A family of bacteria which inhabit RED BLOOD CELLS and cause several animal diseases.
Infections with bacteria of the family ANAPLASMATACEAE.
Traumatic or experimentally induced separation of the head from the body in an animal or human.
A genus of gram-negative bacteria whose organisms are obligate parasites of vertebrates. Species are transmitted by arthropod vectors with the host range limited to ruminants. Anaplasma marginale is the most pathogenic species and is the causative agent of severe bovine anaplasmosis.
A family of small, gram-negative organisms, often parasitic in humans and other animals, causing diseases that may be transmitted by invertebrate vectors.
A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.
Small, often pleomorphic, coccoid to ellipsoidal organisms occurring intracytoplasmically in circulating LYMPHOCYTES. They are the etiologic agents of tick-borne diseases of humans; DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; and HORSES.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ANAPLASMA, family ANAPLASMATACEAE, formerly called Ehrlichia phagocytophila or Ehrlichia equi. This organism is tick-borne (IXODES) and causes disease in horses and sheep. In humans, it causes human granulocytic EHRLICHIOSIS.
A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.

Western immunoblot analysis of the antigens of Haemobartonella felis with sera from experimentally infected cats. (1/33)

Cats were experimentally infected with a Florida isolate of Haemobartonella felis in order to collect organisms and evaluate the immune response to H. felis. Cryopreserved organisms were thawed and injected intravenously into nonsplenectomized and splenectomized cats. Splenectomized animals were given 10 mg of methylprednisolone per ml at the time of inoculation. Blood films were evaluated daily for 1 week prior to infection and for up to 60 days postinfection (p. i.). Blood for H. felis purification was repeatedly collected from splenectomized animals at periods of peak parasitemias. Organisms were purified from infected blood by differential centrifugation, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes for immunoblot analysis. Serum was collected from nonsplenectomized animals prior to and for up to 60 days p.i. and was used on immunoblots to identify antigens. The combination of splenectomy and corticosteroid treatment resulted in marked, cyclic parasitemias without concurrent severe anemia, providing an opportunity to harvest organisms in a manner that was not lethal to the animals. Several antigens (150, 52, 47, 45, and 14 kDa) were identified. An antigen with a molecular mass of approximately 14 kDa appeared to be one of the most immunodominant and was consistently recognized by immune sera collected at various times during the course of infection. These data suggest that one or more of these antigens might be useful for the serologic diagnosis of H. felis infections in cats.  (+info)

Development and evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction assay using the 16S rRNA gene for detection of Eperythrozoon suis infection. (2/33)

The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of Eperythrozoon suis was amplified using gene-specific primers developed from GenBank sequence accession U88565. The gene was subsequently cloned and sequenced. Based on these sequence data, 3 sets of E. suis-specific primers were designed. These primers selectively amplified 1394, 690, and 839 base-pair (bp) fragments of the 16S rRNA gene from DNA of E. suis extracted from the blood of an experimentally infected pig during a parasitemic episode. No polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were amplified from purified DNA of Haemobartonella felis, Mycoplasma genitalium, or Bartonella bacilliformis using 2 of these primer sets. When the primer set amplifying the 690-bp fragment was used, faint bands were observed with H. felis as the target DNA. No PCR products were amplified from DNA that had been extracted from the blood of a noninfected pig or using PCR reagents without target DNA. The detection limits for E. suis by competitive quantitative PCR were estimated to range from 57 and 800 organisms/assay. This is the first report of the utility of PCR-facilitated diagnosis and quantitation of E. suis based on the 16S rRNA gene. The PCR method developed will be useful in monitoring the progression and significance of E. suis in the disease process in the pig.  (+info)

Specific in situ hybridization of Haemobartonella felis with a DNA probe and tyramide signal amplification. (3/33)

Haemobartonella felis is an epierythrocytic bacterium suspected to be the causative agent of feline infectious anemia. Previous studies with a polymerase chain reaction assay have identified a mycoplasmal 16S rRNA gene sequence that coincides with clinical disease and the presence of organisms in the blood. Tissues from a cat experimentally infected with H. felis were used for in situ hybridization studies to physically link this 16S rRNA gene to the organisms on the red cells. A biotin-labeled probe was used in conjunction with tyramide signal amplification to visualize the hybridization signal. This study clearly demonstrates a specific hybridization signal on the red cells in the tissues of the H. felis-infected cat. This in situ hybridization study is the final step in fulfilling the molecular guidelines for disease causation and proves that H. felis, a mycoplasmal organism, is the causative agent of feline infectious anemia.  (+info)

Proposal to transfer some members of the genera Haemobartonella and Eperythrozoon to the genus Mycoplasma with descriptions of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemofelis', 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomuris', 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemosuis' and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma wenyonii'. (4/33)

Cell-wall-less uncultivated parasitic bacteria that attach to the surface of host erythrocytes currently are classified in the order Rickettsiales, family Anaplasmataceae, in the genera Haemobartonella and Eperythrozoon. Recently 16S rRNA gene sequences have been determined for four of these species: Haemobartonella felis and Haemobartonella muris and Eperythrozoon suis and Eperythrozoon wenyonii. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequence data shows that these haemotrophic bacteria are closely related to species in the genus Mycoplasma (class Mollicutes). These haemotrophic bacteria form a new phylogenetic cluster within the so-called pneumoniae group of Mycoplasma and share properties with one another as well as with other members of the pneumoniae group. These studies clearly indicate that the classification of these taxa should be changed to reflect their phylogenetic affiliation and the following is proposed: (i) that Haemobartonella felis and Haemobartonella muris should be transferred to the genus Mycoplasma as 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemofelis' and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomuris' and (ii) that Eperythrozoon suis and Eperythrozoon wenyonii should be transferred to the genus Mycoplasma as 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemosuis' and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma wenyonii'. The former Haemobartonella and Eperythrozoon species described here represent a new group of parasitic mycoplasmas that possess a pathogenic capacity previously unrecognized among the mollicutes. These haemotrophic mycoplasmas have been given the trivial name haemoplasmas. These results call into question the affiliation of the remaining officially named species of Haemobartonella and Eperythrozoon which should be considered species of uncertain affiliation pending the resolution of their phylogenetic status.  (+info)

Detection and identification of spotted fever group Rickettsiae and Ehrlichiae in African ticks. (5/33)

Rickettsia africae, a recently identified pathogen, was detected for the first time in Amblyomma ticks from Niger, Mali, Burundi, and Sudan, and "R. mongolotimonae" was identified for the first time in Africa. Rickettsiae of unknown pathogenicity and two new ehrlichiae of the Ehrlichia canis group were identified in ticks from Mali and Niger.  (+info)

Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some species of Ehrlichia with Anaplasma, Cowdria with Ehrlichia and Ehrlichia with Neorickettsia, descriptions of six new species combinations and designation of Ehrlichia equi and 'HGE agent' as subjective synonyms of Ehrlichia phagocytophila. (6/33)

The genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Cowdria, Neorickettsia and Wolbachia encompass a group of obligate intracellular bacteria that reside in vacuoles of eukaryotic cells and were previously placed in taxa based upon morphological, ecological, epidemiological and clinical characteristics. Recent genetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes, groESL and surface protein genes have indicated that the existing taxa designations are flawed. All 16S rRNA gene and groESL sequences deposited in GenBank prior to 2000 and selected sequences deposited thereafter were aligned and phylogenetic trees and bootstrap values were calculated using the neighbour-joining method and compared with trees generated with maximum-probability, maximum-likelihood, majority-rule consensus and parsimony methods. Supported by bootstrap probabilities of at least 54%, 16S rRNA gene comparisons consistently clustered to yield four distinct clades characterized roughly as Anaplasma (including the Ehrlichia phagocytophila group, Ehrlichia platys and Ehrlichia bovis) with a minimum of 96.1% similarity, Ehrlichia (including Cowdria ruminantium) with a minimum of 97.7% similarity, Wolbachia with a minimum of 95.6% similarity and Neorickettsia (including Ehrlichia sennetsu and Ehrlichia risticii) with a minimum of 94.9% similarity. Maximum similarity between clades ranged from 87.1 to 94.9%. Insufficient differences existed among E. phagocytophila, Ehrlichia equi and the human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent to support separate species designations, and this group was at least 98.2% similar to any Anaplasma species. These 16S rRNA gene analyses are strongly supported by similar groESL clades, as well as biological and antigenic characteristics. It is proposed that all members of the tribes Ehrlichieae and Wolbachieae be transferred to the family Anaplasmataceae and that the tribe structure of the family Rickettsiaceae be eliminated. The genus Anaplasma should be emended to include Anaplasma (Ehrlichia) phagocytophila comb. nov. (which also encompasses the former E. equi and the HGE agent), Anaplasma (Ehrlichia) bovis comb. nov. and Anaplasma (Ehrlichia) platys comb. nov., the genus Ehrlichia should be emended to include Ehrlichia (Cowdria) ruminantium comb. nov. and the genus Neorickettsia should be emended to include Neorickettsia (Ehrlichia) risticii comb. nov. and Neorickettsia (Ehrlichia) sennetsu comb. nov.  (+info)

Infection exclusion of the rickettsial pathogen anaplasma marginale in the tick vector Dermacentor variabilis. (7/33)

Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne, rickettsial cattle pathogen that is endemic in several areas of the United States. Recent studies (J. de la Fuente, J. C. Garcia-Garcia, E. F. Blouin, J. T. Saliki, and K. M. Kocan, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 9:658-668, 2002) demonstrated that infection of cultured tick cells and bovine erythrocytes with one genotype of A. marginale excluded infection with other genotypes, a phenomenon referred to as infection exclusion. The present study was undertaken to confirm the phenomenon of infection exclusion of A. marginale genotypes in a tick vector, Dermacentor variabilis. Only one genotype of A. marginale (Virginia isolate) was detected by PCR in ticks that fed first on a calf infected with a Virginia isolate and second on a calf infected with an Oklahoma isolate. These studies demonstrate that infection exclusion of A. marginale genotypes also occurs in naturally infected ticks, as well as in cattle and cultured tick cells, and results in establishment of only one genotype per tick.  (+info)

Molecular characterization of Aegyptianella pullorum (Rickettsiales, Anaplasmataceae). (8/33)

We sequenced the 16S rRNA and groEL genes of Aegyptianella pullorum, a small bacterium that infects and replicates only in avian red blood cells. A specific PCR test was developed to analyze A. pullorum DNA. Phylogenic analysis revealed A. pullorum is most closely related to Anaplasma spp.  (+info)

Anaplasmataceae is a family of gram-negative, tick-borne bacteria that includes several human pathogens. These bacteria are known to infect and parasitize the white blood cells (such as granulocytes, monocytes, or erythrocytes) of various mammals, including humans. The bacterial genus within Anaplasmataceae include Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Neorickettsia, and Orientia.

Some notable human pathogens in this family are:

1. Anaplasma phagocytophilum - Causes Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis (HGA), which is transmitted primarily through the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus).
2. Ehrlichia chaffeensis - Causes Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (HME), which is transmitted mainly by the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum).
3. Ehrlichia ewingii - Associated with Human Ewingii Ehrlichiosis, primarily transmitted through the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum).
4. Neorickettsia sennetsu - Causes Sennetsu fever, which is a rare infectious disease in humans and is usually found in Japan and Southeast Asia. It's transmitted by the swallow bug or through the consumption of raw fish.
5. Orientia tsutsugamushi - Causes Scrub typhus, a widespread mite-borne disease in the Asia-Pacific region.

These bacterial infections can lead to flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle pain, and fatigue. In severe cases, they may cause complications like respiratory failure, organ damage, or even death if left untreated. Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment are crucial for a favorable prognosis.

Anaplasmataceae infections are a group of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the family Anaplasmataceae. These bacteria include Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Neorickettsia genera, which infect various mammalian hosts, including humans. The most well-known diseases caused by these bacteria are human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS).

Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, which infects neutrophils in humans. Symptoms of HGA include fever, headache, muscle aches, and chills. In severe cases, it can lead to complications such as respiratory failure, neurological symptoms, and even death.

Human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) is caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis or Ehrlichia ewingii, which infect monocytes in humans. Symptoms of HME are similar to those of HGA but may also include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and rash. Severe cases can lead to complications such as kidney failure, respiratory distress, and neurological symptoms.

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is caused by Dabie bandavirus, a member of the genus Bandavirus within the family Phenuiviridae. It was previously classified as a member of the family Anaplasmataceae. SFTS is transmitted to humans through tick bites and causes symptoms such as fever, fatigue, muscle pain, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Severe cases can lead to complications such as multi-organ failure, shock, and death.

Diagnosis of Anaplasmataceae infections typically involves laboratory tests that detect the presence of bacterial DNA or antibodies against the bacteria in the blood. Treatment usually includes antibiotics such as doxycycline, which is effective against all three genera of bacteria within the family Anaplasmataceae. Preventing tick bites through the use of insect repellent and protective clothing can help reduce the risk of infection.

Decapitation is the surgical separation or removal of the head from the body. It is also used to describe the traumatic separation of the head from the body, such as in a severe accident or a violent act. In a medical context, decapitation may be performed during an autopsy or as part of a surgical procedure for certain conditions like cancer or severe trauma.

Anaplasma is a genus of intracellular bacteria that infect and parasitize the white blood cells of various animals, including humans. It is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks. The most common species that infect humans are Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys.

Anaplasma phagocytophilum causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a tick-borne disease characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, and leukopenia. It infects granulocytes, a type of white blood cell, and can cause severe complications such as respiratory failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and even death in some cases.

Anaplasma platys causes canine cyclic thrombocytopenia, a disease that affects dogs and is characterized by recurring low platelet counts. It infects platelets, another type of blood cell involved in clotting, and can cause bleeding disorders in affected animals.

Diagnosis of Anaplasma infections typically involves the detection of antibodies against the bacteria or the direct identification of the organism through molecular methods such as PCR. Treatment usually involves the use of antibiotics such as doxycycline, which is effective against both species of Anaplasma. Prevention measures include avoiding tick-infested areas and using insect repellents and protective clothing to reduce the risk of tick bites.

Rickettsiaceae is a family of Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria that are primarily parasitic in arthropods and mammals. They are the causative agents of several important human diseases, including typhus fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and rickettsialpox. These bacteria are typically transmitted to humans through the bites of infected arthropods such as ticks, fleas, or lice.

The bacteria in Rickettsiaceae are small, non-motile, and have a unique bipolar appearance with tapered ends. They can only replicate inside host cells, where they manipulate the host cell's machinery to create a protective niche for themselves. This makes them difficult to culture and study outside of their hosts.

Rickettsiaceae bacteria are divided into several genera based on their genetic and antigenic characteristics, including Rickettsia, Orientia, and Coxiella. Each genus contains several species that can cause different diseases in humans. For example, Rickettsia rickettsii is the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, while Rickettsia prowazekii causes epidemic typhus.

Overall, Rickettsiaceae bacteria are important pathogens that can cause serious and sometimes fatal diseases in humans. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with appropriate antibiotics is essential for a successful outcome.

Anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern United States and western black-legged ticks (Ixodes pacificus) in the western United States.

The bacterium infects and reproduces within certain white blood cells, leading to symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, and chills that typically appear within 1-2 weeks after a tick bite. Other possible symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, confusion, and a rash (although a rash is uncommon).

Anaplasmosis can be diagnosed through blood tests that detect the presence of antibodies against the bacterium or the DNA of the organism itself. It is usually treated with antibiotics such as doxycycline, which are most effective when started early in the course of the disease.

Preventing tick bites is the best way to avoid anaplasmosis and other tick-borne diseases. This can be done by using insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, avoiding wooded and brushy areas with high grass, and checking for ticks after being outdoors. If a tick is found, it should be removed promptly using fine-tipped tweezers, grasping the tick as close to the skin as possible and pulling straight upwards with steady pressure.

Ehrlichia is a genus of gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria that infect and replicate within the vacuoles of host cells. These bacteria are transmitted to humans and animals through the bite of infected arthropods, such as ticks. Infection with Ehrlichia can cause a variety of symptoms, including fever, headache, muscle aches, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Some species of Ehrlichia, such as Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii, are known to cause human disease, including ehrlichiosis.

Ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne disease that can range in severity from mild to severe and can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated. Symptoms of ehrlichiosis may include fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In some cases, the infection can lead to more serious complications, such as neurological problems, respiratory failure, or kidney failure.

Ehrlichiosis is typically treated with antibiotics, such as doxycycline, which are effective against the bacteria. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect that you may have been infected with Ehrlichia, as early treatment can help prevent serious complications. Prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and avoiding tick-infested areas, can also help reduce the risk of infection.

'Anaplasma phagocytophilum' is a gram-negative bacterium that causes Anaplasmosis, a tick-borne disease in humans. It infects and survives within granulocytes, a type of white blood cell, leading to symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle pain, and chills. In severe cases, it can cause complications like respiratory failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and even death. It is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks, primarily the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the United States and the sheep tick (Ixodes ricinus) in Europe. Proper diagnosis and treatment with antibiotics are crucial for managing this infection.

Ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by infection with Ehrlichia bacteria. It is typically transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected tick. The symptoms of ehrlichiosis can include fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. If left untreated, ehrlichiosis can cause serious complications, including damage to the central nervous system and other organs. It is important to seek medical attention if you think you may have been exposed to ehrlichiosis and are experiencing symptoms of the disease. A healthcare provider can diagnose ehrlichiosis through laboratory tests and can recommend appropriate treatment, which typically involves antibiotics. Prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and avoiding tick-infested areas, can help reduce the risk of ehrlichiosis and other tick-borne diseases.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). ...
Species in the family Anaplasmataceae have unique characteristics that can help differentiate them from other families ... The current classification is Bacteria, Pseudomonadota, Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Anaplasmataceae, Ehrlichia ewingii ... "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some ...
Rikihisa Y (October 2006). "New findings on members of the family Anaplasmataceae of veterinary importance". Annals of the New ... Neorickettsia risticii is a member of the Order Rickettsiales and Family Anaplasmataceae within the Class Alphaproteobacteria. ...
Furthermore, the Anaplasmataceae are pleiomorphic cocci which range in size between 0.5 and 1.2 μm. The precise cellular ... During the last 20 years several bacteria within the family Anaplasmataceae have been discovered. Among others, one was found ... NM belongs to the family Anaplasmataceae together with Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Neorickettsia, Aegyptianella and Wolbachia. ... in the family Anaplasmataceae, isolated from wild rats and found in Ixodes ovatus ticks". International Journal of Systematic ...
2001). "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of ... "Persistent Infections and Immunity in Ruminants to Arthropod-Borne Bacteria in the Family Anaplasmataceae". Annual Review of ...
... is a genus of gram-negative bacteria of the alphaproteobacterial order Rickettsiales, family Anaplasmataceae. ...
Anaplasmataceae) in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)". Journal of Medical Entomology. 40 (6): 1000-1004. doi:10.1603/0022 ...
... is a tick-borne bacterial infection, caused by bacteria of the family Anaplasmataceae, genera Ehrlichia and ...
2001). "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of ... ATIF, FARHAN AHMAD (2016-03-02). "Alpha proteobacteria of genusAnaplasma(Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae): Epidemiology and ...
... in the family Anaplasmataceae, isolated from wild rats and found in Ixodes ovatus ticks". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 54 (Pt 5 ... "Survey of Ixodes pacificus Ticks in California Reveals a Diversity of Microorganisms and a Novel and Widespread Anaplasmataceae ...
showed greater similarity to those of Mollicutes than to those of the family Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales to ...
... anaplasmataceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.054.050 - anaplasmosis MeSH C01.252.400.054.160 - ehrlichiosis MeSH C01.252.400.054 ...
November 2001). "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: ...
November 2001). "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: ...
Anaplasmataceae) by Dermacentor andersoni Stiles (Acari: Ixodidae) with mechanical transmission by the horse fly, Tabanus ...
2001). "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of ...
2001). "Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of ...
... anaplasmataceae MeSH B03.660.050.020.050 - Anaplasma MeSH B03.660.050.020.050.100 - Anaplasma centrale MeSH B03.660.050.020. ...
Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil On This Page ... Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil. Volume 28, ... Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil. Emerging ... Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis ...
Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). ...
Categories: Anaplasmataceae Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 5 ...
... and other anaplasmataceae. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennetts Principles and Practice of ...
Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some ... and other anaplasmataceae [Chapter 194]. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennetts Principles ...
Anaplasmataceae [1]. Animals [3]. Anthelminthics [1]. Antiparasitic agents [1]. Author index [1]. ...
Comparison of the Efficiency of Biological Transmission of Anaplasma marginale (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) by Dermacentor ...
Anaplasmataceae;Wolbachia RSV_genus941 Bacteria;Proteobacteria;Alphaproteobacteria;Rickettsiales;Holosporaceae;NA RSV_genus942 ... Anaplasmataceae RSV_family320 Bacteria;Proteobacteria;Alphaproteobacteria;Rickettsiales;Holosporaceae RSV_family321 Bacteria; ...
The organism was classified in the family Anaplasmataceae but recently was shown to be more closely related to the mycoplasma. ...
Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some ... Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some ...
Characterization of Candidatus Neoehrlichia lotoris (family Anaplasmataceae) from raccoons (Procyon lotor). Citation. Yabsley ...
Anaplasmataceae. *Ehrlichiosis: Anaplasma phagocytophilum *Human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Anaplasmosis. *Ehrlichia ...
Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil Cite ... 2022). Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil. 28(2). ... "Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil" vol. 28, no. 2, ... "Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. Infecting Capybaras, Brazil" 28, no. 2 (2022) ...
Anaplasmataceae. LEPTOSPIRA CANICOLA. Leptospira Interrogans serovar canicola. NOCARDIOFORM GROUP. Actinomycetales. B04 - ...
Anaplasmataceae. LEPTOSPIRA CANICOLA. Leptospira Interrogans serovar canicola. NOCARDIOFORM GROUP. Actinomycetales. B04 - ...
Anaplasmataceae. LEPTOSPIRA CANICOLA. Leptospira Interrogans serovar canicola. NOCARDIOFORM GROUP. Actinomycetales. B04 - ...
The overall prevalence of Bartonella spp., Anaplasmataceae, Babesia spp., Leptospira spp., Spotted fever group Rickettsiae, ... and Anaplasmataceae with a co-infection rate of 0.46%. Our results suggested that species distribution and co-infections of ...
Ānāpāna (Skt.). Control of breathing in Hindu yoga. Source for information on Ānāpāna: The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions dictionary.
Anaplasmataceae , Anoplura , Bartonella , Cervos , Dípteros , Piroplasmida , Humanos , Animais , Ovinos , Bovinos , Cervos/ ... Anaplasmataceae DNA (Wolbachia spp.) was detected only in M. ovinus (16%), while < 1% of the louse flies were positive for ... Genomic DNA from each louse fly was screened for Borrelia spp., Bartonella spp., Trypanosomatida, Anaplasmataceae, Filarioidea ...
Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some ...
Twenty-three ticks were positive for Anaplasmataceae, including one Anaplasma and two Ehrlichia genotypes. Because the sequence ... collected in different locations in central Sri Lanka to determine which were infected with Rickettsia and Anaplasmataceae. ...
Evaluation of Transovarial Transmission and Transmissibility of Ehrlichia chaffeensis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in ...
Las muestras fueron analizadas inicialmente con una PCR para la detección de familia Anaplasmataceae y aquellas que resultaron ... Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some ...
... name given to the diseases caused by obligate intracellular bacteria in the genus Ehrlichia within the family Anaplasmataceae. ...
Adolescent Adult Aged Aged, 80 And Over Anaplasma Phagocytophilum Anaplasmataceae Animals Female Humans Male Middle Aged ...
Anaplasmataceae Infections. *Bacteroidaceae Infections. *Bartonellaceae Infections. *Bordetella Infections. *Borrelia ...
... syndrome developmental brain transcriptome reveals defective oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination Anaplasmataceae- ...
  • Novel Anaplasmataceae agents Candidatus Ehrlichia hydrochoerus and Anaplasma spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Detección molecular de Rickettsia massiliae y Anaplasma platys en garrapatas Rhipicephalus sanguineus y caninos domésticos del municipio de Bahía Blanca (Argentina). (unl.edu.ar)
  • 2001. Reorganization of genera in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in the order Rickettsiales: unification of some species of Ehrlichia with Anaplasma. (unl.edu.ar)
  • Detección molecular de Ehrlichia canis en perros de diferentes localidades de la provincia de Córdoba, Argentina. (unl.edu.ar)
  • Ehrlichiosis is the general name given to the diseases caused by obligate intracellular bacteria in the genus Ehrlichia within the family Anaplasmataceae. (cdc.gov)
  • Infezioni Da Anaplasmataceae 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the family ANAPLASMATACEAE. (lookformedical.com)
  • The organism was classified in the family Anaplasmataceae but recently was shown to be more closely related to the mycoplasma. (vin.com)
  • Familia de bacterias del orden RICKETTSIALES que habitan en los ERITROCITOS y en otros tipos de células y que causan enfermedades en animales y en el ser humano. (bvsalud.org)
  • It is an obligate intracellular, gram-negative polymorphic bacterium belonging to the order Rickettsiales of the family Anaplasmataceae and genus Anaplasma (16), which is observed in various forms, spherical or spherical rods, or they are polymorphic and form basal colonies in the cytoplasm of different types of white blood cells such as neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and monocytes called morulae when examining a blood smear stained with Giemsa stain (14,17). (iraqjournals.com)
  • Molecular detection and characterization of a novel Anaplasmataceae in wild rodents from Valdivia, southern Chile. (nih.gov)
  • Molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens of the family Anaplasmataceae in Brazilian brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira, Fischer, 1814) and marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus, Illiger, 1815). (nih.gov)