A genus of nematode intestinal parasites that consists of several species. A. duodenale is the common hookworm in humans. A. braziliense, A. ceylonicum, and A. caninum occur primarily in cats and dogs, but all have been known to occur in humans.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus ANCYLOSTOMA. Characteristics include anemia, dyspepsia, eosinophilia, and abdominal swelling.
A common parasite of humans in the moist tropics and subtropics. These organisms attach to villi in the small intestine and suck blood causing diarrhea, anorexia, and anemia.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus NECATOR. The resulting anemia from this condition is less severe than that from ANCYLOSTOMIASIS.
A superfamily of nematode parasitic hookworms consisting of four genera: ANCYLOSTOMA; NECATOR; Bunostomum; and Uncinaria. ANCYLOSTOMA and NECATOR occur in humans and other mammals. Bunostomum is common in ruminants and Uncinaria in wolves, foxes, and dogs.
A genus of intestinal parasite worms which includes one of the most important hookworms of man, NECATOR AMERICANUS. The only other known species, N. suillus, has been recovered from pigs.
Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.
Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
An order of nematodes of the subclass SECERNENTEA. Characteristics include an H-shaped excretory system with two subventral glands.
Proteins found in any species of helminth.
Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.
Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.
Determination of parasite eggs in feces.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
Analogs or derivatives of bephenium (N,N-dimethyl-N-(2-phenoxyethyl)benzenemethanaminium).
An area of recreation or hygiene for use by the public.
A genus of nematode worms comprising the whipworms.
A species of parasitic nematode that is the largest found in the human intestine. Its distribution is worldwide, but it is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation. Human infection with A. lumbricoides is acquired by swallowing fully embryonated eggs from contaminated soil.
A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
A genus of nematodes of the superfamily STRONGYLOIDEA, parasitic in the intestines of animals. The adults are usually free in the intestinal lumen; the larvae encyst in the wall.
Substances used in the treatment or control of nematode infestations. They are used also in veterinary practice.
Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.
A genus of ascomycetous mitosporic fungi in the family Orbiliaceae. It is used for the biological control of nematodes in livestock.
Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.
Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.
Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.
A depolarizing neuromuscular-blocking agent, that causes persistent nicotinic activation resulting in spastic paralysis of susceptible nematodes. It is a drug of second-choice after benzimidazoles for treatment of ascariasis, hookworm, and pinworm infections, being effective after a single dose. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, p920)
A species of parasitic nematode widely distributed in tropical and subtropical countries. The females and their larvae inhabit the mucosa of the intestinal tract, where they cause ulceration and diarrhea.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

The hookworm platelet inhibitor: functional blockade of integrins GPIIb/IIIa (alphaIIbbeta3) and GPIa/IIa (alpha2beta1) inhibits platelet aggregation and adhesion in vitro. (1/106)

Hookworms, aggressive, blood-feeding, intestinal nematodes, are currently a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia in the developing world. An inhibitor of platelet aggregation and adhesion has been partially purified and characterized from soluble protein extracts of adult Ancylostoma caninum hookworms. This protein, named the hookworm platelet inhibitor, has an estimated molecular mass of 15 kDa as determined by size-exclusion chromatography. In addition to blocking platelet aggregation in response to a variety of agonists, the partially purified inhibitor also prevents adhesion of resting platelets to immobilized fibrinogen and collagen. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies were used to identify specific blockade of cell surface integrins GPIIb/IIIa (alphaIIbbeta3) and GPIa/IIa (alpha2beta1), the platelet receptors for fibrinogen and collagen, respectively. This broad-spectrum anti-platelet activity is also present in excretory and secretory products of adult worms, suggesting a biologic role for the hookworm platelet inhibitor in vivo.  (+info)

Protective immunity in mice elicited by living infective third-stage hookworm larvae (Shanghai strain of Ancylostoma caninum). (2/106)

OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the mechanisms of protective immunity in mice elicited by living hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum third-stage infective larvae (L3). METHODS: The number of migrating infective larvae recovered from the lungs was used as an endpoint for vaccine immunity. The timing of maximal L3 lung entry was determined by counting the number of lung larvae at several time points after infection with 500 or 1000 L3. Mice were immunized either orally or subcutaneously with 500 L3, followed by two boosts of L3 once every two weeks. The immunized mice were challenged orally with 500 L3 one week after the final boost. To evaluate the protective immunity, the number of L3 recovered from the lungs of the immunized mice during the time of maximal larval entry was compared with that of controls. Host immunity was also evaluated by comparing circulating anti-L3 antibodies between immunized and controlled mice, using both enzyme immunoassays and immunoblotting techniques, and by lung histopathology. RESULTS: The peak time of larval entry into the lungs occurred 48 hours after infection. Mice immunized either orally or subcutaneously with L3 exhibited a marked reduction (90.2% and 86.2% respectively) in the number of recovered lung larvae in comparison to controls (P < 0.01). The protection might be associated with circulating anti-L3 antibodies, including antibodies directed against 132-200 kDa L3 antigens, as well as three major antigens ranging from 28 to 51 kDa. Larvae migrating through the lungs of vaccinated mice showed cuticular damages accompanied with host-inflammatory cell invasion. CONCLUSIONS: Immunization with living L3 protects mice against lung invasion after challenged with hookworm infection. Vaccine immunity is associated with circulating antibodies against L3 antigens and lung inflammatory responses. The mouse model is potentially useful for developing a hookworm vaccine.  (+info)

Epidemiology of hookworm infection in Itagua, Paraguay: a cross sectional study. (3/106)

A cross-sectional study in Itagua, Paraguay tested 192 people for the presence, intensity and species of hookworm infection. Fifty-nine percent of these individuals were found to be infected. Intensity of infection was determined on 92% of infected individuals by quantitative egg counts. The high intensity hookworm infections, which cause the greatest morbidity, were clustered between the ages of five and 14 years. No differences were seen between genders. The species of hookworm was determined for parasites reared from 72% of infected individuals. Both Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale were identified, although the former species predominated. We conclude that hookworm infection continues to be a public health problem in Paraguay, particularly among children and adolescents who suffer from high intensity infections. A. duodenale continues to persist in the Western Hemisphere and has not been completely displaced by N. americanus.  (+info)

Antibody-dependent reductions in mouse hookworm burden after vaccination with Ancylostoma caninum secreted protein 1. (4/106)

Vaccination of mice with either third-stage Ancylostoma caninum infective hookworm larvae (L3) or alum-precipitated recombinant Ancylostoma secreted protein 1 from A. caninum (Ac-ASP-1) results in protection against hookworm challenge infections. Vaccine protection is manifested by reductions in lung hookworm burdens at 48 h postchallenge. Mice actively immunized 4 times with Ac-ASP-1 also exhibited reductions in hookworm burden in the muscles. Hookworm burden reductions from Ac-ASP-1 immunization were associated with elevations in all immunoglobulin subclasses, with the greatest rise observed in host IgG1 and IgG2b. The addition of a fourth immunization resulted in even higher levels of IgG and IgE. In contrast, L3-vaccinated mice exhibited marked elevations in IgG1 and IgM, including anti-Ac-ASP-1 IgM antibody. Passive immunization with pooled sera from recombinant Ac-ASP-1-vaccinated mice also resulted in lung hookworm burden reductions. It is hypothesized that recombinant Ac-ASP-1 vaccinations elicit antibody that interferes with parasite larval migration.  (+info)

A common muscarinic pathway for diapause recovery in the distantly related nematode species Caenorhabditis elegans and Ancylostoma caninum. (5/106)

Converging TGF-beta and insulin-like neuroendocrine signaling pathways regulate whether Caenorhabditis elegans develops reproductively or arrests at the dauer larval stage. We examined whether neurotransmitters act in the dauer entry or recovery pathways. Muscarinic agonists promote recovery from dauer arrest induced by pheromone as well as by mutations in the TGF-beta pathway. Dauer recovery in these animals is inhibited by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Muscarinic agonists do not induce dauer recovery of either daf-2 or age-1 mutant animals, which have defects in the insulin-like signaling pathway. These data suggest that a metabotropic acetylcholine signaling pathway activates an insulin-like signal during C. elegans dauer recovery. Analogous and perhaps homologous cholinergic regulation of mammalian insulin release by the autonomic nervous system has been noted. In the parasitic nematode Ancylostoma caninum, the dauer larval stage is the infective stage, and recovery to the reproductive stage normally is induced by host factors. Muscarinic agonists also induce and atropine potently inhibits in vitro recovery of A. caninum dauer arrest. We suggest that host or parasite insulin-like signals may regulate recovery of A. caninum and could be potential targets for antihelminthic drugs.  (+info)

A broad spectrum Kunitz type serine protease inhibitor secreted by the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. (6/106)

Although blood-feeding hookworms infect over a billion people worldwide, little is known about the molecular mechanisms through which these parasitic nematodes cause gastrointestinal hemorrhage and iron deficiency anemia. A cDNA corresponding to a secreted Kunitz type serine protease inhibitor has been cloned from adult Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm RNA. The translated sequence of the A. ceylanicum Kunitz type inhibitor 1 (AceKI-1) cDNA predicts a 16-amino acid secretory signal sequence, followed by a 68-amino acid mature protein with a molecular mass of 7889 daltons. Recombinant protein (rAceKI-1) was purified from induced lysates of Escherichia coli transformed with the rAceKI-1/pET 28a plasmid, and in vitro studies demonstrate that rAceKI-1 is a tight binding inhibitor of the serine proteases chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, neutrophil elastase, and trypsin. AceKI-1 inhibitory activity is present in soluble protein extracts and excretory/secretory products of adult hookworms but not the infective third stage larvae. The native AceKI-1 inhibitor has been purified to homogeneity from soluble extracts of adult A. ceylanicum using size exclusion and reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. As a potent inhibitor of mammalian intestinal proteases, AceKI-1 may play a role in parasite survival and the pathogenesis of hookworm anemia.  (+info)

Mitigation of hookworm disease by immunization with soluble extracts of Ancylostoma ceylanicum. (7/106)

Hookworms are a leading cause of anemia in developing countries, and a strategy aimed at reducing pathology caused by blood-feeding adult parasites would be a valuable addition to global control efforts. This article describes experiments designed to induce resistance to the major clinical sequelae (weight loss and anemia) of Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm infection in Syrian golden hamsters of the outbred LVG strain. Previously infected animals acquired long-lived resistance to weight loss and anemia caused by a secondary hookworm infection. Furthermore, transfer of pooled serum from twice-infected hamsters to animals undergoing a primary infection was associated with partial resistance to growth delay and anemia. Active vaccination of hamsters with soluble adult hookworm antigens emulsified in alum led to partial protection from hookworm-associated pathology in the absence of reductions in adult worm burden. This intriguing result may have important implications for human vaccine development.  (+info)

Enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blotting analysis of human serologic responses to infective hookworm larval antigen. (8/106)

OBJECTIVE: To explore the possibility of using specific antigens for immunodiagnosis of hookworm disease in endemic area. METHOD: Infective third-stage larvae of the canine hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum), were prepared as the source of antigen. Enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blotting (EITB) was employed as an immunodiagnostic method. RESULTS: Two immunodominant bands of hookworm antigens (42 kDa and 55 kDa) were recognized by the sera of hookworm-infected patients (serum dilution 1:200; antigen centrifuged at 36,000 r/m for 20 minutes, but not by sera from negative controls. CONCLUSION: The 42 kDa and 55 kDa A. caninum antigens might be the specific antigens that could be used for immunodiagnosis of hookworm disease in endemic area.  (+info)

Ancylostoma is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are commonly known as hookworms. These intestinal parasites infect humans and other animals through contact with contaminated soil, often via the skin or mouth. Two species of Ancylostoma that commonly infect humans are Ancylostoma duodenale and Ancylostoma ceylanicum.

Ancylostoma duodenale is found primarily in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and southern Europe. It can cause a disease called ancylostomiasis or hookworm infection, which can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and impaired growth in children.

Ancylostoma ceylanicum is found mainly in Southeast Asia, southern China, and some parts of Australia. It can also cause ancylostomiasis, with symptoms similar to those caused by Ancylostoma duodenale. However, Ancylostoma ceylanicum infections are often less severe than those caused by Ancylostoma duodenale.

Preventive measures for hookworm infection include wearing shoes in areas where the soil may be contaminated with feces, washing hands thoroughly after using the toilet or handling soil, and avoiding ingestion of contaminated soil or water. Treatment for hookworm infection typically involves administration of anthelmintic drugs to eliminate the parasites from the body.

Ancylostomiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the hookworms, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. These tiny worms infect the human intestines, specifically in the small intestine, where they attach themselves to the intestinal wall and feed on the host's blood.

The infection is typically acquired through skin contact with contaminated soil, particularly in areas where human feces are used as fertilizer or where there is poor sanitation. The larvae penetrate the skin, enter the bloodstream, and migrate to the lungs, where they mature further before being coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine.

Symptoms of ancylostomiasis can range from mild to severe and may include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, particularly in children or individuals with weakened immune systems, the infection can lead to protein-energy malnutrition, cognitive impairment, and even death.

Treatment for ancylostomiasis typically involves administration of anthelmintic medications such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the parasitic worms. Improved sanitation and hygiene practices can help prevent reinfection and reduce the spread of the disease.

Necator americanus is a species of parasitic hookworm that primarily infects the human intestine. The medical definition of Necator americanus would be:

A nematode (roundworm) of the family Ancylostomatidae, which is one of the most common causes of human hookworm infection worldwide. The adult worms live in the small intestine and feed on blood, causing iron deficiency anemia and protein loss. Infection occurs through contact with contaminated soil, often through bare feet, and results in a skin infection called cutaneous larva migrans (creeping eruption). After penetrating the skin, the larvae migrate to the lungs, ascend the respiratory tract, are swallowed, and then mature into adults in the small intestine.

The life cycle of Necator americanus involves several developmental stages, including eggs, larvae, and adult worms. The eggs are passed in the feces of infected individuals and hatch in warm, moist soil. The larvae then mature and become infective, able to penetrate human skin upon contact.

Preventive measures include wearing shoes in areas with known hookworm infection, avoiding walking barefoot on contaminated soil, improving sanitation and hygiene practices, and treating infected individuals to break the transmission cycle. Treatment of hookworm infection typically involves administration of anthelmintic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the adult worms in the intestine.

Necatoriasis is a parasitic infection caused by the nematode (roundworm) Necator americanus, also known as the "New World hookworm." This condition is primarily found in areas with warm, moist climates and poor sanitation. The infection typically occurs when the larvae of the parasite penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet that come into contact with contaminated soil.

Once inside the human body, the larvae migrate to the lungs, where they mature and are coughed up and swallowed. They then reside in the small intestine, where they feed on blood and cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and growth retardation in children. Necatoriasis is usually treated with anthelmintic medications like albendazole or mebendazole. Preventive measures include wearing shoes in areas where the parasite is common and improving sanitation to reduce the spread of contaminated soil.

Ancylostomatoidea is a superfamily of nematode (roundworm) parasites that includes the genera Ancylostoma and Necator, which are commonly known as hookworms. These parasites are primarily found in the small intestine of their hosts, which can include humans and other animals.

Ancylostomatoidea parasites have a complex life cycle that involves both free-living and parasitic stages. The life cycle begins when the parasite's eggs are passed in the feces of an infected host and hatch into larvae in the soil. The larvae then infect a new host by penetrating the skin, usually through contact with contaminated soil.

Once inside the host, the larvae migrate through the body to the lungs, where they mature and are coughed up and swallowed, allowing them to reach the small intestine. Here, they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on the host's blood, causing anemia and other symptoms of hookworm infection.

Hookworm infections can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, they can lead to anemia, intestinal obstruction, and even death. Prevention measures include wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, practicing good hygiene, and treating infected individuals to prevent the spread of the parasite.

"Necator" is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are known to infect humans. The most common species in this genus is "Necator americanus," which is one of the two major hookworms that cause human helminthiasis (a type of intestinal worm infection). Necator americanus, also known as the New World hookworm, primarily infects people through contact with contaminated soil. The larvae penetrate the skin and migrate to the lungs, where they are coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine, where they mature into adults and attach to the intestinal wall to feed on blood. Heavy infections can lead to iron deficiency anemia, protein loss, and impaired growth and cognitive development, particularly in children.

Larva migrans is a parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of certain nematode (roundworm) species. The term "larva migrans" is used to describe two distinct clinical syndromes: cutaneous larva migrans and visceral larva migrans.

1. Cutaneous Larva Migrans (CLM): Also known as creeping eruption, it is caused by the hookworm species that typically infect dogs and cats (Ancylostoma braziliense, Ancylostoma caninum). The larvae penetrate human skin, usually through bare feet in contact with contaminated soil or sand, and cause an intensely pruritic (itchy) serpiginous (snake-like) track as they migrate under the skin.

2. Visceral Larva Migrans (VLM): It is caused by the migration of larvae from certain roundworm species, such as Toxocara spp., which primarily infect canids (dogs and related animals). Humans become accidental hosts when they ingest embryonated eggs present in contaminated soil, water, or undercooked meat. The larvae then migrate through various organs, causing inflammation and damage to tissues. VLM often affects the liver, lungs, eyes, and less commonly the central nervous system. Symptoms can vary widely depending on the organs involved but may include fever, cough, abdominal pain, and eye inflammation.

It is important to note that these infections are not transmitted from person-to-person. Preventive measures include wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, washing hands thoroughly after contact with soil or pets, cooking meat properly, and avoiding the ingestion of dirt or sand by young children.

Hookworm infections are parasitic diseases caused by the ingestion or penetration of hookworm larvae (immature worms) into the human body. The two main species that infect humans are Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale.

The infection typically occurs through skin contact with contaminated soil, often when walking barefoot on dirty ground. The larvae then penetrate the skin, enter the bloodstream, and travel to the lungs where they mature further. They are coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood.

Hookworm infections can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, chronic hookworm infections can lead to serious complications such as protein malnutrition and heart failure. Treatment typically involves the use of anti-parasitic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the adult worms and allow the body to expel them. Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene practices, wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, and regular deworming of at-risk populations.

Helminthiasis, in general, refers to the infection or infestation of humans and animals by helminths, which are parasitic worms. When referring to "Animal Helminthiasis," it specifically pertains to the condition where animals, including domestic pets and livestock, are infected by various helminth species. These parasitic worms can reside in different organs of the animal's body, leading to a wide range of clinical signs depending on the worm species and the location of the infestation.

Animal Helminthiasis can be caused by different types of helminths:

1. Nematodes (roundworms): These include species like Ascaris suum in pigs, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina in cats, and Toxocara canis in dogs. They can cause gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss.
2. Cestodes (tapeworms): Examples include Taenia saginata in cattle, Echinococcus granulosus in sheep and goats, and Dipylidium caninum in dogs and cats. Tapeworm infestations may lead to gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea or constipation and may also cause vitamin deficiencies due to the worm's ability to absorb nutrients from the host animal's digestive system.
3. Trematodes (flukes): These include liver flukes such as Fasciola hepatica in sheep, goats, and cattle, and schistosomes that can affect various animals, including birds and mammals. Liver fluke infestations may cause liver damage, leading to symptoms like weight loss, decreased appetite, and jaundice. Schistosome infestations can lead to issues in multiple organs depending on the species involved.

Preventing and controlling Helminthiasis in animals is crucial for maintaining animal health and welfare, as well as ensuring food safety for humans who consume products from these animals. Regular deworming programs, good hygiene practices, proper pasture management, and monitoring for clinical signs are essential components of a comprehensive parasite control strategy.

Strongylida is an order of parasitic roundworms, also known as nematodes. These parasites are primarily found in the gastrointestinal tracts of various hosts, including mammals, birds, and reptiles. Strongylida species have a complex life cycle that involves both free-living and parasitic stages. They are known for their strong epidemiological significance, as they can cause significant disease burden and production losses in livestock industries worldwide.

Some well-known Strongylida genera include:

* Strongyloides (threadworms)
* Ancylostoma (hookworms)
* Necator (hookworms)
* Ostertagia (brown stomach worms)
* Haemonchus (barber's pole worms)

These parasites can cause a range of clinical signs, depending on the species and intensity of infection. Common symptoms include diarrhea, anemia, weight loss, and decreased productivity in affected animals. In humans, Strongyloides species can cause strongyloidiasis, which may present as cutaneous larva migrans or intestinal infection, with potential dissemination to various organs in severe cases.

Helminth proteins refer to the proteins that are produced and expressed by helminths, which are parasitic worms that cause diseases in humans and animals. These proteins can be found on the surface or inside the helminths and play various roles in their biology, such as in development, reproduction, and immune evasion. Some helminth proteins have been identified as potential targets for vaccines or drug development, as blocking their function may help to control or eliminate helminth infections. Examples of helminth proteins that have been studied include the antigen Bm86 from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus, and the tetraspanin protein Sm22.6 from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

Helminths are a type of parasitic worm that can infect humans and animals. They are multi-cellular organisms that belong to the phyla Platyhelminthes (flatworms) or Nematoda (roundworms). Helminths can be further classified into three main groups: nematodes (roundworms), cestodes (tapeworms), and trematodes (flukes).

Helminth infections are typically acquired through contact with contaminated soil, food, or water. The symptoms of helminth infections can vary widely depending on the type of worm and the location and extent of the infection. Some common symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and malnutrition.

Helminths have complex life cycles that often involve multiple hosts. They can be difficult to diagnose and treat, and in some cases, may require long-term treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. Preventive measures such as good hygiene practices, proper sanitation, and access to clean water can help reduce the risk of helminth infections.

Cestode infections, also known as tapeworm infections, are caused by the ingestion of larval cestodes (tapeworms) present in undercooked meat or contaminated water. The most common types of cestode infections in humans include:

1. Taeniasis: This is an infection with the adult tapeworm of the genus Taenia, such as Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) and Taenia solium (pork tapeworm). Humans become infected by consuming undercooked beef or pork that contains viable tapeworm larvae. The larvae then mature into adult tapeworms in the human intestine, where they can live for several years, producing eggs that are passed in the feces.
2. Hydatid disease: This is a zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus, which is commonly found in dogs and other carnivores. Humans become infected by accidentally ingesting eggs present in dog feces or contaminated food or water. The eggs hatch in the human intestine and release larvae that migrate to various organs, such as the liver or lungs, where they form hydatid cysts. These cysts can grow slowly over several years and cause symptoms depending on their location and size.
3. Diphyllobothriasis: This is an infection with the fish tapeworm Diphyllobothrium latum, which is found in freshwater fish. Humans become infected by consuming raw or undercooked fish that contain viable tapeworm larvae. The larvae mature into adult tapeworms in the human intestine and can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vitamin B12 deficiency.

Preventing cestode infections involves practicing good hygiene, cooking meat thoroughly, avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked fish, and washing fruits and vegetables carefully before eating. In some cases, treatment with antiparasitic drugs may be necessary to eliminate the tapeworms from the body.

A "Parasite Egg Count" is a laboratory measurement used to estimate the number of parasitic eggs present in a fecal sample. It is commonly used in veterinary and human medicine to diagnose and monitor parasitic infections, such as those caused by roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and other intestinal helminths (parasitic worms).

The most common method for measuring parasite egg counts is the McMaster technique. This involves mixing a known volume of feces with a flotation solution, which causes the eggs to float to the top of the mixture. A small sample of this mixture is then placed on a special counting chamber and examined under a microscope. The number of eggs present in the sample is then multiplied by a dilution factor to estimate the total number of eggs per gram (EPG) of feces.

Parasite egg counts can provide valuable information about the severity of an infection, as well as the effectiveness of treatment. However, it is important to note that not all parasitic infections produce visible eggs in the feces, and some parasites may only shed eggs intermittently. Therefore, a negative egg count does not always rule out the presence of a parasitic infection.

Helminth DNA refers to the genetic material found in parasitic worms that belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) and Nematoda (roundworms). These parasites can infect various organs and tissues of humans and animals, causing a range of diseases.

Helminths have complex life cycles involving multiple developmental stages and hosts. The study of their DNA has provided valuable insights into their evolutionary history, genetic diversity, and mechanisms of pathogenesis. It has also facilitated the development of molecular diagnostic tools for identifying and monitoring helminth infections.

Understanding the genetic makeup of these parasites is crucial for developing effective control strategies, including drug discovery, vaccine development, and disease management.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, known as an antigen. They are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens, neutralizing or marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

Helminths are parasitic worms that can infect humans and animals. They include roundworms, tapeworms, and flukes, among others. Helminth infections can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type of worm and the location of the infection.

Antibodies to helminths are produced by the immune system in response to an infection with one of these parasitic worms. These antibodies can be detected in the blood and serve as evidence of a current or past infection. They may also play a role in protecting against future infections with the same type of worm.

There are several different classes of antibodies, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Antibodies to helminths are typically of the IgE class, which are associated with allergic reactions and the defense against parasites. IgE antibodies can bind to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators that help to protect against the worm.

In addition to IgE, other classes of antibodies may also be produced in response to a helminth infection. For example, IgG antibodies may be produced later in the course of the infection and can provide long-term immunity to reinfection. IgA antibodies may also be produced and can help to prevent the attachment and entry of the worm into the body.

Overall, the production of antibodies to helminths is an important part of the immune response to these parasitic worms. However, in some cases, the presence of these antibodies may also be associated with allergic reactions or other immunological disorders.

Bephenium compounds are a type of anti-parasitic drug that is primarily used to treat intestinal infections caused by parasites such as worms. The most common bephenium compound is bephenium hydroxynaphthoate, which works by paralyzing and eliminating the parasites from the body. These compounds were widely used in the past, but their use has decreased with the development of more modern anti-parasitic drugs. They are still available in some parts of the world as an over-the-counter or prescription medication. As with any medication, bephenium compounds should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, and it's important to follow the recommended dosage and duration of treatment.

"Public facilities" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, in a broader context, public facilities generally refer to buildings, services, and infrastructure that are owned and operated by local, state, or federal government agencies for the use of the general public. These can include parks, libraries, community centers, public restrooms, transportation systems (such as buses, trains, and subways), and other similar establishments.

While not a medical definition per se, public facilities can have implications for public health and accessibility. For example, accessible public facilities are essential for individuals with disabilities to fully participate in community life. Public restrooms that are clean, well-maintained, and equipped with necessary amenities (such as grab bars and accessible sinks) can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases and ensure that all members of the community have equal access to these facilities. Similarly, public transportation systems that are safe, reliable, and accessible can improve overall community health by providing individuals with greater mobility and access to healthcare services, employment opportunities, and other essential resources.

"Trichuris" is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are known to infect the intestines of various mammals, including humans. The species that commonly infects humans is called "Trichuris trichiura," which is also known as the human whipworm. These worms are named for their long, thin shape that resembles a whip.

The life cycle of Trichuris involves ingestion of eggs containing infective larvae through contaminated food or water. Once inside the human body, the larvae hatch and migrate to the large intestine, where they mature into adult worms that live in the caecum and colon. Adult female worms lay thousands of eggs every day, which are passed in the feces and can survive in the environment for years, waiting to infect a new host.

Infections with Trichuris trichiura can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and weight loss. In severe cases, it can lead to anemia, malnutrition, and impaired growth in children. Treatment for trichuriasis typically involves medication that kills the adult worms, such as albendazole or mebendazole.

'Ascaris lumbricoides' is the medical term for a type of intestinal roundworm that can infect humans. This parasitic worm is one of the largest that can infest humans, and it is particularly prevalent in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene.

The life cycle of Ascaris lumbricoides begins when an infected person passes eggs in their feces. These eggs can then be ingested through contaminated food or water, or by accidentally ingesting soil that contains the eggs. Once inside the body, the larvae hatch from the eggs and migrate through the tissues to the lungs, where they mature further. They are then coughed up and swallowed, entering the digestive system again, where they mature into adult worms.

Adult female Ascaris lumbricoides worms can grow up to 20-35 cm in length, while males are smaller, typically around 15-30 cm. They live in the small intestine and feed on partially digested food. Females can lay tens of thousands of eggs per day, which are passed in the feces and can infect other people if they come into contact with them.

Symptoms of ascariasis (the infection caused by Ascaris lumbricoides) can vary depending on the number of worms present and the severity of the infestation. Mild infections may cause no symptoms at all, while more severe infections can lead to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. In rare cases, the worms can cause intestinal obstruction or migrate to other parts of the body, leading to serious complications.

Treatment for ascariasis typically involves medication to kill the worms, such as albendazole or mebendazole. Preventing infection requires good hygiene practices, including washing hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the toilet and before eating, and avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water.

Cestoda is a class of parasitic worms belonging to the phylum Platyhelminthes, also known as flatworms. Cestodes are commonly known as tapeworms and have a long, flat, segmented body that can grow to considerable length in their adult form. They lack a digestive system and absorb nutrients through their body surface.

Cestodes have a complex life cycle involving one or two intermediate hosts, usually insects or crustaceans, and a definitive host, which is typically a mammal, including humans. The tapeworm's larval stage develops in the intermediate host, and when the definitive host consumes the infected intermediate host, the larvae mature into adults in the host's intestine.

Humans can become infected with tapeworms by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals or through accidental ingestion of contaminated water or food containing tapeworm eggs or larvae. Infection with tapeworms can cause various symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and vitamin deficiencies.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

Oesophagostomum is a genus of parasitic roundworms that infect the gastrointestinal tract of various mammals, including primates and pigs. The adult worms are typically found in the large intestine, where they lay their eggs, which are passed in the feces and can contaminate the environment.

In humans, Oesophagostomum infection is also known as "nodular worm" or "whipworm of the large intestine." The larvae hatch from the eggs and penetrate the skin, causing a pruritic rash. They then migrate to the lungs, where they cause coughing and other respiratory symptoms before being swallowed and passing into the gastrointestinal tract.

Symptoms of Oesophagostomum infection in humans can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and weight loss. In severe cases, the worms can cause intestinal obstruction or perforation. Treatment typically involves administration of anthelmintic drugs to kill the parasites.

Antinematodal agents are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by nematodes, which are also known as roundworms. These agents work by either killing the parasitic worms or preventing them from reproducing. Some examples of antinematodal agents include albendazole, ivermectin, and mebendazole. These medications are used to treat a variety of nematode infections, such as ascariasis, hookworm infection, and strongyloidiasis. It is important to note that the use of antinematodal agents should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

There are many diseases that can affect cats, and the specific medical definitions for these conditions can be quite detailed and complex. However, here are some common categories of feline diseases and examples of each:

1. Infectious diseases: These are caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. Examples include:
* Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), also known as feline parvovirus, which can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms and death in kittens.
* Feline calicivirus (FCV), which can cause upper respiratory symptoms such as sneezing and nasal discharge.
* Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), which can suppress the immune system and lead to a variety of secondary infections and diseases.
* Bacterial infections, such as those caused by Pasteurella multocida or Bartonella henselae, which can cause abscesses or other symptoms.
2. Neoplastic diseases: These are cancerous conditions that can affect various organs and tissues in cats. Examples include:
* Lymphoma, which is a common type of cancer in cats that can affect the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and other organs.
* Fibrosarcoma, which is a type of soft tissue cancer that can arise from fibrous connective tissue.
* Squamous cell carcinoma, which is a type of skin cancer that can be caused by exposure to sunlight or tobacco smoke.
3. Degenerative diseases: These are conditions that result from the normal wear and tear of aging or other factors. Examples include:
* Osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative joint disease that can cause pain and stiffness in older cats.
* Dental disease, which is a common condition in cats that can lead to tooth loss, gum inflammation, and other problems.
* Heart disease, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which is a thickening of the heart muscle that can lead to congestive heart failure.
4. Hereditary diseases: These are conditions that are inherited from a cat's parents and are present at birth or develop early in life. Examples include:
* Polycystic kidney disease (PKD), which is a genetic disorder that causes cysts to form in the kidneys and can lead to kidney failure.
* Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which can be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait in some cats.
* Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), which is a group of genetic disorders that cause degeneration of the retina and can lead to blindness.

Nematode infections, also known as roundworm infections, are caused by various species of nematodes or roundworms. These parasitic worms can infect humans and animals, leading to a range of health problems depending on the specific type of nematode and the location of the infection within the body.

Common forms of nematode infections include:

1. Ascariasis: Caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, this infection occurs when people ingest the parasite's eggs through contaminated food or water. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the worms may obstruct the intestines or migrate to other organs, leading to potentially life-threatening complications.
2. Hookworm infections: These are caused by Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. The larvae penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet, and migrate to the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and protein loss.
3. Trichuriasis: Also known as whipworm infection, this is caused by Trichuris trichiura. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal prolapse in severe cases.
4. Strongyloidiasis: Caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, this infection occurs when the larvae penetrate the skin, usually through contaminated soil, and migrate to the lungs and then the small intestine. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. In immunocompromised individuals, strongyloidiasis can lead to disseminated disease, which is potentially fatal.
5. Toxocariasis: This infection is caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, found in dogs and cats, respectively. Humans become infected through ingestion of contaminated soil or undercooked meat. Symptoms include fever, cough, abdominal pain, and vision loss in severe cases.
6. Enterobiasis: Also known as pinworm infection, this is caused by Enterobius vermicularis. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing perianal itching and restlessness, especially at night.

Preventive measures include:

1. Proper hand hygiene: Wash hands with soap and water after using the toilet, changing diapers, handling pets or their feces, and before preparing or eating food.
2. Personal hygiene: Keep fingernails short and clean, avoid biting nails, and wear shoes in public areas, especially where soil may be contaminated with human or animal feces.
3. Food safety: Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, cook meat properly, and avoid consuming raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or fish.
4. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean surfaces that come into contact with food, such as countertops, cutting boards, and utensils. Dispose of trash properly and maintain a clean living environment.
5. Pet care: Keep pets healthy and regularly deworm them as recommended by a veterinarian. Pick up pet feces promptly to prevent contamination of the environment.
6. Public health measures: Implement public health interventions, such as regular waste disposal, sewage treatment, and vector control, to reduce the transmission of parasitic infections.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Duddingtonia" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually the name of a genus of fungi that live in the soil and are parasites of nematodes (roundworms). The fungus forms adhesive spores that stick to the nematode's body, then germinate and penetrate the worm, eventually killing and consuming it. It has been studied for its potential as a biological control agent for certain plant-parasitic nematodes. I hope this information is helpful! If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Anthelmintics are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by parasitic worms, also known as helminths. These medications work by either stunting the growth of the worms, paralyzing them, or killing them outright, allowing the body to expel the worms through normal bodily functions. Anthelmintics are commonly used to treat infections caused by roundworms, tapeworms, flukeworms, and hookworms. Examples of anthelmintic drugs include albendazole, mebendazole, praziquantel, and ivermectin.

Helminth antigens refer to the proteins or other molecules found on the surface or within helminth parasites that can stimulate an immune response in a host organism. Helminths are large, multicellular parasitic worms that can infect various tissues and organs in humans and animals, causing diseases such as schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiases.

Helminth antigens can be recognized by the host's immune system as foreign invaders, leading to the activation of various immune cells and the production of antibodies. However, many helminths have evolved mechanisms to evade or suppress the host's immune response, allowing them to establish long-term infections.

Studying helminth antigens is important for understanding the immunology of helminth infections and developing new strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Some researchers have also explored the potential therapeutic use of helminth antigens or whole helminths as a way to modulate the immune system and treat autoimmune diseases or allergies. However, more research is needed to determine the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

Parasitic intestinal diseases are disorders caused by microscopic parasites that invade the gastrointestinal tract, specifically the small intestine. These parasites include protozoa (single-celled organisms) and helminths (parasitic worms). The most common protozoan parasites that cause intestinal disease are Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Entamoeba histolytica. Common helminthic parasites include roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides), tapeworms (Taenia saginata and Taenia solium), hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), and pinworms (Enterobius vermicularis).

Parasitic intestinal diseases can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weight loss. The severity and duration of the symptoms depend on the type of parasite, the number of organisms present, and the immune status of the host.

Transmission of these parasites can occur through various routes, including contaminated food and water, person-to-person contact, and contact with contaminated soil or feces. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, washing hands thoroughly after using the toilet and before handling food, cooking food thoroughly, and avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or seafood.

Treatment of parasitic intestinal diseases typically involves the use of antiparasitic medications that target the specific parasite causing the infection. In some cases, supportive care such as fluid replacement and symptom management may also be necessary.

Pyrantel is an anthelmintic medication used to treat and prevent gastrointestinal parasitic infections caused by roundworms, hookworms, and pinworms in humans and animals. It works by paralyzing the parasites, allowing them to be expelled from the body. Pyrantel is available in various formulations, including tablets, suspensions, and pastes, for human and veterinary use. Common brand names include Pin-X, Reese's Pinworm Medicine, and Strongid.

"Strongyloides stercoralis" is a species of parasitic roundworm that can infect humans and other animals. The adult female worms live in the small intestine, where they lay eggs that hatch into larvae. These larvae can then either mature into adult worms within the host's intestine or be passed out of the body in feces. If the larvae in the feces come into contact with suitable moist soil, they can mature into infective larvae that can penetrate the skin of a new host and cause infection.

In humans, "Strongyloides stercoralis" infection can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, and weight loss. In some cases, the infection can become chronic and lead to serious complications, such as disseminated disease or gram-negative sepsis, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

The diagnosis of "Strongyloides stercoralis" infection typically involves the detection of larvae in the stool or other bodily fluids, although serological tests and PCR assays are also available. Treatment usually involves the use of anti-parasitic drugs, such as ivermectin or albendazole, to kill the worms and prevent the progression of the infection.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). It is used to index, catalog, and search for biomedical and health-related information and documents, such as journal articles and books. MeSH terms represent a consistent and standardized way to describe and categorize biomedical concepts, allowing for more precise and effective searching and retrieval of relevant information. The MeSH hierarchy includes descriptors for various categories including diseases, chemicals, drugs, anatomical parts, physiological functions, and procedures, among others.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

... commonly infects dogs Ancylostoma ceylanicum Ancylostoma duodenale Ancylostoma pluridentatum, commonly infects sylvatic cats ... Ancylostoma is a genus of nematodes that includes some species of hookworms. Species include: Ancylostoma braziliense, commonly ... Ancylostoma tubaeforme, infects cats along with other hosts Ancylostomiasis List of parasites (human) Ancylostoma at the U.S. ... infects cats, popularly known in Brazil as bicho-geográfico Ancylostoma caninum, ...
Carolina® Microscope SlidesTop QualityAffordableBacked by expert technical supportFor over 70 years our mission has been to provide educators with top-quality microscope slides for botany, zoology, histology, embryology, parasitology, genetics, and pathology. We offer an extensive collection of ...
Cytokine response to Ancylostoma duodenale (A. duodenale) infection was measured after starting treatments with piperazine. ...
... in the largest biology dictionary online. Free learning resources for students covering all major areas of biology. ... Ancylostoma species have two (e.g. A. duodenale, A. braziliense, and A. ceylanicum) or three (e.g. A. caninum and A. tubaeforme ... Ancylostoma. Definition noun A genus belonging to the family of Ancylostomatidae which is a family of nematodes that includes ...
Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworms in Dogs, Grenada, West Indies Cite CITE. Title : Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworms in Dogs, ... 2022). Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworms in Dogs, Grenada, West Indies. 28(9). Zendejas-Heredia, Patsy A. et al. "Ancylostoma ... "Zoonotic Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworm Infections, Ecuador" 28, no. 9 (2022). Sears, William J. et al. "Zoonotic Ancylostoma ... "Ancylostoma ceylanicum Hookworms in Dogs, Grenada, West Indies" vol. 28, no. 9, 2022. Export RIS Citation Information.. ...
The Geographic Distribution of Ancylostoma Pluridentatum and Other Hookworms in Bobcats (Felis rufus) from Florida. ... Cames, Tania A. and Forrester, Donald J. (1998) "The Geographic Distribution of Ancylostoma Pluridentatum and Other Hookworms ...
Definition: being symmetric about a plane running from frontal end to caudal end (head to tail), and having nearly identical right and left ...
Copyright © 2017 TipsCrew. All Rights Reserved ...
... as braziliense Ancylostoma or Ancylostoma caninum, usually only cause intestinal infection in cats and dogs, but can cause ... The Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are small roundworms, which are between 0.5 and 1.5 cm in diameter and have a ... Both Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus do not multiply within our body. To generate new worms, the eggs must be ... The Ancylostoma duodenale is a species of hookworm that inhabits Mediterranean, North Africa, Iran, India, Pakistan, China and ...
General information about Ancylostoma tubaeforme (ANCTTU)
Ancylostoma ceylanicum annotations: 11.88 kbp from ANCCEYDFT_Contig45:366,436..378,319. Browser Select Tracks Snapshots ...
Rhina ancylostoma Bloch & Schneider, 1801. Common name. shark ray. WildNet taxon ID. 22595. Conservation significant. No. ... Species profile-Rhina ancylostoma (shark ray). Classification. Animalia (animals) → Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) → ... Rhynchobatidae (wedgefishes) → Rhina ancylostoma (shark ray). Sighting data. Download. KML , CSV , GeoJson. Species details. ...
Ancylostoma duodenale. 60 µm x 40 µm. Range, 57-76 µm x 35-47 µm.. Oval or ellipsoidal with a thin shell.. Colorless with ...
INCIDENCE OF HOOKWORM (ANCYLOSTOMA DUODENALE) INFECTION BETWEEN TWO PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN YANDEL COMMUNITY OJN Preprints , ... Ukoro, F. O., Azenge, P. M. and Idogah, E. E. (2020). Incidence of hookworm (ancylostoma duodenale) infection between two ...
Hookworms (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma spp.). In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds ... Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ...
Toxoplasma - Download as a PDF or view online for free
The Effect of Ancylostoma Caninum Infection on Erythropoiesis in Dogs Author: Iris M. Krupp ...
Other parasites, such as Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis, have a similar cycle to ...
Take a journey of discovery through the worlds largest ocean at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California.
The Record of Ancylostoma braziliense as an Intestinal Parasite of Man in North America ...
Graphical representation of the life cycles of hookworms (human: Necator americanus or Ancylostoma duodenale; mouse: ... as the human hookworm parasites Necator americanus or Ancylostoma duodenale. Albeit not directly related phylogenetically to ...
Hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum, Ancylostoma braziliense, Uncinaria stenocephala, Ancylostoma ceylanicum). Hookworms are small ...
Hookworm infections,[13] including cutaneous larva migrans caused by hookworms of genus Ancylostoma. A single dose of ...
921 South 8th Avenue , Pocatello, Idaho, 83209. ...
Prociv P, Croese J. Human eosinophilic enteritis caused by dog hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. Lancet 1990;335:1299-1302. * ... Ascarids (Toxocara spp.) and hookworms (Ancylostoma spp. and Uncinaria stenocephala), the common intestinal roundworms of dogs ... Ancylostoma and Uncinaria spp); W = whipworms (Trichuris vulpis); T = Taeniid tapeworms; D = Flea tapeworms (Dipylidium caninum ...
The exotic-looking fish - also known as a bowmouth guitarfish (Rhina ancylostoma) - was killed during the act of mating by an ... The shark ray, also called the bowmouth guitarfish (Rhina ancylostoma). (Image credit: ,a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/ ...
Enterobius, trichuris, capillaria, and hookworm including ancylostoma caninum. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1996 Sep. 25(3):579 ... and Ancylostoma duodenale, require a soil phase for development. Because most helminthic parasites do not self-replicate, the ...
Highly magnified histologic section showing hookworm (Ancylostoma sp) attached to the intestine. ...
Ancylostoma duodenale: A0A0C2GLY2; Mimachlamys varia: A0A249JKI1; Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: A0A6P7G8G0; Anabarilius ... Ancylostoma ceylanicum: A0A016SGD9, A0A0D6LGQ8; Scophthalmus maximus: A0A2U9CLZ0; Austrofundulus limnaeus: A0A2I4BRU8; ...
  • Ancylostoma caninum Female, w.m. (carolina.com)
  • Other species of hookworms, as braziliense Ancylostoma or Ancylostoma caninum, usually only cause intestinal infection in cats and dogs, but can cause larva migrans in man. (tabletsmanual.com)
  • and for treatment of existing larval and adult hookworm ( Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria stenocephala ) infections. (fda.gov)
  • To describe dogs with detected Ancylostoma caninum anthelmintic treatment resistance markers in Canada. (avma.org)
  • Kamp sf rgek: Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala. (equus.hu)
  • The main differential diagnosis for hemorrhagic enteritis in a puppy is hookworm ( Ancylostoma caninum ) infection. (vin.com)
  • Hookworms (Ancylostoma caninum and tubaeforme) typically infect the skin (cutaneous larva migrans), but can cause visceral disease as well. (heska.com)
  • Ancylostoma braziliense and Ancylostoma caninum are hookworms that have cats and dogs as the primary hosts. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Drontal for cats is effective against Uncinaria stenocephala and Ancylostoma braziliense. (mypetneedsthat.com)
  • Ancylostoma ceylanicum annotations: 11.88 kbp from ANCCEYDFT_Contig45:366,436. (amazonaws.com)
  • Yan Hu from the University of California, San Diego, infected 12 hamsters with the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum , which can infect people. (newscientist.com)
  • Revolution is also indicated for the treatment and control of roundworm (Toxocara cati) and intestinal hookworm (Ancylostoma tubaeforme) infections in cats. (medi-vet.com)
  • Ancylostoma is a genus of nematodes that includes some species of hookworms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hookworms ( Necator americanus and Ancylostoma spp. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hookworm infections , [13] including cutaneous larva migrans caused by hookworms of genus Ancylostoma . (wikipedia.org)
  • and hookworms (Ancylostoma spp. (cdc.gov)
  • The major species of hookworms associated with infections in humans are Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. (healthychildren.org)
  • The main worms causing soil-transmitted helminthiases are roundworm ( Ascaris lumbricoides ), whipworm ( Trichuris trichiura ), and hookworms ( Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale ). (who.int)
  • The Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are small roundworms, which are between 0.5 and 1.5 cm in diameter and have a head shaped like a hook, especially N. americanus. (tabletsmanual.com)
  • The shark ray, also called the bowmouth guitarfish (Rhina ancylostoma). (livescience.com)
  • The exotic-looking fish - also known as a bowmouth guitarfish ( Rhina ancylostoma ) - was killed during the act of mating by an amorous male. (livescience.com)
  • The hookworm, also called hookworm, necatoriasis, yellowing or Jeca Tatu disease is a very common intestinal parasitosis caused by two Nematodes: Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus. (tabletsmanual.com)
  • Contamination with Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus is through direct skin contact with contaminated soil (usually the legs) or by accidental ingestion of this larva on the environment (often by hands contaminated by soil going to mouth without being washed). (tabletsmanual.com)
  • Five to eight weeks after the patient has been infected for the first time, the female Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus starts to produce thousands of eggs, which will be released to the environment through feces, restarting the parasite's life cycle. (tabletsmanual.com)
  • Both Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus do not multiply within our body. (tabletsmanual.com)
  • The problem is that the Ancylostoma duodenale usually have a 1 year lifetime and Necator americanus can reach up to 5 years. (tabletsmanual.com)
  • Other parasites, such as Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis, have a similar cycle to Ascaris, with passage of larval forms through the alveolar walls. (medscape.com)
  • Some species, including Enterobius vermicularis, can be transmitted directly from person to person, while others, such as Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, and Ancylostoma duodenale, require a soil phase for development. (medscape.com)
  • Ancylostomiasis is infection with the hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus . (msdmanuals.com)
  • Ancylostoma spp was detected from 184/32,205 dog fecal samples by reference laboratory qPCR surveillance, between May 15, 2022, and April 26, 2023. (avma.org)
  • Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are the two human hookworm species that are normally discussed together as the cause of hookworm infection . (wikipedia.org)
  • High prevalence of Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm infections in humans, Cambodia, 2012. (nih.gov)
  • Field application of a novel multiplex qPCR assay reveals the occurrence of the zoonotic hookworm Ancylostoma braziliense in Nigerian dogs. (nih.gov)
  • Characterization of antigens of hookworm larvae (Ancylostoma spp. (ugm.ac.id)
  • EMVERM ® is indicated for the treatment of patients two years of age and older with gastrointestinal infections caused by Ancylostoma duodenale (hookworm), Ascaris lumbricoides (roundworm), Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm), Necator americanus (hookworm), and Trichuris trichiura (whipworm). (nih.gov)
  • Two types of hookworm - Necator americanis and Ancylostoma duadonale - are found in soil. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • Yan Hu from the University of California, San Diego, infected 12 hamsters with the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum , which can infect people. (newscientist.com)
  • Oxibendazole treats Roundworm species (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina) and Hookworm species (Ancylostoma spp. (jedds.com)
  • Ancylostoma, hookworm, adult w.m. 34(d). (shopanatomical.com)
  • Ancylostoma duodenale is a species of the roundworm genus Ancylostoma . (wikipedia.org)
  • Only Ancylostoma duodenale is an issue in Australia and is typically found in remote communities. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • The major species of hookworms associated with infections in humans are Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. (healthychildren.org)
  • Az ancylostoma duodenale fertōzések intenzitására és az azt befolyásoló tényezōkre vonatkozó vizsgálatok a brennbergi bányamunkásoknál. (nih.gov)
  • The main species that infect people are the roundworm ( Ascaris lumbricoides ), the whipworm ( Trichuris trichiura ) and the hookworms ( Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale ). (who.int)
  • We have also learnt that landings and populations of giant guitarfish Glaucostegus typus , bowmouth guitarfish Rhina ancylostoma and Annandale's guitarfish Rhinobatos annandalei have declined substantially and, most importantly, that wedgefish Rhynchobatus species have been perceived as extremely rare, with no sightings in the past eight or nine years. (saveourseas.com)
  • Intestinal parasites like roundworms (Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonine), hookworms (Uncinaria and Ancylostoma), and whipworms can also cause diarrhea. (petside.com)
  • The species that infect man are the Ancylostoma Duodenum and the Necatore Americanus. (drclark.net)
  • Eggs from Ancylostoma spp were found in 80% of the collected faecal samples. (slu.se)
  • Nursing Central , nursing.unboundmedicine.com/nursingcentral/view/Tabers-Dictionary/742143/all/Ancylostoma. (unboundmedicine.com)

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