Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y: A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine as the eventual drainage site.Postgastrectomy Syndromes: Sequelae of gastrectomy from the second week after operation on. Include recurrent or anastomotic ulcer, postprandial syndromes (DUMPING SYNDROME and late postprandial hypoglycemia), disordered bowel action, and nutritional deficiencies.Arteriovenous Anastomosis: A vessel that directly interconnects an artery and a vein, and that acts as a shunt to bypass the capillary bed. Not to be confused with surgical anastomosis, nor with arteriovenous fistula.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Gastric Bypass: Surgical procedure in which the STOMACH is transected high on the body. The resulting small proximal gastric pouch is joined to any parts of the SMALL INTESTINE by an end-to-side SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS, depending on the amounts of intestinal surface being bypasses. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of MORBID OBESITY by limiting the size of functional STOMACH, food intake, and food absorption.Bile Reflux: Retrograde bile flow. Reflux of bile can be from the duodenum to the stomach (DUODENOGASTRIC REFLUX); to the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX); or to the PANCREAS.Surgical Staplers: Fastening devices composed of steel-tantalum alloys used to close operative wounds, especially of the skin, which minimizes infection by not introducing a foreign body that would connect external and internal regions of the body. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995)Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Pancreaticojejunostomy: Surgical anastomosis of the pancreatic duct, or the divided end of the transected pancreas, with the jejunum. (Dorland, 28th ed)Myoelectric Complex, Migrating: A pattern of gastrointestinal muscle contraction and depolarizing myoelectric activity that moves from the stomach to the ILEOCECAL VALVE at regular frequency during the interdigestive period. The complex and its accompanying motor activity periodically cleanse the bowel of interdigestive secretion and debris in preparation for the next meal.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Gastroparesis: Chronic delayed gastric emptying. Gastroparesis may be caused by motor dysfunction or paralysis of STOMACH muscles or may be associated with other systemic diseases such as DIABETES MELLITUS.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Proctocolectomy, Restorative: A surgical procedure involving the excision of the COLON and RECTUM and the formation of an ILEOANAL RESERVOIR (pouch). In patients with intestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, this procedure avoids the need for an OSTOMY by allowing for transanal defecation.Gastric Emptying: The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.Gastrectomy: Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Colonic Pouches: Sacs or reservoirs created to function in place of the COLON and/or RECTUM in patients who have undergone restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Pouchitis: Acute INFLAMMATION in the INTESTINAL MUCOSA of the continent ileal reservoir (or pouch) in patients who have undergone ILEOSTOMY and restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Heart Bypass, Right: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricle (Dorland, 28th ed). This a permanent procedure often performed to bypass a congenitally deformed right atrium or right ventricle.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Esophagostomy: Surgical formation of an external opening (stoma) into the esophagus.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Y Chromosome: The male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans and in some other male-heterogametic species in which the homologue of the X chromosome has been retained.Receptors, Purinergic P2Y1: A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ATP and ADP. The activated P2Y1 receptor signals through the G-PROTEIN-coupled activation of PHOSPHOLIPASE C and mobilization of intracellular CALCIUM.Internal Mammary-Coronary Artery Anastomosis: Direct myocardial revascularization in which the internal mammary artery is anastomosed to the right coronary artery, circumflex artery, or anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery is the most frequent choice, especially for a single graft, for coronary artery bypass surgery.Cerebral Revascularization: Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.Esophagectomy: Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Portacaval Shunt, Surgical: Surgical portasystemic shunt between the portal vein and inferior vena cava.Choledochostomy: Surgical formation of an opening (stoma) into the COMMON BILE DUCT for drainage or for direct communication with a site in the small intestine, primarily the DUODENUM or JEJUNUM.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Temporal Arteries: Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Colitis, Ulcerative: Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Hepatic Duct, Common: Predominantly extrahepatic bile duct which is formed by the junction of the right and left hepatic ducts, which are predominantly intrahepatic, and, in turn, joins the cystic duct to form the common bile duct.Bronchial Arteries: Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Rhizoctonia: A mitosporic Ceratobasidiaceae fungal genus that is an important plant pathogen affecting potatoes and other plants. There are numerous teleomorphs.Fetofetal Transfusion: Passage of blood from one fetus to another via an arteriovenous communication or other shunt, in a monozygotic twin pregnancy. It results in anemia in one twin and polycythemia in the other. (Lee et al., Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p737-8)Esophageal Stenosis: A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Corrosion Casting: A tissue preparation technique that involves the injecting of plastic (acrylates) into blood vessels or other hollow viscera and treating the tissue with a caustic substance. This results in a negative copy or a solid replica of the enclosed space of the tissue that is ready for viewing under a scanning electron microscope.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Gastrostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.Rectal Diseases: Pathological developments in the RECTUM region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Hydroxyproline: A hydroxylated form of the imino acid proline. A deficiency in ASCORBIC ACID can result in impaired hydroxyproline formation.Duodenostomy: Surgical formation of an opening into the DUODENUM.Adenomatous Polyposis Coli: A polyposis syndrome due to an autosomal dominant mutation of the APC genes (GENES, APC) on CHROMOSOME 5. The syndrome is characterized by the development of hundreds of ADENOMATOUS POLYPS in the COLON and RECTUM of affected individuals by early adulthood.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Pancreatic Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.Defecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures: Any surgical procedure performed on the biliary tract.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Moyamoya Disease: A noninflammatory, progressive occlusion of the intracranial CAROTID ARTERIES and the formation of netlike collateral arteries arising from the CIRCLE OF WILLIS. Cerebral angiogram shows the puff-of-smoke (moyamoya) collaterals at the base of the brain. It is characterized by endothelial HYPERPLASIA and FIBROSIS with thickening of arterial walls. This disease primarily affects children but can also occur in adults.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Gastroenterostomy: A variety of surgical reconstructive procedures devised to restore gastrointestinal continuity, The two major classes of reconstruction are the Billroth I (gastroduodenostomy) and Billroth II (gastrojejunostomy) procedures.Bile Ducts: The channels that collect and transport the bile secretion from the BILE CANALICULI, the smallest branch of the BILIARY TRACT in the LIVER, through the bile ductules, the bile ducts out the liver, and to the GALLBLADDER for storage.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Coronary Artery Bypass, Off-Pump: Coronary artery bypass surgery on a beating HEART without a CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS (diverting the flow of blood from the heart and lungs through an oxygenator).Esophagoplasty: A plastic operation on the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Jejunal Diseases: Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Diverticulitis, Colonic: Inflammation of the COLONIC DIVERTICULA, generally with abscess formation and subsequent perforation.Fetoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the fetus and amniotic cavity through abdominal or uterine entry.Enteric Nervous System: Two ganglionated neural plexuses in the gut wall which form one of the three major divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The enteric nervous system innervates the gastrointestinal tract, the pancreas, and the gallbladder. It contains sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Thus the circuitry can autonomously sense the tension and the chemical environment in the gut and regulate blood vessel tone, motility, secretions, and fluid transport. The system is itself governed by the central nervous system and receives both parasympathetic and sympathetic innervation. (From Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p766)Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Fecal Incontinence: Failure of voluntary control of the anal sphincters, with involuntary passage of feces and flatus.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Brachiocephalic Veins: Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.Tibial Arteries: The anterior and posterior arteries created at the bifurcation of the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle and lies along the tibia at the distal part of the leg to surface superficially anterior to the ankle joint. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg, ankle, and foot. The posterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, lies behind the tibia in the lower part of its course, and is found situated between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg and foot.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Ureter: One of a pair of thick-walled tubes that transports urine from the KIDNEY PELVIS to the URINARY BLADDER.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Intestinal Atresia: Congenital obliteration of the lumen of the intestine, with the ILEUM involved in 50% of the cases and the JEJUNUM and DUODENUM following in frequency. It is the most frequent cause of INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION in NEWBORNS. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Venae Cavae: The inferior and superior venae cavae.Surgical Fixation Devices: Devices used to hold tissue structures together for repair, reconstruction or to close wounds. They may consist of adsorbable or non-adsorbable, natural or synthetic materials. They include tissue adhesives, skin tape, sutures, buttons, staples, clips, screws, etc., each designed to conform to various tissue geometries.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Fontan Procedure: A procedure in which total right atrial or total caval blood flow is channeled directly into the pulmonary artery or into a small right ventricle that serves only as a conduit. The principal congenital malformations for which this operation is useful are TRICUSPID ATRESIA and single ventricle with pulmonary stenosis.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Biliary Tract Diseases: Diseases in any part of the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Ileal Diseases: Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Esophageal Atresia: Congenital abnormality characterized by the lack of full development of the ESOPHAGUS that commonly occurs with TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA. Symptoms include excessive SALIVATION; GAGGING; CYANOSIS; and DYSPNEA.Bile Duct Diseases: Diseases in any part of the ductal system of the BILIARY TRACT from the smallest BILE CANALICULI to the largest COMMON BILE DUCT.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Urinary Diversion: Temporary or permanent diversion of the flow of urine through the ureter away from the URINARY BLADDER in the presence of a bladder disease or after cystectomy. There is a variety of techniques: direct anastomosis of ureter and bowel, cutaneous ureterostomy, ileal, jejunal or colon conduit, ureterosigmoidostomy, etc. (From Campbell's Urology, 6th ed, p2654)Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Intestinal Volvulus: A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Arterio-Arterial Fistula: Abnormal communication between two ARTERIES that may result from injury or occur as a congenital abnormality.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Endoscopes: Instruments for the visual examination of interior structures of the body. There are rigid endoscopes and flexible fiberoptic endoscopes for various types of viewing in ENDOSCOPY.Common Bile Duct: The largest bile duct. It is formed by the junction of the CYSTIC DUCT and the COMMON HEPATIC DUCT.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Hemorheology: The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Airway Extubation: Removal of an endotracheal tube from the patient.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Colon, Transverse: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between ASCENDING COLON and DESCENDING COLON. It passes from the RIGHT COLIC FLEXURE across the ABDOMEN, then turns sharply at the left colonic flexure into the descending colon.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Esophageal Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the ESOPHAGUS. The most common type is TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA between the esophagus and the TRACHEA.Thyroid Cartilage: The largest cartilage of the larynx consisting of two laminae fusing anteriorly at an acute angle in the midline of the neck. The point of fusion forms a subcutaneous projection known as the Adam's apple.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Splenic Vein: Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.

Outcomes after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. (1/202)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the short-term outcomes for laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in 275 patients with a follow-up of 1 to 31 months. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a highly successful approach to morbid obesity but results in significant perioperative complications. A laparoscopic approach has significant potential to reduce perioperative complications and recovery time. METHODS: Consecutive patients (n = 275) who met NIH criteria for bariatric surgery were offered laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between July 1997 and March 2000. A 15-mL gastric pouch and a 75-cm Roux limb (150 cm for superobese) was created using five or six trocar incisions. RESULTS: The conversion rate to open gastric bypass was 1%. The start of an oral diet began a mean of 1.58 days after surgery, with a median hospital stay of 2 days and return to work at 21 days. The incidence of early major and minor complications was 3.3% and 27%, respectively. One death occurred related to a pulmonary embolus (0.4%). The hernia rate was 0.7%, and wound infections requiring outpatient drainage only were uncommon (5%). Excess weight loss at 24 and 30 months was 83% and 77%, respectively. In patients with more than 1 year of follow-up, most of the comorbidities were improved or resolved, and 95% reported significant improvement in quality of life. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is effective in achieving weight loss and in improving comorbidities and quality of life while reducing recovery time and perioperative complications.  (+info)

Alternative operative techniques in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. (2/202)

The only effective treatment for patients with morbid obesity is surgery. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery has become quite popular in attempts to decrease the morbidity associated with laparotomy. In this article, we describe the technical details of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with three different techniques for creating the 15-cc gastric pouch. These techniques avoid upper endoscopy for the transoral introduction of the 21-mm circular stapler anvil down to the gastric pouch.  (+info)

Superiority of portal venous drainage over systemic venous drainage in pancreas transplantation: a retrospective study. (3/202)

OBJECTIVE: To compare portal and systemic venous drainage of pancreas transplants and demonstrate an immunologic and survival superiority of portal venous drainage. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Traditionally, solitary pancreas transplants have been performed using systemic venous and bladder drainage, but more recently, the advantages of enteric drainage have been well documented. Although physiologic benefits for portal venous drainage have been described, the impact of portal venous drainage, especially with solitary pancreas transplants, has yet to be determined. METHODS: Since August 1995, 280 pancreas transplants with enteric duct drainage were analyzed. One hundred and seventeen were simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK), 63 with systemic venous drainage (SV) and 54 with portal venous drainage (PV). The remainder were solitary transplants; 97 pancreas after kidney (PAK; 42 SV and 55 PV) and 66 transplants alone (PTA; 26 SV and 40 PV). Immunosuppressive therapy was equivalent for both groups. RESULTS: The groups were similar with respect to recipient characteristics and HLA matching. Thirty-six month graft survival for all transplants was 79% for PV and 65% for SV (P =.008). By category, SPK graft survival was 74% for PV and 76% for SV, PAK graft survival was 70% for PV and 56% for SV, and PTA graft survival was 84% for PV and 50% for SV. The rate of at least one rejection episode was also significantly higher in the SV group. At 36 months, for all pancreas transplants, the rejection rate was 21% for PV and 52% for SV (P <.0001). For SPK, rejection rates were 9% for PV and 45% for SV. For PAK, rejection rates were 16% for PV and 65% for SV, and for PTA 36% for PV and 51% for SV. The rejection rates for kidneys following SPK were also lower in the PV group (26% versus 43% for SV). Furthermore, the grades of rejection were milder in PV for all transplants (P =.017). By multivariate analysis, portal venous drainage was the only parameter that significantly affected rejection. CONCLUSION: Graft survival and rejection is superior for PV. These clinical findings are consistent with published reports of experimentally induced portal tolerance and strongly argue that PV drainage should be the procedure of choice for pancreas transplantation.  (+info)

Diagnosis and treatment of congenital choledochal cyst: 20 years' experience in China. (4/202)

AIM: To summarize the experience of diagnosis and treatment of congenital choledochal cyst in the past 20 years (1980-2000). METHODS: The clinical data of 108 patients admitted from 1980 to 2000 were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Abdominal pain,jaundice and abdominal mass were presented in most child cases. Clinical symptoms in adult cases were non-specific, resulting in delayed diagnosis frequently. Fifty-seven patients (52.7%) had coexistent pancreatiobiliary disease. Carcinoma of the biliary duct occurred in 18 patients (16.6%). Ultrasonic examination was undertaken in 94 cases, ERCP performed in 46 cases and CT in 71 cases. All of the cases were correctly diagnosed before operation. Abnormal pancreatobiliary duct junction was found in 39 patients. Before 1985 the diagnosis and classification of congenital choledochal cyst were established by ultrasonography preoperatively and confirmed during operation, the main procedures were internal drainage by cyst enterostomy. After 1985, the diagnosis was established by ERCP and CT, and cystectomy with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was the conventional procedures.In 1994, we reported a new and simplified operative procedure in order to reduce the risk of choledochal cyst malignancy. Postoperative complication was mainly retrograde infection of biliary tract, which could be controlled by the administration of antibiotics, there was no perioperative mortality. CONCLUSION: The concept in diagnosis and treatment of congenital choledochal cyst has obviously been changed greatly.CT and ERCP were of great help in the classification of the disease.Currently, cystectomy with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy is strongly recommended as the choice for patients with type I and type IV cysts. Piggyback orthotopic liver transplantation is indicated in type V cysts (Caroli's disease) with frequently recurrent cholangitis.  (+info)

Results of 281 consecutive total laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses to treat morbid obesity. (5/202)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for the treatment of morbid obesity. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a new and technically challenging surgical procedure that requires careful study. METHODS: The authors attempted total laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in 281 consecutive patients. Procedures included 175 proximal bypasses, 12 long-limb bypasses, and 9 revisional procedures from previous bariatric operations. The gastrojejunostomy and jejunojejunostomy were primarily constructed using linear stapling techniques. RESULTS: Eight patients required conversion to an open procedure (2.8%). The mean age of the patients was 41.6 years (range 15-71) and 87% were female. The mean preoperative body mass index was 48.1 kg/m2. The operative time decreased significantly from 234 +/- 77 minutes in the first quartile to 162 +/- 42 minutes in the most recent quartile. Postoperative length of stay averaged 4 days (range 2-91), with 75% of patients discharged within 3 days. The median hospital stay was 2 days. No patient died after surgery. Complications included three (1.5%) major wound infections (each followed a reoperation for a complication or open conversion), incisional hernia in 5 patients (1.8%), and anastomotic leak with peritonitis in 14 patients (5.1%). Three gastrojejunal leaks were managed without surgery, four by laparoscopic repair/drainage, and three by open repair/drainage. Only three patients had anastomotic leaks in the most recent 164 procedures (1.8%) since the routine use of a two-layer anastomotic technique. Data at 1 year after surgery were available in 69 of 96 (72%) patients (excludes revisions). Weight loss at one year was 70 +/- 5% of excess weight. Most comorbid conditions resolved by 1 year after surgery; notably, 88% of patients with diabetes no longer required medications. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic gastric bypass demonstrates excellent weight loss and resolution of comorbidities with a low complication rate. The learning curve is evident: operative time and leaks decreased with experience and improved techniques. The primary advantage is an extremely low risk of wound complications, including infection and hernia.  (+info)

Factors influencing energy intake and body weight loss after gastric bypass. (6/202)

OBJECTIVE: The gastric bypass-induced quantitative and qualitative modifications of energy intake (En In, kcal/day) and their impact on body weight (bw) loss were evaluated. The factors influencing energy intake and body weight loss were also investigated. DESIGN: Longitudinal study. SETTING: University Hospital of Geneva. SUBJECTS: Fifty obese women undergoing a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. RESULTS: The reduction of EnIn was significantly related to bw loss expressed either in kg or as percentage correction of excess bw (P<0.01 for both), whereas the post-operative modifications of diet composition did not play a role. Age and initial bw significantly influenced bw loss (P<0.0001 and P<0.001, respectively), as shown by multiple regression analysis. Patients were divided into four sub-groups according to their age (under or over 35 y) and initial bw (under or over 120 kg). ANOVA showed that under 35-y-old subjects reduced their EnIn significantly more than their older counterparts having similar bw (P<0.02 and P<0.05); consequently, bw loss, expressed in kg, was significantly (P<0.0001 and P<0.0005) larger in younger patients. Subjects with an initial bw over 120 kg lost significantly (P<0.001 and P<0.02) more weight as compared to patients with a smaller degree of obesity (under 120 kg) and similar age. CONCLUSIONS: Gastric bypass-induced body weight loss is mainly due to the reduction of EnIn, whereas the qualitative modifications of the diet do not play a role. Younger subjects have a greater capacity to reduce EnIn and, therefore, lose more weight. Pre-operative high degree of obesity leads to a larger weight reduction, probably because of a greater energy deficit.  (+info)

Major bile duct injuries associated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy: effect of surgical repair on quality of life. (7/202)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of patients after surgical reconstruction of a major bile duct injury from laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The incidence of bile duct injuries has increased dramatically since the introduction and widespread use of LC. Previous reports show that at long-term follow-up, most patients surgically repaired will have a successful outcome as measured by standard clinical parameters. However, there is a general impression that these patients have an impaired QOL. Data addressing QOL of these patients are limited. METHODS: A standard QOL questionnaire was sent to 89 patients after successful surgical repair of a major bile duct injury from a LC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1990 and 2000. The instrument consisted of 30 items on a visual analog scale categorized into physical (15 items), psychological (10 items), and social (5 items) domains. The same questionnaire was sent to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 100) and to patients who underwent uncomplicated LC (n = 100). An additional portion of the questionnaire inquired about outcome measures and legal action undertaken by patients. RESULTS: Overall QOL scores for bile duct injury patients in the three domains (physical, psychological, and social) were 76%, 77%, and 75%, respectively. QOL scores were comparable to those of patients undergoing uncomplicated LC and healthy controls in the physical and social domains but were significantly different in the psychological domain. Presenting symptoms, prior repair, level of injury, number of stents, length of postoperative stenting, and length of follow-up did not influence QOL scores. Repaired patients reported similar rates of abdominal pain, change in bowel habits, use of pain medications, and recent symptoms of fever or chills as LC controls. Thirty-one percent of responding bile duct injury patients reported having sought legal recourse for their injury. All QOL domain scores were significantly lower in the patients who pursued a lawsuit versus those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides formal data evaluating QOL after surgical repair of major bile duct injuries from LC. Although there was a significant difference in the QOL as evaluated from a psychological dimension, bile duct injury patients reported QOL scores in the physical and social domains comparable to those of control patients. The decreased QOL assessment in the psychological dimension may be attributable to the prolonged, complicated, and unexpected nature of these injuries. The presence of a lawsuit appears to be associated with a poorer QOL assessment.  (+info)

Ileocecal valve as substitute for the missing pyloric sphincter after partial distal gastrectomy. (8/202)

OBJECTIVES: Accelerated gastric emptying (including dumping syndrome) occurs frequently after gastric resections, largely resulting from rapid entry of meal contents into the small intestine. The authors hypothesized that an ileocecal segment used as an interpositional graft placed between the remaining part of the stomach and the small intestine would slow down food transit and thus replace pyloric function. METHODS: Thirty Gottingen minipigs were randomized into three groups. Group 1: partial gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction; Group 2: partial gastrectomy and ileocecal interpositional graft; and Group 3: sham laparotomy. Gastric emptying in the nonsedated animals was quantified using radioscintigraphy at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The animals ingested 300 grams of soft food containing 99mTc labeled resin- pellets using a technique previously described. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. RESULTS: Three months postoperatively, the ileocecal group had a significantly prolonged gastric emptying time compared with the Roux-en-Y group, but gastric emptying time was also significantly faster compared to the control group (sham laparotomy). After 6 months no significant difference was seen between the ileocecal group and the controls, while emptying rates were still significantly faster in the Roux-en-Y group. CONCLUSIONS: Reconstruction of the gastric reservoir with an ileocecal segment largely restores gastric emptying patterns of food in minipigs. Six months postoperatively, gastric emptying time is similar to that of controls, and significantly slower when compared with the group with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. These results suggest that the ileocecal interposition graft could offer specific advantages over current reconstruction procedures.  (+info)

Christopher L Kalmar, MD, MBA, Tananchai A Lucktong, MD, FACS. Virginia Tech Carilion. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in the world. Jejunojenual intussusception after RYGB at the enteroenterostomy is a rare but potentially serious complication requiring timely radiographic diagnosis. For presentations without necrosis, surgical therapy with laparoscopic enteropexy of all limbs of the enteroenteric anastomosis in our experience allows same-day management with return to work and activities of daily living without recurrence. ...
The 44-year-old man in this study was presented with sudden-onset, persistent epigastralgia and had undergone living donor living transplantation (LDLT) for familial amyloid polyneuropathy at 42 years of age, with the left hepatic lobe graft donated by his wife. During LT, biliary reconstruction was performed by hepaticojejunostomy with a Roux limb via the antecolic route as the common bile duct was removed for the sake of the following domino LT. The peritoneal defect related to Roux-en-Y anastomosis was primarily closed with several 4-0 silk interrupted sutures. Although he had experienced repeated episodes of small bowel obstruction, which had all recovered fully following conservative management, at 5, 9, and 14 months post-transplantation, continuous epigastralgia and repeated vomiting for 7 h during the present admission prompted clinical suspicion of bowel strangulation. Abdominal guarding and rigidity in the epigastric region were noted on examination. The body temperature was 37.1 °C. ...
Endoscope, Jaundice, Obstructive Jaundice, Patients, Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography, Balloon Dilation, Gi Tract, Stenosis, Strictures, Anatomy, Billroth Ii, Ercp, Gastrectomy, Roux-en-y Anastomosis, Bile, Bile Duct, Bleeding, Cannulation, Catheter, Cholangitis
This study is being done to learn more about how different surgery procedures bring back the eating pathway after removing the stomach in patients with stomach cancer. If the surgeon has decided that some, or all, of the patients stomach must be removed the surgeon must create a new way to allow food to travel from the mouth to the intestines. Some patients develop problems because they are missing their stomach, such as lack of hunger, bloating, cramping, and heartburn.. The surgeons at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center are conducting a study to determine if a change in surgery can help reduce these symptoms.. The most common method of creating a way for food is called a Roux-en-Y, in which one part of the intestine is connected with the end of the esophagus (the swallowing tube) in the abdomen, and another connection is made between the intestines lower down.. The change in surgery involves creating a pouch from a part of the intestines to replace the stomach.. This study will compare ...
This study is being done to learn more about how different surgery procedures bring back the eating pathway after removing the stomach in patients with stomach cancer. If the surgeon has decided that some, or all, of the patients stomach must be removed the surgeon must create a new way to allow food to travel from the mouth to the intestines. Some patients develop problems because they are missing their stomach, such as lack of hunger, bloating, cramping, and heartburn.. The surgeons at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center are conducting a study to determine if a change in surgery can help reduce these symptoms.. The most common method of creating a way for food is called a Roux-en-Y, in which one part of the intestine is connected with the end of the esophagus (the swallowing tube) in the abdomen, and another connection is made between the intestines lower down.. The change in surgery involves creating a pouch from a part of the intestines to replace the stomach.. This study will compare ...
Although surgical hepaticojejunostomy plays an important role in the therapy for AS after Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, reduplicative biliary reconstruction remains a challenging topic for hepatobiliary surgeons, and a considerable percentage of patients still need endoscopic or intercurrent treatment. The standardized regimens in treating AS involve two operational steps: first, to remove the stricture;second, to prevent restricture. Because of this, balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage become the primary approach and gold standard for minimally invasive procedures, especially for patients requiring multiple operations [13].. At present, BD is the main method to relieve AS, and there are several schemes of balloon dilatation, with differing results at follow-up. An early study reported that 93.3 % percent (14/15) of the strictures could be successfully dilated by the BD, but the incidence of restricture was high and could reach up to 45 % within a long-term follow-up ...
This variant is the most commonly employed gastric bypass technique, and is by far the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in the United States. The small intestine is divided approximately 45 cm (18 in) below the lower stomach outlet and is re-arranged into a Y-configuration, enabling outflow of food from the small upper stomach pouch via a "Roux limb". In the proximal version, the Y-intersection is formed near the upper (proximal) end of the small intestine. The Roux limb is constructed using 80-150 cm (31-59 in) of the small intestine, preserving the rest (and the majority) of it for absorbing nutrients. The patient will experience very rapid onset of the stomach feeling full, followed by a growing satiety (or "indifference" to food) shortly after the start of a meal.. ...
At the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany, biliary reconstruction after iatrogenic bile duct lesions was performed in 85 patients by means of end-to-side Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. In 66%...
Comparison of Revision in Roux-en-Y vs Mini-Gastric Bypass Dr K S Kular Kular Medical Education & Research Society Kular Group of Institutes [email protected]
Roux In class last week, we started by making three different types of roux: light, medium, and dark. A roux is a mixture of heated flour and fat that is then used to thicken sauces, soups, and stews. In a roux, the starch granules (from flour) are coated and separated by the fat from butter…
Joshua P Landreneau, MD, MSc1, Andrew T Strong, MD1, Kevin El-Hayek, MD1, Ricard Corcelles, MD2, Matthew Kroh, MD2, John Rodriguez, MD1. 1Cleveland Clinic, 2Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. Introduction: Gastroparesis is a debilitating functional disorder of the stomach marked by delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Patients with severe, refractory symptoms may ultimately be managed with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. However it is unclear whether the stomach may left in situ, as with a RYGB, or resected as in gastrectomy. The present study aims to compare perioperative outcomes and long-term symptomatic relief between these operations.. Methods: All patients underwent RYGB or gastrectomy for the treatment of gastroparesis (GP) at our institution from September 2010 through March 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with prior gastric resection or whose primary operative indication was not gastroparesis were excluded ...
AUTHORS: Schipper I et al. Obesity Surgery June 2019. BACKGROUND Several studies have shown a reduction in postoperative pain and length of hospital stay when using intraperitoneal local anesthetics during laparoscopic surgery. In morbidly obese patients, respiratory depression due to opioid use is a serious side effect. Any different type of analgesia is therefore clinically relevant.. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of intraperitoneal bupivacaine on postoperative pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB).. METHODS Between March and November 2017, 130 patients were included and randomly assigned to receive 20 ml or 0 ml of 2.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride sprayed onto the diaphragm. Pain scores for abdominal and shoulder pain were conducted using the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain score at 0, 1, 6, and 24 h postoperatively. The length of hospital stay and use of analgesics was recorded in digital patient records. The primary outcome is the pain scores and the secondary ...
This case report describes an esophagojejunal anastomotic leak following total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The leak was treated successfully with endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. This is the first case report on the endoscopic application of cyanoacrylate alone for the treatment of an anastomotic leak. This report describes a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian man who underwent surgery for gastric cancer. He underwent total gastrectomy and esophagojejunal anastomosis with Roux-en-Y anastomosis plus transverse colectomy. An anastomotic leak was treated conservatively at first for a total of three weeks. However, the leak persisted; therefore, the decision was made to apply topical endoscopic n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. The endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate alone can be used successfully to treat esophagojejunal anastomotic leakage.
HypothesisLaparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a complex procedure performed on a high-risk patient population. Good results can be attained with experience
The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve of one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB-MGB) at the start of a low volume bariatric unit and analyze its impact as a preceding procedure to Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB). From January 2014 to December 2017, all patients who underwent bariatric surgeries in our teaching hospital that were performed by the same surgeon were enrolled. The first 47 patients who underwent OAGB-MGB were assigned to group A. RYGB has been offered as a treatment option since July 2016; thereafter, 26 patients who underwent OAGB-MGB and 32 patients who underwent RYGB at the same time interval were assigned to group B and group C, respectively. Baseline characteristics, perioperative outcomes and percentage of total weight loss (%TWL) up to 12 months postoperatively were collected and analyzed between groups. Compared to the patients in group C, those in groups A and B were older (39.4 yrs. and 42.2 yrs., respectively, vs. 34.2 yrs.; p = 0.021) and predominantly male (48.9
The current obesity epidemic in the U.S. is associated with major medical and social problems accompanied by increased morbidity and mortality, which is prop...
CONCLUSION: The closure of MDs eliminated the risk of IH in half of the operated patients of LRYGB in this series. PMID: 31521564 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Gastrotomy with anvil dunk: A novel technique for gastrojejunostomy in the patient undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Gastroenterology Research and Practice is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that provides a forum for researchers and clinicians working in the areas of gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreas and biliary, and related cancers. The journal welcomes submissions on the physiology, pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and therapy of gastrointestinal diseases.
Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy is the most commonly used surgical technique for reconstruction of the biliary tract in patients with benign biliary stricture [3, 5-8]. In those patients, there is a relatively high incidence of strictured HJ ranging from 2% to 25% [2, 3, 7-10]. The endoscopic management of these complications seems to be the best option and least invasive compared to interventional radiology or reoperation [11-13]. However, the altered anatomy of the Roux-en-Y construction represents a major difficulty to access the HJ by the endoscope. The use of standard gastroduodenoscope proved to be extremely difficult, time consuming and with high failure rate [14, 15].. Several attempts were reported to overcome these difficulties in endoscopic approach to HJ. The use of long enteroscope, whether double balloon or single balloon, was shown to improve the results of endoscopic access. However, these reports are still few with limited number of cases and the availability of the enteroscopes ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Total gastrectomy risk model. T2 - Data from 20,011 Japanese patients in a nationwide internet-based database. AU - Watanabe, Masayuki. AU - Miyata, Hiroaki. AU - Gotoh, Mitsukazu. AU - Baba, Hideo. AU - Kimura, Wataru. AU - Tomita, Naohiro. AU - Nakagoe, Tohru. AU - Shimada, Mitsuo. AU - Kitagawa, Yuko. AU - Sugihara, Kenichi. AU - Mori, Masaki. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. N2 - Objective: To construct a risk model for total gastrectomy outcomes using a nationwide Internet-based database. Background: Total gastrectomy is a very common procedure in Japan. This procedure is among themost invasive gastrointestinal procedures and is known to carry substantial surgical risks. Methods: The National Clinical Database was used to retrieve records on more than 1,200,000 surgical cases from 3500 hospitals in 2011. After data cleanup, 20,011 records from 1623 hospitals were analyzed for procedures performed between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011. Results: The average patient age ...
Does any one know the correct CPT code for a choledochojejunostomy with Roux-en-Y? It was performed because the patient had a biliary stricture.
Le filtre à air à haut débit DNA augmente considérablement les performances et la puissance. Entièrement compatible avec Yamaha YFM 660 R Raptor.
Obesity has more than doubled since 1980 worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. And while Roux-en gastric bypass has been the gold standard, novel alternative treatments are being developed.
Proukou В Y. пппп Page 620 Choledochojejunostomy and Cholecystojejunostomy 621 пSTEP 11 Completed cholecystojejunostomy A drain is coming off alesse in situ after finishing the anastomosis, to indicate postoperative bleeding of bile leakage.
In this weeks Homerun Slides continuing our series from Dr. Stanley Schwartz, we cover topics including the Benefits of Combined Treatment (Pharmacotherapy and Lifestyle Modification), a demonstation of how Obesity Requires Long-Term Care, and information on how Roux-en-Y surgery restores the incretin
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Preoperative Transabdominal Ultrasonography (US) Prior to Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGBP) and Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) in the First 100 Operations. Was It Beneficial and Reliable During the Learning Curve?. AU - Jaser, Nabil. AU - Mustonen, Harri K. AU - Pietilä, Jaakko AU - Juuti, Anne Tuulikki. AU - Leivonen , Marja. PY - 2012/3. Y1 - 2012/3. KW - 3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology. U2 - 10.1007/s11695-011-0416-z. DO - 10.1007/s11695-011-0416-z. M3 - Article. VL - 22. SP - 416. EP - 421. JO - Obesity Surgery. JF - Obesity Surgery. SN - 0960-8923. IS - 3. ER - ...
This study aimed to explore the effect of biliopancreatic limb and Roux limb lengths during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) procedures on weight loss and T2DM control. We studied the clinical records of 58 patients with metabolic syndrome, T2DM, and body mass index (BMI) 32 to 50 kg/m2 who underwent LRYGB in our hospital. The short limb group (Group A) underwent LRYGB with a limb ...
Vertically banded gastroplasty or adjustable gastric banding often result in weight regain, complications, or side effects. Failed restrictive bariatric procedures can be converted in revisional laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). This study aimed to compare weight loss, evolution of comorbidities, and quality of life (QOL) between primary versus revisional LRYGB. ...
INTRODUCTION: Internal herniation is a potential complication following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). Previous studies have shown that closure of mesenteric defects after LRYGB may reduce the incidence of internal herniation. However, controversy remains as to whether mesenteric defect closure is necessary to decrease the incidence of internal hernias after LRYGB. This study aims to determine if jejeunal mesenteric defect closure reduces incidence of internal hernias and other complications in patients undergoing LRYGB.. METHODS: 105 patients undergoing laparoscopic antecolic RYGB were randomized into two groups: closed mesenteric defect (n = 50) or open mesenteric defect (n = 55). Complication rates were obtained from the medical record. Patients were followed up to 3 years post-operatively. Patients also completed the gastrointestinal quality of life index (GI QoL) pre-operatively and 12 months post-operatively. Outcome measures included: incidence of internal hernias, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Biliary complications in adult living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct hepaticocholedochostomy or Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy biliary reconstruction. AU - Kawachi, Shigeyuki. AU - Shimazu, Motohide. AU - Wakabayashi, Go. AU - Hoshino, Ken. AU - Tanabe, Minoru. AU - Yoshida, Masashi. AU - Morikawa, Yasuhide. AU - Kitajima, Masaki. PY - 2002. Y1 - 2002. N2 - Background. The aim of this study was to compare lhe incidence of biliary complications after adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT) with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (R-Y HJ) or duct-to-duct hepaticocholedochostomy (D-D HC). Methods. Biliary complications were reviewed in 20 consecutive ALDLT recipients surviving more than 1 month, including 10 patients who underwent R-Y HJ and 10 patients who underwent D-D HC reconstructions. Results. Ten biliary complications were seen in 8 patients (40%) from the study group. Specifically, 1 case of biliary leakage and 1 case of biliary hemorrhage were observed in ...
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterised by progressive insulin resistance and loss of β-cell function. An incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis is hindering the effective treatment of this disease. Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB); however, causes rapid remission of liver insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, and therefore affords us an opportunity to examine some fundamental characteristics of these conditions. Gathering evidence suggests that liver insulin resistance may be a crucial contributor to development of diabetes. In this thesis, we used liver biopsies taken before, and in some individuals after, RYGB surgery to explore or identify several molecular processes involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The study cohort included individuals with normal glucose tolerance and others with type 2 diabetes. Ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) may cause insulin resistance through its inhibitory action on insulin signalling. ...
Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald H, ed. Buchwalds Atlas of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgical Techniques and Procedures. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 6. Buchwald H. Open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald H, ed. Buchwalds Atlas of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgical Techniques and Procedures. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 5. Halperin F, Ding SA, Simonson DC, et al. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery or lifestyle with intensive medical management in patients with type 2 diabetes: feasibility and 1-year results of a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Surg. 2014;149(7):716-726. PMID: 24899464 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24899464. Mingrone G, Panunzi S, De Gaetano A, et al. Bariatric-metabolic surgery versus conventional medical treatment in obese patients with type 2 diabetes: 5 year follow-up of an open-label, single-centre, randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2015;386(9997):964-973. PMID: 26369473.\ ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Changes in renal function following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. T2 - A prospective study. AU - Getty, Jorge L Zelada. AU - Hamdallah, Isam N.. AU - Shamseddeen, Hazem. AU - Wu, Jennifer. AU - Low, Roger. AU - Craig, Jacqueline. AU - Ali, Mohamed R. PY - 2012/7. Y1 - 2012/7. N2 - Background: Studies of the impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) on renal function have shown mixed results. We constructed this prospective repeated-measures controlled study to characterize this response and identify the best method of gauging renal function in this setting. Methods: Clinical data, serum creatinine (SC), and 24-h urine were collected 1 week before and 6 months following RYGB. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated utilizing the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Creatinine clearance (CCL) was measured as a 24-h collection (24CCL) and calculated by the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) formula. Results: The study population of 37 patients (81% women) had a mean age of 47±11 ...
BOSTON-The surgical learning curve for the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is approximately 100 procedures, according to a study published today.
BACKGROUND: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) is well tolerated and effective in ameliorating diseases common to morbidly obese patients. A potential drawback, however, is the risk for stomal ulcers, probably due to acid and peptic digestion of the mucosa in the proximal Roux limb. METHODS: In 23 RYGBP patients (mean BMI 45 kg/m(2), age 39 years), the gastro-jejunostomy was performed by circular stapler and the gastric suture ring retrieved for histological examination. 13 consecutive patients received our standard totally transected 4 x 3 cm proximal gastric pouch. The anvil was passed transgastricly and reference biopsies were taken from the gastrotomy in the corpus of the stomach. In the last 10 patients, the pouch size was reduced to 2 x 3 cm by a modified surgical technique. RESULTS: All suture rings from the standard pouches consisted of corpus-fundus mucosa with a large amount of parietal cells, histologically identical to the reference biopsies from the gastrotomy. Also, the 10 suture ...
1. National Institutes of Health. Office of Dietary Supplements. Multivitamin/mineral Supplements: Fact Sheet for Consumers. Available online at: www.ods.od.nih/gov/pdf/factshees/MVMS-Consumer.pdf. Accessed March 30, 2016.. 2. Flancbaum L, Belsley S, Drake V, et al. Preoperative nutritional status of patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. J Gastrointest Surg. 2006; 10(7):1033-1037.. 3. Miller GD, Norris, A, Fernandez A. Changes in nutrients and food groups intakes following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Obes Surg. 2014;24(11):1926-1932.. 4. Parrott J, Frank L, Dilks R, et al. ASMBS Integrated Health Nutritional Guidelines for the Surgical Weight Loss Patient - 2016 Update: Micronutrients. SOARD. (In-Press). Available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2016.12.018. Accessed January 27, 2017. 5. Coupaye M, Puchaux K, Bogard C, et al. Nutritional consequences of adjustable gastric banding and gastric bypass: A 1-year prospective study. Obes Surg. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Postprandial gastrointestinal hormone production is different, depending on the type of reconstruction following total gastrectomy. AU - Kalmár, Katalin. AU - Németh, József. AU - Kelemen, Ágoston. AU - Horváth, Örs Péter. PY - 2006/4/1. Y1 - 2006/4/1. N2 - Objectives: The present study examines the differences in gastrointestinal hormone production at 3 different reconstruction types after total gastrectomy. Background Data: Total gastrectomy causes significant weight loss, mainly due to a reduced caloric intake probably because of a lack of initiative to eat or early satiety during meals. Behind this phenomenon a disturbed gastrointestinal hormone production can be presumed. Methods: Patients participating in a randomized study were recruited for the clinical experiment. Seven patients with simple Roux-en-Y reconstruction, 11 with aboral pouch (AP) construction, and 10 with aboral pouch with preserved duodenal passage (APwPDP) reconstruction, as well as 6 healthy ...
Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of reinforcement on duodenal stump using single purse-string suture during laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer in preventing duodenal stump leakage. Methods: A descriptive cohort study was conducted to retrospectively collect clinical data of 211 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent laparoscopic radical gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y or Billroth â ¡ reconstruction and reinforcement on duodenal stump using laparoscopic single purse-string suture in Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University between January 2013 and December 2016. Of 211 patients, 136 were male and 75 were female with mean age of (57.5±11.1)(24 to 87) years. Tumors locating at gastric upper 1/3, middle 1/3 and low 1/3 were found in 62, 68 and 81 patients respectively. Eighty-three cases underwent total gastrectomy, 128 underwent distal subtotal gastrectomy, 107 underwent Roux-en-Y reconstruction and 104 underwent Billroth II reconstruction. The procedure of reinforcement ...
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a type of weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is also called bariatric surgery. Its often done as a laparoscopic surgery, with small incisions in the abdomen.
Learn more about Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass -- Laparoscopic Surgery at Capital Regional Medical Center DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ComplicationsWhat to...
Anatomical terms of location Billroth II Roux-en-Y anastomosis "Gastroduodenostomy - procedure, recovery, blood, tube, removal ...
Cholecystectomy and bilioenteric anastomosis may be required. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy has shown good outcome in some ...
... Image 1. Greater weight loss than sleeve gastrectomy (SG). 2. Greater weight loss than Roux-en-Y gastric bypass ( ... The SIPS involves the creation of a 300-cm common channel with a single-anastomosis duodenal enterostomy. ... No Roux limb side effects.[citation needed] 8. Similar nutritional problems to RYGB and less than DS.[citation needed] 9. Low ...
Roux-en-Y anastomosis "Stump blow-out". The Free Medical Dictionary. Farlex. Retrieved 14 September 2013. Zivic, Edward ( ...
"Therapeutic ERCP with the double-balloon enteroscope in patients with Roux-en-Y anastomosis". Gastrointestinal endoscopy. 67 (6 ...
Roux-en-Y Anastomosis and Ileostomy Irrigation with Pancreatic Enzymes". Annals of Surgery. 145 (3): 404-414. doi:10.1097/ ...
Leakage of an anastomosis can occur in about 2% of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and less than 1% in mini gastric bypass. Leaks ... Adjustable gastric banding surgery Duodenal Switch surgery Roux-en-Y anastomosis Vagotomy-Cutting of the vagus nerve to reduce ... The Roux-en-Y laparoscopic gastric bypass, first performed in 1993, is regarded as one of the most difficult procedures to ... Antecolic antegastric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery has been estimated to result in internal hernia in 0.2% of cases, mainly ...
... are treated by surgical excision of the cyst with the formation of a roux-en-Y anastomosis ... "Single-incision versus conventional laparoscopic cyst excision and Roux-Y hepaticojejunostomy for children with choledochal ...
... colonoscopes for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in liver transplant patients with Roux-en-Y biliary anastomosis. ... in patients with post-Whipple or Roux-en-Y surgical anatomy). The major risk of an ERCP is the development of pancreatitis, ...
Less common surgical treatments for SMA syndrome include Roux-en-Y duodenojejunostomy, gastrojejunostomy, anterior ... Performed as either an open surgery or laparoscopically, duodenojejunostomy involves the creation of an anastomosis between the ... lysis of the duodenal suspensory muscle have the advantage that they do not involve the creation of an intestinal anastomosis. ...
File "2006 MeSH Trees".) MeSH E04.035.070 --- anastomosis, roux-en-y MeSH E04.035.087 --- arteriovenous shunt, surgical MeSH ... anastomosis, roux-en-y MeSH E04.210.078 --- appendectomy MeSH E04.210.120 --- biliary tract surgical procedures MeSH E04.210. ... internal mammary-coronary artery anastomosis MeSH E04.100.376.730 --- pericardial window techniques MeSH E04.100.376.735 --- ... internal mammary-coronary artery anastomosis MeSH E04.928.220.600 --- pericardial window techniques MeSH E04.928.220.605 --- ...
Other examples include Roux-en-Y anastomosis or ureteroureterostomy. Pathological anastomosis results from trauma or disease ... Arterial anastomosis includes actual arterial anastomosis (e.g., palmar arch, plantar arch) and potential arterial anastomosis ... An anastomosis (plural anastomoses) is a connection or opening between two things (especially cavities or passages) that are ... Anastomosis: medical or Modern Latin, from Greek ἀναστόμωσις, anastomosis, "outlet, opening", Gr ana- "up, on, upon", stoma " ...
Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy - indications same as Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Roux-en-Y pancreas transplant Roux-en-Y ... In general surgery, a Roux-en-Y anastomosis, or Roux-en-Y, is an end-to-side surgical anastomosis of bowel used to reconstruct ... Roux-en-Ys are used in several operations and collectively called Roux operations. When describing the surgery, the Roux limb ... Roux-en-Y reconstruction following partial or complete gastrectomy for stomach cancer. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy used to ...
Billroth I Roux-en-Y Morgan, Matt A. "Billroth II gastrojejunostomy , Radiology Reference Article , Radiopaedia.org". ... in which the greater curvature of the stomach is connected to the first part of the jejunum in end-to-side anastomosis. This ...
Marginal ulceration is a known complication of both open and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, with an incidence of ... Jejunojejunostomy is a surgical technique used in an anastomosis between two portions of the jejunum. It is a type of bypass ... "Incidence of marginal ulcers and the use of absorbable anastomotic sutures in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass". Surgery ...
Finsterer-Hofmeister operation List of surgeries by type Roux-en-Y Sleeve gastrectomy Lahey Clinic (1941). Surgical Practice of ... involves a resection of 2/3 of the stomach with blind closure of the duodenal stump and a retrocolic gastro-jejunal anastomosis ...
"Comparison Between Banded and Nonbanded Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass with 2-Year Follow-Up: A Preliminary Retrospective Analysis". ... He is also the first in India to perform single anastomosis duodenal-ileal switch. Bhandari is also the youngest surgeon to ...
... and complications from laparoscopic Roux-en-Y surgery are lower than conventional (open) Roux-en-Y surgery.[1][13][14] ... It involved anastomosis of the upper and lower intestine, which bypasses a large amount of the absorptive circuit, which caused ... Miller K (2008). Comparison of Nutritional Deficiencies and Complications following Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy, Roux-en-y ... A common form of gastric bypass surgery is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, designed to reduce the amount of food a person is able ...
... and complications from laparoscopic Roux-en-Y surgery are lower than conventional (open) Roux-en-Y surgery.[2][14][15] ... It involved anastomosis of the upper and lower intestine, which bypasses a large amount of the absorptive circuit, which caused ... Miller K (2008). Comparison of Nutritional Deficiencies and Complications following Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy, Roux-en-y ... Like the Roux en Y Bypass, it is now understood that it's results are largely due to a significant alteration in gut hormones ...
The arteries supplying the joint are derived from an extensive circulatory anastomosis between the brachial artery and its ... Le Roux, S; Saranga, S S M; Taylor, R; Vickery, J; Powell, R J; Lloyd, G (2008). "Elbow extension test to rule out elbow ...
Appelboam, A; Reuben, A D; Benger, J R; Beech, F; Dutson, J; Haig, S; Higginson, I; Klein, J A; Le Roux, S; Saranga, S S M; ... The arteries supplying the joint are derived from an extensive circulatory anastomosis between the brachial artery and its ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Elbow&oldid=905872937" ...
Wilson JA, Romagnuolo J, Byrne TK, Morgan K, Wilson FA (2006). "Predictors of endoscopic findings after Roux-en-Y gastric ... given mixed evidence of an increased risk of leakage from any bowel anastomosis created. This risk may vary according to the ... "Long Term Medical Issues associated after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Procedure (RYGBP)" (PDF). SSMHealth. M. L. Kowalski, R. ... given mixed evidence of increased risk of leakage from any bowel anastomosis created. An estimated 10-20% of NSAID patients ...
"Long Term Medical Issues associated after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Procedure (RYGBP)" (PDF). SSMHealth.. ... given mixed evidence of increased risk of leakage from any bowel anastomosis created.[33][34][35] ... Wilson JA, Romagnuolo J, Byrne TK, Morgan K, Wilson FA (2006). "Predictors of endoscopic findings after Roux-en-Y gastric ... ˈɛnsɛd/ EN-sed Synonyms. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents/analgesics (NSAIAs), Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines ( ...
... connection between blood vessels or other tubular or hollow structures such as loops of intestine is called anastomosis. ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Surgery&oldid=897540481#Types_of_surgery" ...
Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy - indications same as Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Roux-en-Y pancreas transplant Roux-en-Y ... In general surgery, a Roux-en-Y anastomosis, or Roux-en-Y, is an end-to-side surgical anastomosis of bowel used to reconstruct ... Roux-en-Ys are used in several operations and collectively called Roux operations. When describing the surgery, the Roux limb ... Roux-en-Y reconstruction following partial or complete gastrectomy for stomach cancer. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy used to ...
Roux-en-y anastomosis definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look ... roux-en-y anastomosis in Medicine Expand. Roux-en-Y anastomosis (rōōěn-wī). n. A Y-shaped surgical connection that divides ...
Laparoscopic Enteropexy for Intussusception at Roux-en-Y Anastomosis. Christopher L Kalmar, MD, MBA, Tananchai A Lucktong, MD, ... Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in the world. Jejunojenual intussusception after ... surgical therapy with laparoscopic enteropexy of all limbs of the enteroenteric anastomosis in our experience allows same-day ...
Single-anastomosis Duodeno Ileal Bypass (SADI) Versus Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (SADISLEEVE). The safety and scientific validity ... Since the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) was described in 1977, this restrictive and malabsorptive procedure has ... laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric ByPass).. Similarly to the experimental group, RYGB will be performed as a primary procedure or ... Prospective Multicentric Randomized Trial Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Single-anastomosis Duodeno Ileal Bypass With ...
A Comparative Study of Hand-sewn Versus Stapled Gastrojejunal Anastomosis in Laparascopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass. OBJECTIVE: ... anastomosis during a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are stapled and hand-sewn techniques. Few outcomes differences have ... METHODS: This case study is a retrospective review of the first 200 patients to undergo laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass ... with a linear stapled technique compared to a hand-sewn gastrojejunal anastomosis in patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en - ...
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: double loop technique and linear anastomosis. A Cardoso Ramos Almino Cardoso Ramos, MD, ... Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with circular anastomosis. This video presents a live demonstration of a laparoscopic ... Vieira dAlmeida demonstrates a stepwise robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in a 51-year old female patient with a BMI of 51. ... Robotic assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYBG): comments on the latest generation of robotic surgical system ...
... at the start of a low volume bariatric unit and analyze its impact as a preceding procedure to Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB ... The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve of one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB-MGB) ... Lo, H. The learning curve of one anastomosis gastric bypass and its impact as a preceding procedure to Roux-en Y gastric bypass ... The learning curve of one anastomosis gastric bypass and its impact as a preceding procedure to Roux-en Y gastric bypass: ...
ERCP with the double balloon enteroscope in patients with Roux-en-Y anastomosis. Klaus Mönkemüller, Lucia C Fry, Michael ... Comparison between double-balloon and single-balloon enteroscopy in therapeutic ERC after Roux-en-Y entero-enteric anastomosis. ... Therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiography using a single-balloon enteroscope in patients with Roux-en-Y anastomosis. ... Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with a single-balloon enteroscope in patients with Roux-en-Y hepatico jejunal anastomosis ...
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y versus One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass on Remission of Diabetes in Morbid Obesity Ommolbanin Abed 1 , Ali ... Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y versus One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass on Remission of Diabetes in Morbid Obesity, J Minim Invasive Surg ... Keywords: Gastric Bypass; Roux-en-Y; Diabetes Mellitus,Type2; HbA1c; Obesity; One-Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (OAGB); Mini- ... Background: Laparoscopic one anastomosis gastric bypass (OAGB) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) are common ...
La Pediatria Medica e Chirurgica (Medical and Surgical Pediatrics) [pISSN 0391-5387] is the official journal of the Italian Society of Pediatric Videosurgery and it is published online by PAGEPress®, Pavia, Italy ...
Hand-sewn and Linear-stapled Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: Outcomes. *Roux-en-y Anastomosis Site ...
Roux-en-Y anastomosis "Stump blow-out". The Free Medical Dictionary. Farlex. Retrieved 14 September 2013. Zivic, Edward ( ...
https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/WikiJournal_of_Medicine/Medical_gallery_of_Blausen_Medical_2014. ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=WikiJournal_of_Medicine/Medical_gallery_of_Blausen_Medical_2014& ...
Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y * Anthropometry * Blood Glucose / metabolism * Body Mass Index * Cross-Sectional Studies ... The aim of this study was the evaluation of plasma ghrelin levels in patients who had undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric ...
Revision of Gastric Anastomosis or Restrictive Procedure. *Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery ...
Revision of Gastric Anastomosis or Restrictive Procedure. *Revision Surgery. *Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery ...
Gastric volvulus Total gastrectomy Gangrenous Roux-en-Y anastomosis This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check ... Exploratory laparotomy and total gastrectomy with oesophago jejunal Roux-en-Y anastomosis was done. Postoperative period was ...
the reconstruction was performed by R-Y anastomosis. Procedure: R-Y reconstruction The reconstruction was performed by R-Y ... Benefit of Roux-en-Y (R-Y) Reconstruction After Pancreaticoduodenectomy. The safety and scientific validity of this study is ...
... is a surgical procedure in which an anastomosis is created between the stomach and the proximal loop of the jejunum. This is ... Cesar Roux and his Roux-en-Y anastomosis]. Acta Gastroenterol Latinoam. 1993. 23(3):175-85. [Medline]. ... the technique of the Roux-en-Y anastomosis was introduced by Wolfer in 1883 and later popularized by Cesar Roux of Lausanne in ... an anastomosis of the high jejunal loop to the posterior surface of the stomach to avoid the long looped Roux-en-Y anastomosis ...
... clinicaltrials.gov Banded Versus Conventional Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (GABY). The aim of this novel study is to ... Anastomosis, Roux-en-y. A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine ... Conventional laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, conventional laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with additional ... Roux-en-Y .... Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Versus Laparoscopic Biliopancreatic Diversion (BPD)- Duodenal Switch for ...
The effect of roux-en-Y vs. Omega-loop gastric bypass on liver, metabolic parameters, and weight loss. Obes Surg. 2016;26(9): ... Laparoscopic roux-en-Y vs. mini-gastric bypass for the treatment of morbid obesity: a 10-year experience. Obes Surg. 2012;22(12 ... Laparoscopic roux-en-Y versus mini-gastric bypass for the treatment of morbid obesity: a prospective randomized controlled ... Greater weight loss with the omega loop bypass compared to the roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a comparative study. Obes Surg. 2014; ...
Anastomosis Roux-en-Y. Fatty liver/complications. Fatty liver/metabolism. Fatty liver/pathology. Fatty liver/surgery. Fatty ... Methods: Forty patients with body mass index (BMI) IMC > 40 kg/m2 were submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with ... Eighteen patients with body mass index >40 kg/m2 submitted to Roux-n-Y gastric bypass were enrolled, and wedge liver biopsy was ... Anastomose em-Y de Roux. Fígado gorduroso/cirurgia. Fígado gorduroso/complicações. Fígado gorduroso/metabolismo. Fígado ...
... anastomosis graft explanation free. What is anastomosis graft? Meaning of anastomosis graft medical term. What does anastomosis ... Looking for online definition of anastomosis graft in the Medical Dictionary? ... Roux-en-Y anastomosis any Y-shaped anastomosis in which the small intestine is included. Roux-en-Y anastomosis ... Kinds of anastomoses are end-to-end anastomosis,end-to-side anastomosis,side-to-side anastomosis. See also bypass. anastomose, ...
... clinicaltrials.gov The technique the investigators propose to perform colorectal and colo-anal anastomosis in patients ... Anastomosis, Roux-en-y. A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine ... The rectal anastomosis was carefully inspected trans-anally then tested intraoperatively by air leak test through trans-anal ... If the anastomosis was considered safe the need for protective stoma was left to discretion of operating surgeon. ...