A species of gram-negative bacteria producing mild to severe ANAPLASMOSIS in SHEEP and GOATS, and mild or inapparent infections in DEER and CATTLE.
A genus of gram-negative bacteria whose organisms are obligate parasites of vertebrates. Species are transmitted by arthropod vectors with the host range limited to ruminants. Anaplasma marginale is the most pathogenic species and is the causative agent of severe bovine anaplasmosis.
A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ANAPLASMA, family ANAPLASMATACEAE, formerly called Ehrlichia phagocytophila or Ehrlichia equi. This organism is tick-borne (IXODES) and causes disease in horses and sheep. In humans, it causes human granulocytic EHRLICHIOSIS.
A species of gram-negative bacteria and causative agent of severe bovine ANAPLASMOSIS. It is the most pathogenic of the ANAPLASMA species.
A species of the genus BRUCELLA which are pathogenic to SHEEP.
A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.
A species of gram-negative bacteria causing mild ANAPLASMOSIS in CATTLE. It also can infect SHEEP and GOATS. It is transmitted by TICKS.
The largest genus of TICKS in the family IXODIDAE, containing over 200 species. Many infest humans and other mammals and several are vectors of diseases such as LYME DISEASE, tick-borne encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, TICK-BORNE), and KYASANUR FOREST DISEASE.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)
Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.
Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.
A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.
Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.

Prevalence and genotypes of Anaplasma species and habitat suitability for ticks in a Mediterranean ecosystem. (1/3)

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Development and evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of Anaplasma ovis. (2/3)

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Looking for prognosticators in ovine anaplasmosis: discriminant analysis of clinical and haematological parameters in lambs belonging to differently susceptible breeds experimentally infected with Anaplasma ovis. (3/3)

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Anaplasma ovis is a gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterium that belongs to the order Rickettsiales. It is the etiological agent of ovine anaplasmosis, which primarily affects sheep and goats. The bacteria infect and replicate within the host's erythrocytes (red blood cells), causing clinical signs such as anemia, jaundice, weight loss, and abortion in pregnant animals. Transmission typically occurs through tick vectors, with the most common vector being Ixodes ricinus in Europe and Ixodes holocyclus in Australia.

In humans, Anaplasma ovis is not known to cause disease, and there are no reports of human infection or illness associated with this bacterium. However, other species within the Anaplasma genus, such as A. phagocytophilum and A. platys, can cause human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and infectious canine cyclic thrombocytopenia, respectively.

It is essential to consult a medical or veterinary professional for accurate information regarding specific pathogens and their associated diseases.

Anaplasma is a genus of intracellular bacteria that infect and parasitize the white blood cells of various animals, including humans. It is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks. The most common species that infect humans are Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys.

Anaplasma phagocytophilum causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a tick-borne disease characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, and leukopenia. It infects granulocytes, a type of white blood cell, and can cause severe complications such as respiratory failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and even death in some cases.

Anaplasma platys causes canine cyclic thrombocytopenia, a disease that affects dogs and is characterized by recurring low platelet counts. It infects platelets, another type of blood cell involved in clotting, and can cause bleeding disorders in affected animals.

Diagnosis of Anaplasma infections typically involves the detection of antibodies against the bacteria or the direct identification of the organism through molecular methods such as PCR. Treatment usually involves the use of antibiotics such as doxycycline, which is effective against both species of Anaplasma. Prevention measures include avoiding tick-infested areas and using insect repellents and protective clothing to reduce the risk of tick bites.

Anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern United States and western black-legged ticks (Ixodes pacificus) in the western United States.

The bacterium infects and reproduces within certain white blood cells, leading to symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, and chills that typically appear within 1-2 weeks after a tick bite. Other possible symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, confusion, and a rash (although a rash is uncommon).

Anaplasmosis can be diagnosed through blood tests that detect the presence of antibodies against the bacterium or the DNA of the organism itself. It is usually treated with antibiotics such as doxycycline, which are most effective when started early in the course of the disease.

Preventing tick bites is the best way to avoid anaplasmosis and other tick-borne diseases. This can be done by using insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, avoiding wooded and brushy areas with high grass, and checking for ticks after being outdoors. If a tick is found, it should be removed promptly using fine-tipped tweezers, grasping the tick as close to the skin as possible and pulling straight upwards with steady pressure.

'Anaplasma phagocytophilum' is a gram-negative bacterium that causes Anaplasmosis, a tick-borne disease in humans. It infects and survives within granulocytes, a type of white blood cell, leading to symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle pain, and chills. In severe cases, it can cause complications like respiratory failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and even death. It is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks, primarily the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the United States and the sheep tick (Ixodes ricinus) in Europe. Proper diagnosis and treatment with antibiotics are crucial for managing this infection.

'Anaplasma marginale' is a gram-negative bacterium that infects red blood cells in various species of animals, including cattle. It is the causative agent of Anaplasmosis, which is a tick-borne disease that can lead to severe anemia, abortion, and even death in infected animals. The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected ticks or through contaminated blood transfusions, needles, or surgical instruments.

The bacterium has a unique life cycle, where it infects and replicates within the red blood cells, causing them to rupture and release more bacteria into the bloodstream. This results in the characteristic symptoms of Anaplasmosis, such as fever, weakness, icterus (yellowing of the mucous membranes), and anemia.

Diagnosis of Anaplasmosis can be confirmed through various laboratory tests, including blood smears, PCR assays, and serological tests. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics such as tetracyclines, which can help to reduce the severity of symptoms and clear the infection. Preventive measures include the control of tick populations, the use of protective clothing and insect repellents, and the implementation of strict biosecurity protocols in veterinary practices and farms.

'Brucella ovis' is a gram-negative, coccobacillus-shaped bacterium that belongs to the genus Brucella. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen that primarily causes contagious epididymitis and orchitis in rams (male sheep), leading to infertility and decreased flock productivity.

This bacterial species is host-adapted, meaning it mainly affects sheep and goats, and does not typically cause disease in humans. However, there have been rare cases of laboratory-acquired infections in people working with infected animals or their tissues.

'Brucella ovis' infection control measures include proper sanitation practices, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and vaccination programs for susceptible animal populations to minimize transmission and disease spread.

Ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by infection with Ehrlichia bacteria. It is typically transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected tick. The symptoms of ehrlichiosis can include fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. If left untreated, ehrlichiosis can cause serious complications, including damage to the central nervous system and other organs. It is important to seek medical attention if you think you may have been exposed to ehrlichiosis and are experiencing symptoms of the disease. A healthcare provider can diagnose ehrlichiosis through laboratory tests and can recommend appropriate treatment, which typically involves antibiotics. Prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and avoiding tick-infested areas, can help reduce the risk of ehrlichiosis and other tick-borne diseases.

Anaplasma centrale is a bacterial species that belongs to the order Rickettsiales and the family Anaplasmataceae. It is an intracellular pathogen that primarily infects red blood cells in ruminants, such as cattle and sheep. The bacteria are transmitted through tick vectors, particularly ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus.

The infection caused by A. centrale is often asymptomatic or mild in affected animals, but it can lead to anemia and decreased productivity in livestock. In some cases, the disease may also cause abortion or death in young animals. There are no known human infections associated with A. centrale.

Diagnosis of Anaplasma centrale infection typically involves microscopic examination of blood smears, PCR testing, and serological assays such as ELISA or complement fixation tests. Treatment usually involves the use of antibiotics such as tetracyclines, which are effective against intracellular bacteria. Preventive measures include tick control and vaccination of livestock.

"Ixodes" is a genus of tick that includes several species known to transmit various diseases to humans and animals. These ticks are often referred to as "hard ticks" because of their hard, shield-like plate on their backs. Ixodes ticks have a complex life cycle involving three stages: larva, nymph, and adult. They feed on the blood of hosts during each stage, and can transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and Powassan virus disease.

The most common Ixodes species in North America is Ixodes scapularis, also known as the black-legged tick or deer tick, which is the primary vector of Lyme disease in this region. In Europe, Ixodes ricinus, or the castor bean tick, is a widespread and important vector of diseases such as Lyme borreliosis, tick-borne encephalitis, and several other tick-borne pathogens.

Ixodes ticks are typically found in wooded or grassy areas with high humidity and moderate temperatures. They can be carried by various hosts, including mammals, birds, and reptiles, and can survive for long periods without feeding, making them efficient disease vectors.

I'm happy to help, but I want to clarify that the term "sheep diseases" refers to a wide range of health issues that can affect sheep populations. It's not a single medical condition with a specific definition. Here are some examples of common diseases that can affect sheep:

1. Ovine Johne's Disease (OJD): A chronic, infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It affects the intestines and can cause weight loss, diarrhea, and death.
2. Footrot: A highly contagious bacterial infection that affects the feet of sheep, causing lameness, swelling, and pain. It's caused by the bacteria Dichelobacter nodosus.
3. Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL): A chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. It affects the lymph nodes and can cause abscesses, weight loss, and death.
4. Contagious Ecthyma (Orf): A highly contagious viral infection that affects the skin and mucous membranes of sheep, causing sores and lesions.
5. Mastitis: An inflammation of the mammary gland in sheep, usually caused by a bacterial infection. It can cause decreased milk production, fever, and loss of appetite.
6. Pneumonia: A respiratory infection that can affect sheep, causing coughing, difficulty breathing, and fever. It can be caused by various bacteria or viruses.
7. Enterotoxemia: A potentially fatal disease caused by the overproduction of toxins in the intestines of sheep, usually due to a bacterial infection with Clostridium perfringens.
8. Polioencephalomalacia (PEM): A neurological disorder that affects the brain of sheep, causing symptoms such as blindness, circling, and seizures. It's often caused by a thiamine deficiency or excessive sulfur intake.
9. Toxoplasmosis: A parasitic infection that can affect sheep, causing abortion, stillbirth, and neurological symptoms.
10. Blue tongue: A viral disease that affects sheep, causing fever, respiratory distress, and mouth ulcers. It's transmitted by insect vectors and is often associated with climate change.

A medical definition of "ticks" would be:

Ticks are small, blood-sucking parasites that belong to the arachnid family, which also includes spiders. They have eight legs and can vary in size from as small as a pinhead to about the size of a marble when fully engorged with blood. Ticks attach themselves to the skin of their hosts (which can include humans, dogs, cats, and wild animals) by inserting their mouthparts into the host's flesh.

Ticks can transmit a variety of diseases, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, and babesiosis. It is important to remove ticks promptly and properly to reduce the risk of infection. To remove a tick, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. Do not twist or jerk the tick, as this can cause the mouthparts to break off and remain in the skin. After removing the tick, clean the area with soap and water and disinfect the tweezers.

Preventing tick bites is an important part of protecting against tick-borne diseases. This can be done by wearing protective clothing (such as long sleeves and pants), using insect repellent containing DEET or permethrin, avoiding wooded and brushy areas with high grass, and checking for ticks after being outdoors.

Domestic animals, also known as domestic animals or pets, are species that have been tamed and kept by humans for various purposes. These purposes can include companionship, work, protection, or food production. Some common examples of domestic animals include dogs, cats, cows, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, and chickens.

Domestic animals are distinguished from wild animals in that they are dependent on humans for their survival and are able to live in close proximity to people. They have often been selectively bred over generations to possess certain traits or characteristics that make them more suitable for their intended uses. For example, dogs may be bred for their size, strength, agility, or temperament, while cats may be bred for their coat patterns or behaviors.

It is important to note that the term "domestic animal" does not necessarily mean that an animal is tame or safe to handle. Some domestic animals, such as certain breeds of dogs, can be aggressive or dangerous if not properly trained and managed. It is always important to approach and handle any animal, domestic or wild, with caution and respect.

A "tick infestation" is not a formal medical term, but it generally refers to a situation where an individual has a large number of ticks (Ixodida: Acarina) on their body or in their living environment. Ticks are external parasites that feed on the blood of mammals, birds, and reptiles.

An infestation can occur in various settings, including homes, gardens, parks, and forests. People who spend time in these areas, especially those with pets or who engage in outdoor activities like camping, hiking, or hunting, are at a higher risk of tick encounters.

Tick infestations can lead to several health concerns, as ticks can transmit various diseases, such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, and babesiosis, among others. It is essential to take preventive measures to avoid tick bites and promptly remove any attached ticks to reduce the risk of infection.

If you suspect a tick infestation in your living environment or on your body, consult a healthcare professional or a pest control expert for proper assessment and guidance on how to proceed.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

I apologize for any confusion, but "livestock" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is an agricultural term that refers to animals that are kept or raised on a farm or ranch for commercial purposes, such as the production of food, fiber, or labor. Examples of livestock include cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry, and horses. I hope this clarifies any confusion. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help.

Ixodidae is a family of arachnids commonly known as hard ticks. Here's a more detailed medical definition:

Ixodidae is a family of tick species, also known as hard ticks, which are obligate ectoparasites of many different terrestrial vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. They have a hard, shield-like structure on their dorsal surface called the scutum, and a prominent mouthpart called the hypostome, which helps them anchor themselves onto their host's skin during feeding.

Hard ticks are vectors of various bacterial, viral, and protozoan diseases that can affect both humans and animals. Some of the diseases transmitted by Ixodidae include Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, and tularemia.

Ixodidae species have a complex life cycle that involves three developmental stages: larva, nymph, and adult. Each stage requires a blood meal from a host to progress to the next stage or to reproduce. The length of the life cycle varies depending on the species and environmental conditions but can take up to several years to complete.

Proper identification and control of Ixodidae populations are essential for preventing tick-borne diseases and protecting public health.

Mites are tiny arthropods belonging to the class Arachnida, which also includes spiders and ticks. They are characterized by their small size, usually measuring less than 1 mm in length, and their lack of obvious segmentation on their bodies. Many mites are parasitic, feeding on the skin cells, blood, or fluids of plants and animals, including humans. Some common mite infestations in humans include scabies, caused by the itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei), and dust mites (e.g., Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae), which are commonly found in household dust and can cause allergic reactions in some people. It's worth noting that the majority of mites are not harmful to humans and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers and predators.

Sheep and goats suffer disease from infection with Anaplasma ovis which is transmitted similarly to the anaplasmas described ... Anaplasma centrale tends to infect the central region of red blood cells, and is sufficiently closely related to An. marginale ... Anaplasma marginale infects marginal areas of red blood cells of cattle and causes anaplasmosis wherever boophilid ticks occur ... Anaplasma phagocytophilum (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophila) is a bacterium of deer that spreads to sheep where it causes tick ...
Haigh JC, Gerwing V, Erdenebaatar J, Hill JE (July 2008). "A novel clinical syndrome and detection of Anaplasma ovis in ... The two major species that cause anaplasmosis in ruminants include Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Anaplasma ... Anaplasma phagocytophilium has a prevalence of 11.9% in sheep, and 15.2% in goats. There are many strains of Anaplasma ... The two major bacterial pathogens are Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. These microorganisms are Gram-negative ...
Other members of this genus include the species A. phagocytophilum, A. marginale, A. platys, A. ovis, and A. centrale Anaplasma ... "Novel Genetic Variants of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma centrale, and a Novel Ehrlichia sp. in Wild ... Other species of Anaplasma, most commonly A. marginale, are well documented to cause disease in cattle. Anaplasma species ... Anaplasma bovis is currently one of 6 recognized species within the Genus Anaplasma. ...
... marginale and Anaplasma centrale in cattle Anaplasma ovis and Anaplasma mesaeterum in sheep and goats Anaplasma ... cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) Anaplasma genomes in the JGI genome browser Anaplasma at the U.S. ... Anaplasma platys in dogs The Anaplasma sparouinense species is responsible for a rare zoonosis, the Sparouine anaplasmosis, ... including tropical and semitropical areas of the world for intraerythrocytic Anaplasma spp. Anaplasma species are biologically ...
... and the bacterium Anaplasma marginale. Horses may be infected with Lyme disease, Anaplasma phagocytophila, and the viral ... Cattle can become infected with redwater fever (from the protozoans Babesia divergens, B. bovis, and B. ovis), Lyme disease ( ... from B. burgdorferi), sheep tick pyemia (Staphylococcus aureus), cattle tick-borne fever (Anaplasma phagocytophila), Q fever ( ...
Anaplasma centrale MeSH B03.440.040.050.500 - Anaplasma marginale MeSH B03.440.040.050.575 - Anaplasma ovis MeSH B03.440. ... Anaplasma centrale MeSH B03.660.050.020.050.500 - Anaplasma marginale MeSH B03.660.050.020.050.575 - Anaplasma ovis MeSH ... Brucella ovis MeSH B03.660.050.070.100.750 - Brucella suis MeSH B03.660.050.070.700 - Ochrobactrum MeSH B03.660.050.070.700.650 ... Brucella ovis MeSH B03.440.400.425.215.500.750 - Brucella suis MeSH B03.440.400.425.251 - burkholderiaceae MeSH B03.440.400.425 ...
Stomoxys flies transmit the bacterium Eperythrozoon ovis to sheep and this infection may lead to fever and anemia. There is one ... Tabanid flies are also transmitters the bacteria Anaplasma marginale and A.centrale to cattle, sheep and goats, causing ... Sheep-keds transmit the bacterium Eperythrozoon ovis to sheep and this infection may cause fever and anemia. They also transmit ... Yilma, J.M.; & Dorchies, P. (1991) Epidemiology of Oestrus ovis in southwest France. Veterinary Parasitology, 40: 315-323. ...
Persistence of Anaplasma ovis infection and conservation of the msp-2 and msp-3 multigene families within the genus Anaplasma. ... ovis heat shock protein 60 (groEL) genes; and A. marginale, A. centrale, and A. ovis major surface protein 4 (msp4) genes (4,5 ... centrale, A. ovis) in GenBank. Anaplasma sp. groEL and msp4 genes showed a 1,650-bp sequence (FJ477840, corresponding to 748 of ... ovis is unknown. Thus, laboratory testing of human blood samples should include universal primers against all Anaplasma spp. to ...
Anaplasma ovis is an arthropod-borne rickettsial pathogen that induces acute anemia in sheep and goats following invasion and ... Although A. ovis does not infect cattle, this pathogen has been reported to infect wild ruminants. A. ovis is transmitted by ...
Anaplasma ovis Real-Time PCR, 100 reactions. https://www.cortex-biochem.com/shop/0597-rtq-v304-100d-anaplasma-ovis-real-time- ...
Sheep and goats suffer disease from infection with Anaplasma ovis which is transmitted similarly to the anaplasmas described ... Anaplasma centrale tends to infect the central region of red blood cells, and is sufficiently closely related to An. marginale ... Anaplasma marginale infects marginal areas of red blood cells of cattle and causes anaplasmosis wherever boophilid ticks occur ... Anaplasma phagocytophilum (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophila) is a bacterium of deer that spreads to sheep where it causes tick ...
Validation of an Anaplasma marginale cELISA for use in the diagnosis of A. ovis infections in domestic sheep and Anaplasma spp ... Transfection of non-susceptible cells with Ovis aries recombinant lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 renders ... Comparison of the Efficiency of Biological Transmission of Anaplasma marginale (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) by Dermacentor ... Ovis canadensis canadensis) (Peer Reviewed Journal) (9-Nov-07) ...
Anaplasma marginale (39.1%), Anaplasma sp. (Omatjenne) (34.7%), Babesia bigemina (7.9%), Anaplasma centrale (6.3%), Anaplasma ... The detection of B. occultans, B. ovis, Hepatozoon spp., Theileria spp. and Hemolivia mauritanica indicate the importance of ... Anaplasma/genética , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Anaplasma/fisiologia , Animais , Vetores Aracnídeos/classificação , ... Anaplasma/genética , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Anaplasma/fisiologia , Animais , Babesia/genética , Babesia/ ...
Most co-exposed sheep had antibodies against Anaplasma spp./TBEV (n = 36), followed by Anaplasma spp./C. burnetii (n = 27) and ... The presence of Anaplasma spp. antibodies did not influence the detection of antibodies against C. burnetii and TBEV. Studies ... The current study aimed to identify co-exposure of sheep to Anaplasma spp., C. burnetii and TBEV. For this purpose, 1,406 serum ... Research in this field may also support the One Health approach due to the zoonotic potential of Anaplasma spp., C. burnetii ...
Anaplasma phagocytophilum (1.81%), Anaplasma marginale (3.26%) and Anaplasma ovis (7.25%). This study reports the first ... Lintan (8.70%), Theileria orientalis (2.17%), Theileria parva (0.36%), Anaplasma capra (18.48%), ... Ehrlichia and Anaplasma. An overall prevalence of 36.96% was recorded from the livestock DBS, with mixed infections seen in ...
The objective of this aviator examine ended up being to check out existence of Anaplasma spp. along with associated antibodies ... ovis along with a. capra utilizing quantitative and standard polymerase sequence of events (PCR). Your surrogate medical ... The complete liquid blood samples (and Equates to Forty five) ended up examined for your existence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum ... These types of results reveal popular experience Anaplasma spp. in the Swedish goat inhabitants. ...
Anaplasmosis is a widespread vector-borne illness affecting canines, and Anaplasma platys is the key etiological agent of the ... Background and intention: Ovine theileriosis brought on by Theileria ovis and Theileria lestoquardi is a crucial infectious ... Phylogenetic study of Theileria ovis and Theileria lestoquardi in sheep from Egypt: Molecular evidence and genetic ... and alteration of hematological variables in Anaplasma-affected canines. A complete of 150 blood samples have been collected ...
Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ...
Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ...
Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ...
Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ...
Orkun O, Emir H, Karaer Z. Ticks threatening lineage of Anatolian wild sheep (Ovis gmelinii anatolica) and determination of ... Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia, Babesia, and Theileria. Hyalomma ticks are aggressive species, which search for humans actively. ... a recent study has shown that clade I is also affecting the Anatolian wild sheep Ovis gmelinii anatolica [128]. The virus was ...
B ovis Ab Ser CF-aCnc B ovis Ab Ser Ql B ovis Ab Ser Ql Aggl B ovis Ab Ser Ql CF B ovis Ab Ser Ql IA B ovis Ab Ser Ql ID B ovis ... Anaplasma Bld Mod Giemsa Anaplasma Tiss Mod Giemsa Anaplasma XXX Ql Micro Anaplasma XXX Seq Ancylostoma Ab Ser-aCnc ... Ab Ser-aCnc B ovis Ab Titr Ser B parap IS1001 DNA Ct XXX Qn NAA+probe B parap IS1001 DNA Lower Resp Ql NAA+pr B parap IS1001 ...
Persistence of Anaplasma ovis infection and conservation of the msp-2 and msp-3 multigene families within the genus Anaplasma. ... ovis heat shock protein 60 (groEL) genes; and A. marginale, A. centrale, and A. ovis major surface protein 4 (msp4) genes (4,5 ... centrale, A. ovis) in GenBank. Anaplasma sp. groEL and msp4 genes showed a 1,650-bp sequence (FJ477840, corresponding to 748 of ... ovis is unknown. Thus, laboratory testing of human blood samples should include universal primers against all Anaplasma spp. to ...
The genetic diversity of A. ovis strains has not been well characterized due to the lack of sequence information. In this study ... we evaluated bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and mule deer (Od … ... Anaplasma ovis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) is a tick-borne pathogen of sheep, goats and wild ruminants. ... Sequence analysis of the msp4 gene of Anaplasma ovis strains José de la Fuente 1 , Mark W Atkinson, Victoria Naranjo, Isabel G ...
Persistence of Anaplasma ovis infection and conservation of the msp-2 and msp-3 multigene families within the genus Anaplasma. ... ovis heat shock protein 60 (groEL) genes; and A. marginale, A. centrale, and A. ovis major surface protein 4 (msp4) genes (4,5 ... centrale, A. ovis) in GenBank. Anaplasma sp. groEL and msp4 genes showed a 1,650-bp sequence (FJ477840, corresponding to 748 of ... ovis is unknown. Thus, laboratory testing of human blood samples should include universal primers against all Anaplasma spp. to ...
Anaplasma phagocytophilum (1.81%), Anaplasma marginale (3.26%) and Anaplasma ovis (7.25%). This study reports the first ... Lintan (8.70%), Theileria orientalis (2.17%), Theileria parva (0.36%), Anaplasma capra (18.48%), ... Anaplasma. An overall prevalence of 36.96% was recorded from the livestock DBS, with mixed infections seen in 7.97% samples. ...
Anaplasma B03.440.040.050.100 Anaplasma centrale B03.440.040.050.500 Anaplasma marginale B03.440.040.050.575 Anaplasma ovis ... Anaplasma centrale B03.660.050.783.500.050.500 Anaplasma marginale B03.660.050.783.500.050.575 Anaplasma ovis B03.660.050.783. ... Brucella ovis B03.660.050.070.100.750 Brucella suis B03.660.050.070.700 Ochrobactrum B03.660.050.070.700.650 Ochrobactrum ... B03.440.040.050.600 Anaplasma phagocytophilum B03.440.040.287 Ehrlichia B03.440.040.287.090 Ehrlichia canis B03.440.040.287.150 ...
Anaplasma ovis (organism). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Anaplasma ovis (organism). Concept Status. Published. ...
Anaplasma ovis Preferred Term Term UI T524623. Date10/29/2002. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2004). ... Anaplasma [B03.660.050.783.500.050] * Anaplasma centrale [B03.660.050.783.500.050.100] * Anaplasma marginale [B03.660.050.783. ... Anaplasma ovis Preferred Concept UI. M0440936. Registry Number. txid142058. Scope Note. A species of gram-negative bacteria ... Anaplasma ovis. Tree Number(s). B03.440.664.750.050.575. B03.660.050.783.500.050.575. Unique ID. D042323. RDF Unique Identifier ...
Anaplasma ovis Preferred Term Term UI T524623. Date10/29/2002. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2004). ... Anaplasma [B03.660.050.783.500.050] * Anaplasma centrale [B03.660.050.783.500.050.100] * Anaplasma marginale [B03.660.050.783. ... Anaplasma ovis Preferred Concept UI. M0440936. Registry Number. txid142058. Scope Note. A species of gram-negative bacteria ... Anaplasma ovis. Tree Number(s). B03.440.664.750.050.575. B03.660.050.783.500.050.575. Unique ID. D042323. RDF Unique Identifier ...
... z ktorých prvýkrát na Slovensku zistila pôvodcu ochorenia oviec Anaplasma ovis a ďalšie dva doposiaľ na Slovensku neznáme druhy ... Neoehrlichia mikurensis a Anaplasma like. 3. Využitím zavedených metód riešiteľský kolektív získal viacero ďalších významných ...
Anaplasma ovis - Preferred Concept UI. M0440936. Scope note. A species of gram-negative bacteria producing mild to severe ... Anaplasma ovis. Scope note:. Especie de bacterias gramnegativas que producen ANAPLASMOSIS de leve a grave en OVINOS y CABRAS, e ... Anaplasma ovis Descriptor Spanish: Anaplasma ovis Spanish from Spain Descriptor. ...
In contrast, Mycoplasma ovis was detected exclusively in one pool of B. ovis. This study provides new bacterial-ectoparasite ... Subsequently, Anaplasma, Bartonella, Ehrlichia, Mycoplasma, and Rickettsia were molecularly detected. Additionally, the ... In Mexico, there are historical reports of six species of chewing and sucking lice associated with Capra hircus and Ovis ... The highest infestation levels were recorded for B. ovis (66.7%; 4.4) from Veracruz. Additionally, two Bartonella species were ...
resulting in the identification of Anaplasma ovis strains in all samples examined. We used a bioinformatics as well as a ... PMID- 19443140 TI - Phylogentic analysis of Anaplasma ovis strains isolated from sheep and goats using groEL and mps4 genes. AB ... All samples depicted the presence of A. ovis regardless of the host (goat or sheep). PMID- 19443141 TI - Ethyl methanesulfonate ... Herein, further research was performed for the identification of the exact Anaplasma spp. ...
It is the most pathogenic of the ANAPLASMA species. HN - 2004 MH - Anaplasma ovis UI - D042323 MN - B3.440.40.50.575 MN - ... HN - 2004 MH - Anaplasma marginale UI - D042322 MN - B3.440.40.50.500 MN - B3.660.50.20.50.500 MS - A species of gram-negative ... HN - 2004 BX - Nitrobacteraceae MH - Brucella ovis UI - D042061 MN - B3.440.400.425.215.500.625 MN - B3.660.50.70.100.625 MS - ... AN - infection: coord IM with GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIAL INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2004 MH - Anaplasma centrale UI - D042321 MN - ...
Human Anaplasmosis and Anaplasma ovis Variant , CD.... *Swine Influenza A Vaccines, Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 V... ...
Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ...
Anaplasma Anaplasma centrale Anaplasma marginale Anaplasma ovis Anaplasma phagocytophilum Anaplasmataceae Anaplasmataceae ... Brucella ovis Brucella suis Brucella Vaccine Brucellaceae Brucellosis Brucellosis, Bovine Bruch Membrane Brugada Syndrome ...
Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma marginale. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ovis. Anaplasma ...
Grøva L, Olesen I, Steinshamn H and Stuen S (2011) Prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection and effect on lamb growth ... A comprehensive evaluation and first molecular report of Theileria ovis infection in small ruminants in Saudi Arabia, Tropical ... Víchová B, Miterpáková M and Iglódyová A (2014) Molecular detection of co-infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and/or ... Radzijevskaja J, Paulauskas A and Rosef O (2008) Prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia divergens in Ixodes ...
  • A . marginale , A . centrale , A . phagocytophilum , A . ovis , A . bovis , and A . platys are obligate intracellular bacteria that infect vertebrate and invertebrate host cells. (cdc.gov)
  • Evolutionary trees based on major surface protein 4 (A) and heat shock protein 60 (B) genes sequences of Anaplasma phagocytophilum , A. marginale , and A. ovis . (cdc.gov)
  • Haemolytic anaemia is caused by A. ovis , whereas an A. phagocytophilum infection results in tick-borne fever [ 13 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • and A . marginale , A . centrale , and A . ovis major surface protein 4 ( msp4 ) genes ( 4 , 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Validation of an Anaplasma marginale cELISA for use in the diagnosis of A. ovis infections in domestic sheep and Anaplasma spp. (usda.gov)
  • Background and intention: Ovine theileriosis brought on by Theileria ovis and Theileria lestoquardi is a crucial infectious illness affecting small ruminants in areas of the tropic and subtropic zones. (bioinfor.me)
  • A. ovis , which is transmitted primarily by Rhipicephalus bursa ticks, is an intraerythrocytic rickettsial pathogen of sheep, goats, and wild ruminants ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Anaplasma ovis is an arthropod-borne rickettsial pathogen that induces acute anemia in sheep and goats following invasion and replication within erythrocytes. (kitpcr.com)
  • Anaplasmosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Anaplasma . (cdc.gov)
  • Anaplasmosis is a widespread vector-borne illness affecting canines, and Anaplasma platys is the key etiological agent of the illness. (bioinfor.me)
  • Research in this field may also support the One Health approach due to the zoonotic potential of Anaplasma spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A. ovis is transmitted by Rhipicephalus bursa, Haemaphysali sulcata and probably other ticks in the old world and by Dermacentor andersoni in the Americas. (kitpcr.com)
  • The current study aimed to identify co-exposure of sheep to Anaplasma spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The proportion of sheep with antibodies against Anaplasma spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most co-exposed sheep had antibodies against Anaplasma spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although A. ovis does not infect cattle, this pathogen has been reported to infect wild ruminants. (kitpcr.com)
  • A 16S rRNA gene sequence (EU448141) from the positive sample showed 100% similarity with other Anaplasma spp. (cdc.gov)
  • In this study, we evaluated bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from Montana for infection with A. ovis by serology and sequence analysis of the msp4 gene. (nih.gov)
  • The results reported herein further confirm that A. ovis infection occurs in natural wild ruminant populations in Western United States and that bighorn sheep and mule deer may serve as wildlife reservoirs of A. ovis. (nih.gov)
  • 2012. Pasteurellaceae isolated from bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) from Idaho, Oregon, and Wyoming. (nih.gov)
  • following transport and antibiotic treatment in free-ranging and captive Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis canadensis ). (nih.gov)
  • A. ovis , which is transmitted primarily by Rhipicephalus bursa ticks, is an intraerythrocytic rickettsial pathogen of sheep, goats, and wild ruminants ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Anaplasma ovis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) is a tick-borne pathogen of sheep, goats and wild ruminants. (nih.gov)
  • Ovis aries ), and Goats ( Capra hircus ) in Montana. (nih.gov)
  • A 16S rRNA gene sequence (EU448141) from the positive sample showed 100% similarity with other Anaplasma spp. (cdc.gov)
  • We report infection of a human with a strain of Anaplasma sp. (cdc.gov)