Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Advance Care Planning: Discussions with patients and/or their representatives about the goals and desired direction of the patient's care, particularly end-of-life care, in the event that the patient is or becomes incompetent to make decisions.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Advance Directive Adherence: Compliance by health personnel or proxies with the stipulations of ADVANCE DIRECTIVES (or similar directives such as RESUSCITATION ORDERS) when patients are unable to direct their own care.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Living Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Projective Techniques: Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary: Active euthanasia of a patient at the patient's request and/or with the patient's consent.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Persistent Vegetative State: Vegetative state refers to the neurocognitive status of individuals with severe brain damage, in whom physiologic functions (sleep-wake cycles, autonomic control, and breathing) persist, but awareness (including all cognitive function and emotion) is abolished.Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Time-to-Pregnancy: Time interval, or number of non-contraceptive menstrual cycles that it takes for a couple to conceive.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Proxy: A person authorized to decide or act for another person, for example, a person having durable power of attorney.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Western World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Fertility Preservation: A method of providing future reproductive opportunities before a medical treatment with known risk of loss of fertility. Typically reproductive organs or tissues (e.g., sperm, egg, embryos and ovarian or testicular tissues) are cryopreserved for future use before the medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation) begins.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Philosophy, MedicalPregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.BelgiumGreat BritainReligion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Sex Reassignment Surgery: Surgical treatments used to change the physiological sexual characteristics of an individual.Sterilization Reversal: Procedures to reverse the effect of REPRODUCTIVE STERILIZATION and to regain fertility. Reversal procedures include those used to restore the flow in the FALLOPIAN TUBE or the VAS DEFERENS.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.United StatesHospice Care: Specialized health care, supportive in nature, provided to a dying person. A holistic approach is often taken, providing patients and their families with legal, financial, emotional, or spiritual counseling in addition to meeting patients' immediate physical needs. Care may be provided in the home, in the hospital, in specialized facilities (HOSPICES), or in specially designated areas of long-term care facilities. The concept also includes bereavement care for the family. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Infertility: Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases: Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor.SwitzerlandReligion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.ScotlandCareer Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Receptors, Lipoxin: Cell surface proteins that bind LIPOXINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.Cyclooxygenase 2: An inducibly-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes and INFLAMMATION. It is the target of COX2 INHIBITORS.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Dinoprostone: The most common and most biologically active of the mammalian prostaglandins. It exhibits most biological activities characteristic of prostaglandins and has been used extensively as an oxytocic agent. The compound also displays a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Cell Surface Extensions: Specialized structures of the cell that extend the cell membrane and project out from the cell surface.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: A rare, X-linked immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by ECZEMA; LYMPHOPENIA; and, recurrent pyogenic infection. It is seen exclusively in young boys. Typically, IMMUNOGLOBULIN M levels are low and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and IMMUNOGLOBULIN E levels are elevated. Lymphoreticular malignancies are common.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.EnglandFertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Infertility, Female: Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein, Neuronal: A member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family that is found at high levels in NERVE CELLS. It interacts with GRB2 ADAPTOR PROTEIN and with CDC42 PROTEIN.GermanyPatient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Genetic Counseling: An educational process that provides information and advice to individuals or families about a genetic condition that may affect them. The purpose is to help individuals make informed decisions about marriage, reproduction, and other health management issues based on information about the genetic disease, the available diagnostic tests, and management programs. Psychosocial support is usually offered.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus: The type species of VESICULOVIRUS causing a disease symptomatically similar to FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cattle, horses, and pigs. It may be transmitted to other species including humans, where it causes influenza-like symptoms.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Reproductive Techniques, Assisted: Clinical and laboratory techniques used to enhance fertility in humans and animals.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.LondonIsraelSmoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Sample Size: The number of units (persons, animals, patients, specified circumstances, etc.) in a population to be studied. The sample size should be big enough to have a high likelihood of detecting a true difference between two groups. (From Wassertheil-Smoller, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 1990, p95)Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.JapanData Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.
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On October 20, 2017, Waterparks revealed the album's title, artwork, and release date via social media, and released the first ... AND. STUFF. UGH. GET. IT. NOW. ENTERTAINMENT PRE-ORDER PACKAGES ARE HERE". @waterparks. Retrieved November 7, 2017. "Waterparks ... "Waterparks return with new album and single". TeamRock.com. Future Publishing Ltd. Retrieved October 28, 2017. Dickman, Maggie ... single from the record, "Blonde". Pre-orders for the album and the music video for "Blonde" were put online on November 2, 2017 ...
Holbrook and USAT Meigs; the U.S. merchant ships SS Admiral Halstead and SS Coast Farmer; and the Dutch merchant ship ... For example, the A-24 dive bomber trigger motors and solenoids were found to have been overlooked in unpacking and destroyed ... The Bloemfontein with an escort composed of the cruisers USS Boise (CL-47) and USS Marblehead (CL-12) and destroyers USS Barker ... Secondary plans to support Dutch and British Commonwealth forces, in the Dutch East Indies, Malaya and Singapore, faced similar ...
One such appraisal is in Sura Al-An'am: And Zachariah and John, and Jesus and Elias: all in the ranks of the righteous. - ... Preserve her and her children from Satan, the rejected." Her Lord accepted her graciously, and she grew up with excellence, and ... 17:3)." Matthew 17:3: "And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him." Matthew 11:14-15: "And if ye ... New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons. Prophet Zachariah the father of St John the Baptist Orthodox icon and synaxarion. ...
... and is surrounded by gardens and vineyards. It has 400 one- and two-storey terraced stonework houses with tiled roofs and ... Kavajë is located in a Mediterranean Climate region where the summers are dry and hot and the winters are wet and mild. Average ... The bazaar is wealthy and bustling, since people from Bashtova and Durrës come here to buy their goods and produce. There are 2 ... About 400 of them were German and Austrian refugees and the rest were from nearby countries like Yugoslavia and Greece. The ...
In other words, they look more like \ and / than like , and ,. The colon ⟨:⟩ is used in place of IPA ⟨ː⟩ to indicate length, ... and written by John Samuel Kenyon and Thomas A. Knott. It provides a phonemic transcription of General American pronunciations ... A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English, also referred to as Kenyon and Knott, was first published by the G. & C. Merriam ... One principal application of Kenyon and Knott's system is to teach American English pronunciation to non-native speakers of ...
Gotfry and Shakib leave. Najma's son, Najid, dies suddenly of an unexpected illness, and Najma relapses and follows him in ... and considered its strength and weaknesses) during his stay of several years, returns and develops a philosophy that engages ... Ala into English in 1903 and wrote various essays and poetry in Arabic. In 1905, however, he returned to Lebanon and lived for ... and chooses to return to spread his views on liberation from the Ottoman empire and on the importance of religious unity and ...
The vinyl has the phrases "Our time has been..." and "....and will be again" scratched into it. The test pressing for this ...
... and side lines of 66-69), are as follows: For "King, Lord-mine" (and partials): (line 32)--LUGAL (39)--LUGAL be-li-ia (40)--be- ... sign is a common multi-use sign in the mid 14th-century BC Amarna letters, and the Epic of Gilgamesh. In the Epic it also has 5 ... El Amarna Tablets, 359-379, Anson F. Rainey, (AOAT 8, Alter Orient Altes Testament 8, Kevelaer and Neukirchen -Vluyen), 1970, ... Comparative Graphemic Analysis of Old Babylonian and Western Akkadian, from Ugarit-Forschungen 8, (Neukirchen-Vluyen). Moran, ...
Following its success were Alouette 2 in 1965 and the two ISIS satellites in 1969 and 1971, further AEROS-A and -B in 1972 and ... The F2 layer persists by day and night and is the main region responsible for the refraction and reflection of radio waves. The ... During the first half of the 20th century it was widely used for transoceanic telephone and telegraph service, and business and ... the ISIS and Alouette topside sounders, and in situ instruments on several satellites and rockets. IRI is updated yearly. IRI ...
AND. "History of the Academy of Notre Dame". Retrieved 2007-05-11. AND. "Student Activities" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-12-01. AND ... newspaper and many more. During All School events, the entire school comes out bursting with crazy colors and designs during ... The Academy of Notre Dame is co-educational for students in grades pre-kindergarten through 8th grade, and is an all-girls high ... The Academy of Notre Dame is a private, Catholic co-educational Pre-K through Grade 8 lower school and college-preparatory ...
This choice of three points and two tangents determines a unique pair of circular arcs, and the locus of middle points for ... 4 shows two examples of biarc families, sharing end points and end tangents, end tangents at A {\displaystyle A} and B {\ ... Biarcs are commonly used in geometric modeling and computer graphics. They can be used to approximate splines and other plane ... Biarcs of each family share end points and end tangents. Red curve (dash-dotted) is the degenerate (discontinuous) biarc, ...
... and >= between objects of the same type, based on user-defined operators == and <. pair, a container template which holds two ... The third is a template copy-constructor which will accept any std::pair<_U1, _U2>, provided the types _U1 and _U2 are capable ... These define a strict weak ordering for objects of type std::pair<_T1, _T2>, based on the first elements and then upon the ... The first (default) constructor initializes both members with the default values 0 and 0.0, whereas the second one accepts one ...
... and "preys on"). Symmetric and antisymmetric (where the only way a can be related to b and b be related to a is if a = b) are ... In mathematics and other areas, a binary relation R over a set X is symmetric if it holds for all a and b in X that a is ... A symmetric relation that is also transitive and reflexive is an equivalence relation. One way to conceptualize a symmetric ... Thus, symmetric relations and undirected graphs are combinatorially equivalent objects. Asymmetric relation Antisymmetric ...
... and 5% respectively in the lease, ultimately giving Aiteo Eastern E&P Company Limited a 45% interest in OML29 and the Nembe ... The other joint venture partners, Total E&P Nigeria Limited and Nigerian Agip Oil Company Limited also assigned their interests ... "The Shell Petroleum Development Company completes sale of oil mining lease 29 and Nembe Creek Trunk Line in Nigeria". Euro ... It was constructed as a replacement to the ageing and often vandalized Nembe Creek Pipeline which had suffered significant ...
Arıkan was born and grew up in Ankara, Turkey. Her first short stories and essays were published in various literary journals ... Her first novel, Ve… Veya… Belki… (And… Or… Maybe…) was published in 1999, followed by Evet... Ama... Sanki... (Yes… But… As If ... After this experience of censorship, Arıkan has been awarded with "Freedom of Idea and Statement Prize 2004" by the Turkish ... 1999 Ve... Veya... Belki... (And... Or... Maybe...), 210 pp., 3rd edition 2005, ISBN 975-289-084-9 2000 Evet... Ama... Sanki ...
... and so arose mutual disapproval among men. As a result, father and son and elder and younger brothers became enemies and were ... and of course, instead of being born free and equal, are born subject, not only to parental authority, but to the laws and ... and ethnology, which investigate the social and power-related structures of indigenous and uncontacted peoples living in tribal ... supposed to have existed prior to the social and political state; and in which men lived apart and independent of each other ...
Merrithews and Keswick Islands, and the north range of lots, comprising lots number one to number nine, inclusive, and number ... South and southeast by the Saint John River and the City of Fredericton; west by a line commencing at the mouth of the Keswick ... and east by Stanley and Saint Marys Parishes, including Upper Shores, Lower Shores, Mitchells, ... Douglas Parish was established in (before 1813) as part of York County and named for (unknown). Douglas Parish included ? ...
Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans Direct Plus Loans for Graduates and Professionals Private Loans Parent Plus Loans A ... and PSLF plans. A petition has been started asking the White House to reconsider its limitations on the PSLF program. On June 9 ... and • Capping the amount of interest that can accrue when a borrower's monthly payment is insufficient to cover the interest to ... it severely restricts its benefits for those with high income/high student loan balances and for those pursuing careers in ...
... it has the same format and the same cast but the lectures focus on the building and making of a civilization rather than the ... Written by Chris Addison and Carl Cooper, it was based around Chris Addison giving a lecture on the evolution of man from "ugly ... Other cast members of the show were Jo Enright and Dan Tetsell who performed sketches to illustrate the lecture. The series was ... The Professor was frequently ridiculed, and was usually introduced as the author of a particular book. The books were always ...
... for a connective and the rule(s) for its dual. The rules for multiplicative conjunction (⊗) and disjunction (⅋): and for their ... and 0 are called additives, and the connectives ! and ? are called exponentials. We can further employ the following ... and disjunction (⊕) : and for their units: Observe that the rules for additive conjunction and disjunction are again admissible ... Next we add initial sequents and cuts: The cut rule can be seen as a way of composing proofs, and initial sequents serve as the ...

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