Andropogon: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of bluestem is also used for other plants in this family. Andropogon nardus has been reclassified as CYMBOPOGON nardus and Andropogon zizanioides to VETIVERIA zizanioides.Phosphorus Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.OklahomaFiresFagaceae: A plant family of the order Fagales subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.MissouriConservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Arnold-Chiari Malformation: A group of congenital malformations involving the brainstem, cerebellum, upper spinal cord, and surrounding bony structures. Type II is the most common, and features compression of the medulla and cerebellar tonsils into the upper cervical spinal canal and an associated MENINGOMYELOCELE. Type I features similar, but less severe malformations and is without an associated meningomyelocele. Type III has the features of type II with an additional herniation of the entire cerebellum through the bony defect involving the foramen magnum, forming an ENCEPHALOCELE. Type IV is a form a cerebellar hypoplasia. Clinical manifestations of types I-III include TORTICOLLIS; opisthotonus; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS; APNEA; NYSTAGMUS, CONGENITAL; swallowing difficulties; and ATAXIA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p261; Davis, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp236-46)MexicoSilver Proteins: Compounds of silver and proteins used as topical anti-infective agents.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Sorghum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.Disarticulation: Amputation or separation at a joint. (Dorland, 28th ed)ArizonaInflorescence: A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Cyperaceae: The sedge plant family of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons)Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)ColombiaCybernetics: That branch of learning which brings together theories and studies on communication and control in living organisms and machines.Paullinia: A plant genus of the family SAPINDACEAE. The seed of P. cupana is the source of guarana powder which contains 4% CAFFEINE.Health Planning Organizations: Organizations involved in all aspects of health planning activities.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.KansasTrichomes: Hair-like extensions on specialized epidermal surfaces of plants which protect against damage from insects, animals, light degradation and fungal infection. Trichomes may also occur on certain unicellular EUKARYOTES.IllinoisRain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)New England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.Rhizome: Root-like underground horizontal stem of plants that produces shoots above and roots below. Distinguished from true roots which don't have buds and nodes. Similar to true roots in being underground and thickened by storage deposits.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Harmful Algal Bloom: An algal bloom where the algae produce powerful toxins that can kill fish, birds, and mammals, and ultimately cause illness in humans. The harmful bloom can also cause oxygen depletion in the water due to the death and decomposition of non-toxic algae species.Lolium: Common member of the Gramineae family used as cattle FODDER. It harbors several fungi and other parasites toxic to livestock and people and produces allergenic compounds, especially in its pollen. The most commonly seen varieties are L. perenne, L. multiflorum, and L. rigidum.TexasIntroduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.AlaskaVerbesina: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain galegine (GUANIDINES).Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance aluminium resistance of broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus L.). (1/5)

In the eastern United States, broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus L.) is found growing on abandoned coal-mined lands that have extremely acidic soils with high residual aluminium (Al) concentrations. Broomsedge may be inherently metal-resistant and nutrient-efficient or may rely on the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal association to overcome limitations on such sites. Broomsedge plants were grown with and without an acidic ecotype AM fungal consortium and exposed to controlled levels of Al in two experiments. The AM fungal consortium conferred Al resistance to broomsedge. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduced Al uptake and translocation in host plants, potentially reflecting measured reductions in inorganic Al availability in the rhizosphere of mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal plants exhibited lower shoot P concentrations, higher phosphorus use efficiency, and lower root acid phosphatase rates than non-mycorrhizal plants. Aluminium significantly reduced calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) tissue concentrations in both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. However, plant response to any change in nutrient acquisition was substantially less pronounced in mycorrhizal plants. The exclusion of Al and greater stability of tissue biomass accretion-tissue nutrient relationships in mycorrhizal broomsedge plants exposed to Al may be important mechanisms that allow broomsedge to grow on unfavourable acidic soils.  (+info)

Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and antibacterial activities of transition metal(II) complexes of the schiff base 2-[(4-methylphenylimino)methyl]-6-methoxyphenol. (2/5)

 (+info)

Genomic and small RNA sequencing of Miscanthus x giganteus shows the utility of sorghum as a reference genome sequence for Andropogoneae grasses. (3/5)

 (+info)

Bud production and dynamics of flowering and vegetative tillers in Andropogon gerardii (Poaceae): the role of developmental constraints. (4/5)

 (+info)

Adding fuel to the fire: the impacts of non-native grass invasion on fire management at a regional scale. (5/5)

 (+info)

  • Andropogon on Sustainable Activism: The Role of Landscape Architects CLICK HERE to watch past program! (temple.edu)
  • formerly included Many species once included in Andropogon are now regarded as better suited to other genera, including Agenium Anadelphia Apluda Arthraxon Bothriochloa Capeochloa Capillipedium Chrysopogon Cymbopogon Dichanthium Diheteropogon Elionurus Elymandra Eragrostis Eulalia Garnotia Gymnopogon Hemarthria Heteropogon Hyparrhenia Hyperthelia Ischaemum Parahyparrhenia Pentameris Polytrias Pseudopogonatherum Pseudosorghum Saccharum Schizachyrium Sorghastrum Sorghum Spodiopogon Themeda Trachypogon List of Poaceae genera lectotype designated by Green, International Botanical Congress Cambridge (England), 1930. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2012. Naming hybrids in the Andropogon lateralis complex (Andropogoneae, Poaceae) after multivariate analysis. (scielo.org.ar)
  • Candidate clones which conferred Al tolerance to yeast transformants (TFs) were obtained from a cDNA library derived from a highly Al-tolerant poaceae, Andropogon virginicus L. One such clone, AL3A-4, encoded an S-adenosyl methionine synthetase (SAMS) gene. (frontiersin.org)
  • reported an Al stress induced half type ABCG transporter protein derived from a poaceae wild plant, Andropogon virginicus L. These proteins are suggested to decrease toxic cytoplasmic Al by their transport systems. (frontiersin.org)
  • Andropogon eriophorus Scheele, Flora 27: 51. (usf.edu)
  • En el inventario preliminar de la flora, basado en 8 300 colectas, se puede estimar la riqueza de plantas vasculares en cerca de 1 380 especies y 100 taxas infraespecíficos, representados en 628 géneros y 145 familias. (gbif.org)
  • 1753. The Plant List search for Andropogon USDA Plants Database Andropogon in West African plants - A Photo Guide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Andropogon ternarius is similar to A. arctatus , but differs in its possession of three anthers and usually in its longer spikelets, both sessile and pedicellate. (vplants.org)
  • Total foliage production of Andropogon scoparius was greater on the Heiden-Hunt clay soil complex (Udic chromusterts and pellusterts) than on he Tabor fine sandy loam (Udertic paleustalfs). (worldwidescience.org)
  • Even considering Andropogon sensu stricto , that is, excluding allied genera such as Bothriochloa Kuntze, Dichanthium Willem. (hindawi.com)
  • BASIONYM: Andropogon tetrastachyus Elliott 1816. (usf.edu)
  • Pestisida Hayati Dari Tanaman Serei Wangi (Andropogon nardus L). (penyuluhpertanian.net)
  • Daya Hambat Minyak Serai Wangi (Andropogon nordus L.) terhadap Pertumbuhan Koloni Patogen Terbawa Benih secara In Vitro dan Pengaruhnya Terhadap Viabilitas dan Vigor Benih Terung (Solanum melongena L. (unsyiah.ac.id)
  • Proposals by British Botanists: 155-195 (1929) Tropicos, Andropogon L. Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families Watson, L. and M. J. Dallwitz. (wikipedia.org)
  • This investigation has been made with reference to the adaptability of Andropogon ischaemum, King Ranch bluestem, to various soils, various slopes, and various erosion conditions in Denton County. (unt.edu)
  • The new name Andropogon × paraguariensis Norrmann & Nagahama is proposed to replace the illegitimate name Andropogon × velutinus Norrmann & Nagahama, a natural hybrid from southern South America. (scielo.org.ar)