Loss of structural differentiation and useful function of neoplastic cells.
A malignant kidney tumor, caused by the uncontrolled multiplication of renal stem (blastemal), stromal (STROMAL CELLS), and epithelial (EPITHELIAL CELLS) elements. However, not all three are present in every case. Several genes or chromosomal areas have been associated with Wilms tumor which is usually found in childhood as a firm lump in a child's side or ABDOMEN.
A form of RHABDOMYOSARCOMA arising primarily in the head and neck, especially the orbit, of children below the age of 10. The cells are smaller than those of other rhabdomyosarcomas and are of two basic cell types: spindle cells and round cells. This cancer is highly sensitive to chemotherapy and has a high cure rate with multi-modality therapy. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p2188)
Primary or metastatic neoplasms of the CEREBELLUM. Tumors in this location frequently present with ATAXIA or signs of INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION due to obstruction of the fourth ventricle. Common primary cerebellar tumors include fibrillary ASTROCYTOMA and cerebellar HEMANGIOBLASTOMA. The cerebellum is a relatively common site for tumor metastases from the lung, breast, and other distant organs. (From Okazaki & Scheithauer, Atlas of Neuropathology, 1988, p86 and p141)
A malignant neoplasm that may be classified either as a glioma or as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of childhood (see NEUROECTODERMAL TUMOR, PRIMITIVE). The tumor occurs most frequently in the first decade of life with the most typical location being the cerebellar vermis. Histologic features include a high degree of cellularity, frequent mitotic figures, and a tendency for the cells to organize into sheets or form rosettes. Medulloblastoma have a high propensity to spread throughout the craniospinal intradural axis. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2060-1)
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.

Loss of p53 promotes anaplasia and local invasion in ret/PTC1-induced thyroid carcinomas. (1/38)

Papillary thyroid carcinomas in humans are associated with the ret/PTC oncogene and, following loss of p53 function, may progress to anaplastic carcinomas. Mice with thyroid-targeted expression of ret/PTC1 developed papillary thyroid carcinomas that were minimally invasive and did not metastasize. These mice were crossed with p53-/- mice to investigate whether loss of p53 would promote anaplasia and metastasis of ret/PTC1-induced thyroid tumors. The majority of p53-/- mice died or were euthanized by 17 weeks of age due to the development of thymic lymphomas, soft tissue sarcomas, and testicular teratomas. All ret/PTC1 mice developed thyroid carcinomas, but tumors in p53-/- mice were more anaplastic, larger in diameter, more invasive, and had a higher mitotic index than tumors in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Thyroid tumors did not metastasize in any of the experimental p53+/+ and p53+/- mice +info)

Association of expression of CD44v6 with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma: comparison with primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. (2/38)

CD44 is a ubiquitous multifunctional cell surface adhesion molecule family. High expression of the standard form, CD44s (CD44), and its variant form, CD44v6, has been reported to be associated with tumor dissemination in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. To evaluate the potential role of CD44 and/or CD44v6 in different entities of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), 30 cases of systemic ALCL (sALCL; 20 cases) and primary cutaneous ALCL (cALCL; 10 cases) were compared for expression of CD44 and CD44v6 by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of CD44v6 also was analyzed with respect to expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in sALCL. No difference of CD44 expression was noted between sALCL and cALCL In contrast, expression of CD44v6 was found in 18 (90%) of sALCL cases and in 5 (50%) of cALCL cases. There was no correlation between expression of CD44v6 and expression of ALK in sALCL. These results indicate that expression of CD44v6 rather than CD44 correlates with sALCL. Furthermore, these results suggest that CD44v6 and ALK may be independent predictors of risk for the systemic phenotype of ALCL.  (+info)

Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma deciduoid or anaplastic variant? Point to ponder. (3/38)

A case of peritoneal mesothelioma displaying unusual morphology, occurring in a 53 year old woman is described. The role of immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy in the evaluation of this tumor is stressed. The appropriate terminology to be used and possible etiologic factor are also discussed.  (+info)

Clinical and biologic significance of nuclear unrest in Wilms tumor. (4/38)

BACKGROUND: Nuclear unrest is a term applied to Wilms tumors (WT) with favorable histology that show nuclear enlargement similar to that seen in anaplasia but with no abnormal mitotic figures. This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical and pathogenetic significance of WT with nuclear unrest. METHODS: The authors reviewed primary nephrectomy specimens and clinical data from 173 patients who were treated for WT on 1 of 5 consecutive clinical trials at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. A subset of 70 patients was selected for p53 immunohistochemistry. Seventeen samples of recurrent tumors were also reviewed. RESULTS: WT with nuclear unrest had age and stage distribution similar to that for WT with favorable histology. Patients who had tumors with favorable histology, nuclear unrest, and anaplastic histology had 5-year cumulative incidences of recurrence of 12.2%, 22.2%, and 36.4%, respectively (P = 0.010). Despite the difference in recurrence incidence, patients who had tumors with nuclear unrest and patients who had tumors with favorable histology had nearly identical overall survival. Immunostaining for p53 was positive in 2 of 24 tumors (8.3%) with favorable histology, 1 of 25 tumors (4%) with nuclear unrest, and 16 of 21 tumors (76%) with anaplastic histology (P < 0.001). Histologic review of samples from recurrent tumors showed that 7 of 10 of primary tumors converted from favorable histology to either nuclear unrest or anaplastic histology in the recurrent tumor. CONCLUSIONS: WT with nuclear unrest more closely resembles favorable histology than anaplastic histology, both clinically and pathogenetically. Analysis of samples from recurrent tumors suggests that WT with nuclear unrest represents an intermediary in the continuum from favorable histology to anaplastic histology. For treatment stratification, it is appropriate to continue grouping nuclear unrest with favorable histology, although a larger analysis will be necessary to confirm the current findings.  (+info)

Gangliogliomas: A report of five cases. (5/38)

Gangliogliomas are rare tumors of the Central Nervous System. Five gangliogliomas were diagnosed out of 1560 brain tumours surgically resected out in a period of 5 years accounting for 0. 32%. We have tried to discuss in detail the pathological features of these tumours and have mentioned the clinical and radiological features associated with them. All the slides, tissue blocks and pathology reports of the surgical specimens of gangliglioma were reviewed and the clinical and radiological data reviewed. The ages of the patients ranged from 7-65 years with 4 males and 1 female. The tumors were located in the lateral ventricle (a rare site), temporal, parietal and the frontal lobes with duration of seizures varying from 1-9 years. The tumors were diagnosed by the presence of a dual population of neoplastic ganglionic and glial components. The glial components consisted of pilocytic astrocytes (l case), fibrillary astrocytes (2 cases), oligodendrocytes (1 case) and anaplastic astrocytes and oligodendrocytes (1 case). There was one-grade I GG, three-Grade II GGs and one-grade III GG. Astrocytes were the commonest glial component of GGs, either pilocytic or fibrillary. Oligodendrocytes as the glial component of GGs was seen in 2 cases one of which was anaplastic and this is a rare finding.  (+info)

Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus. (6/38)

BACKGROUND: p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. METHODS: p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. CONCLUSION: Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein.  (+info)

Multiple metastases to the small bowel from large cell bronchial carcinomas. (7/38)

AIM: Metastases from lung cancer to gastrointestinal tract are not rare at postmortem studies but the development of clinically significant symptoms from the gastrointestinal metastases is very unusual. METHODS: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were cut into 5 microm thick sections and routinely stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Some slides were also stained with Alcian-PAS. Antibodies used were primary antibodies to pancytokeratin, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, smooth muscle actin and CD-117. RESULTS: We observed three patients who presented with multiple metastases from large cell bronchial carcinoma to small intestine. Two of them had abdominal symptoms (sudden onset of abdominal pain, constipation and vomiting) and in one case the tumor was incidentally found during autopsy. Microscopically, all tumors showed a same histological pattern and consisted almost exclusively of strands and sheets of poorly cohesive, polymorphic giant cells with scanty, delicate stromas. Few smaller polygonal anaplastic cells dispersed between polymorphic giant cells, were also observed. Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining of the tumor cells with cytokeratin and vimentin. Microscopically and immunohistochemically all metastases had a similar pattern to primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine. CONCLUSION: In patients with small intestine tumors showing anaplastic features, especially with multiple tumors, metastases from large cell bronchial carcinoma should be first excluded, because it seems that they are more common than expected.  (+info)

Salvage chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide for recurrent temozolomide-refractory anaplastic astrocytoma. (8/38)

BACKGROUND: A prospective Phase II study of cyclophosphamide (CYC) was conducted in adult patients with recurrent temozolomide-refractory anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) with a primary objective of evaluating 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). METHODS: Forty patients (28 men, 12 women) ages 26-57 years (median, 43 yrs) with neuroradiographically recurrent AA were treated. All patients had previously been treated with surgery and involved-field radiotherapy. Additionally, all patients were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy after radiotherapy. All patients were treated at recurrence with CYC administered intravenously on 2 consecutive days (750 mg/m2/day) every 4 weeks (operationally defined as a single cycle). Neurologic and neuroradiographic evaluation were performed every 8 weeks. RESULTS: All patients were evaluable. A total of 215 cycles of CYC (median, 4 cycles; range 2-12 cycles) was administered. CYC-related toxicity included alopecia (all patients, 100%), anemia (5, 12.5%), thrombocytopenia (6, 15%), and neutropenia (8, 20%). Four (10%) patients required transfusion. Nine patients (22.5%) (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 11%-39%) demonstrated a neuroradiographic partial response, 16 patients (40.0%) (95% CI, 25%-57%) demonstrated stable disease, and 15 patients (37.5%) (95% CI, 23%-54%) had progressive disease after 2 cycles of CYC. Time to tumor progression ranged from 2-19 months (median, 4 mos; 95% CI, 2-6 mos). Survival ranged from 2-26 months (median, 8 mos; 95% CI, 6-10 mos). The 6-month and 12-month PFS was 30% and 8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: CYC demonstrated modest efficacy with acceptable toxicity in this cohort of adult patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, all of whom had failed prior TMZ chemotherapy.  (+info)

Anaplasia is a term used in pathology to describe the loss of differentiation and cellular organization in malignant tumors. It is characterized by the presence of large, pleomorphic cells with high mitotic activity, absence of mature tissue architecture, and lack of functional specialization. Anaplastic tumors are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis due to their rapid growth and tendency to metastasize. The term "anaplasia" is derived from the Greek words "ana," meaning "back" or "against," and "plasis," meaning "formation" or "molding."

Wilms tumor, also known as nephroblastoma, is a type of kidney cancer that primarily affects children. It occurs in the cells of the developing kidneys and is named after Dr. Max Wilms, who first described this type of tumor in 1899. Wilms tumor typically develops before the age of 5, with most cases occurring in children under the age of 3.

The medical definition of Wilms tumor is:

A malignant, embryonal kidney tumor originating from the metanephric blastema, which is a mass of undifferentiated cells in the developing kidney. Wilms tumor is characterized by its rapid growth and potential for spread (metastasis) to other parts of the body, particularly the lungs and liver. The tumor usually presents as a large, firm, and irregular mass in the abdomen, and it may be associated with various symptoms such as abdominal pain, swelling, or blood in the urine.

Wilms tumor is typically treated with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The prognosis for children with Wilms tumor has improved significantly over the past few decades due to advances in treatment methods and early detection.

Rhabdomyosarcoma, embryonal is a type of soft tissue sarcoma, which is a cancer that develops in the body's connective tissues, such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage. Specifically, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is a subtype of rhabdomyosarcoma that arises from cells that are in the process of becoming muscle cells. This type of cancer typically affects children, with most cases diagnosed before the age of 10.

Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma can develop in various parts of the body, including the head and neck, genitourinary tract (reproductive and urinary organs), and extremities. The tumors are often aggressive and fast-growing, but they can be treated with a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

The medical definition of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is: "A malignant neoplasm composed of small, round to avoid cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and scant cytoplasm, often arranged in a loose, fascicular pattern. It arises from primitive muscle cells and typically affects children and adolescents. The tumor can develop in various parts of the body, including the head and neck, genitourinary tract, and extremities."

Cerebellar neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the cerebellum, which is the part of the brain responsible for coordinating muscle movements and maintaining balance. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from various types of cells within the cerebellum.

The most common type of cerebellar neoplasm is a medulloblastoma, which arises from primitive nerve cells in the cerebellum. Other types of cerebellar neoplasms include astrocytomas, ependymomas, and brain stem gliomas. Symptoms of cerebellar neoplasms may include headaches, vomiting, unsteady gait, coordination problems, and visual disturbances. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and age. Treatment may involve surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Medulloblastoma is a type of malignant brain tumor that originates in the cerebellum, which is the part of the brain located at the back of the skull and controls coordination and balance. It is one of the most common types of pediatric brain tumors, although it can also occur in adults.

Medulloblastomas are typically made up of small, round cancer cells that grow quickly and can spread to other parts of the central nervous system, such as the spinal cord. They are usually treated with a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. The exact cause of medulloblastoma is not known, but it is thought to be related to genetic mutations or abnormalities that occur during development.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

"Anaplasia". Medical Definition from MediLexicon. "Anaplasia". Biology-Online Dictionary. Archived from the original on 2019-12- ... Anaplasia (from Ancient Greek: ἀνά ana, "backward" + πλάσις plasis, "formation") is a condition of cells with poor cellular ... Anaplasia is the most extreme disturbance in cell growth encountered in the spectrum of cellular proliferations. Pleomorphism ... The term anaplasia literally means "to form backward". It implies dedifferentiation, or loss of structural and functional ...
ISBN 0-683-07916-6. Anaplasia. Biology-Online dictionary. Retrieved 2016-06-07 Hypoplasia. Medical dictionary. The Free ...
... with anaplasia. However, within-stage differences were not significant, although cases without anaplasia fared better in each ... Dehner LP (1989). Anaplasia in solid malignant tumors of childhood. Arch Pathol Lab Med 113:11-12. Shimada H, Ambros IM, Dehner ... Chatten argued that increasing anaplasia in stage IV in comparison with stage III found in her cases suggested a trend toward ... Expressions of pleomorphism-anaplasia have been fully acknowledged among the multifarious features of neuroblastoma in the ...
Anaplasia in a tumor may be focal or diffuse. Specific types include: anaplastic astrocytoma anaplastic large-cell lymphoma ...
... in cancers is characterized by anaplasia, invasiveness, and metastasis. Malignant tumors are also characterized by ...
Keratinocytes in the stratum malphigii may show a loss of polarity, pleomorphism, and anaplasia. Some irregular downward ...
He is remembered for his work in the field of oncology, in particular, his concept pertaining to anaplasia of cancer cells. He ... About asymmetrical cell division in epithelial cancers and their biological significance, Anaplasia first described). Die ...
Anaplasia Cell growth Cytopathology Giant cell carcinoma of the lung Nuclear atypia Schmoller, Kurt M.; Skotheim, Jan M. ( ...
The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. ...
There is usually minimal pleomorphism but less commonly there can be anaplasia, mitotic activity, and necrosis.[citation needed ...
Anaplasia is defined as cells being in an undifferentiated state and it is often associated with cancer. Often this loss of ...
His doctoral thesis, on facial anaplasia, was awarded a magna cum laude in 1909, and published the same year. It was followed ...
The cells which constitute the tumor eventually undergo metaplasia, followed by dysplasia then anaplasia, resulting in a ...
Grade III anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas may evolve and show signs of anaplasia, according to evidence in the ...
An international study of more than 600 people with RMS showed worst outcomes in cases with anaplasia, regardless of fusion- ... Approximately 10% of ERMS cases include a loss of function mutation at TP53, which results in anaplasia, poor cellular ...
... unlike anaplasia (a backward differentiation). Examples of prosoplasia include the forward differentiation of cells in the ...
... and are associated with anaplasia and a high mitotic rate.: 677 List of cutaneous conditions Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean ...
Cells can become anaplastic in two ways: neoplastic tumor cells can dedifferentiate to become anaplasias (the dedifferentiation ... Characteristics of malignant tumors include: uncontrolled mitosis (growth by division beyond the normal limits) anaplasia: the ... Anaplasia or dedifferentiation: loss of differentiation of cells and of their orientation to one another and blood vessels, a ...
... leading to the discovery of the relationship between tumor anaplasia and degeneration. Tumor and brain tissue can be examined ...
The neoplastic grading is a measure of cell anaplasia (reversion of differentiation) in the sampled tumor and is based on the ...
Primary leptomeningeal oligodendroglioma with documented progression to anaplasia and t(1;19) (q10;p10) in a child. Acta ...
... anaplasia MeSH C23.550.727.152 - cell transformation, neoplastic MeSH C23.550.727.152.110 - blast crisis MeSH C23.550.727.152. ...
... has an increased risk of progressing to anaplasia and invasive cancer which is life-threatening. Sometimes, the term "precancer ...
Contains diffuse anaplasia (poorly developed cells) Mutations of the WT1 gene which is located on the short arm of chromosome ...
... cell features of anaplasia, pleomorphism, and kidney- and horse shaped-nuclei. These lesions are often limited to the dermis ...
"Anaplasia". Medical Definition from MediLexicon. "Anaplasia". Biology-Online Dictionary. Archived from the original on 2019-12- ... Anaplasia (from Ancient Greek: ἀνά ana, "backward" + πλάσις plasis, "formation") is a condition of cells with poor cellular ... Anaplasia is the most extreme disturbance in cell growth encountered in the spectrum of cellular proliferations. Pleomorphism ... The term anaplasia literally means "to form backward". It implies dedifferentiation, or loss of structural and functional ...
Please note: comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment. ...
We describe a stromal predominant Wilms growth with focal anaplasia and. We describe a stromal predominant Wilms growth with ... focal anaplasia and a composite, growth particular chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous removal of the whole gene within a ...
Interestingly, areas with wild-type TP53 with loss of heterozygosity and only one feature of anaplasia (anaplasia score 1) also ... Interestingly, areas with wild-type TP53 with loss of heterozygosity and only one feature of anaplasia (anaplasia score 1) also ... Interestingly, areas with wild-type TP53 with loss of heterozygosity and only one feature of anaplasia (anaplasia score 1) also ... Interestingly, areas with wild-type TP53 with loss of heterozygosity and only one feature of anaplasia (anaplasia score 1) also ...
Moderately differentiated (moderate anaplasia). Gleason 8-10. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated (marked anaplasia) ...
Moderately differentiated (moderate anaplasia). Gleason 8-10. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated (marked anaplasia) ...
Moderately differentiated (moderate anaplasia). Gleason 8-10. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated (marked anaplasia) ...
... which consist of significant anaplasia and necrotic areas. Sometimes, these tumors may appear as hypoechoic lesions with ...
Low values of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), the sixth base, are associated with anaplasia in human brain tumors ...
Stage/histologic subtype iii fh and iiiv focal anaplasia iiiv uh diffuse anaplasia, stage iv patients. Clinical features a. ...
List of words that start with An. Here you can find complete list of 700+ important words starting with an.
VII Anaplasia. VIIA Poorly-differentiated. VIIB Undifferentiated. VIIR Regressive. ... Anaplastic Tumor Necrosis (High Necrosis): In the tissues of advanced anaplasia in high-grade (VIB, VIIA and VIIB) tumors, ... Full-scale anaplasia (e.g. Grade VIIA-VIIB tumors).. __________________________________________________ ...
2. Anaplasia. 3. Sarcoma. 4. Pitting edema. 29) Major component of innate immunity are all of following, the most unlikely is: ... 25) Regarding anaplasia which of the following statement is true:. 1. Nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio 1:6. 2. Increase mitosis. 3 ... 4. Anaplasia. 37) Arthus reaction is example of:. 1. Type - lll hypersensitivity. 2. Type - II hypersensitivity. 3. Type- IV ... 3. Anaplasia. 4 Atrophy. 41) Goodpasture syndrome is example of:. 1. Type -Ill hypersensitivityy. 2. Type - I hypersensitivity ...
... degree of anaplasia (scored as either 0 or 1) and vii) invasion (scored from 0 to 3). Invasive foci were characterized by ...
The TNM classification for prostate cancer is provided below. Table 1.
Anaplasia/induzido quimicamente , Anaplasia/patologia , Protocolos Antineoplásicos , Pré-Escolar , Efeitos Colaterais e Reações ... LAY SUMMARY: Anaplasia is an unfavorable feature in Wilms tumor (WT), and it is classified as focal (focal anaplastic Wilms ... All patients with stage I disease had comparable good outcomes, regardless of the presence/absence of anaplasia. In contrast, ... In 28% of the cases, there were discrepancies affecting the recognition of anaplasia, classification (DAWT vs FAWT), or the ...
ANARE Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition Source for information on ANARE: The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations dictionary.
Cytopathological Dilemma of Anaplastic Sacral Chordoma with Radiological and Histological Corroboration
Cytologic anaplasia is a prognostic factor in osteosarcoma biopsies, but mitotic rate or extent of spontaneous tumor necrosis ...
... from anaplasia to a degree of maturation. Rarely, signet ring-like morphology is visualized6. In the present case, the patient ...
Mark A Gradual Transition Toward Anaplasia in Wilms Tumor Through Tolerance to Genetic Damage Uno, Kaname LU ; Rastegar, Bahar ...
A Gradual Transition Toward Anaplasia in Wilms Tumor Through Tolerance to Genetic Damage. Uno K, Rastegar B, Jansson C, ..., ...
Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign ...
... of the liver is a localized mass consisting of a fibrous stroma and chronic inflammatory infiltrate without anaplasia. ... of the liver is a localized mass consisting of a fibrous stroma and chronic inflammatory infiltrate without anaplasia. ... of the liver is a localized mass consisting of a fibrous stroma and chronic inflammatory infiltrate without anaplasia. ... of the liver is a localized mass consisting of a fibrous stroma and chronic inflammatory infiltrate without anaplasia. ...
... pleomorphism and anaplasia were found histologically. Four cases of the anaplastic type were diagnosed at the first operation ...
Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign ... Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign ... En comparación con las neoplasias benignas, las neoplasias malignas muestran mayor grado de anaplasia y tienen capacidad de ...
Nonsurgical options include basis in familial syn- metastasize to the degree of anaplasia as determined by with antiretroviral ...
  • We describe a stromal predominant Wilms growth with focal anaplasia and a composite, growth particular chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous removal of the whole gene within a heterozygous 11p13 removal and an additional area of uniparental disomy (UPD) small to 11p15. (opioid-receptors.com)
  • Stage/histologic subtype iii fh and iiiv focal anaplasia iiiv uh diffuse anaplasia, stage iv patients. (elastizell.com)
  • Patients with Wilms tumor (WT) in general have excellent survival, but the prognosis of patients belonging to the subgroup of WT with diffuse anaplasia (DA) is poor due to frequent resistance to chemotherapy. (lu.se)
  • Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms. (lookformedical.com)
  • Almost all (95.6%) areas with full-scale anaplasia had TP53 mutations or loss of heterozygosity, along with an increased amount of CNAs. (lu.se)
  • Loss of differentiation is known as anaplasia, hence the name of several grade 3 gliomas. (newdelhi-news.in)
  • 22. Focal versus diffuse anaplasia in nephroblastoma. (nih.gov)
  • 24. Focal versus diffuse anaplasia in Wilms tumor--new definitions with prognostic significance: a report from the National Wilms Tumor Study Group. (nih.gov)
  • Nephroblastoma (Wilms tumour) with diffuse anaplasia and lymph metastasis. (nih.gov)
  • Histopathological examination showed that SAHA accelerated vascular invasion, anaplasia formation and distant lung metastasis in ThrbPV/PVPten+/− mice. (nih.gov)
  • Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms. (usda.gov)
  • Anaplasia can be either focal (limited to just certain parts of the tumor) or diffuse (spread widely through the tumor). (cancer.org)
  • 40. Bilateral Wilms' tumor with anaplasia: lessons from the National Wilms' Tumor Study. (nih.gov)
  • 23. Stromal-type Nephroblastoma with or without Anaplasia in Two Hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). (nih.gov)
  • Although the cells aren't quite normal looking, there is no anaplasia (see next paragraph). (cancer.org)
  • The endothelial cells of hemangiosarcoma exhibit anaplasia and an increased rate of mitoses. (nih.gov)
  • Anaplasia is seen in surgical cohorts have epithe- lioid histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells for perscription a need you do viagra affecting the brain. (familytreecounseling.com)

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