceptibility of normal versus glutathione-depleted rat erythrocytes to 5- ...

*DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Blood Disorders: Anemia: Hemolytic

Family Practice Notebook: Hemolytic Anemia Hematology and oncology of hemolytic anemia. A look at the causes, lab work and ... MedlinePlus: Hemolytic Anemia Overview of the condition giving alternative names, a definition, causes, incidence and risk ...

*Hemoglobinemia

"Hemolytic Anemia". University of Virginia Health System. Retrieved 2009-05-01. Coagulation Blood diseases. ... This is an effect of intravascular hemolysis, in which hemoglobin separates from red blood cells, a form of anemia. ...

*CD55 deficiency

Brodsky, Robert A. (2015-11-26). "Complement in hemolytic anemia". Blood. 126 (22): 2459-2465. doi:10.1182/blood-2015-06-640995 ...

*Hemolysin

"What Is Hemolytic Anemia? - NHLBI, NIH". United States National Institutes of Health. 2011-04-01. Retrieved 2012-11-24. Kebaier ... The main consequence of hemolysis is hemolytic anemia, condition that involves the destruction of erythrocytes and their later ...

*Shih Tzu

The Shih Tzu may be more prone than other breeds to get a blood disease called immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, which causes ... "Immune-mediated Hemolytic Anemia, Canine". Clinton Parkway Animal Hospital, Veterinary Health Services. Retrieved 18 April 2015 ...

*Degmacyte

Yoo, D; Lessin, LS (1992). "Drug-associated 'bite cell' Hemolytic anemia". The American Journal of Medicine. 92 (3): 243-8. doi ...

*GCLC

A cause of hereditary hemolytic anemia". The New England Journal of Medicine. 286 (11): 557-61. doi:10.1056/NEJM197203162861101 ... Deficiency of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in human is associated with enzymopathic hemolytic anemia. Model organisms have ... "A missense mutation in the heavy subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene causes hemolytic anemia". Blood. 95 (7): ... "Gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase deficiency and hemolytic anemia". Blood. 75 (1): 271-3. PMID 2294991. Konrad PN, Richards F, ...

*Cold agglutinin disease

Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia List of hematologic conditions Cold Agglutinin Disease at eMedicine Gertz, Moric A ( ... It is a form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, specifically one in which antibodies only bind red blood cells at low body ... Individuals with cold agglutinin disease present with signs and symptoms of hemolytic anemia. Those with secondary agglutinin ... Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E. (2015). "Cold Agglutinin-Mediated Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia". ...

*List of OMIM disorder codes

SEC23B Anemia, hemolytic, due to UMPH1 deficiency; 266120; NT5C3 Anemia, hemolytic, Rh-null, regulator type; 268150; RHAG ... SLC40A1 Hemolytic anemia due to adenylate kinase deficiency; 612631; AK1 Hemolytic anemia due to gamma-glutamylcysteine ... GCLC Hemolytic anemia due to glutathione synthetase deficiency; 231900; GSS Hemolytic anemia due to hexokinase deficiency; ... HK1 Hemolytic anemia, nonspherocytic, due to glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency; 613470; GPI Hemolytic uremic syndrome, ...

*Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

Schneider, Arthur S.; William N. Valentine; Hattori M; H. L. Heins Jr (1965). "Hereditary Hemolytic Anemia with Triosephosphate ... It is a unique glycolytic enzymopathy that is characterized by chronic haemolytic anaemia, cardiomyopathy, susceptibility to ...

*HK1

Mutations in this gene have been associated with hemolytic anemia due to hexokinase deficiency. Alternative splicing of this ... Bianchi M, Magnani M (1995). "Hexokinase mutations that produce nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia". Blood Cells, Molecules & ... "Generalized hexokinase deficiency in the blood cells of a patient with nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia". Blood. 61 (1): 12-8. ... deficiency has been identified as a cause of erythroenzymopathies associated with hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia ( ...

*List of dog diseases

Hemolytic anemia* is a type of regenerative anemia found in dogs characterized by destruction of the red blood cell. The most ... Babesiosis can cause hemolytic anemia in dogs. Neosporosis* is caused by Neospora caninum Protothecosis in dogs is caused by a ... Antibodies are present on the cell surface, leading to lysis and severe anemia. Other causes of hemolytic lesion include ... may be a sign of hemolytic anemia, indicating the need for a complete blood count to investigate a possible diagnosis. Heart ...

*Childbirth

Delayed clamping of the cord decreases the risk of anemia but may increase risk of jaundice. Clamping is followed by cutting of ... Abruptio placentae Chorioamnionitis Fetal compromise such as isoimmunization leading to hemolytic disease of the newborn or ...

*Kinase

"Nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia due to hexokinase deficiency". "Phosphofructokinase Deficiency Glycogen Storage Disease". Bauer ... Mutations in the hexokinase gene can lead to a hexokinase deficiency which can cause nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. ...
Severe Hemolytic Anemia Post-Renal Transplantation Produced by Donor Anti-D Passenger Lymphocytes: Case Report and Literature Review Academic Article ...
Tips to help with your thrombocytopenia: Thrombocytopenia Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia. My thrombocytopenia, Online resources for thrombocytopenia.
Claycomb C, Berkovic M. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, noncardiac pulmonary edema, and renal failure after treatment of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C: report of a case. J Am Osteopath Assoc 1986;86(8):499. doi: 10.7556/jaoa.1986.86.8.499.. Download citation file:. ...
Immune-mediated diseases result from the immune system inappropriately attacking and damaging or destroying parts of itself. A number of important immune-mediated diseases including immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP; a disorder leading to platelet destruction and uncontrolled hemorrhage) unfortunately are common and very serious problems in pet dogs. With IMHA, the bodys own immune system begins to hunt down and destroy its red blood cells resulting in oftentimes life-threatening anemia. IMHA can be frustrating for veterinarians and financially and emotionally challenging for pet owners. Sometimes the disease is considered primary and its cause is unknown. In other cases, it is deemed secondary, a complication of another underlying illness. Nor is treatment universal. It is not uncommon for dogs to fail to respond to the prescribed drugs or for the drugs to have unpleasant or unacceptable side effects. In other cases, dogs initial treatment is a ...
Mechanical hemolytic anemia is a form of hemolytic anemia due to mechanically induced damage to red blood cells. Red blood cells, while flexible, may in some circumstances succumb to physical shear and compression. This may result in hemoglobinuria. The damage is induced through repetitive mechanical motions such as prolonged marching (march hemoglobinuria) and marathon running. Mechanical damage can also be induced through the chronic condition microangiopathic hemolytic anemia or due to prosthetic heart valves. Repetitive impacts to the body may cause mechanical trauma and bursting (hemolysis) of red blood cells. This has been documented to have occurred in the feet during running and hands from Conga or Candombe drumming. Defects in red blood cell membrane proteins have been identified in some of these patients. Free haemoglobin is released from lysed red blood cells and filtered into the urine. March hematuria, occurs when blood is seen in the urine after repetitive impacts on the body, ...
The presence of any intravascular mechanism that destroys red cells in excess of bone marrow compensation results in an anemia of the hemolytic type. Any classification of the hemolytic anemias is difficult because of the large number and wide variety of agents that can destroy red cells. Among such agents are bacterial and parasitic infections, drugs, chemicals, animal poisons, and occasionally red cell destruction occurs as an allergic phenomenon as observed in sensitivity to the bean Vicia fava or the pollen of its flower. Chronic familial hemolytic icterus with spherocytosis, increased fragility of the red cells to hypotonic saline solutions ...
If you have a severe medically determinable impairment s that does not meet a listing, we will determine whether your impairment s medically equals a listing. Share this page from the NHLBI on Blogger. Hemolytic anemias, both congenital and acquired, are disorders that result. Primary care doctors, such as a family doctor or pediatrician, may help diagnose and treat hemolytic anemia. Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Nephrology Association. Hemolytic disease of the newborn. Tchernia G, Delhommeau F, Perrotta S, Cynober T, Bader-Meunier B, Nobili B, et al. Successful treatment of a patient with mixed warm and cold antibody mediated Evans syndrome and glucose intolerance. Symptoms of hemolytic anemia are similar to other forms of anemia fatigue and shortness of breathbut in addition, the breakdown of red cells leads to jaundice and increases the risk of particular long-term complications, such hook with local singles comcasual hookups gallstones and pulmonary hypertension. Cervantes ...
Gallegher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldmans Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161.. Jager U, Lechner K. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 44.. Price EA, Schrier SS. Extrinsic nonimmune hemolytic anemias. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 45. ...
Mice with normoblastosis, nb/nb, have a severe hemolytic anemia. The extreme fragility and shortened lifespan of the mutant erythrocytes result from a defective membrane skeleton. Previous studies in our laboratory indicated a 50% deficiency of spectrin and an absence of normal ankyrin in erythrocyte membranes of nb/nb mice. We now report genetic mapping data that localize both the nb and erythroid ankyrin (Ank-1) loci to the centromeric end of mouse chromosome 8. Using immunological and biochemical methods, we have further characterized the nature of the ankyrin defect in mutant erythrocytes. We do not detect normal sized (210 kDa) erythroid ankyrin by immunoblot analysis in nb/nb reticulocytes. However, nb/nb reticulocytes do contain a 150-kDa ankyrin immunoreactive protein. The 150-kDa protein is present with normal-sized ankyrin in nb/+ reticulocytes but is not found in +/+ reticulocytes. Our genetic and biochemical data indicate that the nb mutation results from a defect in the
To examine the possibility that intravascular haemolysis may lead to intravascular coagulation we have compared the degree of fibrin deposition, as measured by levels of serum fibrinogen-fibrin degradation products (F.D.P.), in two different types of intravascular haemolysis associated with red cell fragmentation. F.D.P. levels in 56 patients with intravascular haemolysis secondary to prosthetic heart valves were compared with those in 18 patients who had microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (M.H.A.) associated with malignant hypertension or renal disease. F.D.P. levels were raised in almost all the patients with M.H.A., and this group had significantly higher levels than any of the valve replacement groups. In contrast, in the prosthetic valve patients F.D.P. levels were usually normal and bore no relation to the degree of haemolysis. It is suggested that in the absence of other precipitating factors intravascular haemolysis will not initiate intravascular coagulation. In M.H.A., while the ...
Despite modern technological advancements in laboratory hematology, the blood film remains an important diagnostic aid. Herein, we report the case of a patient with a history of gastric cancer, who presented seven years following apparently successfu
Summary GlobalDatas clinical trial report, Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2015″ provides an overview of Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia clinical trials scenario. This report provides top line data relating to the clinical trials on Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia. Report includes.... ...
Cold Agglutinin hemolytic anemia due to cold autoantibodies associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae is rare. Optimal treatment includes antibiotics and maintenance of a constant warm environment for the patient. This treatment, however, may result in a prolonged, costly, and confining hospitalization.. We report the use of an environmental suit for a patient with severe hemolysis due to M. pneumoniae pneumonia. This suit provides a constant temperature and has enabled the patient to journey outside his room, despite winter temperatures, yet avoid further hemolytic episodes. Early discharge was possible and has facilitated the patients return to home and work as well as ...
A 34 year old Chinese woman with limited scleroderma presented with rapid onset of mental confusion and generalised tonic-clonic seizures. Her blood pressure control had been unsatisfactory in the preceding 4 weeks despite the use of three anti-hypertensive agents, which included an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Malignant hypertension (blood pressure 240/140 mm Hg on admission) was evident, with typical fundoscopic abnormalities, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, and rapidly deteriorating renal function with acute oligouric renal failure (increase in serum creatinine from baseline of 86 to 495 μmol/l in 3 days). There was, however, no evidence of left ventricular failure.. Treatment was given in the intensive care unit with infusions of labetalol (up to 150 mg/h) and iloprost (up to 10 μg/h), large doses of captopril (150 mg/day), and haemodialysis. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain showed marked vasogenic oedema distributed symmetrically at the cortex, ...
Lipid peroxidation has long been considered to play a role in the mechanism underlying arylamine drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Much of the basis for this concept comes from early studies, such as those byRasbridge and Scott (1973), who showed that red cells from dapsone patients were unusually sensitive to peroxide-induced lysis. Other investigators have demonstrated the correlation between hydrogen peroxide formation in red cells treated with various hemolytic agents, and lipid peroxidation and hemolysis (Cohen and Hochstein, 1964; Stocks and Dormandy, 1971; Ferrali et al., 1992). Goldstein and McDonagh (1976) reported that although there was no evidence for an increase in blood levels of MDA in dapsone-treated rats, spectra consistent with a fluorescent cross-link of MDA with aminolipid were observed. However, as noted by the authors, the presence of membrane-bound hemoglobin complicated interpretation of the results; heme is a potentiator of lipid peroxidation and could have produced ...
Hemolytic anemia is a disorder in which red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can be made. The destruction of red blood cells is called hemolysis. Red blood cells carry oxygen to all parts of your body. If you have a lower than normal amount of red blood cells, you have anemia. When you have anemia, your blood cant bring enough oxygen to all your tissues and organs. Without enough oxygen, your body cant work as well as it should. Hemolytic anemia can be inherited or acquired:. ...
Auto-immune Hemolytic Anemia is a life threatening disease where the body attacks its own red blood cells. Symptoms of Auto-immune Hemolytic Anemia are jaundice, fainting, pale gums, lips and eye margins, dark tea colored urine, lethargy and rapid
What is Hemolytic Anemia ? Hemolytic anemia is a rare blood disorder in which red blood cells are rapidly destroyed. The severity of this type of anemia is dete
Hemolytic anemia occurs when the body does not have enough healthy red blood cells (RBCs). This is because the cells are destroyed too early. The body also does not make new RBCs fast enough to replace the ones that are destroyed. There are many types of hemolytic anemia.
Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA) current information. Natural protocol for Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia by a Master Herbalist with The Pet Health and Nutrition Center...
View details of top hemolytic anemia hospitals in Gurgaon. Get guidance from medical experts to select best hemolytic anemia hospital in Gurgaon
Do You Have Warm-reacting-antibody Hemolytic Anemia? Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Warm-reacting-antibody Hemolytic Anemia group. Find support forums, advice and chat with groups who share this life experience. A Warm-reacti...
Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis: 0.4-26% cats. Pathogenicity. M. haemofelis is the most pathogenic feline haemoplasma species. Acute infection often results in severe haemolytic anaemia (especially in young cats), although at other times only mild anaemia is seen. Chronic infection is not usually associated with anaemia. Cats do not need to be immunocompromised or splenectomised to succumb to M. haemofelis clinical disease. Epidemiological studies have only variably demonstrated associations between anaemia and M. haemofelis infection, likely because these studies usually include chronically M. haemofelis-infected asymptomatic cats. Persistent autoagglutination or positive Coombs testing, indicating the presence of RBC-bound antibodies, are found in anaemic cats with acute M. haemofelis infection,1 although these antibodies usually appear only after the start of the development of anaemia, suggesting that they are as a result of haemoplasma-induced haemolysis rather than initiating ...
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Plasma cells are mature B lymphocytes that engage in the production of one specific antibody.Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs when the red cell membrane is damaged in circulation,.Characteristic red blood cell abnormalities are anemia, sickle cell anemia and spherocytosis.The preferred and most reliable diagnosis of malaria is microscopic examination of blood films, because each of the four major parasite species has distinguishing characteristics.Others tests to determine anemia include the red blood cell count and the hemoglobin count.. Doctors give unbiased, trusted information on the benefits and side effects of Mephyton to treat Anemia: Dr.Since your body has fewer red blood cells when you have thalassemia, you may have symptoms of a low blood count, or anemia ...
The hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders in which the red blood cells are destroyed faster than the bone marrow can make them. The term for destruction of red blood cells is hemolysis.
Heritable Hemolytic Anemia/PKD is where the red cells have a genetically controlled defective pyruvate kinase activity. This is not a curable anemia.
One week before Thanksgiving our 2 year old Mastiff became ill. Upon waking Thursday morning she was lethargic and disinterested in eating/going out. I left work early to get her to our vet. Initially they suspected an intestinal blockage per xrays. Upon doing blood work they found her red blood count was down to 9% and she needed an immediate transfusion. We rushed down to the nearest emergency care facility (an hour away) where she was diagnosed with Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA). She spent the better part of ten days at the facility receiving round the clock care and numerous blood transfusions and expensive immunosuppressants. She finally began to stabilize after 8 days. My wife and I were worried that we were going to have to make the hard choice. Thank goodness we didnt. We submitted a claim of over 10k to Trupanion. They covered everything save for our $100 deductible and a 10% copay. She still has a long way to go, 6-8 month of treatment, and even then there is no guarantee ...
... definition, an anemic condition characterized by the destruction of red blood cells: seen in some drug reactions and in certain infectious and hereditary disorders. See more.
A mild normochromic, normocytic anaemia is a common finding and usually a consequence of other diseases, including (1) anaemia of chronic disorders-associated with chronic infection, all forms of inflammatory diseases, and malignant disease; mechanism
View Notes - Heme cases Mar 24_teaching aid from PHARM HEM at UCSD. Feb 24, 2011 SOM 214 Hemolytic anemias Classifications: Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic = mechanism Hereditary vs. Acquired = chronicity,
Complete information about Hemolytic Anemia, including signs and symptoms; conditions that suggest it; contributing risk factors; conditions suggested by it.
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Compare risks and benefits of common medications used for Hemolytic Anemia. Find the most popular drugs, view ratings, user reviews, and more...
G6PD Deficiency is a Hereditary Condition that can Cause Hemolytic Anemia when a Person is Exposed to Triggers like Certain Meication and Particular Food.
Methods Forty patients were studied. Initially a test cohort of 10 patients with multiple sclerosis and 10 patients with microangiopathic white matter lesions underwent brain 3T MRI. Anonymised scans were analysed blind to clinical data, and simple diagnostic rules were devised, which were applied to a validation cohort of 20 patients (13 with multiple sclerosis and 7 with microangiopathic lesions).. ...
A G6PD deficiency is an inherited disorder (by X-linked recessive transmission). It can lead to a certain type of anemia known as hemolytic anemia. Anemia is a blood disorder in which the body doesnt have enough red blood cells.. G6PD protects oxygen-rich red blood cells (RBCs) from chemicals called reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS build up in your body during a fever, infection, or when you take certain medications. If your G6PD levels are too low, your RBCs wont be protected from these chemicals. The blood cells will die, leading to anemia.. Certain foods, medications, infections, and severe stress can trigger a hemolytic episode, which is the rapid destruction of RBCs. In people with hemolytic anemia, the body cant produce enough RBCs to replace those that have been destroyed. Your doctor may order a G6PD test if they suspect you have hemolytic anemia based on symptoms such as:. ...
You may need this test to tell your healthcare provider whether you have antibodies that have attached to your red blood cells. You may need this test if you have symptoms of hemolytic anemia after a blood transfusion. A baby may need this blood test if the babys mother makes antibodies against the babys red blood cells and passes those antibodies to the baby inside the womb. This condition is called hemolytic disease of the newborn.. The most common cause of hemolytic anemia is when your immune system makes antibodies to your own red blood cells by mistake. When your immune system makes antibodies against your own healthy cells, it is called autoimmune disease. Symptoms or signs of hemolytic anemia may include:. ...
My favorite aspect of practicing medicine is treating diseases caused by dysfunction of the immune system. In previous blogs, I reviewed two common immune-mediated diseases - immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. A less commonly appreciated condition of immune system dysfunction is immune-mediated polyarthropathy or IMPA, a disease where the immune system attacks a pets joints. … [Read more…] ...
My favorite aspect of practicing medicine is treating diseases caused by dysfunction of the immune system. In previous blogs, I reviewed two common immune-mediated diseases - immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. A less commonly appreciated condition of immune system dysfunction is immune-mediated polyarthropathy or IMPA, a disease where the immune system attacks a pets joints. … [Read more…] ...
4- Finally and most importantly, over vaccination is now believed to be at the source of many auto-immune diseases. Although Veterinary colleges all teach their students that following the first sets of vaccines a puppy receives, re-vaccinations should be done every 3 to 4 years and should end when the dog reaches 7 to 9 years of age, Vets continue to send reminder cards to their clients yearly. People dont get vaccinated every year, and neither should animals. Even the department of agriculture of most countries recognises this fact when they require you to vaccinate your dogs against rabies every 3 years. By constantly activating the immune system of our dogs, their cells learn to react against much of their own normal systems, inflicting various autoimmune diseases such as lupus, immune-mediated arthritis, immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and much more... If your dog suffer from any autoimmune disease, it is recommanded that he does not receive anymore vaccines with the exception of Rabies ...
Treatment will depend on your childs symptoms, age, and general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is.. A child with hemolytic anemia is often treated by a hematologist, an expert in blood disorders. The treatment for hemolytic anemia will vary depending on the cause of the illness and how severe the anemia is. Some children do not need treatment. For those that do, treatment may include:. ...
Sera from 125 patients receiving mean total doses of beta-lactam therapy of 215 g over a mean of 14 days were assayed by radioimmunoassay. Titres of anti-penicilloyl antibodies, expressed in arbitrary units of specific IgG per microliter of serum (u/microliter), ranged from undetectable (less than 3 u/microliter) to 1,650 u/microliter. There was a higher prevalence of elevated IgG levels in patients who developed haemolytic anaemia or neutropenia compared with patients with no adverse reactions but only in those patients who developed haemolytic anaemia were the antibody titres significantly higher ...
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The Kerry Blue Terrier Foundation (KBTF) is pleased to announce that it has contributed funds to an important research study on autoimmune diseases in dogs.
So I have MS, so what? There are so many more things going on. Besides there are a million MS bloggers out there, all of whom write a helluva lot better about the topic than do I [some are on the list below]. Id rather write about current events, entertainment, technology, geek toys and mood swings; they are usually much more fun ...
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There are two main reasons why a dog crashes with anemia after boosters. Either its from the vaccine and the vaccine alone - thats the hemolytic anemia that you were reading about - or there was a subclinical disease process going on that the vaccine triggered into a more virulent form. These disease processes tend to be either a tick disease, or cancer. With the fever, I would tend to tick disease too, and I would treat, regardless of what the SNAP says, we have many examples on the tick list of the SNAP being negative and more extensive titer tests being positive ...
A new series of ortho-naphthoquinone analogs of β-lapachone were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The biological results indicated that most of our compounds were efficient substrates for NQO1. The new scaffold with water-soluble side chain resulted in greater solubility under acidic condition compared to β-lapachone. Thus avoiding the use of hydroxylpropyl β-cyclodextrin which would finally cause the rapid drug clearance from the blood and dose-limiting toxicity in the form of hemolytic anemia. The most soluble and promising compound in this series was 2-((4-benzylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl)naphtho[2,1-d]oxazole-4,5-dione (3k), which inhibited cancer cell (NQO1-rich A549 cell line) growth at IC50 values of 4 ...
Blood Case Studies BIO 169 1. A) The primary disorder of this person is Hemolytic Anemia. That is when the bone marrow is unable to produce more red blood
It looks like this is going to be a short hospitalization for John. He just got to the hospital on Monday and they are already talking about discharging him today (Thursday). Either today or tomorrow. Dr. Claxton has decided that John will get chemo for four to eight weeks, probably eight, to try to help the Hemolytic Anemia. And he figured there was no reason John couldnt get the chemo where we live, as well as the blood John will need, so he decided John could be sent home soon. Then the doctor doing the rotations made the decision yesterday that John could come home today.. I hope it is not too soon, but John is looking so much better than when he came in. Like a different person. And he can get the blood and chemo where we live. Mitzi, Dr. Claxtons nurse, has set it up so that Johns blood will be available where we live, twice a week, no matter what, so that if he needs it, it will be there, instead of him having to wait days like before. So that will be a new and excellent thing.. So ...
Todays morning report was an interesting case of hemolytic anemia: check out a prior post on the topic here, with a few links at the bottom to review articles ...
In medicine (hematology) microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) is a microangiopathic subgroup of hemolytic anemia (loss of red blood cells through destruction) caused by factors in the small blood vessels. It is identified by the finding of anemia and schistocytes on microscopy of the blood film. In diseases such as hemolytic uremic syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and malignant hypertension, the endothelial layer of small vessels is damaged with resulting fibrin deposition and platelet aggregation. As red blood cells travel through these damaged vessels, they are fragmented resulting in intravascular hemolysis. The resulting schistocytes (red cell fragments) are also increasingly targeted for destruction by the reticuloendothelial system in the spleen, due to their narrow passage through obstructed vessel lumina. It is seen in systemic lupus erythematosus, where immune complexes aggregate with platelets, forming intravascular thrombi. ...
To the editor: Nomifensine (Merital, Hoechst-Roussel, Somerville, New Jersey), a non-tricyclic antidepressant, was withdrawn from the worldwide market (1) in January 1986 after reports from Europe of serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity reactions, notably hemolytic anemia. The following case report appears to document the worst reaction to nomifensine in the United States. It supports previous reports suggesting an association between nomifensine and acute hemolytic anemia with subsequent acute renal failure.. A 32-year-old white female nurse took nomifensine for several months in 1985 for depression, with no complications. Later, against advice, she took one 50-mg capsule and within a few hours ...
CHAPTER 57 DRUG-RELATED IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA Williams Hematology CHAPTER 57 DRUG-RELATED IMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA CHARLES H. PACKMAN Definitions and History Etiology and Pathogenesis Hapten or Drug Adsorption Mechanism Ternary Complex Mechanism: Drug-Antibody-Target Cell Complex Autoantibody Mechanism Nonimmunologic Protein Adsorption Clinical Features Laboratory Features Differential Diagnosis Therapy, Course, and Prognosis Therapy Course and Prognosis Chapter References…
The first deficiency to be demonstrated was a haemolytic Anemia described in premature infants. Infant formulations now contain vitamin E. Haemolytic anaemia is a breakdown of red cells with haemolysis which results in anaemia. There is sequestration of the red cells in the spleen which may enlarge.. A haemolytic anaemia is where the red blood cells are being broken down resulting in the patient becoming anaemic. There are a number of things which can attack the red blood cells. In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia it seems that the body is producing its own attack - that is, it is producing antibodies which it would normally produce to fight infections to fight its own cells. There are a lot of autoimmune diseases of different kinds and this haemolytic anaemia might be part of one of those diseases or it might be a problem in its own right - then it tends to get called idiopathic autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.. Acquired haemolytic anaemia may also be caused by the presence of antibodies ...
SUMMARY Hemolytic anemia is a prominent part of the clinical presentation of patients infected with organisms such as the Plasmodium sp., Babesia, and Bartonella, which directly invade the erythrocyte. Malaria is the most common cause of hemolytic anemia on a worldwide basis, and much has been learned about how the parasite enters the erythrocyte and the mechanism of anemia. Falciparum malaria, in particular, can cause severe and sometimes fatal hemolysis (blackwater fever). Other organisms cause hemolytic anemia by producing a hemolysin (e.g., Clostridium perfringens), by stimulating an immune response (e.g., Mycoplasma pneumoniae), by enhancing macrophage recognition and hemophagocytosis, or by as yet unknown mechanisms. The many different infections that have been associated with hemolytic anemia are tabulated and references to the original studies provided.. ...
Hereditary hemolytic anemia, a dominantly transmitted disorder, has affected 12 family members spanning three generations. The concentration of adenosine triphosphate in the red cells was about half that of comparably reticulocyte-rich blood. Since adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase compete for a common substrate, the greatly increased activity of the former may interfere with nucleotide salvage via the latter. ...
We have investigated the hemolytic mechanisms in a patient with acquired immune hemolytic anemia whose red cells appeared to be coated with IgA alone. The clinical course was similar to that of patients with hemolytic anemia mediated by warm-reacting IgG antibody. Splenic sequestration of red cells was demonstrated, and marked reduction of hemolysis occurred after corticosteroid therapy. Antibody was eluted from the patients red cells and used to sensitize normal red cells in vitro. These sensitized red cells were not lysed by fresh autologous serum, nor did they fix detectable amounts of C3. However, red cells sensitized by eluted antibody were lysed by normal human peripheral blood monocytes in a system designed to demonstrate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Monocyte-mediated hemolysis of sensitized red cells was inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of normal serum IgA to the system, but not by IgG. The ability of the eluate to induce monocyte-mediated hemolysis was ...
Spur cell anaemia (acanthocytosis), a rare acquired haemolytic anaemia observed mainly in the end stages of alcoholic cirrhosis, is characterised by an increased ratio of free cholesterol to phospholipid in the erythrocyte membranes that results in multispiculated erythrocytes (acanthocytes). These acanthocytes undergo rapid splenic destruction and consequently have a shortened survival. Recent studies have indicated that alcoholic iron overload may be associated with spur cell anaemia rather than hereditary haemochromatosis. Patients usually need frequent blood transfusions and the prognosis is extremely poor. Liver transplantation, which improves hepatic function and resolves spur cell anaemia, has been the most effective treatment. Our patient did not choose liver transplantation. She had a poor response to conservative treatment with multiple blood transfusions and died of liver failure seven months later. ...
the child was given her second doses of the oral polio virus, hepatitis B, and diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP) vaccines, and within four days she exhibited lethargy, a low level fever, and lack of appetite. She was unresponsive when admitted to the hospital three days later, suffering from severe anemia and low hemoglobin levels. Tests for Haemophilus influenza, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neiseria meningitidis were negative or did not appear conclusively as cause or contributor to the current condition. The infant continued to experience severe hemolysis and died 41 hours after admission. Although the study could not prove it conclusively, by eliminating other causes of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), the researchers suggest that, in this case, there is a causal relationship to the second DTP vaccination. A 1992 report from the Institute of Medicine concluded, however, that there is insufficient evidence of either the presence or absence of such a connection.. ...
Another name for Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia is Hemolytic Anemia. Early symptoms of hemolytic anemia may include: * Anorexia * Weakness or fatigue - During ...
Looking for haemolytic anaemia? Find out information about haemolytic anaemia. A decrease in the blood concentration of hemoglobin and the number of erythrocytes, due to the inability of the mature erythrocytes to survive in the... Explanation of haemolytic anaemia
Immune mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA), also known as auto-immune mediated hemolytic anemia (AIHA), is a disease in which the bodys immune system, which is designed to attack and kill germs, attacks and kills the bodys own red blood cells. The attack begins when antibodies, which are molecules made by the immune system to target germs, instead attach to and target the animals own red blood cells for destruction. The red blood cells carry oxygen to the tissues, and the animal cannot survive without adequate oxygenation of the tissues. The causes of IMHA remain largely unknown. While some cases of IMHA may be associated with a triggering event (cancer, infection, and perhaps even vaccinations), these events do not explain why the immune system misdirects its arsenal of weapons against the animal it is meant to protect ...
Formerly known as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or AIHA) Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a condition where the patients immune system begins attacking his or her own red blood cells. What occurs on a microscopic level is this: the branch of the immune system that produces antibodies begins to direct them against the patients own red blood cells. The red blood cells become quickly coated with tiny antibody proteins, essentially marking these red blood cells for destruction. When too many red blood cells are destroyed the patient is said to be anemic, and will feel cold and weak ...
Lux, S E.; Wolfe, L C.; Pease, B; Tomaselli, M B.; John, K M.; and Bernstein, S E., " Hemolytic anemias due to abnormalities in red cell spectrin: a brief review." (1981). Faculty Research 1980 - 1989. 159 ...
... is anemia due to hemolysis , the abnormal breakdown of red blood cells either in the blood vessels (intravascular hemolysis) or elsewhere in the body (extravascular). The mechanism by which the immune system mistakes the red blood cells for a "foreign invader" varies somewhat according to the cause. It usually involves adherence of the offending agent (parasite, drug or toxin) to the surface of the red blood cells.Autoimmune hemolytic anemia can also be caused by or occur with another disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and rarely it follows the use of certain drugs, such as penicillin. Though much attention has been given recently to AIHA due to evidence linking the process of vaccinating with the manifestation of this sometimes life-threatening disease, immunization is only one potential cause for this condition. In particular, a form of damaged red blood cell known as a spherocyte occurs. Finding spherocytes on a blood smear almost guarantees that some form of ...
The classic laboratory finding of hemolysis is anemia with an elevated reticulocyte count. The reticulocytosis reflects normal bone marrow function and occurs in response to the premature RBC destruction; reticulocytes are larger than older erythrocytes and have a blue-purple color known as polychromasia (Fig. 433-1). Reticulocytosis generally occurs 3 to 5 days after a sudden drop in hemoglobin concentration but is relatively constant in children with congenital hemolytic anemia. Making the diagnosis of hemolytic anemia begins with recognizing the constellation of signs and symptoms, then obtaining a complete blood count with reticulocyte count, and finally examining the peripheral blood smear. Additional laboratory findings supporting the diagnosis of hemolysis include elevated total serum bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; LDH being released from RBCs during hemolysis). Intravascular hemolysis also causes decreased or undetectable levels of haptoglobin, but this test is not specific so ...
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a syndrome characterized by microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and several variable signs of organ damage due to the platelet thrombi in the microcirculation. This article reports a case with TMA which developed after ingestion of ahigh-dose combination ofverapamil and trandolapril. Totheauthors' knowledge, no prior cases of TMA induced by trandolapril (an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) and verapamil (a calcium channel blocker) have been reported in the literature.
A patient with scleroderma renal crisis is described. At presentation he had severe hypertension, deteriorating renal function, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, and elevated levels of renin, aldosterone and noradrenaline. Enalapril controlled blood pressure, stabilized renal function, lowered aldosterone and noradrenaline levels, and improved peripheral circulation. It appears that converting-enzyme inhibitors can favourably alter the outlook of this otherwise fatal disorder.. ...
Propolis is a resinous substance collected from plants by bees. Its composition depends on the vegetation, the season, and the source area. It usually contains many chemical compounds such as polyphenols, steroids and amino acids. The hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a type of anaemia characterized by microcytic and hyperchromic red cells, spherical in shape and without central pallor. Clinically, subjects present from asymptomatic conditions to severe haemolytic anaemia. In this study it was evaluated the effect of two propolis extracts in the osmotic fragility of HS patient red blood cell (RBC) membrane. It was found that propolis decreases the erythrocytes membrane fragility, being the effect of Bornes propolis more pronounced than Fundão propolis. This effect was related with the higher phenolic content of the former propolis. The results obtained in vitro suggest that the membrane fragility increases under oxidative stress conditions for the patient RBCs and the protection effect of ...
Treatment of IMHA is directed at suppressing the immune response, treating any concurrent disease processes, and symptomatically supporting the patient. Blood transfusions are likely to be required in the majority of cases to maintain red cell concentration. However, patients may require multiple transfusions which increases the rate of transfusion reactions. Difficulty blood typing and cross matching these patients due to the presence of auto agglutination can also complicate the transfusion process. Given the high prevalence of rickettsial disease in this area, we will often recommend a course of doxycycline in patients that test negative for the more common diseases due to the concern for a peracute infection. Steroids remain the primary drug used for immunosuppressive therapy and prednisone therapy is started at 1-2mg/kg/day. We find that many patients benefit from the addition of a secondary agent to allow a lower dose of prednisone to minimize side effects and allow better control of the ...
Hemolytic anemia is defined as a shortening of red blood cell (RBC) survival to less than 100 days (normal: approximately 120 days) due to an increased rate of destruction of RBCs. (See.)Hemolytic anemia is caused by one of two mechanisms:Abnormaliti
All enzyme defects, including erythrocyte enzyme errors, are inherited; some are sex-linked and located on the X chromosome. Some family members have no hematologic abnormalities, while others have a hemolytic anemia. For a number of RBC enzyme defects (eg, deficiencies of hexokinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, pyruvate kinase), the sole clinical manifestation is hemolytic anemia. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is the most common metabolic error of the red cell and presents with acute hemolytic anemia in response to oxidant stress (eg, drugs, acute infections, fava bean ingestion).. This is a consultative evaluation looking at red cell enzyme defects as the cause for early red cell destruction.. ...
If there are fragments, it is consistent with a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Fragments are broken apart red blood cells; the red blood cells are broken apart in the intravascular system when there is damage and clot formation in blood vessels that the red blood cells get trapped in and ripped apart. There could also be other indicators of hemolysis including: elevated LDH, elevated indirect bilirubin, and decreased haptoglobin. It is not an immune related cause of hemolysis so the DAT (direct antiglobulin test) should be negative ...
1 Answer - Posted in: anemia, hemolytic anemia - Answer: I found no answer to your question. This is the best, simplest explanation ...
Linked here are two great review articles. This one addresses such questions as "What are the differences between warm and cold antibody hemolytic anemias?" "What is the difference between primary and secondary AIHA and what are some of the secondary causes?" "How can the ratio of conjugated to total bilirubin help differentiate between biliary disease and hemolysis as the cause of hyperbilirubinemia?" ...
Babesia is a parasite and one of the infections transmitted by a tic along with Lyme disease, bartonella and mycoplasma infections. Symptoms of babesiosis are similar to those of Lyme disease but it more often starts with a high fever and chills. As the infection progresses, patients may develop fatigue, headache, sweats, muscle aches, nausea, and vomiting. Babesiosis is often so mild it is not noticed but can be life-threatening to people with no spleen, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems. Complications include very low blood pressure, liver problems, severe hemolytic anemia (a breakdown of red blood cells), . ...
References: Ahuja, Y.R., Vijayalakshmi, V., Stem cell test: A practical tool in toxicogenomics (2007) Toxicology, 231 (1), pp. 1-10; Ainsworth, C.D., Crowther, M.A., Treleaven, D., Evanovttch, D., Webert, K.E., Blajchman, M.A., Severe hemolytic anemia post-renal transplantation produced by donor anti-D passenger lymphocytes, case report and literature review (2009) Transfusion Medical Review, 23 (2), pp. 155-159; Amit, M., Carpenter, M.K., Clonally derived human embryonic stem cell lines maintain pluripotency and proliferative potential for prolonged periods of culture (2000) Developmental Biology, 227 (2), pp. 271-278; Amit, M., Itskovitz-Eldor, J., Maintenance of human embryonic stem cells in animal serum- and feeder layer-free culture conditions (2006) Methods Molecular Biology, 331, pp. 105-113; Amit, M., Margulets, V., Human feeder layers for human embryonic stem cells (2003) Biological Reproduction, 68 (6), pp. 2150-2156; Andrews, P.W., From teratocarcinomas to embryonic stem cells (2002) ...
Even though zinc is an essential requirement for a healthy body, too much zinc can be harmful. Excessive absorption of zinc can also suppress copper and iron absorption. The free zinc ion in solution is highly toxic to plants, invertebrates, and even vertebrate fish. The Free Ion Activity Model (FIAM) is well-established in the literature, and shows that just micromolar amounts of the free ion kills some organisms. A recent example showed 6 micromolar killing 93% of all daphnia in water.[4] Swallowing a post 1982 American one cent piece (97.5% zinc) can also cause damage to the stomach lining due to the high solubility of the zinc ion in the acidic stomach.[5] Zinc toxicity, mostly in the form of the ingestion of US pennies minted after 1982, is commonly fatal in dogs where it causes a severe hemolytic anemia.[6] In pet parrots zinc is highly toxic and poisoning can often be fatal[7]. There is evidence of induced copper deficiency at low intakes of 100-300 mg Zn/d. The USDA RDA is 15 mg Zn/d. ...
AIHA is the current problem - in addition to the CLL, of course. Dave has had some ups and downs the last few weeks, and hes due to start Chemo again tomorrow. But Im not convinced that his blood counts are adequate (that he can withstand a round of chemo.) The doctor has been increasing his Prednisone, but based on his appearance, I have a feeling his counts are down again. He had more blood drawn this morning, so tomorrow morning, when we meet with the doctor, well know for sure ...
Case Reports in Medicine is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports and case series in all areas of clinical medicine.
A Disease characterized by chronic Hemolytic Anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for Hemoglobin S ...
Potent adjuvanted killed vaccines like those for rabies virus also can trigger immediate and delayed (vaccinosis) adverse vaccine reactions. Genetic predisposition to these disorders in humans has been linked to the leucocyte antigen D-related gene locus of the major histocompatibility complex, and is likely to have parallel associations in domestic animals.. It must be recognized, however, that we have the luxury of asking such questions today only because the risk of disease has been effectively reduced by the widespread use of vaccination programs.. Adverse Events Associated with Vaccination The clinical signs associated with vaccine reactions typically include fever, stiffness, sore joints and abdominal tenderness, susceptibility to infections, neurological disorders and encephalitis, collapse with autoagglutinated red blood cells and icterus (autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA, also called immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, IMHA), or generalized petechiae and ecchymotic hemorrhages ...
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Recent studies have identified a factor H-associated form of HUS, caused by gene mutations that cluster in the C-terminal region of the complement regulator factor H. Here we report how three mutations (E1172Stop, R1210C, and R1215G; each of the latter two identified in three independent cases from different, unrelated families) affect protein function. All three mutations cause reduced binding to the central complement component C3b/C3d to heparin, as well as to endothelial cells. These defective features of the mutant factor H proteins explain progression of endothelial cell and microvascular damage in factor H-associated genetic HUS and indicate a protective role of factor H for tissue integrity during thrombus formation.. ...
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Recent studies have identified a factor H-associated form of HUS, caused by gene mutations that cluster in the C-terminal region of the complement regulator factor H. Here we report how three mutations (E1172Stop, R1210C, and R1215G; each of the latter two identified in three independent cases from different, unrelated families) affect protein function. All three mutations cause reduced binding to the central complement component C3b/C3d to heparin, as well as to endothelial cells. These defective features of the mutant factor H proteins explain progression of endothelial cell and microvascular damage in factor H-associated genetic HUS and indicate a protective role of factor H for tissue integrity during thrombus formation.. ...
The following testimonial letter was translated from Spanish.). As believers in God, we are are sure that Carao was an answer sent by the Lord in response to our prayers. For more than 2 years, David had been taking Prednizolona, in relatively large doses (up to 20 mg. daily) for a child of his age (4 years) and when the dosage was reduced (following the doctors instructions) the autoimmune hemolytic anemia reappeared. On 4 occasions, David required blood transfusions.. When he started taking Carao, he immediately began to improve. read more ». ...
Patients from two families with chronic hemolytic anemia have been studied. The erythrocytes are very fragile and appear microcytic with a great variety of shapes. Clinical evaluation failed to identify traditionally ...
Although we typically think of a pentad of manifestations of TTP and, in fact, have a treatment threshold consisting of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia otherwise unexplained, the disease can cause manifestations in multiple organs. Here is a discussion of cardiac manifestations. ...
Durán, S., Apte, M., Alarcón, G. S., Marion, M. C., Edberg, J. C., Kimberly, R. P., Zhang, J., Langefeld, C. D., ViLá, L. M. and Reveille, J. D. (2008), Features associated with, and the impact of, hemolytic anemia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: LX, results from a multiethnic cohort. Arthritis & Rheumatism, 59: 1332-1340. doi: 10.1002/art.24020 ...
Learn more about Hemolytic Anemia symptoms, diagnosis, and treatments from experts at Boston Childrens, ranked best Childrens Hospital by US News.
Learn more about the causes, symptoms, complications, and treatments for hemolytic anemia, and how to participate in an NHLBI clinical trial.
13 Changes in surface rarely change the function of hemoglobin with the exception of the sickle cell mutation. Internal residues cause the hemoglobin to contort to different shapes and alter its binding properties. Heinz bodies are precipitated aggregates of hemoglobin. Usually cause hemolytic anemia characteristic by cell lysis. Hb Hammersmith Phe CD1(42)   Ser. The Phe wedges the heme in place, without it the heme falls out of the protein. Hb Bristol Val E11(67)   Asp occludes O 2 from the pocket. Hb Bibba substitutes a Pro in the middle of H helix kinks the chain. Hb Savannah replaces Gly B6(24)  Val where the B helix crosses the E helix. ...
This description of psychotic mania in a substantial proportion of G6PD-deficient subjects attending our department is to be discussed in the context of existing literature. The role of G6PD deficiency in psychiatric disorders has not been definitely established, studies varying from reports of acute psychotic cases [6,7] to surveys of enzyme activity in hospitalized populations [8-10,14]. G6PD deficiency was also used as a traditional X-chromosome marker in linkage studies [4,15-17]. The first study dates back to 1962, when Dern et al [6] reported a not-otherwise-described temporary psychosis during primaquine administration in two G6PD-deficient subjects several weeks after the subsidence of acute hemolytic anemia.. In 1976, Nasr reported two consecutive acute psychotic episodes in a young Afro-American woman [7]. An abstract of the description of the latter case is worthy of mention: "She was in good mental health until one week prior to admission, when she started to become irritable and ...
Weʼre raising money to help pay for mylos medical treatment for immune-mediates haemolytic anemia and non-regenerative anemia. Support this JustGiving Crowdfunding Page.
You may need this test to tell your healthcare provider whether you have antibodies that have attached to your red blood cells. You may need this test if you have symptoms of hemolytic anemia after a blood transfusion. A baby may need this blood test if the babys mother makes antibodies against the babys red blood cells and passes those antibodies to the baby inside the womb. This condition is called hemolytic disease of the newborn. The most common cause of hemolytic anemia is when your immune system makes antibodies to your own red blood cells by mistake. When your immune system makes antibodies against your own healthy cells, it is called autoimmune disease. Symptoms or signs of hemolytic anemia may include: ...
Haemolytic anaemia is a form of anaemia caused by haemolysis. It may be either hereditary or acquired. Haemolytic anaemia that is hereditary may be due to defects in erythrocyte production, in hemoglobin production, or in erythrocyte metabolism. Acquired haemolytic anemia, in turn, may be due to immune related factors. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is an example of an acquired form of haemolytic anaemia. It occurs when the antibodies act against own red blood cells. These antibodies lyse the red blood cells. Thus, in a person with a severe automimmune haemolytic anaemia, the lifespan of red blood cells could be reduced into just few days from the normal 100-120 days.1 Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may either be warm or cold depending on the characteristics of the autoantibodies involved. Warm (antibody) autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is more common than cold (antibody) autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. 2 ...
Pyruvate kinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the bodys tissues. People with this disorder have a condition known as chronic hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are broken down (undergo hemolysis) prematurely, resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). Specifically, pyruvate kinase deficiency is a common cause of a type of inherited hemolytic anemia called hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the red blood cells do not assume a spherical shape as they do in some other forms of hemolytic anemia.. Chronic hemolytic anemia can lead to unusually pale skin (pallor), yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), extreme tiredness (fatigue), shortness of breath (dyspnea), and a rapid heart rate (tachycardia). An enlarged spleen (splenomegaly), an excess of iron in the blood, and small pebble-like deposits in the gallbladder or bile ducts (gallstones) are also common in this ...
Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is defined clinically by the abnormalities caused by systemic thrombotic microangiopathy: thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Additional clinical features may include neurologic abnormalities, renal failure, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is another clinical presentation of thrombotic microangiopathy. Like TTP, HUS is manifested by thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with the additional abnormality of renal failure. Although it is commonly stated that HUS is manifested primarily by renal failure whereas TTP is manifested primarily by neurologic abnormalities, these 2 syndromes cannot be distinguished clinically, because many patients have both renal failure and severe neurologic abnormalities, or neither. The term HUS is often restricted to children. In adults, all syndromes are referred to as TTP, whether or not neurologic abnormalities or renal failure are present. Amorosi EL, ...
Abstract To learn more about the course of Babesia microti infections in primates, six Macaca mulatta monkeys with blood-induced B. microti infections were followed for 270 days with regular thick blood smears. Three of the monkeys experienced from 1-3 recurrences of parasitemia defined here as ⩾200 organisms/mm3 blood. Following splenectomy on day 297, parasitemia recurred in all animals, reaching levels of 1.9 × 105 to 2.7 × 106 organisms/mm3, and was associated with a moderately severe hemolytic anemia. These findings suggest that similar recurrences of parasitemia may occur in human cases, and that splenectomy may present a risk to persons with a past history of B. microti infection.
Anti-Kpa antibodies are an uncommon cause of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Screening for antibodies to low frequency antigens such as Kpa is not routine, so detecting them can present a challenge. We report a case of hydropic HDFN due to anti-Kpa antibodies discovered incidentally with direct antiglobulin testing of a fetal blood sample in the course of work-up and treatment for presumed acute parvovirus B19 induced hydrops fetalis. Six intrauterine red blood cell transfusions and one simple neonatal red blood cell transfusion were required. The cause of fetal anemia needs to be properly diagnosed in order to provide appropriate clinical care in affected pregnancies. Sensitization from uncommon antigens is more difficult to diagnose due to the lack of routine screening. This case illustrates the importance of performing direct antiglobulin testing on fetal blood before intrauterine transfusion in any case of fetal anemia despite presumed alternative etiologies.
Once formerly thought to be a rare disorder, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is becoming increasingly recognized. It is characterized by a pentad of clinical findings, including microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, neurologic and renal abnormalities, and fever. Following a case report, the major clinical findings, pathophysiologic findings, diagnoses, and use of various therapeutic modalities are discussed. ...
Chapter 11. Musculoskeletal Disease 141. Bone Fractures 141. Osteosarcoma (OSA) 143. Panosteitis (Pano) 146. Osteoarthritis or Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) 146. Hip Dysplasia 148. Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) 151. Patellar Luxation 152. Cranial or Anterior Cruciate Ligament (CCL or ACL) Rupture or Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease (CCLD) 153. Intervertebral Disk Disease (IVDD) 156. Myasthenia Gravis 159. Chapter 12. Hematologic and Lymph Disease 163. Erythrocyte Disorders 163. Anemia 163. Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA) 166. Absolute Erythrocytosis or Polycythemia 168. Leukocyte and Lymph Disorders 169. Malignant Lymphoma or Lymphosarcoma (LSA) 169. Multiple Myeloma (Plasma Cell Tumor) 170. Chylothorax 171. Thrombocyte and Coagulation Disorders 172. Primary Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia (PIMT) or Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia 172. Hemophilia 172. von Willebrands Disease 173. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy 174. Rodenticide Toxicity 175. Feline Aortic Thromboembolism ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare disease of hematopoietic stem cells due to a mutation in the PIG-A gene leading to a deficiency of GPI-anchored proteins. Lack of two specific GPI-anchored proteins, CD55 and CD59, leads to uncontrolled complement activation that result in both intravascular and extravascular hemolysis. Free hemoglobin leads to nitric oxide depletion that mediates the pathophysiology of some of the common clinical signs of PNH. Clinical symptoms of PNH include evidence of hemolytic anemia, bone marrow failure, smooth muscle dystonias and thromboses.

New Market Study: Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia - Pipeline Review, H2 2012New Market Study: 'Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia - Pipeline Review, H2 2012'

Hemolytic Anemia. Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia - Pipeline Review, Half Year is built using data and information ... This report provides information on the therapeutic development for Acquired (Autoimmune) Hemolytic Anemia, complete with ... Hemolytic Anemia - Pipeline Review, H2 2012, provides an overview of the indications therapeutic pipeline. ... a href=http://www.fastmr.com/prod/511567_acquired_autoimmune_hemolytic_anemia_pipeline.aspx,View Full Report Details and ...
more infohttp://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/new-market-study-acquired-autoimmune-hemolytic-anemia-pipeline-review-h2-2012-204330.htm

Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia - Biology-Online DictionaryAutoimmune haemolytic anaemia - Biology-Online Dictionary

Haemolytic anaemia is a form of anaemia caused by haemolysis. It may be either hereditary or acquired. Haemolytic anaemia that ... Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is an example of an acquired form of haemolytic anaemia. It occurs when the antibodies act ... Warm (antibody) autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is more common than cold (antibody) autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. 2 ... cold autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Reference(s): 1 Sawitsky, A. & Ozaeta, P. B. (1970). "Disease-associated autoimmune ...
more infohttps://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Immune_complex_haemolytic_anaemia

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia - WikipediaAutoimmune hemolytic anemia - Wikipedia

Hemolytic anemia is the hemolytic state in which anemia is present, and bone marrow function is inferentially unable to ... Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (or autoimmune haemolytic anaemia; AIHA) occurs when antibodies directed against the persons own ... AIHA is classified as either warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia or cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which includes cold ... The National Cancer Institute considers "immunohemolytic anemia", "autoimmune hemolytic anemia", and "immune complex hemolytic ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoimmune_hemolytic_anemia

Anti B cell targeted immunotherapy for treatment of refractory autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in a young infant | Archives of...Anti B cell targeted immunotherapy for treatment of refractory autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in a young infant | Archives of...

Haemolytic anaemia in early infancy is often a result of blood group incompatibility, hereditary red cell morphological ... Treatment of refractory autoimmune haemolytic anaemia with anti-CD20 (Rituximab). Br J Haematol2001;114:241-6. ... A diagnosis of idiopathic autoimmune haemolytic anaemia was made, and the patient started on high dose methylprednisolone (5 mg ... Paediatricians should be aware of this new therapeutic tool for treating severe autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, but until there ...
more infohttp://adc.bmj.com/content/88/4/337

Hemolytic Anemia Differential DiagnosesHemolytic Anemia Differential Diagnoses

A hemolytic anemia will develop if bone marrow activity cannot compensate for the erythrocyte loss. ... encoded search term (Hemolytic Anemia) and Hemolytic Anemia What to Read Next on Medscape. Medscape Consult. ... Arbach O, Funck R, Seibt F, Salama A. Erythropoietin May Improve Anemia in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated ... Go to Anemia, Iron Deficiency Anemia, and Chronic Anemia for complete information on these topics. ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/201066-differential

Hereditary hemolytic anemiaHereditary hemolytic anemia

Protein which, if defective, causes hereditary hemolytic anemia, a hereditary disease characterized by the premature ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/keywords/KW-0360

Immune Mediated Hemolytic AnemiaImmune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia

... (IMHA) or Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) In hemolytic anemia, a loss of red blood cells ( ... Immune mediated hemolytic anemia in Giant Schnauzer Question: I have a very sick giant schnauzer with hemolytic anemia. It ... Immune mediated hemolytic anemia (also known as auto-immune hemolytic anemia) can occur as a primary problem -- no discernible ... So the short answer is that immune mediated hemolytic anemia is one particular cause of hemolytic anemia but there are other ...
more infohttps://www.vetinfo.com/dimhanemia.html

Hemolytic Anemia in ChildrenHemolytic Anemia in Children

The hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders in which the red blood cells are destroyed faster than the bone marrow can make ... Hemolytic Anemia in Children. What is hemolytic anemia in children?. Hemolytic anemia is a group of disorders in which the red ... What causes hemolytic anemia in a child?. Hemolytic anemia has 2 types of causes:. * Intrinsic. This is when the destruction of ... Key points about hemolytic anemia in children. * Hemolytic anemias are a group of conditions in which red blood cells are ...
more infohttps://www.nationwidechildrens.org/conditions/health-library/hemolytic-anemia-in-children

Hemolytic anemia - WikipediaHemolytic anemia - Wikipedia

Low-grade hemolytic anemia occurs in 70% of prosthetic heart valve recipients, and severe hemolytic anemia occurs in 3%.[4] ... In cold hemolytic anemia there is advantage in transfusing warmed blood.. *In severe immune-related hemolytic anemia, steroid ... Similarly, poisoning by arsine or stibine also causes hemolytic anemia.. *Runners can suffer hemolytic anemia due to " ... Main articles: Congenital hemolytic anemia and Acquired hemolytic anemia. They may be classified according to the means of ...
more infohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemolytic_anemia

Autoimmune Hemolytic AnemiaAutoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

... , Autoimmune Hemolysis, Immune Hemolytic Anemia, AIHA, Warm Hemolysis, Cold Hemolysis, Cold ... Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia, Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia. ... immune hemolytic anemia, anemias hemolytic immune, anemia hemolytic immune, immune hemolytic anemias, Immune Hemolytic Anemia, ... anemia hemolytic autoimmune, hemolytic autoimmune anemia, anemia autoimmune hemolytic, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, anaemia ...
more infohttps://fpnotebook.com/legacy/HemeOnc/Hemolysis/AtmnHmlytcAnm.htm

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Induced by LevofloxacinAutoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Induced by Levofloxacin

G. Garratty, "Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia," Hematology/the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology. ... G. Garratty, "Immune hemolytic anemia associated with drug therapy," Blood Reviews, vol. 24, no. 4-5, pp. 143-150, 2010. View ... Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition. We report the case of a 32-year-old white female who presented to ... The patient had evidence of hemolytic anemia with a hemoglobin of 6.7 g/dL which dropped to 5 g/dL on day 2, the direct Coombs ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/criid/2014/201015/

Hemolytic anemia | Define Hemolytic anemia at Dictionary.comHemolytic anemia | Define Hemolytic anemia at Dictionary.com

Hemolytic anemia definition, an anemic condition characterized by the destruction of red blood cells: seen in some drug ... hemolytic anemia in Medicine Expand. hemolytic anemia n. Anemia resulting from the abnormal destruction of of red blood cells, ... Anemia resulting from the lysis of red blood cells, as in response to certain toxic or infectious agents and in certain ...
more infohttp://www.dictionary.com/browse/hemolytic-anemia

How is acquired autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) treated?How is acquired autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) treated?

if you have a disease thats causing your anemia, your doctor will treat. if a medicine is the cause, youll likely have to ... "How is Hemolytic Anemia Diagnosed?" "Types of Hemolytic Anemia," "What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemolytic Anemia?" "What ... "How is Hemolytic Anemia Diagnosed?" "Types of Hemolytic Anemia," "What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemolytic Anemia?" "What ... How is acquired autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) treated?. ANSWER If you have a disease thats causing your anemia, your ...
more infohttps://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/qa/how-is-acquired-autoimmune-hemolytic-anemia-aiha-treated

Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic AnemiaImmunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

C. H. Packman, "Hemolytic anemia due to warm autoantibodies," Blood Reviews, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 17-31, 2008. View at Publisher ... L. D. Petz, "Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias," Current Opinion in Hematology, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 411-416, 2001. View ... B. C. Gehrs and R. C. Friedberg, "Autoimmune hemolytic anemia," American Journal of Hematology, vol. 69, no. 4, pp. 258-271, ... K. E. King and P. M. Ness, "Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia," Seminars in Hematology, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 131-136, ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/jir/2013/561852/ref/

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Support Group - Drugs.comAutoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Support Group - Drugs.com

Ask questions and get answers about Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia. Our support group helps people share their own experience. 6 ... Home › Q & A › Support Groups › Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia. Join the Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia group to help and get ... Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Support Group. Related terms: Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia ... Hemolytic Anemia. Related Drug Support Groups. prednisone, Deltasone, Sterapred, Liquid Pred, Sterapred DS, Meticorten, Orasone ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/answers/support-group/autoimmune-hemolytic-anemia/

Plus itPlus it

Symptomatic Haemolytic Anaemia. Br Med J 1968; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5601.354-a (Published 11 May 1968) Cite ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/2/5601/354.2

Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: What is it?Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: What is it?

Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a rare blood disorder. It occurs when medication you take leads your immune system to ... What Is Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia?. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is an extremely rare blood disorder ... Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia. Medically reviewed by Steve Kim, MD on January 11, 2016. - Written by Cindie Slightham ... Outlook for Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia. Your outlook is good as long as the medication is stopped quickly. Your body ...
more infohttps://www.healthline.com/health/drug-induced-immune-hemolytic-anemia

Hemolytic Anemia | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)Hemolytic Anemia | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

... and treatments for hemolytic anemia, and how to participate in an NHLBI clinical trial. ... Hemolytic Anemia *Anemia (National Library of Medicine [NLM], MedlinePlus). *Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (Genetic and Rare ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemolytic anemia is a blood disorder that occurs when your red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can ... Hemolytic Anemia In support of our mission, we are committed to advancing hemolytic anemia research in part through the ...
more infohttps://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/hemolytic-anemia

Donath-Landsteiner Hemolytic Anemia: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, EtiologyDonath-Landsteiner Hemolytic Anemia: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Etiology

Donath-Landsteiner hemolytic anemia (DLHA) and cold agglutinin disease. DLHA is an intravascular hemolytic anemia caused by a ... Two forms of cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias are generally recognized: ... encoded search term (Donath-Landsteiner Hemolytic Anemia) and Donath-Landsteiner Hemolytic Anemia What to Read Next on Medscape ... Two forms of cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias are generally recognized: Donath-Landsteiner hemolytic anemia (DLHA) ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/955176-overview

Autoimmune Hemolytic AnemiaAutoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

This kind of anemia can be a result of or occur along with another illness ... Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia is known as a rare collection of disorders which can strike the patient at any age group ... For gentle hemolytic anemia, you may not require treatment, while rigorous hemolytic anemia may be life impeding if allowed to ... Hemolytic anemia may be controlled and successfully treated. The progress of the anemia lies on the severity and cause of the ...
more infohttps://www.womenhealthzone.com/general-health/anemia/autoimmune-hemolytic-anemia/

Hemolytic Anemia at 20x Magnification | MicroscopyUHemolytic Anemia at 20x Magnification | MicroscopyU

Other indicators that an individuals anemia is hemolytic include elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase and unbound ... Some key signs of the hemolytic form of the condition are only recognizable with the aid of a microscope. For instance, when ... Though the readily observable symptoms of hemolytic anemia are similar to those of other types of anemias, there are several ... Hemolytic Anemia at 20x Magnification. Though the readily observable symptoms of hemolytic anemia are similar to those of other ...
more infohttps://www.microscopyu.com/gallery-images/hemolytic-anemia-at-20x-magnification

Plus itPlus it

Non-spherocytic Haemolytic Anaemia. Br Med J 1961; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.5220.210-a (Published 21 January 1961) ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/1/5220/210.2

Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia | Define Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia at Dictionary.comMicroangiopathic hemolytic anemia | Define Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia at Dictionary.com

Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/microangiopathic-hemolytic-anemia

Animal Recovery from Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA)Animal Recovery from Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA)

... fully recovered from an Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA) or Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA). Also cases of congestive ... Dog Recovers From Auto Immune Hemolytic Anaemia (AIHA) "My dog Arnie had been given up on by the vet. He had acute anemia ... Maltese saved from Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA). On March 26, 2007 my maltese, Mya, woke up not feeling well at all. She ... It was at this point the doctor requested labs be drawn to rule out Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA). While he did not ...
more infohttps://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/Testimonials/AmailBag2

Hemolytic Anemia in the Best of the Web DirectoryHemolytic Anemia in the Best of the Web Directory

Hand selected websites about Hemolytic Anemia. Free. Healthcare information from the top websites about physical and mental ... Top / Health / Conditions and Illness / Blood Disorders / Anemia / Hemolytic All Reference Health: Hemolytic Anemia Reveals ... Answers.com: Hemolytic Anemia Offers a guide to the disorders symptoms, causes, diagnoses and therapies. ... Wrong Diagnosis: Hemolytic Anemia Locate statistics, symptoms, types, causes, prognoses and a glossary of terms. ...
more infohttps://botw.org/top/Health/Conditions_and_Illness/Blood_Disorders/Anemia/Hemolytic/
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