Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.
Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.
A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.
Methods of PAIN relief that may be used with or in place of ANALGESICS.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.
Pain during the period after surgery.
A narcotic analgesic proposed for severe pain. It may be habituating.
A phenylacetamide that was formerly used in ANALGESICS but nephropathy and METHEMOGLOBINEMIA led to its withdrawal from the market. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology,1991, p431)
Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.
A narcotic analgesic structurally related to METHADONE. Only the dextro-isomer has an analgesic effect; the levo-isomer appears to exert an antitussive effect.
Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.
Progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, resulting from its continued administration. It should be differentiated from DRUG RESISTANCE wherein an organism, disease, or tissue fails to respond to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should also be differentiated from MAXIMUM TOLERATED DOSE and NO-OBSERVED-ADVERSE-EFFECT LEVEL.
An opioid analgesic related to MORPHINE but with less potent analgesic properties and mild sedative effects. It also acts centrally to suppress cough.
Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.
A narcotic analgesic that can be used for the relief of most types of moderate to severe pain, including postoperative pain and the pain of labor. Prolonged use may lead to dependence of the morphine type; withdrawal symptoms appear more rapidly than with morphine and are of shorter duration.
A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)
The first mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic to be marketed. It is an agonist at the kappa and sigma opioid receptors and has a weak antagonist action at the mu receptor. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1991, p97)
A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.
A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Mu opioid receptors bind, in decreasing order of affinity, endorphins, dynorphins, met-enkephalin, and leu-enkephalin. They have also been shown to be molecular receptors for morphine.
A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE.
Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.
A drug that has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. It is the sodium sulfonate of AMINOPYRINE.
An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.
Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.
A widely used local anesthetic agent.
The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.
A specific opiate antagonist that has no agonist activity. It is a competitive antagonist at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Relief of PAIN, without loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, through ANALGESIC AGENTS administered by the patients. It has been used successfully to control POSTOPERATIVE PAIN, during OBSTETRIC LABOR, after BURNS, and in TERMINAL CARE. The choice of agent, dose, and lockout interval greatly influence effectiveness. The potential for overdose can be minimized by combining small bolus doses with a mandatory interval between successive doses (lockout interval).
A water-soluble extractive mixture of sulfated polysaccharides from RED ALGAE. Chief sources are the Irish moss CHONDRUS CRISPUS (Carrageen), and Gigartina stellata. It is used as a stabilizer, for suspending COCOA in chocolate manufacture, and to clarify BEVERAGES.
An IBUPROFEN-type anti-inflammatory analgesic and antipyretic. It is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.
A complication of kidney diseases characterized by cell death involving KIDNEY PAPILLA in the KIDNEY MEDULLA. Damages to this area may hinder the kidney to concentrate urine resulting in POLYURIA. Sloughed off necrotic tissue may block KIDNEY PELVIS or URETER. Necrosis of multiple renal papillae can lead to KIDNEY FAILURE.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AGENTS, NON-STEROIDAL) similar in mode of action to INDOMETHACIN.
Non-narcotic analgesic chemically similar to ORPHENADRINE. Its mechanism of action is unclear. It is used for the relief of acute and chronic pain. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p26)
Cell membrane proteins that bind opioids and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The endogenous ligands for opioid receptors in mammals include three families of peptides, the enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. The receptor classes include mu, delta, and kappa receptors. Sigma receptors bind several psychoactive substances, including certain opioids, but their endogenous ligands are not known.
Narcotic analgesic related to CODEINE, but more potent and more addicting by weight. It is used also as cough suppressant.
Agents inhibiting the effect of narcotics on the central nervous system.
A pyrrolizine carboxylic acid derivative structurally related to INDOMETHACIN. It is an NSAID and is used principally for its analgesic activity. (From Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)
Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.
A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic properties used in the therapy of rheumatism and arthritis.
Sensing of noxious mechanical, thermal or chemical stimuli by NOCICEPTORS. It is the sensory component of visceral and tissue pain (NOCICEPTIVE PAIN).
Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.
An opioid analgesic made from MORPHINE and used mainly as an analgesic. It has a shorter duration of action than morphine.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A narcotic antagonist with some agonist properties. It is an antagonist at mu opioid receptors and an agonist at kappa opioid receptors. Given alone it produces a broad spectrum of unpleasant effects and it is considered to be clinically obsolete.
Analgesia produced by the insertion of ACUPUNCTURE needles at certain ACUPUNCTURE POINTS on the body. This activates small myelinated nerve fibers in the muscle which transmit impulses to the spinal cord and then activate three centers - the spinal cord, midbrain and pituitary/hypothalamus - to produce analgesia.
Cyclohexanecarboxylic acids are organic compounds consisting of a cyclohexane ring substituted with a carboxylic acid group, typically represented by the structural formula C6H11COOH.
A derivative of the opioid alkaloid THEBAINE that is a more potent and longer lasting analgesic than MORPHINE. It appears to act as a partial agonist at mu and kappa opioid receptors and as an antagonist at delta receptors. The lack of delta-agonist activity has been suggested to account for the observation that buprenorphine tolerance may not develop with chronic use.
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) with antipyretic and analgesic actions. It is primarily available as the sodium salt.
The elimination of PAIN, without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, during OBSTETRIC LABOR; OBSTETRIC DELIVERY; or the POSTPARTUM PERIOD, usually through the administration of ANALGESICS.
A synthetic morphinan analgesic with narcotic antagonist action. It is used in the management of severe pain.
An opioid analgesic with actions and uses similar to those of MORPHINE, apart from an absence of cough suppressant activity. It is used in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, including pain in obstetrics. It may also be used as an adjunct to anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1092)
Analogs or derivatives of morphine.
Compounds based on a partially saturated iminoethanophenanthrene, which can be described as ethylimino-bridged benzo-decahydronaphthalenes. They include some of the OPIOIDS found in PAPAVER that are used as ANALGESICS.
A narcotic antagonist with analgesic properties. It is used for the control of moderate to severe pain.
Dull or sharp aching pain caused by stimulated NOCICEPTORS due to tissue injury, inflammation or diseases. It can be divided into somatic or tissue pain and VISCERAL PAIN.
Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.
Agents that induce NARCOSIS. Narcotics include agents that cause somnolence or induced sleep (STUPOR); natural or synthetic derivatives of OPIUM or MORPHINE or any substance that has such effects. They are potent inducers of ANALGESIA and OPIOID-RELATED DISORDERS.
A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.
Drugs that are used to reduce body temperature in fever.
A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.
Product of the oxidation of ethanol and of the destructive distillation of wood. It is used locally, occasionally internally, as a counterirritant and also as a reagent. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A narcotic used as a pain medication. It appears to be an agonist at kappa opioid receptors and an antagonist or partial agonist at mu opioid receptors.
Intensely discomforting, distressful, or agonizing sensation associated with trauma or disease, with well-defined location, character, and timing.
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
A imidazole derivative that is an agonist of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. It is closely-related to MEDETOMIDINE, which is the racemic form of this compound.
An analgesic with mixed narcotic agonist-antagonist properties.
A pyrrolizine carboxylic acid derivative structurally related to INDOMETHACIN. It is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent used for analgesia for postoperative pain and inhibits cyclooxygenase activity.
An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.
A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.
One of the three major groups of endogenous opioid peptides. They are large peptides derived from the PRO-OPIOMELANOCORTIN precursor. The known members of this group are alpha-, beta-, and gamma-endorphin. The term endorphin is also sometimes used to refer to all opioid peptides, but the narrower sense is used here; OPIOID PEPTIDES is used for the broader group.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
A cyclooxygenase inhibiting, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that is well established in treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and used for musculoskeletal disorders, dysmenorrhea, and postoperative pain. Its long half-life enables it to be administered once daily.
A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.
An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.
Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.
Derivative of noroxymorphone that is the N-cyclopropylmethyl congener of NALOXONE. It is a narcotic antagonist that is effective orally, longer lasting and more potent than naloxone, and has been proposed for the treatment of heroin addiction. The FDA has approved naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence.
Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Delta opioid receptors bind endorphins and enkephalins with approximately equal affinity and have less affinity for dynorphins.
A narcotic analgesic that may be habit-forming. It is nearly as effective orally as by injection.
The endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity. The three major classes currently recognized are the ENKEPHALINS, the DYNORPHINS, and the ENDORPHINS. Each of these families derives from different precursors, proenkephalin, prodynorphin, and PRO-OPIOMELANOCORTIN, respectively. There are also at least three classes of OPIOID RECEPTORS, but the peptide families do not map to the receptors in a simple way.
A form of acupuncture with electrical impulses passing through the needles to stimulate NERVE TISSUE. It can be used for ANALGESIA; ANESTHESIA; REHABILITATION; and treatment for diseases.
Disorders related or resulting from abuse or mis-use of opioids.
A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry.
Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.
Intravenous anesthetics that induce a state of sedation, immobility, amnesia, and marked analgesia. Subjects may experience a strong feeling of dissociation from the environment. The condition produced is similar to NEUROLEPTANALGESIA, but is brought about by the administration of a single drug. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed)
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
An organic amine proton acceptor. It is used in the synthesis of surface-active agents and pharmaceuticals; as an emulsifying agent for cosmetic creams and lotions, mineral oil and paraffin wax emulsions, as a biological buffer, and used as an alkalizer. (From Merck, 11th ed; Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1424)
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.
The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Kappa opioid receptors bind dynorphins with a higher affinity than endorphins which are themselves preferred to enkephalins.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.
Epidural anesthesia administered via the sacral canal.
The process by which PAIN is recognized and interpreted by the brain.
The use of specifically placed small electrodes to deliver electrical impulses across the SKIN to relieve PAIN. It is used less frequently to produce ANESTHESIA.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.
Thiazines are heterocyclic chemical compounds containing a sulfur atom and a nitrogen atom in a six-membered ring, which are the core structure of various drugs used in treatment of psychiatric disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and gastrointestinal conditions.
An opioid antagonist with properties similar to those of NALOXONE; in addition it also possesses some agonist properties. It should be used cautiously; levallorphan reverses severe opioid-induced respiratory depression but may exacerbate respiratory depression such as that induced by alcohol or other non-opioid central depressants. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p683)
Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.
An enkephalin analog that selectively binds to the MU OPIOID RECEPTOR. It is used as a model for drug permeability experiments.
A synthetic opioid that is used as the hydrochloride. It is an opioid analgesic that is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. It has actions and uses similar to those of MORPHINE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1082-3)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.
The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.
Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. It is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase.
A disulfide opioid pentapeptide that selectively binds to the DELTA OPIOID RECEPTOR. It possesses antinociceptive activity.
Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)
One of the three major families of endogenous opioid peptides. The enkephalins are pentapeptides that are widespread in the central and peripheral nervous systems and in the adrenal medulla.
Compounds that bind to and activate ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
An antigen solution emulsified in mineral oil. The complete form is made up of killed, dried mycobacteria, usually M. tuberculosis, suspended in the oil phase. It is effective in stimulating cell-mediated immunity (IMMUNITY, CELLULAR) and potentiates the production of certain IMMUNOGLOBULINS in some animals. The incomplete form does not contain mycobacteria.
Central gray matter surrounding the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT in the MESENCEPHALON. Physiologically it is probably involved in RAGE reactions, the LORDOSIS REFLEX; FEEDING responses, bladder tonus, and pain.
Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.
Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.
A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.
A family of hexahydropyridines.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.
A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.
A subclass of cyclooxygenase inhibitors with specificity for CYCLOOXYGENASE-2.
An effect usually, but not necessarily, beneficial that is attributable to an expectation that the regimen will have an effect, i.e., the effect is due to the power of suggestion.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.
Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.
Injections into the cerebral ventricles.
A gas that condenses under slight pressure. Because of its low boiling point ethyl chloride sprayed on skin produces an intense cold by evaporation. Cold blocks nerve conduction. Ethyl chloride has been used in surgery but is primarily used to relieve local pain in sports medicine.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Compounds having the cannabinoid structure. They were originally extracted from Cannabis sativa L. The most pharmacologically active constituents are TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL; CANNABINOL; and CANNABIDIOL.
Pain-alleviating drugs characterized by rapid action time.
Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.
Neurons in the SPINAL CORD DORSAL HORN whose cell bodies and processes are confined entirely to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. They receive collateral or direct terminations of dorsal root fibers. They send their axons either directly to ANTERIOR HORN CELLS or to the WHITE MATTER ascending and descending longitudinal fibers.
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.
Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.
The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Inbred ICR mice are a strain of albino laboratory mice that have been selectively bred for consistent genetic makeup and high reproductive performance, making them widely used in biomedical research for studies involving reproduction, toxicology, pharmacology, and carcinogenesis.
An agonist of RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 that is used in veterinary medicine for its analgesic and sedative properties. It is the racemate of DEXMEDETOMIDINE.
A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.
Excision of the uterus.
A phenothiazine with pharmacological activity similar to that of both CHLORPROMAZINE and PROMETHAZINE. It has the histamine-antagonist properties of the antihistamines together with CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM effects resembling those of chlorpromazine. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p604)
Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.
Anti-inflammatory analgesic.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.
The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
A subgroup of TRP cation channels named after vanilloid receptor. They are very sensitive to TEMPERATURE and hot spicy food and CAPSAICIN. They have the TRP domain and ANKYRIN repeats. Selectivity for CALCIUM over SODIUM ranges from 3 to 100 fold.
Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.
Pain associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR in CHILDBIRTH. It is caused primarily by UTERINE CONTRACTION as well as pressure on the CERVIX; BLADDER; and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Labor pain mostly occurs in the ABDOMEN; the GROIN; and the BACK.
Excision of the adenoids. (Dorland, 28th ed)
That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.
The air-dried exudate from the unripe seed capsule of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, or its variant, P. album. It contains a number of alkaloids, but only a few - MORPHINE; CODEINE; and PAPAVERINE - have clinical significance. Opium has been used as an analgesic, antitussive, antidiarrheal, and antispasmodic.
Peptide neurotoxins from the marine fish-hunting snails of the genus CONUS. They contain 13 to 29 amino acids which are strongly basic and are highly cross-linked by disulfide bonds. There are three types of conotoxins, omega-, alpha-, and mu-. OMEGA-CONOTOXINS inhibit voltage-activated entry of calcium into the presynaptic membrane and therefore the release of ACETYLCHOLINE. Alpha-conotoxins inhibit the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. Mu-conotoxins prevent the generation of muscle action potentials. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
Arthritis is a general term used to describe inflammation in the joints, often resulting in pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility, which can be caused by various conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, or lupus.
Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.
Tricyclic antidepressant with anticholinergic and sedative properties. It appears to prevent the re-uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin at nerve terminals, thus potentiating the action of these neurotransmitters. Amitriptyline also appears to antagonize cholinergic and alpha-1 adrenergic responses to bioactive amines.
Drugs that selectively bind to and activate alpha adrenergic receptors.
Designated locations along nerves or organ meridians for inserting acupuncture needles.
Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.
An anti-inflammatory analgesic and antipyretic of the phenylalkynoic acid series. It has been shown to reduce bone resorption in periodontal disease by inhibiting CARBONIC ANHYDRASE.
A 31-amino acid peptide that is the C-terminal fragment of BETA-LIPOTROPIN. It acts on OPIOID RECEPTORS and is an analgesic. Its first four amino acids at the N-terminal are identical to the tetrapeptide sequence of METHIONINE ENKEPHALIN and LEUCINE ENKEPHALIN.
The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.
Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.
The mallow family of the order Malvales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members include GOSSYPIUM, okra (ABELMOSCHUS), HIBISCUS, and CACAO. The common names of hollyhock and mallow are used for several genera of Malvaceae.
To move about or walk on foot with the use of aids.
The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.
A narcotic analgesic that may be habit-forming. It is a controlled substance (opium derivative) listed in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21 Parts 329.1, 1308.11 (1987). Sale is forbidden in the United States by Federal statute. (Merck Index, 11th ed)
Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.
A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.
Pain originating from internal organs (VISCERA) associated with autonomic phenomena (PALLOR; SWEATING; NAUSEA; and VOMITING). It often becomes a REFERRED PAIN.
The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE.
A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors found on both presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes where they signal through Gi-Go G-PROTEINS. While postsynaptic alpha-2 receptors play a traditional role in mediating the effects of ADRENERGIC AGONISTS, the subset of alpha-2 receptors found on presynaptic membranes signal the feedback inhibition of NEUROTRANSMITTER release.
Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.
Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
A narcotic analgesic morphinan used as a sedative in veterinary practice.

Spinal antinociceptive synergism between morphine and clonidine persists in mice made acutely or chronically tolerant to morphine. (1/3414)

Morphine (Mor) tolerance has been attributed to a reduction of opioid-adrenergic antinociceptive synergy at the spinal level. The present experiments tested the interaction of intrathecally (i.t.) administered Mor-clonidine (Clon) combinations in mice made acutely or chronically tolerant to Mor. ICR mice were pretreated with Mor either acutely (40 nmol i.t., 8 h; 100 mg/kg s.c., 4 h) or chronically (3 mg/kg s.c. every 6 h days 1 and 2; 5 mg/kg s.c. every 6 h days 3 and 4). Antinociception was detected via the hot water (52.5 degrees C) tail-flick test. After the tail-flick latencies returned to baseline levels, dose-response curves were generated to Mor, Clon, and Mor-Clon combinations in tolerant and control mice. Development of tolerance was confirmed by significant rightward shifts of the Mor dose-response curves in tolerant mice compared with controls. Isobolographic analysis was conducted; the experimental combined ED50 values were compared statistically against their respective theoretical additive ED50 values. In all Mor-pretreated groups, the combination of Mor and Clon resulted in significant leftward shifts in the dose-response curves compared with those of each agonist administered separately. In all tolerant and control groups, the combination of Mor and Clon produced an ED50 value significantly less than the corresponding theoretical additive ED50 value. Mor and Clon synergized in Mor-tolerant as well as in control mice. Spinally administered adrenergic/opioid synergistic combinations may be effective therapeutic strategies to manage pain in patients apparently tolerant to the analgesic effects of Mor.  (+info)

Characterization of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ketorolac and its enantiomers in the rat. (2/3414)

The marked analgesic efficacy of ketorolac in humans, relative to other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), has lead to speculation as to whether additional non-NSAID mechanism(s) contribute to its analgesic actions. To evaluate this possibility, we characterized (R,S)-ketorolac's pharmacological properties in vivo and in vitro using the nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors [indomethacin (INDO) and diclofenac sodium (DS)] as well as the selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, as references. The potency of racemic (R,S)-ketorolac was similar in tests of acetic acid-induced writhing, carrageenan-induced paw hyperalgesia, and carrageenan-induced edema formation in rats; ID50 values = 0.24, 0. 29, and 0.08 mg/kg, respectively. (R,S)-ketorolac's actions were stereospecific, with (S)-ketorolac possessing the biological activity of the racemate in the above tests. The analgesic potencies for (R,S)-, (S)-, and (R)-ketorolac, INDO, and DS were highly correlated with their anti-inflammatory potencies, suggesting a common mechanism. (R,S)-ketorolac was significantly more potent than INDO or DS in vivo. Neither difference in relative potency of COX inhibition for (R,S)-ketorolac over INDO and DS nor activity of (S)-ketorolac at a number of other enzymes, channels, or receptors could account for the differences in observed potency. The distribution coefficient for (R,S)-ketorolac was approximately 30-fold less than for DS or INDO, indicating that (R,S)-ketorolac is much less lipophilic than these NSAIDs. Therefore, the physicochemical and pharmacokinetics properties of (R,S)-ketorolac may optimize the concentrations of (S)-ketorolac at its biological target(s), resulting in greater efficacy and potency in vivo.  (+info)

Cannabinoid suppression of noxious heat-evoked activity in wide dynamic range neurons in the lumbar dorsal horn of the rat. (3/3414)

The effects of cannabinoid agonists on noxious heat-evoked firing of 62 spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons were examined in urethan-anesthetized rats (1 cell/animal). Noxious thermal stimulation was applied with a Peltier device to the receptive fields in the ipsilateral hindpaw of isolated WDR neurons. To assess the site of action, cannabinoids were administered systemically in intact and spinally transected rats and intraventricularly. Both the aminoalkylindole cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (125 microg/kg iv) and the bicyclic cannabinoid CP55,940 (125 microg/kg iv) suppressed noxious heat-evoked activity. Responses evoked by mild pressure in nonnociceptive neurons were not altered by CP55,940 (125 microg/kg iv), consistent with previous observations with another cannabinoid agonist, WIN55,212-2. The cannabinoid induced-suppression of noxious heat-evoked activity was blocked by pretreatment with SR141716A (1 mg/kg iv), a competitive antagonist for central cannabinoid CB1 receptors. By contrast, intravenous administration of either vehicle or the receptor-inactive enantiomer WIN55,212-3 (125 microg/kg) failed to alter noxious heat-evoked activity. The suppression of noxious heat-evoked activity induced by WIN55,212-2 in the lumbar dorsal horn of intact animals was markedly attenuated in spinal rats. Moreover, intraventricular administration of WIN55,212-2 suppressed noxious heat-evoked activity in spinal WDR neurons. By contrast, both vehicle and enantiomer were inactive. These findings suggest that cannabinoids selectively modulate the activity of nociceptive neurons in the spinal dorsal horn by actions at CB1 receptors. This modulation represents a suppression of pain neurotransmission because the inhibitory effects are selective for pain-sensitive neurons and are observed with different modalities of noxious stimulation. The data also provide converging lines of evidence for a role for descending antinociceptive mechanisms in cannabinoid modulation of spinal nociceptive processing.  (+info)

Pharmacological studies on root bark of mulberry tree (Morus alba L.) (4/3414)

Pharmacological studies were done on the root bark of mulberry tree and pharmacological effects were compared with the clinical effects of "Sohakuhi" in Chinese medicine. n-Butanol- and water-soluble fractions of mulberry root had similar effects except for those on the cadiovascular system. Both fractions showed cathartic, analgesic, diuretic, antitussive, antiedema, sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypotensive actions in mice, rats, guinea pigs and dogs. There appears to be a correlation between the experimental pharmacological results and the clinical applications of mulberry root found in the literature on Chinese medicine.  (+info)

Incidence of analgesic nephropathy in Berlin since 1983. (5/3414)

BACKGROUND: Phenacetin was removed from the German market in 1986 and was replaced mainly in analgesic compounds by acetaminophen. Our objective was to examine the effect of this measure on the incidence of analgesic nephropathy in light of the changes in other end-stage renal diseases. METHODS: We therefore compared the proportion of renal diseases in all patients starting dialysis treatment during three 18-month periods: 4/1982-9/1983 (n=57); 1/1991-6/1992 (n=81); and 10/1995-3/1997 (n=76). RESULTS: On the one hand, the proportion of end-stage analgesic nephropathy decreased significantly from 30% in 1981-1982 to 21% in 1991-1992 and 12% in 1995-1997 (P=0.01). On the other hand, type II diabetes increased significantly from 7% to 22% (P=0.01) and 29%, (P=0.001). Using the chi2 distribution test to analyze the frequencies of seven diseases at three different time intervals, however, showed that the changes in renal-disease proportions between 1982-1983, 1991-1992 and 1995-1997 were not significantly independent. There was a significant median age increase from 52 years (CI0.95 44-58) in 1982-1983 to 63 (CI0.95 55-67) in 1991-1992 and 63 (CI0.95 60-66) in 1995-1997 (P=0.003) for all patients starting dialysis but not for those with analgesic nephropathy [59 (55-71) vs 64 (53-67) and 61 (50-72); n.s.]. CONCLUSION: The decrease of end-stage analgesic nephropathy since 1983 may be partially due to the removal of phenacetin from the German market in 1986. However, considering the general increase in numbers of dialysis patients, their higher age and the increased incidence of type II diabetes, the decrease in analgesic nephropathy is not a statistically significant independent variable. Altered admittance policies for dialysis treatment have yielded a new pattern of renal-disease proportion which interferes with changes in the incidence of analgesic nephropathy.  (+info)

Prevalence and treatment of pain in older adults in nursing homes and other long-term care institutions: a systematic review. (6/3414)

BACKGROUND: The high prevalence of pain in older adults and its impact in this age group make it a public health issue, yet few studies of pain relief focus on older adults. Residents of long-term care facilities have more cognitive impairment than their community-living counterparts and may have difficulty reporting the presence and severity of pain. This systematic literature review was conducted to determine the prevalence of pain, and the type and effectiveness of interventions that have been used to treat pain in residents of nursing homes. METHODS: Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (from January 1966 to May 1997), HEALTH (from January 1975 to May 1997), CINAHL (from January 1982 to April 1997), AGELINE (from January 1978 to April 1997) and the Cochrane Library (1997, issue 1) and by performing a manual search of textbooks and reference lists. Studies of any methodological design were included if they estimated the prevalence of pain in nursing homes or other long-term care institutions or evaluated interventions for the treatment of pain in residents. Of the 14 eligible studies, 12 were noncomparative studies, 1 was a comparison study with nonrandomized contemporaneous controls, and 1 was a randomized controlled trial. Information on several factors was extracted from each study, including study design, number of patients and facilities, main outcomes measured, methods used to identify and detect pain, prevalence and types of pain, and interventions used to treat pain. The strength of the evidence provided by each study was also assessed. RESULTS: In the 6 studies with data from self-reporting or chart reviews, the prevalence of pain ranged from 49% to 83%. In the 5 studies with data on analgesic use only, the prevalence of pain ranged from 27% to 44%. Only 3 studies, with just 30 patients in total, evaluated an intervention for the treatment of pain. INTERPRETATION: Despite the high prevalence of pain in residents of nursing homes, there is a lack of studies evaluating interventions to relieve their pain. The authors make recommendations for future studies in this area.  (+info)

Evaluation of lidocaine as an analgesic when added to hypertonic saline for sclerotherapy. (7/3414)

PURPOSE: The efficacy of sclerosing agents for the treatment of telangiectasias and reticular veins is well established. The injection of these agents is often associated with pain, and it is not uncommon for sclerotherapists to include lidocaine with the sclerosants in an attempt to reduce the pain associated with treatment. However, there are concerns that this may reduce the overall efficacy of the treatment because of dilution of the sclerosant. Patient comfort and overall outcome associated with treatment using HS with lidocaine (LIDO) versus that using HS alone was compared. METHODS: Forty-two patients were prospectively entered into the study and randomized blindly to sclerotherapy with 23.4% HS or 19% LIDO. Study subjects and treating physicians were blinded to the injection solution used. Injection sites were chosen for veins ranging in size from 0.1 to 3 mm. Photographs of the area to be treated were taken, and the patients rated their pain. They were then observed at regular intervals for four months, and clinical data was collected. Thirty-five subjects completed the full follow-up period, and photographs of the injected area were taken again. Three investigators blinded to the treatment assignment then evaluated the photographs and scored the treatment efficacy according to a standardized system. RESULTS: In the HS group, 61.9% (13 of 21) patients rated their pain as none or mild, whereas 90.5% (19 of 21) of patients in the LIDO group had no or mild discomfort. This difference is significant, with a P value of.034. There was no difference in the overall efficacy of treatment between the two groups. The groups had similar rates of vein thrombosis and skin necrosis. CONCLUSION: Although lidocaine is often used with sclerosing agents, there are no previous reports in the literature to evaluate its effectiveness in reducing the pain experienced by the patient. In this study, patients receiving LIDO experienced significantly less discomfort at the time of injection than patients who received HS alone. There were no differences in the effectiveness of treatment or in the incidence of complications between the two groups.  (+info)

Ketamine-induced peripheral analgesia in rats. (8/3414)

AIM: To examine whether ketamine may directly act at peripheral nociceptors to produce analgesia. METHODS: Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane. As a nociceptive flexion reflex (FR), C responses from the posterior biceps semitendinosus (PBST) muscle was evoked by electrical stimulation (2 ms, 80 V, 2-3 pulses, 0.5 Hz) via a pair of stainless steel needles inserted subcutaneously applied to the two toes of ipsilateral hindpw. RESULTS: Subcutaneous injection of ketamine (36 mmol.L-1, 5 microL) into the ipsilateral hindpaw produced an inhibition of C responses. At 9 min after application of ketamine, injection of naloxone (1%, 5 microL) into the same area annulled ketamine-induced inhibition. CONCLUSION: Ketamine as a dissociate anesthetic acts on peripheral nociceptors to produce analgesia, which is related to activity of peripheral opioid receptors.  (+info)

Analgesics are a class of drugs that are used to relieve pain. They work by blocking the transmission of pain signals in the nervous system, allowing individuals to manage their pain levels more effectively. There are many different types of analgesics available, including both prescription and over-the-counter options. Some common examples include acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), and opioids such as morphine or oxycodone.

The choice of analgesic will depend on several factors, including the type and severity of pain being experienced, any underlying medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and individual patient preferences. It is important to use these medications as directed by a healthcare provider, as misuse or overuse can lead to serious side effects and potential addiction.

In addition to their pain-relieving properties, some analgesics may also have additional benefits such as reducing inflammation (like in the case of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs) or causing sedation (as with certain opioids). However, it is essential to weigh these potential benefits against the risks and side effects associated with each medication.

When used appropriately, analgesics can significantly improve a person's quality of life by helping them manage their pain effectively and allowing them to engage in daily activities more comfortably.

Analgesics, opioid are a class of drugs used for the treatment of pain. They work by binding to specific receptors in the brain and spinal cord, blocking the transmission of pain signals to the brain. Opioids can be synthetic or natural, and include drugs such as morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, and methadone. They are often used for moderate to severe pain, such as that resulting from injury, surgery, or chronic conditions like cancer. However, opioids can also produce euphoria, physical dependence, and addiction, so they are tightly regulated and carry a risk of misuse.

Analgesics, non-narcotic are a class of medications used to relieve pain that do not contain narcotics or opioids. They work by blocking the transmission of pain signals in the nervous system or by reducing inflammation and swelling. Examples of non-narcotic analgesics include acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), and aspirin. These medications are often used to treat mild to moderate pain, such as headaches, menstrual cramps, muscle aches, and arthritis symptoms. They can be obtained over-the-counter or by prescription, depending on the dosage and formulation. It is important to follow the recommended dosages and usage instructions carefully to avoid adverse effects.

Analgesia is defined as the absence or relief of pain in a patient, achieved through various medical means. It is derived from the Greek word "an-" meaning without and "algein" meaning to feel pain. Analgesics are medications that are used to reduce pain without causing loss of consciousness, and they work by blocking the transmission of pain signals to the brain.

Examples of analgesics include over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve). Prescription opioid painkillers, such as oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet) and hydrocodone (Vicodin), are also used for pain relief but carry a higher risk of addiction and abuse.

Analgesia can also be achieved through non-pharmacological means, such as through nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation, acupuncture, and other complementary therapies. The choice of analgesic therapy depends on the type and severity of pain, as well as the patient's medical history and individual needs.

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is a complex phenomenon that can result from various stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical, or chemical irritation, and it can be acute or chronic. The perception of pain involves the activation of specialized nerve cells called nociceptors, which transmit signals to the brain via the spinal cord. These signals are then processed in different regions of the brain, leading to the conscious experience of pain. It's important to note that pain is a highly individual and subjective experience, and its perception can vary widely among individuals.

Pain measurement, in a medical context, refers to the quantification or evaluation of the intensity and/or unpleasantness of a patient's subjective pain experience. This is typically accomplished through the use of standardized self-report measures such as numerical rating scales (NRS), visual analog scales (VAS), or categorical scales (mild, moderate, severe). In some cases, physiological measures like heart rate, blood pressure, and facial expressions may also be used to supplement self-reported pain ratings. The goal of pain measurement is to help healthcare providers better understand the nature and severity of a patient's pain in order to develop an effective treatment plan.

Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic (pain reliever) derived from the opium poppy. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, blocking the transmission of pain signals and reducing the perception of pain. Morphine is used to treat moderate to severe pain, including pain associated with cancer, myocardial infarction, and other conditions. It can also be used as a sedative and cough suppressant.

Morphine has a high potential for abuse and dependence, and its use should be closely monitored by healthcare professionals. Common side effects of morphine include drowsiness, respiratory depression, constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Overdose can result in respiratory failure, coma, and death.

Postoperative pain is defined as the pain or discomfort experienced by patients following a surgical procedure. It can vary in intensity and duration depending on the type of surgery performed, individual pain tolerance, and other factors. The pain may be caused by tissue trauma, inflammation, or nerve damage resulting from the surgical intervention. Proper assessment and management of postoperative pain is essential to promote recovery, prevent complications, and improve patient satisfaction.

Tramadol is a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic, chemically unrelated to other opioids but with actions similar to those of morphine. It is used to manage moderate to moderately severe pain and is available in immediate-release and extended-release formulations. Tramadol has multiple mechanisms of action including binding to mu-opioid receptors, inhibiting the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin, and weakly inhibiting monoamine oxidase A and B. Common side effects include dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, and somnolence. Respiratory depression is less frequent compared to other opioids, but caution should still be exercised in patients at risk for respiratory compromise. Tramadol has a lower potential for abuse than traditional opioids, but it can still produce physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.

Phenacetin is not typically defined in a medical dictionary as it is an obsolete drug. However, it was previously used as a painkiller and fever reducer. It is a compound that has been used in various forms of medication, such as headache powders and cough medicines. Phenacetin is no longer widely available or recommended for use due to its association with kidney damage and increased risk of cancer when taken in high doses or over long periods of time.

In modern medical contexts, phenacetin may be mentioned as a component of some older medications or as a historical example in discussions of the evolution of pharmaceuticals and their regulation.

Acetaminophen is a medication used to relieve pain and reduce fever. It is a commonly used over-the-counter drug and is also available in prescription-strength formulations. Acetaminophen works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, chemicals in the body that cause inflammation and trigger pain signals.

Acetaminophen is available in many different forms, including tablets, capsules, liquids, and suppositories. It is often found in combination with other medications, such as cough and cold products, sleep aids, and opioid pain relievers.

While acetaminophen is generally considered safe when used as directed, it can cause serious liver damage or even death if taken in excessive amounts. It is important to follow the dosing instructions carefully and avoid taking more than the recommended dose, especially if you are also taking other medications that contain acetaminophen.

If you have any questions about using acetaminophen or are concerned about potential side effects, it is always best to consult with a healthcare professional.

Dextropropoxyphene is a mild narcotic analgesic (pain reliever) that is prescribed for the relief of moderate to moderately severe pain. It is a synthetic opioid and works by binding to opiate receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and other areas of the body to reduce the perception of pain. Dextropropoxyphene is available in immediate-release and extended-release tablets, usually in combination with acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol).

Dextropropoxyphene has a narrow therapeutic index, which means that there is only a small range between the effective dose and a potentially toxic dose. It also has a high potential for abuse and addiction, and its use has been associated with serious side effects such as respiratory depression, seizures, and cardiac arrhythmias. In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) withdrew approval for all dextropropoxyphene-containing products due to these safety concerns.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Drug tolerance is a medical concept that refers to the decreased response to a drug following its repeated use, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effect. This occurs because the body adapts to the presence of the drug, leading to changes in the function or expression of targets that the drug acts upon, such as receptors or enzymes. Tolerance can develop to various types of drugs, including opioids, benzodiazepines, and alcohol, and it is often associated with physical dependence and addiction. It's important to note that tolerance is different from resistance, which refers to the ability of a pathogen to survive or grow in the presence of a drug, such as antibiotics.

Codeine is a opiate analgesic, commonly used for its pain-relieving and cough suppressant properties. It is typically prescribed for mild to moderately severe pain, and is also found in some over-the-counter cold and cough medications. Codeine works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which helps to reduce the perception of pain. Like other opiates, codeine can produce side effects such as drowsiness, constipation, and respiratory depression, and it carries a risk of dependence and addiction with long-term use. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking codeine, and to inform them of any other medications you are taking, as well as any medical conditions you may have.

Pain threshold is a term used in medicine and research to describe the point at which a stimulus begins to be perceived as painful. It is an individual's subjective response and can vary from person to person based on factors such as their pain tolerance, mood, expectations, and cultural background.

The pain threshold is typically determined through a series of tests where gradually increasing levels of stimuli are applied until the individual reports feeling pain. This is often used in research settings to study pain perception and analgesic efficacy. However, it's important to note that the pain threshold should not be confused with pain tolerance, which refers to the maximum level of pain a person can endure.

Meperidine is a synthetic opioid analgesic (pain reliever) that works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, blocking the transmission of pain signals. It is also known by its brand name Demerol and is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Meperidine has a rapid onset of action and its effects typically last for 2-4 hours.

Meperidine can cause various side effects such as dizziness, sedation, nausea, vomiting, sweating, and respiratory depression (slowed breathing). It also has a risk of abuse and physical dependence, so it is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States.

Meperidine should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider due to its potential for serious side effects and addiction. It may not be suitable for people with certain medical conditions or those who are taking other medications that can interact with meperidine.

Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opioid analgesic, which is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, typically used to treat patients with severe pain or to manage pain after surgery. It works by binding to the body's opioid receptors, which are found in the brain, spinal cord, and other areas of the body.

Fentanyl can be administered in several forms, including transdermal patches, lozenges, injectable solutions, and tablets that dissolve in the mouth. Illegally manufactured and distributed fentanyl has also become a major public health concern, as it is often mixed with other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and counterfeit pills, leading to an increase in overdose deaths.

Like all opioids, fentanyl carries a risk of dependence, addiction, and overdose, especially when used outside of medical supervision or in combination with other central nervous system depressants such as alcohol or benzodiazepines. It is important to use fentanyl only as directed by a healthcare provider and to be aware of the potential risks associated with its use.

Pentazocine is a synthetic opioid analgesic, chemically unrelated to other opiates or opioids. It acts as an agonist at the kappa-opioid receptor and as an antagonist at the mu-opioid receptor, which means it can produce pain relief but block the effects of full agonists such as heroin or morphine. Pentazocine is used for the management of moderate to severe pain and is available in oral, intramuscular, and intravenous formulations. Common side effects include dizziness, lightheadedness, sedation, nausea, and vomiting.

Pain management is a branch of medicine that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of pain and improvement in the quality of life of patients with chronic pain. The goal of pain management is to reduce pain levels, improve physical functioning, and help patients cope mentally and emotionally with their pain. This may involve the use of medications, interventional procedures, physical therapy, psychological therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

The definition of pain management can vary depending on the medical context, but it generally refers to a multidisciplinary approach that addresses the complex interactions between biological, psychological, and social factors that contribute to the experience of pain. Pain management specialists may include physicians, nurses, physical therapists, psychologists, and other healthcare professionals who work together to provide comprehensive care for patients with chronic pain.

Opioid mu receptors, also known as mu-opioid receptors (MORs), are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to opioids, a class of chemicals that include both natural and synthetic painkillers. These receptors are found in the brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract, and play a key role in mediating the effects of opioid drugs such as morphine, heroin, and oxycodone.

MORs are involved in pain modulation, reward processing, respiratory depression, and physical dependence. Activation of MORs can lead to feelings of euphoria, decreased perception of pain, and slowed breathing. Prolonged activation of these receptors can also result in tolerance, where higher doses of the drug are required to achieve the same effect, and dependence, where withdrawal symptoms occur when the drug is discontinued.

MORs have three main subtypes: MOR-1, MOR-2, and MOR-3, with MOR-1 being the most widely studied and clinically relevant. Selective agonists for MOR-1, such as fentanyl and sufentanil, are commonly used in anesthesia and pain management. However, the abuse potential and risk of overdose associated with these drugs make them a significant public health concern.

Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic, which means it's a painkiller that's synthesized from thebaine, an alkaloid found in the poppy plant. It's a strong pain reliever used to treat moderate to severe pain and is often prescribed for around-the-clock treatment of chronic pain. Oxycodone can be found in various forms, such as immediate-release tablets, extended-release tablets, capsules, and solutions.

Common brand names for oxycodone include OxyContin (extended-release), Percocet (oxycodone + acetaminophen), and Roxicodone (immediate-release). As an opioid, oxycodone works by binding to specific receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and gut, reducing the perception of pain and decreasing the emotional response to pain.

However, it's important to note that oxycodone has a high potential for abuse and addiction due to its euphoric effects. Misuse or prolonged use can lead to physical dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation. Therefore, it should be taken exactly as prescribed by a healthcare professional and used with caution.

Local anesthetics are a type of medication that is used to block the sensation of pain in a specific area of the body. They work by temporarily numbing the nerves in that area, preventing them from transmitting pain signals to the brain. Local anesthetics can be administered through various routes, including topical application (such as creams or gels), injection (such as into the skin or tissues), or regional nerve blocks (such as epidural or spinal anesthesia).

Some common examples of local anesthetics include lidocaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine. These medications can be used for a variety of medical procedures, ranging from minor surgeries (such as dental work or skin biopsies) to more major surgeries (such as joint replacements or hernia repairs).

Local anesthetics are generally considered safe when used appropriately, but they can have side effects and potential complications. These may include allergic reactions, toxicity (if too much is administered), and nerve damage (if the medication is injected into a nerve). It's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using local anesthetics, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Dipyrone is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as non-opioid analgesics. It is primarily used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects, which means it helps to relieve pain and reduce fever. Dipyrone works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, chemicals in the body that cause inflammation and sensitivity to pain.

Dipyrone is available in various forms, including tablets, suppositories, and intravenous solutions. It is commonly used to treat mild to moderate pain, such as headaches, menstrual cramps, and muscle aches. However, it is important to note that dipyrone has been banned in several countries, including the United States, due to its potential to cause agranulocytosis, a serious blood disorder that can lead to infection and other complications.

The medical definition of dipyrone is as follows:

Dipyrone (INN, BAN, USAN), also known as metamizole or novaminsulfon, is a non-opioid analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory drug. It is used for the treatment of mild to moderate pain, fever, and inflammation. Dipyrone works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to pain, fever, and inflammation. However, due to its potential to cause agranulocytosis, a serious blood disorder, dipyrone has been banned in several countries, including the United States.

Hyperalgesia is a medical term that describes an increased sensitivity to pain. It occurs when the nervous system, specifically the nociceptors (pain receptors), become excessively sensitive to stimuli. This means that a person experiences pain from a stimulus that normally wouldn't cause pain or experiences pain that is more intense than usual. Hyperalgesia can be a result of various conditions such as nerve damage, inflammation, or certain medications. It's an important symptom to monitor in patients with chronic pain conditions, as it may indicate the development of tolerance or addiction to pain medication.

Spinal injections, also known as epidural injections or intrathecal injections, are medical procedures involving the injection of medications directly into the spinal canal. The medication is usually delivered into the space surrounding the spinal cord (the epidural space) or into the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds and protects the spinal cord (the subarachnoid space).

The medications used in spinal injections can include local anesthetics, steroids, opioids, or a combination of these. The purpose of spinal injections is to provide diagnostic information, therapeutic relief, or both. They are commonly used to treat various conditions affecting the spine, such as radicular pain (pain that radiates down the arms or legs), disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease.

Spinal injections can be administered using different techniques, including fluoroscopy-guided injections, computed tomography (CT) scan-guided injections, or with the help of a nerve stimulator. These techniques ensure accurate placement of the medication and minimize the risk of complications.

It is essential to consult a healthcare professional for specific information regarding spinal injections and their potential benefits and risks.

Bupivacaine is a long-acting local anesthetic drug, which is used to cause numbness or loss of feeling in a specific area of the body during certain medical procedures such as surgery, dental work, or childbirth. It works by blocking the nerves that transmit pain signals to the brain.

Bupivacaine is available as a solution for injection and is usually administered directly into the tissue surrounding the nerve to be blocked (nerve block) or into the spinal fluid (epidural). The onset of action of bupivacaine is relatively slow, but its duration of action is long, making it suitable for procedures that require prolonged pain relief.

Like all local anesthetics, bupivacaine carries a risk of side effects such as allergic reactions, nerve damage, and systemic toxicity if accidentally injected into a blood vessel or given in excessive doses. It should be used with caution in patients with certain medical conditions, including heart disease, liver disease, and neurological disorders.

Epidural analgesia is a type of regional anesthesia used to manage pain, most commonly during childbirth and after surgery. The term "epidural" refers to the location of the injection, which is in the epidural space of the spinal column.

In this procedure, a small amount of local anesthetic or narcotic medication is injected into the epidural space using a thin catheter. This medication blocks nerve impulses from the lower body, reducing or eliminating pain sensations without causing complete loss of feeling or muscle movement.

Epidural analgesia can be used for both short-term and long-term pain management. It is often preferred in situations where patients require prolonged pain relief, such as during labor and delivery or after major surgery. The medication can be administered continuously or intermittently, depending on the patient's needs and the type of procedure being performed.

While epidural analgesia is generally safe and effective, it can have side effects, including low blood pressure, headache, and difficulty urinating. In rare cases, it may also cause nerve damage or infection. Patients should discuss the risks and benefits of this procedure with their healthcare provider before deciding whether to undergo epidural analgesia.

Naloxone is a medication used to reverse the effects of opioids, both illicit and prescription. It works by blocking the action of opioids on the brain and restoring breathing in cases where opioids have caused depressed respirations. Common brand names for naloxone include Narcan and Evzio.

Naloxone is an opioid antagonist, meaning that it binds to opioid receptors in the body without activating them, effectively blocking the effects of opioids already present at these sites. It has no effect in people who have not taken opioids and does not reverse the effects of other sedatives or substances.

Naloxone can be administered via intranasal, intramuscular, intravenous, or subcutaneous routes. The onset of action varies depending on the route of administration but generally ranges from 1 to 5 minutes when given intravenously and up to 10-15 minutes with other methods.

The duration of naloxone's effects is usually shorter than that of most opioids, so multiple doses or a continuous infusion may be necessary in severe cases to maintain reversal of opioid toxicity. Naloxone has been used successfully in emergency situations to treat opioid overdoses and has saved many lives.

It is important to note that naloxone does not reverse the effects of other substances or address the underlying causes of addiction, so it should be used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for individuals struggling with opioid use disorders.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a method of pain management that allows patients to self-administer doses of analgesic medication through a controlled pump system. With PCA, the patient can press a button to deliver a predetermined dose of pain medication, usually an opioid, directly into their intravenous (IV) line.

The dosage and frequency of the medication are set by the healthcare provider based on the patient's individual needs and medical condition. The PCA pump is designed to prevent overinfusion by limiting the amount of medication that can be delivered within a specific time frame.

PCA provides several benefits, including improved pain control, increased patient satisfaction, and reduced sedation compared to traditional methods of opioid administration. It also allows patients to take an active role in managing their pain and provides them with a sense of control during their hospital stay. However, it is essential to monitor patients closely while using PCA to ensure safe and effective use.

Carriageenans are a family of linear sulfated polysaccharides that are extracted from red edible seaweeds. They have been widely used in the food industry as thickening, gelling, and stabilizing agents. In the medical field, they have been studied for their potential therapeutic applications, such as in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders and inflammation. However, some studies have suggested that certain types of carriageenans may have negative health effects, including promoting inflammation and damaging the gut lining. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand their safety and efficacy.

Ketoprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to treat pain, fever, and inflammation in the body. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that cause pain and inflammation in the body.

Ketoprofen has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties, making it a useful medication for managing various conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, muscle pain, dental pain, and migraines. It is available in various forms, including oral capsules, tablets, suppositories, and topical creams or gels.

Like other NSAIDs, ketoprofen can cause side effects such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage if used in high doses or for extended periods. It is essential to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider before using this medication.

Kidney papillary necrosis is a medical condition characterized by the death (necrosis) of the renal papillae, which are the small conical projections at the ends of the renal tubules in the kidneys. This condition typically occurs due to reduced blood flow to the kidneys or as a result of toxic injury from certain medications, chronic infections, diabetes, sickle cell disease, and systemic vasculitides.

The necrosis of the papillae can lead to the formation of small stones or debris that can obstruct the flow of urine, causing further damage to the kidneys. Symptoms of kidney papillary necrosis may include fever, flank pain, nausea, vomiting, and bloody or foul-smelling urine. The diagnosis is typically made through imaging studies such as CT scans or MRI, and treatment may involve addressing the underlying cause, administering antibiotics to prevent infection, and providing supportive care to maintain kidney function.

Tolmetin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to relieve pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that cause pain and inflammation in the body. Tolmetin is available in immediate-release and sustained-release forms, and it is typically prescribed to treat conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

The medical definition of Tolmetin can be found in various pharmaceutical and medical references, including the Merck Manual, the American Hospital Formulary Service (AHFS) Drug Information, and the National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus. According to these sources, the chemical name for Tolmetin is (3R,5S)-3-(4-methylbenzoyl)-5-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-indole-2-one, and its molecular formula is C19H16NO3.

Tolmetin has a number of potential side effects, including stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gas, dizziness, and headache. It can also increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal side effects, such as bleeding, ulcers, and perforations in the stomach or intestines, especially in people who are over the age of 65 or have a history of stomach ulcers or other gastrointestinal problems. Tolmetin can also increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, and other cardiovascular events, particularly in people who take it for a long time or at high doses.

Tolmetin is available only by prescription, and it should be taken exactly as directed by a healthcare provider. It is important to follow the instructions on the label carefully and to talk to a doctor or pharmacist if there are any questions about how to take Tolmetin or what the potential side effects may be.

Nefopam is a non-narcotic, centrally acting analgesic used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is a non-opioid agent that works by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the central nervous system, thereby enhancing their pain inhibitory effects. Nefopam may also have some anti-inflammatory activity. It is available as an oral preparation and is often used in combination with other analgesics for more effective pain relief. Side effects of nefopam include nausea, dizziness, dry mouth, and sweating.

Opioid receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) found in the cell membranes of certain neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system. They bind to opioids, which are chemicals that can block pain signals and produce a sense of well-being. There are four main types of opioid receptors: mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin. These receptors play a role in the regulation of pain, reward, addiction, and other physiological functions. Activation of opioid receptors can lead to both therapeutic effects (such as pain relief) and adverse effects (such as respiratory depression and constipation).

Hydrocodone is an opioid medication used to treat severe pain. It works by changing how the brain and nervous system respond to pain. Medically, it's defined as a semisynthetic opioid analgesic, synthesized from codeine, one of the natural opiates found in the resin of the poppy seed pod.

Hydrocodone is available only in combination with other drugs, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, which are added to enhance its pain-relieving effects and/or to prevent abuse and overdose. Common brand names include Vicodin, Lortab, and Norco.

Like all opioids, hydrocodone carries a risk of addiction and dependence, and it should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare provider. It's also important to note that misuse or abuse of hydrocodone can lead to overdose and death.

Narcotic antagonists are a class of medications that block the effects of opioids, a type of narcotic pain reliever, by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and blocking the activation of these receptors by opioids. This results in the prevention or reversal of opioid-induced effects such as respiratory depression, sedation, and euphoria. Narcotic antagonists are used for a variety of medical purposes, including the treatment of opioid overdose, the management of opioid dependence, and the prevention of opioid-induced side effects in certain clinical situations. Examples of narcotic antagonists include naloxone, naltrexone, and methylnaltrexone.

Ketorolac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to treat moderate to severe pain. It works by reducing the levels of prostaglandins, chemicals in the body that cause inflammation and trigger pain signals in the brain. By blocking the production of prostaglandins, ketorolac helps to reduce pain, swelling, and fever.

Ketorolac is available in several forms, including tablets, injection solutions, and suppositories. It is typically used for short-term pain relief, as it can increase the risk of serious side effects such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney problems with long-term use.

Like other NSAIDs, ketorolac may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, especially in people who already have cardiovascular disease or risk factors for it. It should be used with caution and only under the supervision of a healthcare provider.

In medicine, "intractable pain" is a term used to describe pain that is difficult to manage, control or relieve with standard treatments. It's a type of chronic pain that continues for an extended period, often months or even years, and does not respond to conventional therapies such as medications, physical therapy, or surgery. Intractable pain can significantly affect a person's quality of life, causing emotional distress, sleep disturbances, and reduced mobility. It is essential to distinguish intractable pain from acute pain, which is typically sharp and short-lived, resulting from tissue damage or inflammation.

Intractable pain may be classified as:

1. Refractory pain: Pain that persists despite optimal treatment with various modalities, including medications, interventions, and multidisciplinary care.
2. Incurable pain: Pain caused by a progressive or incurable disease, such as cancer, for which no curative treatment is available.
3. Functional pain: Pain without an identifiable organic cause that does not respond to standard treatments.

Managing intractable pain often requires a multidisciplinary approach involving healthcare professionals from various fields, including pain specialists, neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and physical therapists. Treatment options may include:

1. Adjuvant medications: Medications that are not primarily analgesics but have been found to help with pain relief, such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and muscle relaxants.
2. Interventional procedures: Minimally invasive techniques like nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation, or intrathecal drug delivery systems that target specific nerves or areas of the body to reduce pain signals.
3. Psychological interventions: Techniques such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness meditation, and relaxation training can help patients cope with chronic pain and improve their overall well-being.
4. Physical therapy and rehabilitation: Exercise programs, massage, acupuncture, and other physical therapies may provide relief for some types of intractable pain.
5. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM): Techniques like yoga, tai chi, hypnosis, or biofeedback can be helpful in managing chronic pain.
6. Lifestyle modifications: Dietary changes, stress management, and quitting smoking may also contribute to improved pain management.

Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) often used for its analgesic (pain-relieving), antipyretic (fever-reducing), and anti-inflammatory effects. It works by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase, which is involved in the production of prostaglandins that cause inflammation and induce pain and fever. Ibuprofen is commonly used to alleviate symptoms of various conditions such as headaches, menstrual cramps, arthritis, mild fever, and minor aches and pains. It is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, suspensions, and topical creams or gels.

Nociception is the neural process of encoding and processing noxious stimuli, which can result in the perception of pain. It involves the activation of specialized nerve endings called nociceptors, located throughout the body, that detect potentially harmful stimuli such as extreme temperatures, intense pressure, or tissue damage caused by chemicals released during inflammation. Once activated, nociceptors transmit signals through sensory neurons to the spinal cord and then to the brain, where they are interpreted as painful experiences.

It is important to note that while nociception is necessary for pain perception, it does not always lead to conscious awareness of pain. Factors such as attention, emotion, and context can influence whether or not nociceptive signals are experienced as painful.

Neuralgia is a type of pain that occurs along the pathway of a nerve, often caused by damage or irritation to the nerve. It is typically described as a sharp, stabbing, burning, or electric-shock like pain that can be severe and debilitating. Neuralgia can affect any nerve in the body, but it most commonly occurs in the facial area (trigeminal neuralgia) or in the nerves related to the spine (postherpetic neuralgia). The pain associated with neuralgia can be intermittent or constant and may be worsened by certain triggers such as touch, temperature changes, or movement. Treatment for neuralgia typically involves medications to manage pain, as well as other therapies such as nerve blocks, surgery, or lifestyle modifications.

Hydromorphone is a potent semi-synthetic opioid analgesic, which is chemically related to morphine but is approximately 8 times more potent. It is used for the relief of moderate to severe pain and is available in various forms such as tablets, extended-release tablets, solutions, and injectable formulations. Common brand names include Dilaudid and Exalgo. Hydromorphone works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, reducing the perception of pain and decreasing the emotional response to pain. As with other opioids, hydromorphone carries a risk for dependence, addiction, and abuse.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Nalorphine is defined as a morphine derivative that antagonizes the effects of opiate agonists, such as morphine and heroin, by competing for binding sites in the central nervous system. It was initially used as an analgesic but has since been replaced by other drugs due to its potential for abuse and adverse psychological effects. Currently, it is primarily used in research and to reverse opioid overdose.

Acupuncture analgesia is a form of pain relief that involves the stimulation of specific points on the body, called acupoints, using thin needles. This technique is based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) principles, which suggest that energy, or "qi," flows through the body along pathways called meridians. According to TCM, blockages or imbalances in this flow of qi can lead to illness or pain. By inserting needles at specific acupoints, acupuncture is thought to help restore the balance and flow of qi, thereby alleviating pain and promoting healing.

In modern medical terms, acupuncture analgesia is believed to work by stimulating the nervous system and triggering the release of natural painkillers called endorphins. The needles may also cause localized changes in blood flow and inflammation, which can help reduce pain and promote healing in the affected area.

Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for a variety of pain conditions, including osteoarthritis, migraines, and chronic low back pain. However, it is important to note that acupuncture should be performed by a qualified practitioner and may not be suitable for everyone. As with any medical treatment, there are potential risks and side effects associated with acupuncture, including infection, bruising, and bleeding. It is always best to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new treatment.

Cyclohexanecarboxylic acids are a type of organic compound that consists of a cyclohexane ring, which is a six-carbon saturated hydrocarbon, substituted with a carboxylic acid group (-COOH). This group contains a carbon atom double bonded to an oxygen atom and single bonded to a hydroxyl group (-OH).

The cyclohexane ring can be in various forms, including the chair, boat, or twist-boat conformations, depending on the orientation of its constituent atoms. The carboxylic acid group can ionize to form a carboxylate anion, which is negatively charged and has a deprotonated hydroxyl group.

Cyclohexanecarboxylic acids have various applications in industry and research, including as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, solvents, and pharmaceuticals. They can also be found naturally in some plants and microorganisms.

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist medication used to treat opioid use disorder. It has a lower risk of respiratory depression and other adverse effects compared to full opioid agonists like methadone, making it a safer option for some individuals. Buprenorphine works by binding to the same receptors in the brain as other opioids but with weaker effects, helping to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms. It is available in several forms, including tablets, films, and implants.

In addition to its use in treating opioid use disorder, buprenorphine may also be used to treat pain, although this use is less common due to the risk of addiction and dependence. When used for pain management, it is typically prescribed at lower doses than those used for opioid use disorder treatment.

It's important to note that while buprenorphine has a lower potential for abuse and overdose than full opioid agonists, it still carries some risks and should be taken under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Edema is the medical term for swelling caused by excess fluid accumulation in the body tissues. It can affect any part of the body, but it's most commonly noticed in the hands, feet, ankles, and legs. Edema can be a symptom of various underlying medical conditions, such as heart failure, kidney disease, liver disease, or venous insufficiency.

The swelling occurs when the capillaries leak fluid into the surrounding tissues, causing them to become swollen and puffy. The excess fluid can also collect in the cavities of the body, leading to conditions such as pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs) or ascites (fluid in the abdominal cavity).

The severity of edema can vary from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by other symptoms such as skin discoloration, stiffness, and pain. Treatment for edema depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, lifestyle changes, or medical procedures.

Nociceptors are specialized peripheral sensory neurons that detect and transmit signals indicating potentially harmful stimuli in the form of pain. They are activated by various noxious stimuli such as extreme temperatures, intense pressure, or chemical irritants. Once activated, nociceptors transmit these signals to the central nervous system (spinal cord and brain) where they are interpreted as painful sensations, leading to protective responses like withdrawing from the harmful stimulus or seeking medical attention. Nociceptors play a crucial role in our perception of pain and help protect the body from further harm.

Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that cause pain and inflammation in the body. Diclofenac is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, suppositories, topical creams, gels, and patches.

The medical definition of Diclofenac is:

Diclofenac sodium: A sodium salt of diclofenac, a phenylacetic acid derivative that is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis. It is used in the treatment of inflammation and pain in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and other conditions. Diclofenac sodium has also been used to treat actinic keratosis, a precancerous skin condition. It is available by prescription in various forms, including oral tablets, capsules, topical creams, gels, and patches.

Obstetrical analgesia refers to the use of medications or techniques to relieve pain during childbirth. The goal of obstetrical analgesia is to provide comfort and relaxation for the mother during labor and delivery while minimizing risks to both the mother and the baby. There are several methods of obstetrical analgesia, including:

1. Systemic opioids: These medications, such as morphine or fentanyl, can be given intravenously to help reduce the pain of contractions. However, they can cause side effects such as drowsiness, nausea, and respiratory depression in the mother and may also affect the baby's breathing and alertness at birth.
2. Regional anesthesia: This involves numbing a specific area of the body using local anesthetics. The two most common types of regional anesthesia used during childbirth are epidural and spinal anesthesia.

a. Epidural anesthesia: A catheter is inserted into the lower back, near the spinal cord, to deliver a continuous infusion of local anesthetic and sometimes opioids. This numbs the lower half of the body, reducing the pain of contractions and allowing for a more comfortable delivery. Epidural anesthesia can also be used for cesarean sections.

b. Spinal anesthesia: A single injection of local anesthetic is given into the spinal fluid, numbing the lower half of the body. This type of anesthesia is often used for cesarean sections and can also be used for vaginal deliveries in some cases.

3. Nitrous oxide: Also known as laughing gas, this colorless, odorless gas can be inhaled through a mask to help reduce anxiety and provide some pain relief during labor. It is not commonly used in the United States but is more popular in other countries.

When choosing an obstetrical analgesia method, it's essential to consider the potential benefits and risks for both the mother and the baby. Factors such as the mother's health, the progression of labor, and personal preferences should all be taken into account when making this decision. It is crucial to discuss these options with a healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate choice for each individual situation.

Butorphanol is a synthetic opioid analgesic (pain reliever) used to treat moderate to severe pain. It works by binding to the opiate receptors in the brain, which reduces the perception of pain. Butorphanol is available as an injectable solution and a nasal spray.

The medical definition of 'Butorphanol' is:

A synthetic opioid analgesic with agonist-antagonist properties. It is used in the management of moderate to severe pain, as a veterinary analgesic, and for obstetrical analgesia. Butorphanol has a high affinity for the kappa-opioid receptor, a lower affinity for the mu-opioid receptor, and little or no affinity for the delta-opioid receptor. Its actions at the mu-opioid receptor are antagonistic to those of morphine and other mu-opioid agonists, while its actions at the kappa-opioid receptor are similar to those of other opioids.

Butorphanol has a rapid onset of action and a relatively short duration of effect. It may cause respiratory depression, sedation, nausea, vomiting, and other side effects common to opioid analgesics. Butorphanol is classified as a Schedule IV controlled substance in the United States due to its potential for abuse and dependence.

Oxymorphone is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic, which is a strong painkiller. It is derived from thebaine, a constituent of opium. Medically, it is used to treat moderate to severe pain and is available under various brand names such as Opana and Numorphan.

Oxymorphone works by binding to the mu-opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which results in pain relief, relaxation, and sedation. It has a high potential for abuse and addiction due to its euphoric effects, and its use should be closely monitored and controlled.

Like other opioids, oxymorphone can cause physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Common side effects of oxymorphone include dizziness, lightheadedness, sedation, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and sweating. Serious side effects may include respiratory depression, low blood pressure, and decreased heart rate.

It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking oxymorphone and to report any bothersome or worsening side effects promptly.

Morphine derivatives are substances that are synthesized from or structurally similar to morphine, a natural opiate alkaloid found in the opium poppy. These compounds share many of the same pharmacological properties as morphine and are often used for their analgesic (pain-relieving), sedative, and anxiolytic (anxiety-reducing) effects.

Examples of morphine derivatives include:

1. Hydrocodone: A semi-synthetic opioid that is often combined with acetaminophen for the treatment of moderate to severe pain.
2. Oxycodone: A synthetic opioid that is used for the management of moderate to severe pain, either alone or in combination with other medications.
3. Hydromorphone: A potent semi-synthetic opioid that is used for the treatment of severe pain, typically in a hospital setting.
4. Oxymorphone: A synthetic opioid that is similar to hydromorphone in its potency and use for managing severe pain.
5. Codeine: A naturally occurring opiate alkaloid that is less potent than morphine but still has analgesic, cough suppressant, and antidiarrheal properties. It is often combined with other medications for various therapeutic purposes.
6. Fentanyl: A synthetic opioid that is significantly more potent than morphine and is used for the management of severe pain, typically in a hospital or clinical setting.

It's important to note that while these derivatives can be beneficial for managing pain and other symptoms, they also carry a risk of dependence, addiction, and potentially life-threatening side effects such as respiratory depression. As a result, their use should be closely monitored by healthcare professionals and prescribed cautiously.

Morphinans are a class of organic compounds that share a common skeletal structure, which is based on the morphine molecule. The morphinan structure consists of a tetracyclic ring system made up of three six-membered benzene rings (A, C, and D) fused to a five-membered dihydrofuran ring (B).

Morphinans are important in medicinal chemistry because many opioid analgesics, such as morphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and levorphanol, are derived from or structurally related to morphinans. These compounds exert their pharmacological effects by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which are involved in pain perception, reward, and addictive behaviors.

It is worth noting that while all opiates (drugs derived from the opium poppy) are morphinans, not all morphinans are opiates. Some synthetic or semi-synthetic morphinans, such as fentanyl and methadone, do not have a natural origin but still share the same basic structure and pharmacological properties.

Meptazinol is a synthetic opioid analgesic with both agonist and antagonist properties. It is primarily used for the relief of moderate to severe pain, although its use is less common than other opioids due to its side effect profile. Meptazinol works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, reducing the perception of pain and increasing tolerance to painful stimuli. It may also produce a sedative effect and can cause respiratory depression at high doses.

Meptazinol is available in various forms, including tablets and injectable solutions, and its use is typically reserved for short-term pain management in hospital settings. Common side effects of meptazinol include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and sweating. Less commonly, it may cause more serious side effects such as hallucinations, seizures, and cardiovascular problems.

It is important to note that meptazinol and other opioids carry a risk of addiction and physical dependence, and their use should be closely monitored by a healthcare professional.

Nociceptive pain is a type of pain that results from the activation of nociceptors, which are specialized sensory receptors located in various tissues throughout the body. These receptors detect potentially harmful stimuli such as extreme temperatures, pressure, or chemical irritants and transmit signals to the brain, which interprets them as painful sensations.

Nociceptive pain can be further classified into two categories:

1. Somatic nociceptive pain: This type of pain arises from the activation of nociceptors in the skin, muscles, bones, and joints. It is often described as sharp, aching, or throbbing and may be localized to a specific area of the body.
2. Visceral nociceptive pain: This type of pain arises from the activation of nociceptors in the internal organs, such as the lungs, heart, and digestive system. It is often described as deep, cramping, or aching and may be more diffuse and difficult to localize.

Examples of conditions that can cause nociceptive pain include injuries, arthritis, cancer, and infections. Effective management of nociceptive pain typically involves a multimodal approach that includes pharmacologic interventions, such as non-opioid analgesics, opioids, and adjuvant medications, as well as non-pharmacologic therapies, such as physical therapy, acupuncture, and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Hypnotics and sedatives are classes of medications that have depressant effects on the central nervous system, leading to sedation (calming or inducing sleep), reduction in anxiety, and in some cases, decreased awareness or memory. These agents work by affecting the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) in the brain, which results in inhibitory effects on neuronal activity.

Hypnotics are primarily used for the treatment of insomnia and other sleep disorders, while sedatives are often prescribed to manage anxiety or to produce a calming effect before medical procedures. Some medications can function as both hypnotics and sedatives, depending on the dosage and specific formulation. Common examples of these medications include benzodiazepines (such as diazepam and lorazepam), non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (such as zolpidem and eszopiclone), barbiturates, and certain antihistamines.

It is essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have potential side effects, such as drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, and impaired coordination. Additionally, long-term use or high doses may lead to tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.

Narcotics, in a medical context, are substances that induce sleep, relieve pain, and suppress cough. They are often used for anesthesia during surgical procedures. Narcotics are derived from opium or its synthetic substitutes and include drugs such as morphine, codeine, fentanyl, oxycodone, and hydrocodone. These drugs bind to specific receptors in the brain and spinal cord, reducing the perception of pain and producing a sense of well-being. However, narcotics can also produce physical dependence and addiction, and their long-term use can lead to tolerance, meaning that higher doses are required to achieve the same effect. Narcotics are classified as controlled substances due to their potential for abuse and are subject to strict regulations.

Alfentanil is a synthetic opioid analgesic drug that is chemically related to fentanyl. It is used for the provision of sedation and pain relief, particularly in critical care settings and during surgical procedures.

The medical definition of Alfentanil is as follows:

Alfentanil is a potent, short-acting opioid analgesic with a rapid onset of action. It is approximately 10 times more potent than morphine and has a rapid clearance rate due to its short elimination half-life of 1-2 hours. Alfentanil is used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia, as well as for sedation and pain relief in critically ill patients. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which inhibits the transmission of pain signals and produces analgesia, sedation, and respiratory depression.

Like all opioids, Alfentanil carries a risk of dependence, tolerance, and respiratory depression, and should be used with caution in patients with respiratory or cardiovascular disease. It is typically administered by healthcare professionals in a controlled setting due to its potency and potential for adverse effects.

Antipyretics are medications that are used to reduce fever or prevent shivering. They work by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are chemicals in the body that cause fever and inflammation. The most commonly used antipyretic is acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol), but other examples include aspirin and ibuprofen. Antipyretics are typically taken orally, but some forms can also be given rectally or intravenously. It's important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking antipyretics, as taking too much can cause liver damage or other serious side effects.

**Ketamine** is a dissociative anesthetic medication primarily used for starting and maintaining anesthesia. It can lead to a state of altered perception, hallucinations, sedation, and memory loss. Ketamine is also used as a pain reliever in patients with chronic pain conditions and during certain medical procedures due to its strong analgesic properties.

It is available as a generic drug and is also sold under various brand names, such as Ketalar, Ketanest, and Ketamine HCl. It can be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, orally, or as a nasal spray.

In addition to its medical uses, ketamine has been increasingly used off-label for the treatment of mood disorders like depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), owing to its rapid antidepressant effects. However, more research is needed to fully understand its long-term benefits and risks in these applications.

It's important to note that ketamine can be abused recreationally due to its dissociative and hallucinogenic effects, which may lead to addiction and severe psychological distress. Therefore, it should only be used under the supervision of a medical professional.

Acetic acid is an organic compound with the chemical formula CH3COOH. It is a colorless liquid with a pungent, vinegar-like smell and is the main component of vinegar. In medical terms, acetic acid is used as a topical antiseptic and antibacterial agent, particularly for the treatment of ear infections, external genital warts, and nail fungus. It can also be used as a preservative and solvent in some pharmaceutical preparations.

Nalbuphine is a synthetic opioid analgesic, which means it is a medication used to treat pain. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, reducing the perception of pain. Nalbuphine has both agonist and antagonist properties at different types of opioid receptors. Specifically, it acts as an agonist at kappa opioid receptors and as a partial antagonist at mu opioid receptors.

Nalbuphine is often used to manage moderate to severe pain, either alone or in combination with other medications. It can be administered through various routes, including intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously. Common side effects of nalbuphine include dizziness, sedation, sweating, and nausea.

It's important to note that opioids like nalbuphine can be habit-forming and should be used with caution under the guidance of a healthcare provider. Misuse or abuse of these medications can lead to serious health consequences, including addiction, overdose, and death.

Acute pain is a type of pain that comes on suddenly and can be severe, but it typically lasts for a short period of time. It is often described as sharp or stabbing and can be caused by tissue damage, inflammation, or injury. Acute pain is the body's way of signaling that something is wrong and that action needs to be taken to address the underlying cause.

Acute pain is different from chronic pain, which is pain that persists for 12 weeks or longer. Chronic pain can be caused by a variety of factors, including ongoing medical conditions, nerve damage, or inflammation. It is important to seek medical attention if you are experiencing acute pain that does not improve or becomes severe, as it may be a sign of a more serious underlying condition.

A nerve block is a medical procedure in which an anesthetic or neurolytic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block the transmission of pain signals from that area to the brain. This technique can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as identifying the source of pain, providing temporary or prolonged relief, or facilitating surgical procedures in the affected region.

The injection typically contains a local anesthetic like lidocaine or bupivacaine, which numbs the nerve, preventing it from transmitting pain signals. In some cases, steroids may also be added to reduce inflammation and provide longer-lasting relief. Depending on the type of nerve block and its intended use, the injection might be administered close to the spine (neuraxial blocks), at peripheral nerves (peripheral nerve blocks), or around the sympathetic nervous system (sympathetic nerve blocks).

While nerve blocks are generally safe, they can have side effects such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, or in rare cases, systemic toxicity from the anesthetic agent. It is essential to consult with a qualified medical professional before undergoing this procedure to ensure proper evaluation, technique, and post-procedure care.

Chronic pain is defined as pain that persists or recurs for a period of 3 months or longer, beyond the normal healing time for an injury or illness. It can be continuous or intermittent and range from mild to severe. Chronic pain can have various causes, such as nerve damage, musculoskeletal conditions, or chronic diseases like cancer. It can significantly impact a person's quality of life, causing limitations in mobility, sleep disturbances, mood changes, and decreased overall well-being. Effective management of chronic pain often involves a multidisciplinary approach, including medications, physical therapy, psychological interventions, and complementary therapies.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Dexmedetomidine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called alpha-2 adrenergic agonists. It is used for sedation and analgesia (pain relief) in critically ill patients, as well as for procedural sedation in adults and children. Dexmedetomidine works by mimicking the effects of natural chemicals in the body that help to regulate sleep, wakefulness, and pain perception.

The medical definition of dexmedetomidine is: "A selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist used for sedation and analgesia in critically ill patients, as well as for procedural sedation in adults and children. Dexmedetomidine has sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, and sympatholytic properties, and its effects are mediated by activation of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in the central nervous system."

It is important to note that dexmedetomidine should only be administered under the close supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can have significant effects on heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory function.

Cyclazocine is a synthetic opioid drug that acts as a partial agonist at mu and kappa opioid receptors, and as an antagonist at delta opioid receptors. It has analgesic (pain-relieving) effects, but its use as an analgesic is limited due to its potential for abuse and the occurrence of unpleasant psychotomimetic side effects such as dysphoria, delusions, and hallucinations.

Cyclazocine was first synthesized in 1957 and has been studied for its potential use in the treatment of opioid addiction, but it is not currently approved for medical use in many countries, including the United States. It is classified as a Schedule I controlled substance in the US, indicating that it has a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use.

Ketorolac tromethamine is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat pain and inflammation in various clinical settings. It is a salt of ketorolac, which is a racemic mixture of R-(+)- and S-(-)-enantiomers.

Ketorolac tromethamine works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are responsible for the production of prostaglandins, inflammatory mediators involved in pain and inflammation. By blocking the action of COX enzymes, ketorolac tromethamine reduces the production of prostaglandins, thereby alleviating pain and inflammation.

This medication is available as an injectable solution for intravenous (IV) or intramuscular (IM) administration, as well as in oral formulations. It is commonly used for short-term management of moderate to severe pain following surgery or trauma, as well as for the treatment of acute migraines and other painful conditions.

It's important to note that ketorolac tromethamine has a boxed warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to its potential to increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events, such as bleeding, ulcers, and perforations, particularly when used for longer than recommended or at higher doses. Additionally, it may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events, renal toxicity, and anaphylaxis in some individuals. Therefore, its use should be closely monitored and managed by healthcare professionals to minimize potential risks.

Sufentanil is a potent, synthetic opioid analgesic that is approximately 5-10 times more potent than fentanyl and 1000 times more potent than morphine. It is primarily used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in surgical settings, as an adjunct to anesthesia, or for obstetrical analgesia during labor and delivery.

Sufentanil works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which inhibits the transmission of pain signals to the brain. It has a rapid onset of action and a short duration of effect, making it useful for procedures that require intense analgesia for brief periods.

Like other opioids, sufentanil can cause respiratory depression, sedation, nausea, vomiting, and constipation. It should be used with caution in patients with compromised respiratory function or those who are taking other central nervous system depressants.

Lidocaine is a type of local anesthetic that numbs painful areas and is used to prevent pain during certain medical procedures. It works by blocking the nerves that transmit pain signals to the brain. In addition to its use as an anesthetic, lidocaine can also be used to treat irregular heart rates and relieve itching caused by allergic reactions or skin conditions such as eczema.

Lidocaine is available in various forms, including creams, gels, ointments, sprays, solutions, and injectable preparations. It can be applied directly to the skin or mucous membranes, or it can be administered by injection into a muscle or vein. The specific dosage and method of administration will depend on the reason for its use and the individual patient's medical history and current health status.

Like all medications, lidocaine can have side effects, including allergic reactions, numbness that lasts too long, and in rare cases, heart problems or seizures. It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider carefully when using lidocaine to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

Endorphins are a type of neurotransmitter, which are chemicals that transmit signals in the nervous system and brain. The term "endorphin" comes from "endogenous morphine," reflecting the fact that these substances are produced naturally within the body and have effects similar to opiate drugs like morphine.

Endorphins are released in response to stress or pain, but they also occur naturally during exercise, excitement, laughter, love, and orgasm. They work by interacting with the opiate receptors in the brain to reduce the perception of pain and promote feelings of pleasure and well-being. Endorphins also play a role in regulating various physiological processes, including appetite, mood, and sleep.

In summary, endorphins are natural painkillers and mood elevators produced by the body in response to stress, pain, or enjoyable activities.

Anti-inflammatory agents are a class of drugs or substances that reduce inflammation in the body. They work by inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which are released during an immune response and contribute to symptoms like pain, swelling, redness, and warmth.

There are two main types of anti-inflammatory agents: steroidal and nonsteroidal. Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs) include corticosteroids, which mimic the effects of hormones produced by the adrenal gland. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a larger group that includes both prescription and over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While both types of anti-inflammatory agents can be effective in reducing inflammation and relieving symptoms, they differ in their mechanisms of action, side effects, and potential risks. Long-term use of NSAIDs, for example, can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney damage, and cardiovascular events. Corticosteroids can have significant side effects as well, particularly with long-term use, including weight gain, mood changes, and increased susceptibility to infections.

It's important to use anti-inflammatory agents only as directed by a healthcare provider, and to be aware of potential risks and interactions with other medications or health conditions.

Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Piroxicam is available as a prescription medication and is used to treat conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is typically taken orally in the form of tablets or capsules, and its effects can last for up to 12 hours.

Like other NSAIDs, piroxicam can cause side effects such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney problems, especially when used at high doses or for long periods of time. It is important to use piroxicam only as directed by a healthcare provider and to follow any recommended precautions.

Amines are organic compounds that contain a basic nitrogen atom with a lone pair of electrons. They are derived from ammonia (NH3) by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms with alkyl or aryl groups. The nomenclature of amines follows the substitutive type, where the parent compound is named as an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon, and the functional group "amine" is designated as a suffix or prefix.

Amines are classified into three types based on the number of carbon atoms attached to the nitrogen atom:

1. Primary (1°) amines: One alkyl or aryl group is attached to the nitrogen atom.
2. Secondary (2°) amines: Two alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.
3. Tertiary (3°) amines: Three alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.

Quaternary ammonium salts have four organic groups attached to the nitrogen atom and a positive charge, with anions balancing the charge.

Amines have a wide range of applications in the chemical industry, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, and solvents. They also play a significant role in biological systems as neurotransmitters, hormones, and cell membrane components.

Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, is a colorless and non-flammable gas with a slightly sweet odor and taste. In medicine, it's commonly used for its anesthetic and pain reducing effects. It is often used in dental procedures, surgery, and childbirth to help reduce anxiety and provide mild sedation. Nitrous oxide works by binding to the hemoglobin in red blood cells, which reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, but this effect is usually not significant at the low concentrations used for analgesia and anxiolysis. It's also considered relatively safe when administered by a trained medical professional because it does not cause depression of the respiratory system or cardiovascular function.

Clonidine is an medication that belongs to a class of drugs called centrally acting alpha-agonist hypotensives. It works by stimulating certain receptors in the brain and lowering the heart rate, which results in decreased blood pressure. Clonidine is commonly used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but it can also be used for other purposes such as managing withdrawal symptoms from opioids or alcohol, treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and preventing migraines. It can be taken orally in the form of tablets or transdermally through a patch applied to the skin. As with any medication, clonidine should be used under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider.

Nonprescription drugs, also known as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, are medications that can be legally purchased without a prescription from a healthcare professional. They are considered safe and effective for treating minor illnesses or symptoms when used according to the directions on the label. Examples include pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen, antihistamines for allergies, and topical treatments for skin conditions. It is still important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if there are any concerns or questions about using nonprescription drugs.

Naltrexone is a medication that is primarily used to manage alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. It works by blocking the effects of opioids and alcohol on the brain, reducing the euphoric feelings and cravings associated with their use. Naltrexone comes in the form of a tablet that is taken orally, and it has no potential for abuse or dependence.

Medically, naltrexone is classified as an opioid antagonist, which means that it binds to opioid receptors in the brain without activating them, thereby blocking the effects of opioids such as heroin, morphine, and oxycodone. It also reduces the rewarding effects of alcohol by blocking the release of endorphins, which are natural chemicals in the brain that produce feelings of pleasure.

Naltrexone is often used as part of a comprehensive treatment program for addiction, along with counseling, behavioral therapy, and support groups. It can help individuals maintain abstinence from opioids or alcohol by reducing cravings and preventing relapse. Naltrexone is generally safe and well-tolerated, but it may cause side effects such as nausea, headache, dizziness, and fatigue in some people.

It's important to note that naltrexone should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and it is not recommended for individuals who are currently taking opioids or who have recently stopped using them, as it can cause withdrawal symptoms. Additionally, naltrexone may interact with other medications, so it's important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications you are taking before starting naltrexone therapy.

An amide is a functional group or a compound that contains a carbonyl group (a double-bonded carbon atom) and a nitrogen atom. The nitrogen atom is connected to the carbonyl carbon atom by a single bond, and it also has a lone pair of electrons. Amides are commonly found in proteins and peptides, where they form amide bonds (also known as peptide bonds) between individual amino acids.

The general structure of an amide is R-CO-NHR', where R and R' can be alkyl or aryl groups. Amides can be classified into several types based on the nature of R and R' substituents:

* Primary amides: R-CO-NH2
* Secondary amides: R-CO-NHR'
* Tertiary amides: R-CO-NR''R'''

Amides have several important chemical properties. They are generally stable and resistant to hydrolysis under neutral or basic conditions, but they can be hydrolyzed under acidic conditions or with strong bases. Amides also exhibit a characteristic infrared absorption band around 1650 cm-1 due to the carbonyl stretching vibration.

In addition to their prevalence in proteins and peptides, amides are also found in many natural and synthetic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, and polymers. They have a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and materials science.

Opioid delta receptors, also known as delta opioid receptors (DORs), are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in the nervous system and other tissues throughout the body. They belong to the opioid receptor family, which includes mu, delta, and kappa receptors. These receptors play an essential role in pain modulation, reward processing, and addictive behaviors.

Delta opioid receptors are activated by endogenous opioid peptides such as enkephalins and exogenous opioids like synthetic drugs. Once activated, they trigger a series of intracellular signaling events that can lead to inhibition of neuronal excitability, reduced neurotransmitter release, and ultimately, pain relief.

Delta opioid receptors have also been implicated in various physiological processes, including immune function, respiratory regulation, and gastrointestinal motility. However, their clinical use as therapeutic targets has been limited due to the development of tolerance and potential adverse effects such as sedation and respiratory depression.

In summary, delta opioid receptors are a type of opioid receptor that plays an essential role in pain modulation and other physiological processes. They are activated by endogenous and exogenous opioids and trigger intracellular signaling events leading to various effects, including pain relief. However, their clinical use as therapeutic targets is limited due to potential adverse effects.

Levorphanol is a potent opioid analgesic medication used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is a synthetic compound with a chemical structure similar to that of morphine, but it has more potent analgesic and sedative effects. Levorphanol works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which reduces the perception of pain and produces a sense of well-being or euphoria.

Levorphanol is available in oral tablet form and is typically used for short-term pain management in patients who are not able to take other opioid medications or who have developed tolerance to them. It has a long duration of action, with effects lasting up to 24 hours after a single dose.

Like all opioids, levorphanol carries a risk of dependence and addiction, as well as serious side effects such as respiratory depression, sedation, and constipation. It should be used with caution in patients with a history of substance abuse or mental illness, and it is not recommended for use in pregnant women or children.

Opioid peptides are naturally occurring short chains of amino acids in the body that bind to opioid receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and gut, acting in a similar way to opiate drugs like morphine or heroin. They play crucial roles in pain regulation, reward systems, and addictive behaviors. Some examples of opioid peptides include endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins. These substances are released in response to stress, physical exertion, or injury and help modulate the perception of pain and produce feelings of pleasure or euphoria.

Electroacupuncture is a form of acupuncture where a small electric current is passed between pairs of acupuncture needles. This technique is used to stimulate the acupoints more strongly and consistently than with manual acupuncture. The intensity of the electrical impulses can be adjusted depending on the patient's comfort level and the desired therapeutic effect. Electroacupuncture is often used to treat conditions such as chronic pain, muscle spasms, and paralysis. It may also be used in the treatment of addiction, weight loss, and stroke rehabilitation.

Opioid-related disorders is a term that encompasses a range of conditions related to the use of opioids, which are a class of drugs that include prescription painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, as well as illegal drugs like heroin. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) identifies the following opioid-related disorders:

1. Opioid Use Disorder: This disorder is characterized by a problematic pattern of opioid use that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. The symptoms may include a strong desire to use opioids, increased tolerance, withdrawal symptoms when not using opioids, and unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control opioid use.
2. Opioid Intoxication: This disorder occurs when an individual uses opioids and experiences significant problematic behavioral or psychological changes, such as marked sedation, small pupils, or respiratory depression.
3. Opioid Withdrawal: This disorder is characterized by the development of a substance-specific withdrawal syndrome following cessation or reduction of opioid use. The symptoms may include anxiety, irritability, dysphoria, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle aches.
4. Other Opioid-Induced Disorders: This category includes disorders that are caused by the direct physiological effects of opioids, such as opioid-induced sexual dysfunction or opioid-induced sleep disorder.

It is important to note that opioid use disorder is a chronic and often relapsing condition that can cause significant harm to an individual's health, relationships, and overall quality of life. If you or someone you know is struggling with opioid use, it is essential to seek professional help from a healthcare provider or addiction specialist.

Prilocaine is an amide local anesthetic that is often used in topical, injectable, and regional anesthesia. It is commonly combined with lidocaine to reduce the risk of methhemoglobinemia, a rare but potentially serious side effect that can occur with prilocaine use.

Prilocaine works by blocking sodium channels in nerve cell membranes, which prevents the transmission of nerve impulses and results in local anesthesia. It has a rapid onset of action and a relatively short duration of effect.

In addition to its use as a local anesthetic, prilocaine is also used in some dental procedures and for the treatment of premature ejaculation. As with any medication, prilocaine can have side effects, including allergic reactions, numbness, tingling, and pain at the injection site. It should be used with caution in patients with certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, liver or kidney dysfunction, and in pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are common complications following surgical procedures. It is defined as nausea, vomiting, or both that occurs within the first 24 hours after surgery. PONV can lead to dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, wound dehiscence, and impaired patient satisfaction. Risk factors for PONV include female gender, non-smoking status, history of motion sickness or PONV, use of opioids, and longer duration of surgery. Preventive measures and treatments include antiemetic medications, fluid therapy, and acupuncture or acupressure.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

The spinal cord is a major part of the nervous system, extending from the brainstem and continuing down to the lower back. It is a slender, tubular bundle of nerve fibers (axons) and support cells (glial cells) that carries signals between the brain and the rest of the body. The spinal cord primarily serves as a conduit for motor information, which travels from the brain to the muscles, and sensory information, which travels from the body to the brain. It also contains neurons that can independently process and respond to information within the spinal cord without direct input from the brain.

The spinal cord is protected by the bony vertebral column (spine) and is divided into 31 segments: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal. Each segment corresponds to a specific region of the body and gives rise to pairs of spinal nerves that exit through the intervertebral foramina at each level.

The spinal cord is responsible for several vital functions, including:

1. Reflexes: Simple reflex actions, such as the withdrawal reflex when touching a hot surface, are mediated by the spinal cord without involving the brain.
2. Muscle control: The spinal cord carries motor signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling voluntary movement and muscle tone regulation.
3. Sensory perception: The spinal cord transmits sensory information, such as touch, temperature, pain, and vibration, from the body to the brain for processing and awareness.
4. Autonomic functions: The sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system originate in the thoracolumbar and sacral regions of the spinal cord, respectively, controlling involuntary physiological responses like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and respiration.

Damage to the spinal cord can result in various degrees of paralysis or loss of sensation below the level of injury, depending on the severity and location of the damage.

Aspirin is the common name for acetylsalicylic acid, which is a medication used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX), which is involved in the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances that cause inflammation and pain. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet effect, which means it can help prevent blood clots from forming. This makes it useful for preventing heart attacks and strokes.

Aspirin is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and chewable tablets. It is also available in prescription strengths for certain medical conditions. As with any medication, aspirin should be taken as directed by a healthcare provider, and its use should be avoided in children and teenagers with viral infections due to the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that can affect the liver and brain.

Spinal anesthesia is a type of regional anesthesia that involves injecting local anesthetic medication into the cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space, which is the space surrounding the spinal cord. This procedure is typically performed by introducing a needle into the lower back, between the vertebrae, to reach the subarachnoid space.

Once the local anesthetic is introduced into this space, it spreads to block nerve impulses from the corresponding levels of the spine, resulting in numbness and loss of sensation in specific areas of the body below the injection site. The extent and level of anesthesia depend on the amount and type of medication used, as well as the patient's individual response.

Spinal anesthesia is often used for surgeries involving the lower abdomen, pelvis, or lower extremities, such as cesarean sections, hernia repairs, hip replacements, and knee arthroscopies. It can also be utilized for procedures like epidural steroid injections to manage chronic pain conditions affecting the spine and lower limbs.

While spinal anesthesia provides effective pain relief during and after surgery, it may cause side effects such as low blood pressure, headache, or difficulty urinating. These potential complications should be discussed with the healthcare provider before deciding on this type of anesthesia.

Dissociative anesthetics are a class of drugs that produce a state of altered consciousness, characterized by a sense of detachment or dissociation from the environment and oneself. These drugs work by disrupting the normal communication between the brain's thalamus and cortex, which can lead to changes in perception, thinking, and emotion.

Some examples of dissociative anesthetics include ketamine, phencyclidine (PCP), and dextromethorphan (DXM). These drugs can produce a range of effects, including sedation, analgesia, amnesia, and hallucinations. At high doses, they can cause profound dissociative states, in which individuals may feel as though they are outside their own bodies or that the world around them is not real.

Dissociative anesthetics are used medically for a variety of purposes, including as general anesthetics during surgery, as sedatives for diagnostic procedures, and as treatments for chronic pain and depression. However, they also have a high potential for abuse and can produce significant negative health effects when taken recreationally.

Formaldehyde is a colorless, pungent, and volatile chemical compound with the formula CH2O. It is a naturally occurring substance that is found in certain fruits like apples and vegetables, as well as in animals. However, the majority of formaldehyde used in industry is synthetically produced.

In the medical field, formaldehyde is commonly used as a preservative for biological specimens such as organs, tissues, and cells. It works by killing bacteria and inhibiting the decaying process. Formaldehyde is also used in the production of various industrial products, including adhesives, resins, textiles, and paper products.

However, formaldehyde can be harmful to human health if inhaled or ingested in large quantities. It can cause irritation to the eyes, nose, throat, and skin, and prolonged exposure has been linked to respiratory problems and cancer. Therefore, it is essential to handle formaldehyde with care and use appropriate safety measures when working with this chemical compound.

Tromethamine is a chemical compound with the formula (CH2OH)3CNH2. It is also known as tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane or THAM. Tromethamine is a tertiary amine that acts as a buffer, maintaining a stable pH in various solutions.

In medical terms, tromethamine is used as a medication to correct acid-base imbalances in the body. It works by binding hydrogen ions and converting them into water and carbon dioxide, which can then be eliminated from the body. Tromethamine is often used in critically ill patients who have severe metabolic acidosis, a condition characterized by an excess of acid in the body that can lead to organ dysfunction and failure.

Tromethamine is available as a sterile solution for injection or as a powder to be reconstituted with sterile water for injection. It may also be used as an additive to intravenous fluids to help maintain a stable pH. Common side effects of tromethamine include local irritation at the injection site, nausea, vomiting, and headache.

'Animal behavior' refers to the actions or responses of animals to various stimuli, including their interactions with the environment and other individuals. It is the study of the actions of animals, whether they are instinctual, learned, or a combination of both. Animal behavior includes communication, mating, foraging, predator avoidance, and social organization, among other things. The scientific study of animal behavior is called ethology. This field seeks to understand the evolutionary basis for behaviors as well as their physiological and psychological mechanisms.

A third molar is the most posterior of the three molars present in an adult human dental arch. They are also commonly known as wisdom teeth, due to their late eruption period which usually occurs between the ages of 17-25, a time traditionally associated with gaining maturity and wisdom.

Anatomically, third molars have four cusps, making them the largest of all the teeth. However, not everyone develops third molars; some people may have one, two, three or no third molars at all. In many cases, third molars do not have enough space to fully erupt and align properly with the rest of the teeth, leading to impaction, infection, or other dental health issues. As a result, third molars are often extracted if they cause problems or if there is a risk they will cause problems in the future.

Tooth extraction is a dental procedure in which a tooth that is damaged or poses a threat to oral health is removed from its socket in the jawbone. This may be necessary due to various reasons such as severe tooth decay, gum disease, fractured teeth, crowded teeth, or for orthodontic treatment purposes. The procedure is performed by a dentist or an oral surgeon, under local anesthesia to numb the area around the tooth, ensuring minimal discomfort during the extraction process.

Opioid receptors, also known as opiate receptors, are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in the nervous system and other tissues. They are activated by endogenous opioid peptides, as well as exogenous opiates and opioids. There are several subtypes of opioid receptors, including mu, delta, and kappa.

Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) are a subtype of opioid receptor that are widely distributed throughout the body, including in the brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract. They are activated by endogenous opioid peptides such as dynorphins, as well as by synthetic and semi-synthetic opioids such as salvinorin A and U-69593.

KORs play a role in the modulation of pain, mood, and addictive behaviors. Activation of KORs has been shown to produce analgesic effects, but can also cause dysphoria, sedation, and hallucinations. KOR agonists have potential therapeutic uses for the treatment of pain, addiction, and other disorders, but their use is limited by their side effects.

It's important to note that opioid receptors and their ligands (drugs or endogenous substances that bind to them) are complex systems with many different actions and effects in the body. The specific effects of KOR activation depend on a variety of factors, including the location and density of the receptors, the presence of other receptors and signaling pathways, and the dose and duration of exposure to the ligand.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

In a medical context, "hot temperature" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, it is often used in relation to fever, which is a common symptom of illness. A fever is typically defined as a body temperature that is higher than normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F) for adults and above 37.5-38°C (99.5-101.3°F) for children, depending on the source.

Therefore, when a medical professional talks about "hot temperature," they may be referring to a body temperature that is higher than normal due to fever or other causes. It's important to note that a high environmental temperature can also contribute to an elevated body temperature, so it's essential to consider both the body temperature and the environmental temperature when assessing a patient's condition.

Prescription drugs are medications that are only available to patients with a valid prescription from a licensed healthcare professional, such as a doctor or nurse practitioner. These drugs cannot be legally obtained over-the-counter and require a prescription due to their potential for misuse, abuse, or serious side effects. They are typically used to treat complex medical conditions, manage symptoms of chronic illnesses, or provide necessary pain relief in certain situations.

Prescription drugs are classified based on their active ingredients and therapeutic uses. In the United States, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) categorizes them into five schedules (I-V) depending on their potential for abuse and dependence. Schedule I substances have the highest potential for abuse and no accepted medical use, while schedule V substances have a lower potential for abuse and are often used for legitimate medical purposes.

Examples of prescription drugs include opioid painkillers like oxycodone and hydrocodone, stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin, benzodiazepines like Xanax and Ativan, and various other medications used to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, anxiety, and high blood pressure.

It is essential to use prescription drugs only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or abuse can lead to severe health consequences, including addiction, overdose, and even death.

Caudal anesthesia is a type of regional anesthesia that involves injecting a local anesthetic into the caudal canal, which is the lower end of the spinal canal where it meets the tailbone or coccyx. This region contains nerve roots that provide sensation to the perineum, buttocks, and lower extremities.

Caudal anesthesia is typically administered through a single injection into the caudal space using a needle inserted through the sacrococcygeal ligament, which is a tough band of tissue that connects the sacrum (the triangular bone at the base of the spine) to the coccyx. Once the needle is in place, the anesthetic solution is injected into the caudal space, where it spreads to surround and numb the nearby nerve roots.

This type of anesthesia is often used for surgeries or procedures involving the lower abdomen, pelvis, or lower extremities, such as hernia repairs, hemorrhoidectomies, or hip replacements. It can also be used to provide postoperative pain relief or to manage chronic pain conditions affecting the lower body.

As with any medical procedure, caudal anesthesia carries some risks and potential complications, including infection, bleeding, nerve damage, and accidental injection of the anesthetic into a blood vessel. However, these complications are rare when the procedure is performed by a trained and experienced anesthesiologist.

Pain perception refers to the neural and psychological processes involved in receiving, interpreting, and responding to painful stimuli. It is the subjective experience of pain, which can vary greatly among individuals due to factors such as genetics, mood, expectations, and past experiences. The perception of pain involves complex interactions between the peripheral nervous system (which detects and transmits information about tissue damage or potential harm), the spinal cord (where this information is processed and integrated with other sensory inputs), and the brain (where the final interpretation and emotional response to pain occurs).

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is a non-invasive method of pain relief that involves the use of low-voltage electrical currents. A TENS device, which is usually small and portable, delivers these currents through electrodes that are placed on the skin near the site of pain. The electrical impulses stimulate nerve fibers, which can help to block the transmission of pain signals to the brain, thereby reducing the perception of pain.

TENS is thought to work through a number of different mechanisms, including the gate control theory of pain and the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body. It is generally considered safe, with few side effects, and can be used in conjunction with other forms of pain management.

TENS is often used to treat chronic pain conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, and lower back pain, as well as acute pain from injuries or surgery. However, its effectiveness varies from person to person, and it may not work for everyone. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider before using TENS, particularly if you have any underlying medical conditions or are taking medication that could interact with the electrical currents.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Self-medication is the use of medications or other healthcare products by individuals to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, without consulting a healthcare professional. This may include using leftover prescription medications, over-the-counter drugs, or alternative therapies. While it might seem convenient and cost-effective, self-medication can lead to incorrect diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, masking of serious conditions, potential drug interactions, dependency, and complications, which may result in further health issues. It is always recommended to seek professional medical advice before starting any medication or therapy.

Thiazines are a class of organic compounds that contain a heterocyclic ring consisting of nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur atoms. In the context of pharmaceuticals, thiazine rings are often found in various drugs, including some antipsychotic medications such as chlorpromazine and thioridazine. These drugs function by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, helping to manage symptoms associated with certain mental health conditions like schizophrenia.

It is important to note that 'thiazines' are not a medical term per se but rather a chemical classification of compounds. The medical relevance lies in the therapeutic application of specific drugs that have thiazine rings within their structures.

Levallorphan is a opioid antagonist and agonist, often used as an analgesic (pain reliever) and antitussive (cough suppressant). It works by binding to the opioid receptors in the brain, blocking the effects of certain opioid agonists such as morphine while also acting as a weak agonist itself. This means that it can both block the pain-relieving effects and produce some of the unwanted side effects of opioids, such as respiratory depression. It is used in clinical settings to reverse or reduce the effects of opioid overdose, and also for the treatment of severe cough.

It's important to note that Levallorphan has a complex pharmacology and its use should be restricted to medical professionals due to its potential for abuse and dependence.

A drug combination refers to the use of two or more drugs in combination for the treatment of a single medical condition or disease. The rationale behind using drug combinations is to achieve a therapeutic effect that is superior to that obtained with any single agent alone, through various mechanisms such as:

* Complementary modes of action: When different drugs target different aspects of the disease process, their combined effects may be greater than either drug used alone.
* Synergistic interactions: In some cases, the combination of two or more drugs can result in a greater-than-additive effect, where the total response is greater than the sum of the individual responses to each drug.
* Antagonism of adverse effects: Sometimes, the use of one drug can mitigate the side effects of another, allowing for higher doses or longer durations of therapy.

Examples of drug combinations include:

* Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection, which typically involves a combination of three or more antiretroviral drugs to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
* Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where combinations of cytotoxic agents are used to target different stages of the cell cycle and increase the likelihood of tumor cell death.
* Fixed-dose combination products, such as those used in the treatment of hypertension or type 2 diabetes, which combine two or more active ingredients into a single formulation for ease of administration and improved adherence to therapy.

However, it's important to note that drug combinations can also increase the risk of adverse effects, drug-drug interactions, and medication errors. Therefore, careful consideration should be given to the selection of appropriate drugs, dosing regimens, and monitoring parameters when using drug combinations in clinical practice.

Methadone is a synthetic opioid agonist, often used as a substitute for heroin or other opiates in detoxification programs or as a long-term maintenance drug for opiate addiction. It works by changing how the brain and nervous system respond to pain signals. It also helps to suppress the withdrawal symptoms and cravings associated with opiate dependence.

Methadone is available in various forms, including tablets, oral solutions, and injectable solutions. It's typically prescribed and dispensed under strict medical supervision due to its potential for abuse and dependence.

In a medical context, methadone may also be used to treat moderate to severe pain that cannot be managed with other types of medication. However, its use in this context is more limited due to the risks associated with opioid therapy.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Preanesthetic medication, also known as premedication, refers to the administration of medications before anesthesia to help prepare the patient for the upcoming procedure. These medications can serve various purposes, such as:

1. Anxiolysis: Reducing anxiety and promoting relaxation in patients before surgery.
2. Amnesia: Causing temporary memory loss to help patients forget the events leading up to the surgery.
3. Analgesia: Providing pain relief to minimize discomfort during and after the procedure.
4. Antisialagogue: Decreasing saliva production to reduce the risk of aspiration during intubation.
5. Bronchodilation: Relaxing bronchial smooth muscles, which can help improve respiratory function in patients with obstructive lung diseases.
6. Antiemetic: Preventing or reducing the likelihood of postoperative nausea and vomiting.
7. Sedation: Inducing a state of calmness and drowsiness to facilitate a smooth induction of anesthesia.

Common preanesthetic medications include benzodiazepines (e.g., midazolam), opioids (e.g., fentanyl), anticholinergics (e.g., glycopyrrolate), and H1-antihistamines (e.g., diphenhydramine). The choice of preanesthetic medication depends on the patient's medical history, comorbidities, and the type of anesthesia to be administered.

A drug interaction is the effect of combining two or more drugs, or a drug and another substance (such as food or alcohol), which can alter the effectiveness or side effects of one or both of the substances. These interactions can be categorized as follows:

1. Pharmacodynamic interactions: These occur when two or more drugs act on the same target organ or receptor, leading to an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect. For example, taking a sedative and an antihistamine together can result in increased drowsiness due to their combined depressant effects on the central nervous system.
2. Pharmacokinetic interactions: These occur when one drug affects the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of another drug. For example, taking certain antibiotics with grapefruit juice can increase the concentration of the antibiotic in the bloodstream, leading to potential toxicity.
3. Food-drug interactions: Some drugs may interact with specific foods, affecting their absorption, metabolism, or excretion. An example is the interaction between warfarin (a blood thinner) and green leafy vegetables, which can increase the risk of bleeding due to enhanced vitamin K absorption from the vegetables.
4. Drug-herb interactions: Some herbal supplements may interact with medications, leading to altered drug levels or increased side effects. For instance, St. John's Wort can decrease the effectiveness of certain antidepressants and oral contraceptives by inducing their metabolism.
5. Drug-alcohol interactions: Alcohol can interact with various medications, causing additive sedative effects, impaired judgment, or increased risk of liver damage. For example, combining alcohol with benzodiazepines or opioids can lead to dangerous levels of sedation and respiratory depression.

It is essential for healthcare providers and patients to be aware of potential drug interactions to minimize adverse effects and optimize treatment outcomes.

Intra-articular injections refer to the administration of medication directly into a joint space. This route of administration is used for treating various joint conditions such as inflammation, pain, and arthritis. Commonly injected medications include corticosteroids, local anesthetics, and viscosupplementation agents. The procedure is usually performed using imaging guidance, like ultrasound or fluoroscopy, to ensure accurate placement of the medication within the joint.

Mefenamic Acid is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly used for its analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties. It works by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which is responsible for prostaglandin synthesis, a key player in pain and inflammation processes.

Mefenamic Acid is primarily used to treat mild to moderate pain, including menstrual cramps, primary dysmenorrhea, post-operative pain, and various types of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Common side effects may include gastrointestinal disturbances like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain. Long-term use of Mefenamic Acid has been associated with increased risks of cardiovascular events, gastrointestinal ulcers, and bleeding. Therefore, it is essential to follow the recommended dosage and consult a healthcare professional for appropriate usage and potential interactions with other medications.

A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure in which the tonsils, two masses of lymphoid tissue located on both sides of the back of the throat, are removed. This procedure is typically performed to treat recurrent or severe cases of tonsillitis (inflammation of the tonsils), sleep-disordered breathing such as obstructive sleep apnea, and other conditions where the tonsils are causing problems or complications. The surgery can be done under general anesthesia, and there are various methods for removing the tonsils, including traditional scalpel excision, electrocautery, and laser surgery. After a tonsillectomy, patients may experience pain, swelling, and difficulty swallowing, but these symptoms typically improve within 1-2 weeks post-surgery.

Enkephalins are naturally occurring opioid peptides that bind to opiate receptors in the brain and other organs, producing pain-relieving and other effects. They are derived from the precursor protein proenkephalin and consist of two main types: Leu-enkephalin and Met-enkephalin. Enkephalins play a role in pain modulation, stress response, mood regulation, and addictive behaviors. They are also involved in the body's reward system and have been implicated in various physiological processes such as respiration, gastrointestinal motility, and hormone release.

Adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists are a class of medications that bind to and activate adrenergic alpha-2 receptors, which are found in the nervous system and other tissues. These receptors play a role in regulating various bodily functions, including blood pressure, heart rate, and release of certain hormones.

When adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists bind to these receptors, they can cause a variety of effects, such as:

* Vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels), which can increase blood pressure
* Decreased heart rate and force of heart contractions
* Suppression of the release of norepinephrine (a hormone and neurotransmitter involved in the "fight or flight" response) from nerve endings
* Analgesia (pain relief)

Adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists are used in a variety of medical conditions, including:

* High blood pressure
* Glaucoma (to reduce pressure in the eye)
* Anesthesia (to help prevent excessive bleeding and to provide sedation)
* Opioid withdrawal symptoms (to help manage symptoms such as anxiety, agitation, and muscle aches)

Examples of adrenergic alpha-2 receptor agonists include clonidine, brimonidine, and dexmedetomidine.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Freund's adjuvant is not a medical condition but a substance used in laboratory research to enhance the body's immune response to an antigen or vaccine. It is named after its developer, Jules T. Freund.

There are two types of Freund's adjuvants: complete and incomplete. Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) contains killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, which causes a strong inflammatory response when injected into the body. This makes it an effective adjuvant for experimental vaccines, as it helps to stimulate the immune system and promote a stronger and longer-lasting immune response.

Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) is similar to FCA but does not contain Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is less potent than FCA but still useful for boosting the immune response to certain antigens.

It is important to note that Freund's adjuvants are not used in human vaccines due to their potential to cause adverse reactions, including granulomas and other inflammatory responses. They are primarily used in laboratory research with animals.

The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a region in the midbrain, surrounding the cerebral aqueduct (a narrow channel connecting the third and fourth ventricles within the brain). It is a column of neurons that plays a crucial role in the modulation of pain perception, cardiorespiratory regulation, and defensive behaviors. The PAG is involved in the descending pain modulatory system, where it receives input from various emotional and cognitive areas and sends output to the rostral ventromedial medulla, which in turn regulates nociceptive processing at the spinal cord level. Additionally, the PAG is implicated in the regulation of fear, anxiety, and stress responses, as well as sexual behavior and reward processing.

"Drug and narcotic control" refers to the regulation and oversight of drugs and narcotics, including their production, distribution, and use. This is typically carried out by governmental agencies in order to ensure public safety, prevent abuse and diversion, and protect the health of individuals. The goal of drug and narcotic control is to strike a balance between making sure that medications are available for legitimate medical purposes while also preventing their misuse and illegal sale.

Drug control policies may include measures such as licensing and registration of manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacies; tracking and monitoring of controlled substances; setting standards for prescription practices; and enforcement of laws and regulations related to drug use and trafficking. Narcotic control specifically refers to the regulation of drugs that have a high potential for abuse and are subject to international treaties, such as opioids.

It's important to note that while these regulations aim to protect public health and safety, they can also be controversial and have unintended consequences, such as contributing to drug shortages or creating barriers to access for people who need controlled substances for legitimate medical reasons.

Ambulatory surgical procedures, also known as outpatient or same-day surgery, refer to medical operations that do not require an overnight hospital stay. These procedures are typically performed in a specialized ambulatory surgery center (ASC) or in a hospital-based outpatient department. Patients undergoing ambulatory surgical procedures receive anesthesia, undergo the operation, and recover enough to be discharged home on the same day of the procedure.

Examples of common ambulatory surgical procedures include:

1. Arthroscopy (joint scope examination and repair)
2. Cataract surgery
3. Colonoscopy and upper endoscopy
4. Dental surgery, such as wisdom tooth extraction
5. Gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy)
6. Hernia repair
7. Hysteroscopy (examination of the uterus)
8. Minor skin procedures, like biopsies and lesion removals
9. Orthopedic procedures, such as carpal tunnel release or joint injections
10. Pain management procedures, including epidural steroid injections and nerve blocks
11. Podiatric (foot and ankle) surgery
12. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy

Advancements in medical technology, minimally invasive surgical techniques, and improved anesthesia methods have contributed to the growth of ambulatory surgical procedures, offering patients a more convenient and cost-effective alternative to traditional inpatient surgeries.

Obstetrical anesthesia refers to the use of anesthetic techniques and medications during childbirth or obstetrical procedures. The goal is to provide pain relief and comfort to the birthing person while ensuring the safety of both the mother and the baby. There are different types of obstetrical anesthesia, including:

1. Local anesthesia: Injection of a local anesthetic agent to numb a specific area, such as the perineum (the area between the vagina and the anus) during childbirth.
2. Regional anesthesia: Numbing a larger region of the body using techniques like spinal or epidural anesthesia. These methods involve injecting local anesthetic agents near the spinal cord to block nerve impulses, providing pain relief in the lower half of the body.
3. General anesthesia: Using inhaled gases or intravenous medications to render the birthing person unconscious during cesarean sections (C-sections) or other surgical procedures related to childbirth.

The choice of anesthetic technique depends on various factors, including the type of delivery, the mother's medical history, and the preferences of both the mother and the healthcare team. Obstetrical anesthesia requires specialized training and expertise to ensure safe and effective pain management during labor and delivery.

Piperidines are not a medical term per se, but they are a class of organic compounds that have important applications in the pharmaceutical industry. Medically relevant piperidines include various drugs such as some antihistamines, antidepressants, and muscle relaxants.

A piperidine is a heterocyclic amine with a six-membered ring containing five carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom. The structure can be described as a cyclic secondary amine. Piperidines are found in some natural alkaloids, such as those derived from the pepper plant (Piper nigrum), which gives piperidines their name.

In a medical context, it is more common to encounter specific drugs that belong to the class of piperidines rather than the term itself.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Conscious sedation, also known as procedural sedation and analgesia, is a minimally depressed level of consciousness that retains the patient's ability to maintain airway spontaneously and respond appropriately to physical stimulation and verbal commands. It is typically achieved through the administration of sedative and/or analgesic medications and is commonly used in medical procedures that do not require general anesthesia. The goal of conscious sedation is to provide a comfortable and anxiety-free experience for the patient while ensuring their safety throughout the procedure.

A "Drug Administration Schedule" refers to the plan for when and how a medication should be given to a patient. It includes details such as the dose, frequency (how often it should be taken), route (how it should be administered, such as orally, intravenously, etc.), and duration (how long it should be taken) of the medication. This schedule is often created and prescribed by healthcare professionals, such as doctors or pharmacists, to ensure that the medication is taken safely and effectively. It may also include instructions for missed doses or changes in the dosage.

Epidural anesthesia is a type of regional anesthesia that involves the injection of local anesthetic medication into the epidural space in the spine, which is the space surrounding the dura mater, a membrane that covers the spinal cord. The injection is typically administered through a catheter placed in the lower back using a needle.

The local anesthetic drug blocks nerve impulses from the affected area, numbing it and relieving pain. Epidural anesthesia can be used for various surgical procedures, such as cesarean sections, knee or hip replacements, and hernia repairs. It is also commonly used during childbirth to provide pain relief during labor and delivery.

The effects of epidural anesthesia can vary depending on the dose and type of medication used, as well as the individual's response to the drug. The anesthetic may take several minutes to start working, and its duration of action can range from a few hours to a day or more. Epidural anesthesia is generally considered safe when administered by trained medical professionals, but like any medical procedure, it carries some risks, including infection, bleeding, nerve damage, and respiratory depression.

An impacted tooth is a condition where a tooth fails to erupt into the oral cavity within its expected time frame, resulting in its partial or complete entrapment within the jawbone or soft tissues. This commonly occurs with wisdom teeth (third molars) but can affect any tooth. Impacted teeth may cause problems such as infection, decay of adjacent teeth, gum disease, or cyst formation, and they may require surgical removal.

Combined anesthetics refer to the use of two or more types of anesthetic agents together during a medical procedure to produce a desired level of sedation, amnesia, analgesia, and muscle relaxation. This approach can allow for lower doses of individual anesthetic drugs, which may reduce the risk of adverse effects associated with each drug. Common combinations include using a general anesthetic in combination with a regional or local anesthetic technique. The specific choice of combined anesthetics depends on various factors such as the type and duration of the procedure, patient characteristics, and the desired outcomes.

A drug prescription is a written or electronic order provided by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse, to a pharmacist that authorizes the preparation and dispensing of a specific medication for a patient. The prescription typically includes important information such as the patient's name and date of birth, the name and strength of the medication, the dosage regimen, the duration of treatment, and any special instructions or precautions.

Prescriptions serve several purposes, including ensuring that patients receive the appropriate medication for their medical condition, preventing medication errors, and promoting safe and effective use of medications. They also provide a legal record of the medical provider's authorization for the pharmacist to dispense the medication to the patient.

There are two main types of prescriptions: written prescriptions and electronic prescriptions. Written prescriptions are handwritten or printed on paper, while electronic prescriptions are transmitted electronically from the medical provider to the pharmacy. Electronic prescriptions are becoming increasingly common due to their convenience, accuracy, and security.

It is important for patients to follow the instructions provided on their prescription carefully and to ask their healthcare provider or pharmacist any questions they may have about their medication. Failure to follow a drug prescription can result in improper use of the medication, which can lead to adverse effects, treatment failure, or even life-threatening situations.

Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that specifically target and inhibit the COX-2 enzyme. This enzyme is responsible for the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever.

COX-2 inhibitors were developed to provide the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of NSAIDs without the gastrointestinal side effects associated with non-selective NSAIDs that inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. However, some studies have suggested an increased risk of cardiovascular events with long-term use of COX-2 inhibitors, leading to restrictions on their use in certain populations.

Examples of COX-2 inhibitors include celecoxib (Celebrex), rofecoxib (Vioxx, withdrawn from the market in 2004 due to cardiovascular risks), and valdecoxib (Bextra, withdrawn from the market in 2005 due to cardiovascular and skin reactions).

The placebo effect is a psychological or psychophysiological phenomenon in which a person's symptoms improve following a treatment but this improvement is not attributable to the properties of the treatment itself. Instead, it is believed to be due to the mind's belief in the effectiveness of the treatment, often influenced by positive expectations and the ritualistic aspects of the therapy itself.

Placebos are often used in clinical trials as a control group to compare against the actual treatment. The placebo effect can make it challenging to determine whether an observed improvement is truly due to the treatment or other factors.

Intravenous injections are a type of medical procedure where medication or fluids are administered directly into a vein using a needle and syringe. This route of administration is also known as an IV injection. The solution injected enters the patient's bloodstream immediately, allowing for rapid absorption and onset of action. Intravenous injections are commonly used to provide quick relief from symptoms, deliver medications that are not easily absorbed by other routes, or administer fluids and electrolytes in cases of dehydration or severe illness. It is important that intravenous injections are performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection.

A drug overdose occurs when a person ingests, inhales, or absorbs through the skin a toxic amount of a drug or combination of drugs. This can result in a variety of symptoms, depending on the type of drug involved. In some cases, an overdose can be fatal.

An overdose can occur accidentally, for example if a person mistakenly takes too much of a medication or if a child accidentally ingests a medication that was left within their reach. An overdose can also occur intentionally, such as when a person takes too much of a drug to attempt suicide or to achieve a desired high.

The symptoms of a drug overdose can vary widely depending on the type of drug involved. Some common symptoms of a drug overdose may include:

* Nausea and vomiting
* Abdominal pain
* Dizziness or confusion
* Difficulty breathing
* Seizures
* Unconsciousness
* Rapid heart rate or low blood pressure

If you suspect that someone has overdosed on a drug, it is important to seek medical help immediately. Call your local poison control center or emergency number (such as 911 in the United States) for assistance. If possible, try to provide the medical personnel with as much information as you can about the person and the drug(s) involved. This can help them to provide appropriate treatment more quickly.

General anesthesia is a state of controlled unconsciousness, induced by administering various medications, that eliminates awareness, movement, and pain sensation during medical procedures. It involves the use of a combination of intravenous and inhaled drugs to produce a reversible loss of consciousness, allowing patients to undergo surgical or diagnostic interventions safely and comfortably. The depth and duration of anesthesia are carefully monitored and adjusted throughout the procedure by an anesthesiologist or certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) to ensure patient safety and optimize recovery. General anesthesia is typically used for more extensive surgical procedures, such as open-heart surgery, major orthopedic surgeries, and neurosurgery.

Intraventricular injections are a type of medical procedure where medication is administered directly into the cerebral ventricles of the brain. The cerebral ventricles are fluid-filled spaces within the brain that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This procedure is typically used to deliver drugs that target conditions affecting the central nervous system, such as infections or tumors.

Intraventricular injections are usually performed using a thin, hollow needle that is inserted through a small hole drilled into the skull. The medication is then injected directly into the ventricles, allowing it to circulate throughout the CSF and reach the brain tissue more efficiently than other routes of administration.

This type of injection is typically reserved for situations where other methods of drug delivery are not effective or feasible. It carries a higher risk of complications, such as bleeding, infection, or damage to surrounding tissues, compared to other routes of administration. Therefore, it is usually performed by trained medical professionals in a controlled clinical setting.

Ethyl chloride is a colorless, volatile, flammable liquid with an ether-like odor. It is used as an industrial solvent and refrigerant, and in the past, it was also used as a topical anesthetic and analgesic. Ethyl chloride works by rapidly evaporating upon contact with the skin, causing localized cooling and numbness. However, its use as a medical product has largely been discontinued due to safety concerns, including its potential for abuse as a recreational inhalant and the risk of severe frostbite and tissue damage if improperly applied.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Cannabinoids are a class of chemical compounds that are produced naturally in the resin of the cannabis plant (also known as marijuana). There are more than 100 different cannabinoids that have been identified, the most well-known of which are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

THC is the primary psychoactive component of cannabis, meaning it is responsible for the "high" or euphoric feeling that people experience when they use marijuana. CBD, on the other hand, does not have psychoactive effects and is being studied for its potential therapeutic uses in a variety of medical conditions, including pain management, anxiety, and epilepsy.

Cannabinoids work by interacting with the body's endocannabinoid system, which is a complex network of receptors and chemicals that are involved in regulating various physiological processes such as mood, appetite, pain sensation, and memory. When cannabinoids bind to these receptors, they can alter or modulate these processes, leading to potential therapeutic effects.

It's important to note that while some cannabinoids have been shown to have potential medical benefits, marijuana remains a controlled substance in many countries, and its use is subject to legal restrictions. Additionally, the long-term health effects of using marijuana or other forms of cannabis are not fully understood and are the subject of ongoing research.

Analgesics, short-acting are medications that provide quick but temporary relief from pain. They are often used to manage acute pain, such as pain following surgery or injury, and the effects typically last for a few hours. Common examples of short-acting analgesics include acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone. These medications work by blocking pain signals in the brain or altering the perception of pain. It's important to follow the dosage instructions carefully and only use these medications as directed by a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and potential risks, particularly with long-term use or misuse.

Anesthetics are medications that are used to block or reduce feelings of pain and sensation, either locally in a specific area of the body or generally throughout the body. They work by depressing the nervous system, interrupting the communication between nerves and the brain. Anesthetics can be administered through various routes such as injection, inhalation, or topical application, depending on the type and the desired effect. There are several classes of anesthetics, including:

1. Local anesthetics: These numb a specific area of the body and are commonly used during minor surgical procedures, dental work, or to relieve pain from injuries. Examples include lidocaine, prilocaine, and bupivacaine.
2. Regional anesthetics: These block nerve impulses in a larger area of the body, such as an arm or leg, and can be used for more extensive surgical procedures. They are often administered through a catheter to provide continuous pain relief over a longer period. Examples include spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, and peripheral nerve blocks.
3. General anesthetics: These cause a state of unconsciousness and are used for major surgical procedures or when the patient needs to be completely immobile during a procedure. They can be administered through inhalation or injection and affect the entire body. Examples include propofol, sevoflurane, and isoflurane.

Anesthetics are typically safe when used appropriately and under medical supervision. However, they can have side effects such as drowsiness, nausea, and respiratory depression. Proper dosing and monitoring by a healthcare professional are essential to minimize the risks associated with anesthesia.

Posterior horn cells refer to the neurons located in the posterior (or dorsal) horn of the gray matter in the spinal cord. These cells are primarily responsible for receiving and processing sensory information from peripheral nerves, particularly related to touch, pressure, pain, and temperature. The axons of these cells form the ascending tracts that carry this information to the brain for further processing. It's worth noting that damage to posterior horn cells can result in various sensory deficits, such as those seen in certain neurological conditions.

Topical administration refers to a route of administering a medication or treatment directly to a specific area of the body, such as the skin, mucous membranes, or eyes. This method allows the drug to be applied directly to the site where it is needed, which can increase its effectiveness and reduce potential side effects compared to systemic administration (taking the medication by mouth or injecting it into a vein or muscle).

Topical medications come in various forms, including creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, sprays, and patches. They may be used to treat localized conditions such as skin infections, rashes, inflammation, or pain, or to deliver medication to the eyes or mucous membranes for local or systemic effects.

When applying topical medications, it is important to follow the instructions carefully to ensure proper absorption and avoid irritation or other adverse reactions. This may include cleaning the area before application, covering the treated area with a dressing, or avoiding exposure to sunlight or water after application, depending on the specific medication and its intended use.

Capsaicin is defined in medical terms as the active component of chili peppers (genus Capsicum) that produces a burning sensation when it comes into contact with mucous membranes or skin. It is a potent irritant and is used topically as a counterirritant in some creams and patches to relieve pain. Capsaicin works by depleting substance P, a neurotransmitter that relays pain signals to the brain, from nerve endings.

Here is the medical definition of capsaicin from the Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary:

caпсаісіn : an alkaloid (C18H27NO3) that is the active principle of red peppers and is used in topical preparations as a counterirritant and analgesic.

Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors are a class of drugs that work by blocking the activity of cyclooxygenase enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever.

There are two main types of COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is produced continuously in various tissues throughout the body and helps maintain the normal function of the stomach and kidneys, among other things. COX-2, on the other hand, is produced in response to inflammation and is involved in the production of prostaglandins that contribute to pain, fever, and inflammation.

COX inhibitors can be non-selective, meaning they block both COX-1 and COX-2, or selective, meaning they primarily block COX-2. Non-selective COX inhibitors include drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, while selective COX inhibitors are often referred to as coxibs and include celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx).

COX inhibitors are commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. However, long-term use of non-selective COX inhibitors can increase the risk of gastrointestinal side effects such as ulcers and bleeding, while selective COX inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke. It is important to talk to a healthcare provider about the potential risks and benefits of COX inhibitors before using them.

Postoperative care refers to the comprehensive medical treatment and nursing attention provided to a patient following a surgical procedure. The goal of postoperative care is to facilitate the patient's recovery, prevent complications, manage pain, ensure proper healing of the incision site, and maintain overall health and well-being until the patient can resume their normal activities.

This type of care includes monitoring vital signs, managing pain through medication or other techniques, ensuring adequate hydration and nutrition, helping the patient with breathing exercises to prevent lung complications, encouraging mobility to prevent blood clots, monitoring for signs of infection or other complications, administering prescribed medications, providing wound care, and educating the patient about postoperative care instructions.

The duration of postoperative care can vary depending on the type and complexity of the surgical procedure, as well as the individual patient's needs and overall health status. It may be provided in a hospital setting, an outpatient surgery center, or in the patient's home, depending on the level of care required.

ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) is a strain of albino Swiss mice that are widely used in scientific research. They are an outbred strain, which means that they have been bred to maintain maximum genetic heterogeneity. However, it is also possible to find inbred strains of ICR mice, which are genetically identical individuals produced by many generations of brother-sister mating.

Inbred ICR mice are a specific type of ICR mouse that has been inbred for at least 20 generations. This means that they have a high degree of genetic uniformity and are essentially genetically identical to one another. Inbred strains of mice are often used in research because their genetic consistency makes them more reliable models for studying biological phenomena and testing new therapies or treatments.

It is important to note that while inbred ICR mice may be useful for certain types of research, they do not necessarily represent the genetic diversity found in human populations. Therefore, it is important to consider the limitations of using any animal model when interpreting research findings and applying them to human health.

Medetomidine is a potent alpha-2 adrenergic agonist used primarily in veterinary medicine as an sedative, analgesic (pain reliever), and sympatholytic (reduces the sympathetic nervous system's activity). It is used for chemical restraint, procedural sedation, and analgesia during surgery or other medical procedures in various animals.

In humans, medetomidine is not approved by the FDA for use but may be used off-label in certain situations, such as sedation during diagnostic procedures. It can cause a decrease in heart rate and blood pressure, so it must be administered carefully and with close monitoring of the patient's vital signs.

Medetomidine is available under various brand names, including Domitor (for veterinary use) and Sedator (for human use in some countries). It can also be found as a combination product with ketamine, such as Dexdomitor/Domitor + Ketamine or Ketamine + Medetomidine.

Local anesthesia is a type of anesthesia that numbs a specific area of the body, blocking pain signals from that particular region while allowing the person to remain conscious and alert. It is typically achieved through the injection or application of a local anesthetic drug, which works by temporarily inhibiting the function of nerve fibers carrying pain sensations. Common examples of local anesthetics include lidocaine, prilocaine, and bupivacaine.

Local anesthesia is commonly used for minor surgical procedures, dental work, or other medical interventions where only a small area needs to be numbed. It can also be employed as part of a combined anesthetic technique, such as in conjunction with sedation or regional anesthesia, to provide additional pain relief and increase patient comfort during more extensive surgeries.

The duration of local anesthesia varies depending on the type and dosage of the anesthetic agent used; some last for just a few hours, while others may provide numbness for up to several days. Overall, local anesthesia is considered a safe and effective method for managing pain during various medical procedures.

A cross-over study is a type of experimental design in which participants receive two or more interventions in a specific order. After a washout period, each participant receives the opposite intervention(s). The primary advantage of this design is that it controls for individual variability by allowing each participant to act as their own control.

In medical research, cross-over studies are often used to compare the efficacy or safety of two treatments. For example, a researcher might conduct a cross-over study to compare the effectiveness of two different medications for treating high blood pressure. Half of the participants would be randomly assigned to receive one medication first and then switch to the other medication after a washout period. The other half of the participants would receive the opposite order of treatments.

Cross-over studies can provide valuable insights into the relative merits of different interventions, but they also have some limitations. For example, they may not be suitable for studying conditions that are chronic or irreversible, as it may not be possible to completely reverse the effects of the first intervention before administering the second one. Additionally, carryover effects from the first intervention can confound the results if they persist into the second treatment period.

Overall, cross-over studies are a useful tool in medical research when used appropriately and with careful consideration of their limitations.

Subcutaneous injection is a route of administration where a medication or vaccine is delivered into the subcutaneous tissue, which lies between the skin and the muscle. This layer contains small blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissues that help to absorb the medication slowly and steadily over a period of time. Subcutaneous injections are typically administered using a short needle, at an angle of 45-90 degrees, and the dose is injected slowly to minimize discomfort and ensure proper absorption. Common sites for subcutaneous injections include the abdomen, thigh, or upper arm. Examples of medications that may be given via subcutaneous injection include insulin, heparin, and some vaccines.

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of the uterus (womb). Depending on the specific medical condition and necessity, a hysterectomy may also include the removal of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and surrounding tissues. There are different types of hysterectomies, including:

1. Total hysterectomy: The uterus and cervix are removed.
2. Supracervical (or subtotal) hysterectomy: Only the upper part of the uterus is removed, leaving the cervix intact.
3. Radical hysterectomy: This procedure involves removing the uterus, cervix, surrounding tissues, and the upper part of the vagina. It is typically performed in cases of cervical cancer.
4. Oophorectomy: The removal of one or both ovaries can be performed along with a hysterectomy depending on the patient's medical condition and age.
5. Salpingectomy: The removal of one or both fallopian tubes can also be performed along with a hysterectomy if needed.

The reasons for performing a hysterectomy may include but are not limited to: uterine fibroids, heavy menstrual bleeding, endometriosis, adenomyosis, pelvic prolapse, cervical or uterine cancer, and chronic pelvic pain. The choice of the type of hysterectomy depends on the patient's medical condition, age, and personal preferences.

Methotrimeprazine is a phenothiazine derivative with antiemetic, antipsychotic, and sedative properties. It works as a dopamine receptor antagonist and has been used in the management of various conditions such as nausea and vomiting, schizophrenia, anxiety, and agitation.

It is important to note that Methotrimeprazine can have significant side effects, including sedation, orthostatic hypotension, extrapyramidal symptoms (such as involuntary movements), and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (a rare but potentially life-threatening reaction). Its use should be under the supervision of a healthcare professional, and it is important to follow their instructions carefully.

A placebo is a substance or treatment that has no inherent therapeutic effect. It is often used in clinical trials as a control against which the effects of a new drug or therapy can be compared. Placebos are typically made to resemble the active treatment, such as a sugar pill for a medication trial, so that participants cannot tell the difference between what they are receiving and the actual treatment.

The placebo effect refers to the phenomenon where patients experience real improvements in their symptoms or conditions even when given a placebo. This may be due to psychological factors such as belief in the effectiveness of the treatment, suggestion, or conditioning. The placebo effect is often used as a comparison group in clinical trials to help determine if the active treatment has a greater effect than no treatment at all.

Clonixin is a type of medication known as an anticholinergic and a peripheral acting muscarinic receptor antagonist. It is primarily used to treat smooth muscle spasms, including those associated with gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. Clonixin works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that stimulates muscle contraction, on certain types of muscarinic receptors in the smooth muscle of the digestive tract. This helps to reduce muscle spasms and relieve symptoms such as abdominal pain and cramping.

It is important to note that Clonixin is not a commonly used medication and may have potential side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, and constipation. It should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, and the dosage and duration of treatment should be individualized based on the patient's medical history and current health status.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

An adjuvant in anesthesia refers to a substance or drug that is added to an anesthetic medication to enhance its effects, make it last longer, or improve the overall quality of anesthesia. Adjuvants do not produce analgesia or anesthesia on their own but work synergistically with other anesthetics to achieve better clinical outcomes.

There are several types of adjuvants used in anesthesia, including:

1. Opioids: These are commonly used adjuvants that enhance the analgesic effect of anesthetic drugs. Examples include fentanyl, sufentanil, and remifentanil.
2. Alpha-2 agonists: Drugs like clonidine and dexmedetomidine are used as adjuvants to provide sedation, analgesia, and anxiolysis. They also help reduce the requirement for other anesthetic drugs, thus minimizing side effects.
3. Ketamine: This NMDA receptor antagonist is used as an adjuvant to provide analgesia and amnesia. It can be used in subanesthetic doses to improve the quality of analgesia during general anesthesia or as a sole anesthetic for procedural sedation.
4. Local anesthetics: When used as an adjuvant, local anesthetics can prolong the duration of postoperative analgesia and reduce the requirement for opioids. Examples include bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and lidocaine.
5. Neostigmine: This cholinesterase inhibitor is used as an adjuvant to reverse the neuromuscular blockade produced by non-depolarizing muscle relaxants at the end of surgery.
6. Dexamethasone: A corticosteroid used as an adjuvant to reduce postoperative nausea and vomiting, inflammation, and pain.
7. Magnesium sulfate: This non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist is used as an adjuvant to provide analgesia, reduce opioid consumption, and provide neuroprotection in certain surgical settings.

The choice of adjuvants depends on the type of surgery, patient factors, and the desired clinical effects.

Drug synergism is a pharmacological concept that refers to the interaction between two or more drugs, where the combined effect of the drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects. This means that when these drugs are administered together, they produce an enhanced therapeutic response compared to when they are given separately.

Drug synergism can occur through various mechanisms, such as:

1. Pharmacodynamic synergism - When two or more drugs interact with the same target site in the body and enhance each other's effects.
2. Pharmacokinetic synergism - When one drug affects the metabolism, absorption, distribution, or excretion of another drug, leading to an increased concentration of the second drug in the body and enhanced therapeutic effect.
3. Physiochemical synergism - When two drugs interact physically, such as when one drug enhances the solubility or permeability of another drug, leading to improved absorption and bioavailability.

It is important to note that while drug synergism can result in enhanced therapeutic effects, it can also increase the risk of adverse reactions and toxicity. Therefore, healthcare providers must carefully consider the potential benefits and risks when prescribing combinations of drugs with known or potential synergistic effects.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channels are a subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, which are non-selective cation channels that play important roles in various physiological processes such as nociception, thermosensation, and mechanosensation. TRPV channels are activated by a variety of stimuli including temperature, chemical ligands, and mechanical forces.

TRPV channels are composed of six transmembrane domains with intracellular N- and C-termini. The TRPV subfamily includes six members: TRPV1 to TRPV6. Among them, TRPV1 is also known as the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) and is activated by capsaicin, the active component of hot chili peppers, as well as noxious heat. TRPV2 is activated by noxious heat and mechanical stimuli, while TRPV3 and TRPV4 are activated by warm temperatures and various chemical ligands. TRPV5 and TRPV6 are primarily involved in calcium transport and are activated by low pH and divalent cations.

TRPV channels play important roles in pain sensation, neurogenic inflammation, and temperature perception. Dysfunction of these channels has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as chronic pain, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Therefore, TRPV channels are considered promising targets for the development of novel therapeutics for these conditions.

Spinal ganglia, also known as dorsal root ganglia, are clusters of nerve cell bodies located in the peripheral nervous system. They are situated along the length of the spinal cord and are responsible for transmitting sensory information from the body to the brain. Each spinal ganglion contains numerous neurons, or nerve cells, with long processes called axons that extend into the periphery and innervate various tissues and organs. The cell bodies within the spinal ganglia receive sensory input from these axons and transmit this information to the central nervous system via the dorsal roots of the spinal nerves. This allows the brain to interpret and respond to a wide range of sensory stimuli, including touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of one's body).

Labor pain is the physiological discomfort and pain experienced by women during childbirth, typically beginning in the lower back and radiating to the abdomen as contractions become more intense and frequent. It's primarily caused by the contraction of uterine muscles, pressure on the cervix, and stretching of the vaginal tissues during labor and delivery.

The pain can vary greatly among individuals, ranging from mild to severe, and it may be influenced by factors such as fear, anxiety, cultural expectations, and previous childbirth experiences. Various methods, including pharmacological interventions (such as epidural anesthesia), non-pharmacological techniques (such as breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, and water immersion), and alternative therapies (such as acupuncture and massage) can be used to manage labor pain.

Adenoidectomy is a surgical procedure in which the adenoids are removed. The adenoids are a patch of tissue located behind the nasal cavity, near the roof of the mouth. They help to filter out germs that are breathed in through the nose. However, sometimes the adenoids can become enlarged or infected, leading to problems such as difficulty breathing through the nose, recurrent ear infections, and sleep apnea. In these cases, an adenoidectomy may be recommended to remove the adenoids and alleviate these symptoms.

The procedure is typically performed on an outpatient basis, which means that the patient can go home the same day as the surgery. The surgeon will use a special instrument to remove the adenoids through the mouth, without making any external incisions. After the surgery, the patient may experience some discomfort, sore throat, and difficulty swallowing for a few days. However, these symptoms usually resolve within a week or two.

It is important to note that an adenoidectomy is not the same as a tonsillectomy, which is the surgical removal of the tonsils. While the tonsils and adenoids are both part of the immune system and located in the same area of the mouth, they serve different functions and may be removed separately or together depending on the individual's medical needs.

The abdomen refers to the portion of the body that lies between the thorax (chest) and the pelvis. It is a musculo-fascial cavity containing the digestive, urinary, and reproductive organs. The abdominal cavity is divided into several regions and quadrants for medical description and examination purposes. These include the upper and lower abdomen, as well as nine quadrants formed by the intersection of the midline and a horizontal line drawn at the level of the umbilicus (navel).

The major organs located within the abdominal cavity include:

1. Stomach - muscular organ responsible for initial digestion of food
2. Small intestine - long, coiled tube where most nutrient absorption occurs
3. Large intestine - consists of the colon and rectum; absorbs water and stores waste products
4. Liver - largest internal organ, involved in protein synthesis, detoxification, and metabolism
5. Pancreas - secretes digestive enzymes and hormones such as insulin
6. Spleen - filters blood and removes old red blood cells
7. Kidneys - pair of organs responsible for filtering waste products from the blood and producing urine
8. Adrenal glands - sit atop each kidney, produce hormones that regulate metabolism, immune response, and stress response

The abdomen is an essential part of the human body, playing a crucial role in digestion, absorption, and elimination of food and waste materials, as well as various metabolic processes.

Opium is defined as the dried latex obtained from incisions made in the unripe seedpods of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). It contains a number of alkaloids, including morphine, codeine, and thebaine. Opium has been used for its pain-relieving, euphoric, and sedative effects since ancient times. However, its use is highly regulated due to the risk of addiction and other serious side effects.

Conotoxins are a group of peptide toxins found in the venom of cone snails (genus Conus). These toxins are synthesized and stored in the venom ducts of the snails and are used for prey capture or defense against predators. Conotoxins have diverse pharmacological activities, acting on various ion channels and receptors in the nervous system. They are characterized by their small size (10-30 amino acids), disulfide bonding pattern, and high sequence variability. Due to their specificity and potency, conotoxins have been studied as potential leads for the development of novel therapeutics, particularly in the areas of pain management and neurological disorders.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Arthritis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation in one or more joints, leading to symptoms such as pain, stiffness, swelling, and reduced range of motion. There are many different types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, and lupus, among others.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and is caused by wear and tear on the joints over time. Rheumatoid arthritis, on the other hand, is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the joint lining, causing inflammation and damage.

Arthritis can affect people of all ages, including children, although it is more common in older adults. Treatment for arthritis may include medications to manage pain and reduce inflammation, physical therapy, exercise, and in some cases, surgery.

Preclinical drug evaluation refers to a series of laboratory tests and studies conducted to determine the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is tested in humans. These studies typically involve experiments on cells and animals to evaluate the pharmacological properties, toxicity, and potential interactions with other substances. The goal of preclinical evaluation is to establish a reasonable level of safety and understanding of how the drug works, which helps inform the design and conduct of subsequent clinical trials in humans. It's important to note that while preclinical studies provide valuable information, they may not always predict how a drug will behave in human subjects.

Amitriptyline is a type of medication known as a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA). It is primarily used to treat depression, but it also has other therapeutic uses such as managing chronic pain, migraine prevention, and treating anxiety disorders. Amitriptyline works by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) in the brain, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, which help to regulate mood and alleviate pain.

The medication is available in various forms, including tablets and liquid solutions, and it is typically taken orally. The dosage of amitriptyline may vary depending on the individual's age, medical condition, and response to treatment. It is essential to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking this medication.

Common side effects of amitriptyline include drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and weight gain. In some cases, it may cause more severe side effects such as orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure upon standing), cardiac arrhythmias, and seizures. It is crucial to inform the healthcare provider of any pre-existing medical conditions or current medications before starting amitriptyline therapy, as these factors can influence its safety and efficacy.

Amitriptyline has a well-established history in clinical practice, but it may not be suitable for everyone due to its potential side effects and drug interactions. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using this medication.

Adrenergic alpha-agonists are a type of medication that binds to and activates adrenergic alpha receptors, which are found in the nervous system and other tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated naturally by chemicals called catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), that are released in response to stress or excitement.

When adrenergic alpha-agonists bind to these receptors, they mimic the effects of catecholamines and cause various physiological responses, such as vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased heart rate and force of heart contractions, and relaxation of smooth muscle in the airways.

Adrenergic alpha-agonists are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), glaucoma, nasal congestion, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Examples of adrenergic alpha-agonists include phenylephrine, clonidine, and guanfacine.

It's important to note that adrenergic alpha-agonists can have both beneficial and harmful effects, depending on the specific medication, dosage, and individual patient factors. Therefore, they should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Acupuncture points, also known as "acupoints," are specific locations on the body that are used in acupuncture therapy. These points are believed to correspond to underlying pathways, or meridians, through which vital energy, or "qi" (pronounced "chee"), flows.

Acupuncture points are typically found along these meridians and are thought to have specific therapeutic properties. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, stimulating these points with needles, heat, pressure, or electrical impulses can help restore the balance of qi and promote healing in the body.

There are over 360 acupuncture points identified in TCM, each with its own name, location, and set of indications for use. Modern research has attempted to identify the anatomical structures underlying these points, with some studies suggesting that they may correspond to nerve bundles, blood vessels, or other physiological features. However, the exact mechanisms by which acupuncture works remain a topic of ongoing scientific investigation and debate.

Conduction anesthesia is a type of local anesthesia in which an anesthetic agent is administered near a peripheral nerve to block the transmission of painful stimuli. It is called "conduction" anesthesia because it works by blocking the conduction of nerve impulses along the nerve fibers.

There are several types of conduction anesthesia, including:

1. Infiltration anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected directly into the tissue where the surgical procedure will be performed. This type of anesthesia can be used for minor surgeries such as wound closure or repair of simple lacerations.
2. Nerve block anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block sensation in a larger area of the body. For example, a brachial plexus block can be used to numb the arm and hand for procedures such as shoulder surgery or fracture reduction.
3. Field block anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected around the periphery of the surgical site to create a "field" of anesthesia that blocks sensation in the area. This type of anesthesia is often used for procedures such as hernia repair or circumcision.

Conduction anesthesia has several advantages over general anesthesia, including reduced risk of complications, faster recovery time, and lower cost. However, it may not be appropriate for all types of surgical procedures or patients, and its effectiveness can vary depending on the skill of the practitioner and the individual patient's response to the anesthetic agent.

Flurbiprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Flurbiprofen is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and topical creams or gels. It is used to treat a variety of conditions, such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, dental pain, and migraines.

Like other NSAIDs, flurbiprofen can cause side effects, such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney problems, especially when taken in high doses or for long periods of time. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

Beta-endorphins are naturally occurring opioid peptides that are produced in the brain and other parts of the body. They are synthesized from a larger precursor protein called proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and consist of 31 amino acids. Beta-endorphins have potent analgesic effects, which means they can reduce the perception of pain. They also play a role in regulating mood, emotions, and various physiological processes such as immune function and hormonal regulation.

Beta-endorphins bind to opioid receptors in the brain and other tissues, leading to a range of effects including pain relief, sedation, euphoria, and reduced anxiety. They are released in response to stress, physical activity, and certain physiological conditions such as pregnancy and lactation. Beta-endorphins have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses in the treatment of pain, addiction, and mood disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential side effects.

Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. It plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability and preventing excessive neuronal firing, which helps to maintain neural homeostasis and reduce the risk of seizures. GABA functions by binding to specific receptors (GABA-A, GABA-B, and GABA-C) on the postsynaptic membrane, leading to hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane and reduced neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals.

In addition to its role in the central nervous system, GABA has also been identified as a neurotransmitter in the peripheral nervous system, where it is involved in regulating various physiological processes such as muscle relaxation, hormone secretion, and immune function.

GABA can be synthesized in neurons from glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, through the action of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Once synthesized, GABA is stored in synaptic vesicles and released into the synapse upon neuronal activation. After release, GABA can be taken up by surrounding glial cells or degraded by the enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T) into succinic semialdehyde, which is further metabolized to form succinate and enter the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances. Therefore, modulating GABAergic signaling through pharmacological interventions or other therapeutic approaches may offer potential benefits for the treatment of these conditions.

Physical stimulation, in a medical context, refers to the application of external forces or agents to the body or its tissues to elicit a response. This can include various forms of touch, pressure, temperature, vibration, or electrical currents. The purpose of physical stimulation may be therapeutic, as in the case of massage or physical therapy, or diagnostic, as in the use of reflex tests. It is also used in research settings to study physiological responses and mechanisms.

In a broader sense, physical stimulation can also refer to the body's exposure to physical activity or exercise, which can have numerous health benefits, including improving cardiovascular function, increasing muscle strength and flexibility, and reducing the risk of chronic diseases.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Malvaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in botany, referring to the mallow family of plants, which includes over 4,000 species. Some plants in this family have been used in traditional medicine, but Malvaceae itself does not have a specific medical definition.

Dependent ambulation is a term used in medical context to describe a person's ability to walk or move around, but only with assistance from another person or the use of assistive devices such as crutches, walkers, or wheelchairs. This means that the person is not able to safely and independently navigate their environment on their own due to physical limitations, balance issues, mobility impairments, or other health conditions.

Dependent ambulation can be temporary or permanent, depending on the underlying cause of the impairment. For example, a person who has undergone surgery may require dependent ambulation during the recovery period, while someone with a progressive neurological condition may require long-term assistance with mobility.

Healthcare professionals, such as physical therapists and occupational therapists, often work with individuals who require dependent ambulation to help them improve their strength, balance, and mobility through various exercises and interventions. The goal is to help the person become as independent as possible and reduce their reliance on assistive devices or other people for mobility.

Spinal nerves are the bundles of nerve fibers that transmit signals between the spinal cord and the rest of the body. There are 31 pairs of spinal nerves in the human body, which can be divided into five regions: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal. Each spinal nerve carries both sensory information (such as touch, temperature, and pain) from the periphery to the spinal cord, and motor information (such as muscle control) from the spinal cord to the muscles and other structures in the body. Spinal nerves also contain autonomic fibers that regulate involuntary functions such as heart rate, digestion, and blood pressure.

Heroin is a highly addictive drug that is processed from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seed pod of the Asian opium poppy plant. It is a "downer" or depressant that affects the brain's pleasure systems and interferes with the brain's ability to perceive pain.

Heroin can be injected, smoked, or snorted. It is sold as a white or brownish powder or as a black, sticky substance known as "black tar heroin." Regardless of how it is taken, heroin enters the brain rapidly and is highly addictive.

The use of heroin can lead to serious health problems, including fatal overdose, spontaneous abortion, and infectious diseases like HIV and hepatitis. Long-term use of heroin can lead to physical dependence and addiction, a chronic disease that can be difficult to treat.

Facial pain is a condition characterized by discomfort or pain felt in any part of the face. It can result from various causes, including nerve damage or irritation, injuries, infections, dental problems, migraines, or sinus congestion. The pain can range from mild to severe and may be sharp, dull, constant, or intermittent. In some cases, facial pain can also be associated with other symptoms such as headaches, redness, swelling, or changes in sensation. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause are essential for effective management of facial pain.

Anesthesia is a medical term that refers to the loss of sensation or awareness, usually induced by the administration of various drugs. It is commonly used during surgical procedures to prevent pain and discomfort. There are several types of anesthesia, including:

1. General anesthesia: This type of anesthesia causes a complete loss of consciousness and is typically used for major surgeries.
2. Regional anesthesia: This type of anesthesia numbs a specific area of the body, such as an arm or leg, while the patient remains conscious.
3. Local anesthesia: This type of anesthesia numbs a small area of the body, such as a cut or wound, and is typically used for minor procedures.

Anesthesia can be administered through various routes, including injection, inhalation, or topical application. The choice of anesthesia depends on several factors, including the type and duration of the procedure, the patient's medical history, and their overall health. Anesthesiologists are medical professionals who specialize in administering anesthesia and monitoring patients during surgical procedures to ensure their safety and comfort.

Visceral pain is a type of pain that originates from the internal organs (viscera) such as the stomach, intestines, liver, or heart. It's often described as diffuse, dull, and hard to localize, unlike somatic pain which arises from the skin, muscles, or bones and is usually easier to pinpoint.

Visceral pain may be caused by various conditions like inflammation, infection, ischemia (reduced blood supply), distention or stretching of the organ walls, or direct damage to the organs. The sensation of visceral pain can be modulated and referred to other areas of the body due to the complex interactions in the nervous system, making it sometimes challenging to diagnose the exact source of the pain.

A headache is defined as pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck. It can be a symptom of various underlying conditions such as stress, sinus congestion, migraine, or more serious issues like meningitis or concussion. Headaches can vary in intensity, ranging from mild to severe, and may be accompanied by other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or sensitivity to light and sound. There are over 150 different types of headaches, including tension headaches, cluster headaches, and sinus headaches, each with their own specific characteristics and causes.

"Carthamus" is the genus name for a group of plants that includes safflower (Carthamus tinctorius). Safflower is an herb that has been used in traditional medicine and as a source of dye. The seeds, flowers, and leaves of safflower have been used in traditional medicine to treat various conditions such as menstrual pain, fever, and cough. However, it's important to note that the scientific evidence supporting these uses is limited, and more research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

Safflower oil, which is extracted from the seeds of the plant, is commonly used in cooking and as a source of vegetable oil. It contains unsaturated fats and has been studied for its potential health benefits, such as improving cholesterol levels and reducing the risk of heart disease. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits.

It's worth noting that while safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) is the most well-known member of the Carthamus genus, there are other species as well, such as Carthamus oxyacantha and Carthamus lanatus, which have also been used in traditional medicine. However, there is limited scientific evidence on their efficacy and safety.

Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. These receptors are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in various organs and tissues throughout the body.

Activation of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors leads to a variety of physiological responses, including inhibition of neurotransmitter release, vasoconstriction, and reduced heart rate. These receptors play important roles in regulating blood pressure, pain perception, and various cognitive and emotional processes.

There are several subtypes of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors, including alpha-2A, alpha-2B, and alpha-2C, which may have distinct physiological functions and be targeted by different drugs. For example, certain medications used to treat hypertension or opioid withdrawal target alpha-2 adrenergic receptors to produce their therapeutic effects.

"Intramuscular injections" refer to a medical procedure where a medication or vaccine is administered directly into the muscle tissue. This is typically done using a hypodermic needle and syringe, and the injection is usually given into one of the large muscles in the body, such as the deltoid (shoulder), vastus lateralis (thigh), or ventrogluteal (buttock) muscles.

Intramuscular injections are used for a variety of reasons, including to deliver medications that need to be absorbed slowly over time, to bypass stomach acid and improve absorption, or to ensure that the medication reaches the bloodstream quickly and directly. Common examples of medications delivered via intramuscular injection include certain vaccines, antibiotics, and pain relievers.

It is important to follow proper technique when administering intramuscular injections to minimize pain and reduce the risk of complications such as infection or injury to surrounding tissues. Proper site selection, needle length and gauge, and injection technique are all critical factors in ensuring a safe and effective intramuscular injection.

A veterinarian is a licensed medical professional who practices veterinary medicine. They are dedicated to the health and well-being of animals, ranging from pets and livestock to wild animals and exotic creatures. Veterinarians diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases and injuries in animals, and they also provide advice and guidance on animal care and nutrition.

Veterinarians may specialize in a particular area of veterinary medicine, such as surgery, internal medicine, dentistry, dermatology, or emergency care. They may work in private clinical practice, research institutions, government agencies, zoos, wildlife rehabilitation centers, or the animal health industry.

To become a veterinarian, one must complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from an accredited veterinary school and pass a licensing exam. Veterinary schools typically require applicants to have a bachelor's degree with a strong background in science courses. Additionally, veterinarians must adhere to strict ethical standards and maintain their knowledge and skills through ongoing education and training.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

Reaction time, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the time period between the presentation of a stimulus and the subsequent initiation of a response. This complex process involves the central nervous system, particularly the brain, which perceives the stimulus, processes it, and then sends signals to the appropriate muscles or glands to react.

There are different types of reaction times, including simple reaction time (responding to a single, expected stimulus) and choice reaction time (choosing an appropriate response from multiple possibilities). These measures can be used in clinical settings to assess various aspects of neurological function, such as cognitive processing speed, motor control, and alertness.

However, it is important to note that reaction times can be influenced by several factors, including age, fatigue, attention, and the use of certain medications or substances.

Etorphine is a potent synthetic opioid analgesic drug that is primarily used for the immobilization and veterinary purposes in large animals. It is not commonly used in human medicine due to its high potency and potential for serious side effects, including respiratory depression and death. In medical context, etorphine is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States, due to its high abuse potential.

Etorphine works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which leads to pain relief, sedation, and decreased breathing rate. It is typically administered via injection and its effects can last for several hours. In veterinary medicine, etorphine may be used to immobilize animals such as elephants, rhinos, and large deer species for medical procedures or relocation.

It's important to note that due to its high potency and potential for serious side effects, etorphine should only be administered by trained professionals in a controlled setting.

The sciatic nerve is the largest and longest nerve in the human body, running from the lower back through the buttocks and down the legs to the feet. It is formed by the union of the ventral rami (branches) of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. The sciatic nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to various muscles and skin areas in the lower limbs, including the hamstrings, calf muscles, and the sole of the foot. Sciatic nerve disorders or injuries can result in symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the lower back, hips, legs, and feet, known as sciatica.

Perioperative care is a multidisciplinary approach to the management of patients before, during, and after surgery with the goal of optimizing outcomes and minimizing complications. It encompasses various aspects such as preoperative evaluation and preparation, intraoperative monitoring and management, and postoperative recovery and rehabilitation. The perioperative period begins when a decision is made to pursue surgical intervention and ends when the patient has fully recovered from the procedure. This care is typically provided by a team of healthcare professionals including anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, physical therapists, and other specialists as needed.

"Intraperitoneal injection" is a medical term that refers to the administration of a substance or medication directly into the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the organs contained within it. This type of injection is typically used in clinical settings for various purposes, such as delivering chemotherapy drugs, anesthetics, or other medications directly to the abdominal organs.

The procedure involves inserting a needle through the abdominal wall and into the peritoneal cavity, taking care to avoid any vital structures such as blood vessels or nerves. Once the needle is properly positioned, the medication can be injected slowly and carefully to ensure even distribution throughout the cavity.

It's important to note that intraperitoneal injections are typically reserved for situations where other routes of administration are not feasible or effective, as they carry a higher risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or injury to surrounding organs. As with any medical procedure, it should only be performed by trained healthcare professionals under appropriate clinical circumstances.

Premedication is the administration of medication before a medical procedure or surgery to prevent or manage pain, reduce anxiety, minimize side effects of anesthesia, or treat existing medical conditions. The goal of premedication is to improve the safety and outcomes of the medical procedure by preparing the patient's body in advance. Common examples of premedication include administering antibiotics before surgery to prevent infection, giving sedatives to help patients relax before a procedure, or providing medication to control acid reflux during surgery.

Isoxazoles are not a medical term, but a chemical compound. They are organic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of one nitrogen atom, one oxygen atom, and three carbon atoms. Isoxazoles have various applications in the pharmaceutical industry as they can be used to synthesize different drugs. Some isoxazole derivatives have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects. However, isoxazoles themselves are not a medical diagnosis or treatment.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure where an orthopedic surgeon uses an arthroscope (a thin tube with a light and camera on the end) to diagnose and treat problems inside a joint. The surgeon makes a small incision, inserts the arthroscope into the joint, and then uses the attached camera to view the inside of the joint on a monitor. They can then insert other small instruments through additional incisions to repair or remove damaged tissue.

Arthroscopy is most commonly used for joints such as the knee, shoulder, hip, ankle, and wrist. It offers several advantages over traditional open surgery, including smaller incisions, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and reduced risk of infection. The procedure can be used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions, including torn ligaments or cartilage, inflamed synovial tissue, loose bone or cartilage fragments, and joint damage caused by arthritis.

Salicylates are a group of chemicals found naturally in certain fruits, vegetables, and herbs, as well as in some medications like aspirin. They are named after willow bark's active ingredient, salicin, from which they were derived. Salicylates have anti-inflammatory, analgesic (pain-relieving), and antipyretic (fever-reducing) properties.

In a medical context, salicylates are often used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. High doses of salicylates can have blood thinning effects and may be used in the prevention of strokes or heart attacks. Commonly prescribed salicylate medications include aspirin, methylsalicylate, and sodium salicylate.

It is important to note that some people may have allergic reactions to salicylates, and overuse can lead to side effects such as stomach ulcers, ringing in the ears, and even kidney or liver damage.

Naproxen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly used for its analgesic (pain-relieving), antipyretic (fever-reducing), and anti-inflammatory properties. It works by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase, which leads to reduced prostaglandin production, thereby alleviating pain, inflammation, and fever.

Medical professionals prescribe Naproxen for various conditions such as:

1. Pain management: Naproxen can be used to treat mild to moderate pain caused by conditions like headaches, menstrual cramps, muscle aches, and dental issues.
2. Inflammatory conditions: It is effective in reducing inflammation associated with arthritis (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile arthritis), gout, bursitis, and tendonitis.
3. Fever reduction: Naproxen can help lower fever caused by infections or other medical conditions.

Common side effects of Naproxen include stomach upset, heartburn, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Serious side effects, although rare, may include gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney damage, and increased risk of cardiovascular events (e.g., heart attack or stroke). Patients should consult their healthcare provider for appropriate dosage and potential risks before starting Naproxen therapy.

Diflunisal is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that cause pain and inflammation in the body.

Diflunisal is available in immediate-release and extended-release tablets, and it is typically taken two to four times a day, depending on the severity of symptoms and the dosage prescribed by a healthcare provider. Common side effects of diflunisal include stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, dizziness, and skin rash.

Like other NSAIDs, diflunisal carries a risk of serious side effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcers, and perforations; kidney damage; and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It should be used with caution in people with a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding disorders, kidney or liver disease, high blood pressure, or heart disease.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions provided by a healthcare provider and to discuss any potential risks and benefits of taking diflunisal before starting therapy.

A cannabinoid receptor CB2 is a G-protein coupled receptor that is primarily found in the immune system and cells associated with the immune system. They are expressed on the cell surface and are activated by endocannabinoids, plant-derived cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids) like those found in marijuana, and synthetic cannabinoids.

CB2 receptors are involved in a variety of physiological processes including inflammation, pain perception, and immune function. They have been shown to play a role in modulating the release of cytokines, which are signaling molecules that mediate and regulate immunity and inflammation. CB2 receptors may also be found in the brain, although at much lower levels than CB1 receptors.

CB2 receptor agonists have been studied as potential treatments for a variety of conditions including pain management, neuroinflammation, and autoimmune disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand their therapeutic potential and any associated risks.

Gynecologic surgical procedures refer to the operations that are performed on the female reproductive system and related organs. These surgeries can be either minimally invasive or open procedures, depending on the condition and the patient's health status.

The indications for gynecologic surgical procedures may include but are not limited to:

1. Diagnosis and treatment of various benign and malignant conditions such as uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, endometriosis, and cancers of the reproductive organs.
2. Management of abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain, and infertility.
3. Treatment of ectopic pregnancies and miscarriages.
4. Pelvic organ prolapse repair.
5. Sterilization procedures such as tubal ligation.
6. Investigation and treatment of suspicious lesions or abnormal Pap smears.

Some common gynecologic surgical procedures include hysterectomy (removal of the uterus), oophorectomy (removal of the ovary), salpingectomy (removal of the fallopian tube), cystectomy (removal of a cyst), myomectomy (removal of fibroids while preserving the uterus), and endometrial ablation (destruction of the lining of the uterus).

Minimally invasive surgical techniques such as laparoscopy and hysteroscopy have gained popularity in recent years due to their advantages over traditional open surgeries, including smaller incisions, less postoperative pain, quicker recovery times, and reduced risk of complications.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Intravenous anesthesia, also known as IV anesthesia, is a type of anesthesia that involves the administration of one or more drugs into a patient's vein to achieve a state of unconsciousness and analgesia (pain relief) during medical procedures. The drugs used in intravenous anesthesia can include sedatives, hypnotics, analgesics, and muscle relaxants, which are carefully selected and dosed based on the patient's medical history, physical status, and the type and duration of the procedure.

The administration of IV anesthesia is typically performed by a trained anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist, who monitors the patient's vital signs and adjusts the dosage of the drugs as needed to ensure the patient's safety and comfort throughout the procedure. The onset of action for IV anesthesia is relatively rapid, usually within minutes, and the depth and duration of anesthesia can be easily titrated to meet the needs of the individual patient.

Compared to general anesthesia, which involves the administration of inhaled gases or vapors to achieve a state of unconsciousness, intravenous anesthesia is associated with fewer adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular function, and may be preferred for certain types of procedures or patients. However, like all forms of anesthesia, IV anesthesia carries risks and potential complications, including allergic reactions, infection, bleeding, and respiratory depression, and requires careful monitoring and management by trained medical professionals.

Morphine dependence is a medical condition characterized by a physical and psychological dependency on morphine, a potent opioid analgesic. This dependence develops as a result of repeated use or abuse of morphine, leading to changes in the brain's reward and pleasure pathways. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) outlines the following criteria for diagnosing opioid dependence, which includes morphine:

A. A problematic pattern of opioid use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by at least two of the following, occurring within a 12-month period:

1. Opioids are often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.
2. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control opioid use.
3. A great deal of time is spent in activities necessary to obtain the opioid, use the opioid, or recover from its effects.
4. Craving, or a strong desire or urge to use opioids.
5. Recurrent opioid use resulting in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
6. Continued opioid use despite having persistent or recurrent social or interpersonal problems caused or exacerbated by the effects of opioids.
7. Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of opioid use.
8. Recurrent opioid use in situations in which it is physically hazardous.
9. Continued opioid use despite knowing that a physical or psychological problem is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by opioids.
10. Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:
a. A need for markedly increased amounts of opioids to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
b. A markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of an opioid.
11. Withdrawal, as manifested by either of the following:
a. The characteristic opioid withdrawal syndrome.
b. The same (or a closely related) substance is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Additionally, it's important to note that if someone has been using opioids for an extended period and suddenly stops taking them, they may experience withdrawal symptoms. These can include:

- Anxiety
- Muscle aches
- Insomnia
- Runny nose
- Sweating
- Diarrhea
- Nausea or vomiting
- Abdominal cramping
- Dilated pupils

If you or someone you know is struggling with opioid use, it's essential to seek professional help. There are many resources available, including inpatient and outpatient treatment programs, support groups, and medications that can help manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

This is a list of investigational analgesics, or analgesics that are currently under development for clinical use but are not ... "There is an enormous need for novel non-opioid analgesics with no abuse liability," and Vertex's results are an "important ...
An analgesic drug, also called simply an analgesic, pain reliever, or painkiller, is any member of the group of drugs used to ... Adjuvant analgesics, also called atypical analgesics, include orphenadrine, mexiletine, pregabalin, gabapentin, cyclobenzaprine ... Analgesic choice is also determined by the type of pain: For neuropathic pain, recent research has suggested that classes of ... Analgesics are typically classified based on their mechanism of action. Paracetamol, also known as acetaminophen or APAP, is a ...
An analgesic adjuvant is a medication that is typically used for indications other than pain control but provides control of ... For instance, caffeine has minimal analgesic effect on its own, but may have an adjuvant effect when given with paracetamol ( ... Derry, C. J.; Derry, S.; Moore, R. A. (2012). "Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults". Prescriber. 23 (7 ... Zhang, W. Y. (2001). "A benefit-risk assessment of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant". Drug Safety. 24 (15): 1127-42. doi: ...
... is injury to the kidneys caused by analgesic medications such as aspirin, bucetin, phenacetin, and ... Treatment of analgesic nephropathy begins with the discontinuation of analgesics, which often halts the progression of the ... Elseviers MM, de Broe ME (1994). "Analgesic nephropathy in Belgium is related to the sales of particular analgesic mixtures". ... A small proportion of individuals with analgesic nephropathy may develop end-stage kidney disease. Analgesic nephropathy was ...
Analgesics, Combination analgesics, All stub articles, Analgesic stubs). ... Compound analgesics are those with multiple active ingredients; they include many of the stronger prescription analgesics. ... Some others have been judged to contribute too often to substance abuse.[citation needed] Lenoltec is a compound analgesic that ... Active ingredients that have been commonly used in compound analgesics include: aspirin or ibuprofen caffeine codeine or ...
A transdermal analgesic or pain relief patch is a medicated adhesive patch used to relieve minor to severe pain. There are many ... The main purpose of transdermal analgesic patches are to administer drugs in a more viable way to patients, as opposed to oral ... Levy, Sandra (10 December 2001). "External painkillers lead sales in analgesics market". Drug Topics. Retrieved 2010-03-24. ... Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Analgesics). ...
Bex was a strong compound analgesic which was popular in Australia for much of the 20th century. It came in the form of APC ( ... "Curbs on Analgesics Likely". The Canberra Times. John Fairfax Ltd. 20 June 1975. p. 3. Retrieved 17 May 2018. Dunlevy, Sue (29 ...
Opioid analgesics, chemistry and receptors. 1986, Plenum Press, New York. pp 234-235. ISBN 0-306-42130-5 Blair, A. M. J. N.; ... doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.1960.tb01240.x. Cahal DA, Dare JG, Keith D (February 1961). "A sequential trial of analgesics in labour ... Maul C, Buschmann H, Sundermann B (2005). "Opioids: 3.3 Synthetic Opioids.". Analgesics. pp. 159-169. ISBN 978-3-527-30403-5. ... Furethidine is a 4-phenylpiperidine derivative that is related to the clinically used opioid analgesic drug pethidine ( ...
May 1978). "Analgesics. 1. Synthesis and analgesic properties of N-sec-alkyl- and N-tert-alkylnormorphines". Journal of ... N-Phenethylnormorphine is an opioid analgesic drug derived from morphine by replacing the N-methyl group with β-phenethyl. It ... Eddy NB (July 1956). "The search for new analgesics". Journal of Chronic Diseases. 4 (1): 59-71. doi:10.1016/0021-9681(56)90007 ...
Goodson LH, Wiegand CJ, Splitter JS (November 1946). "Analgesics; n-alkylated-1,2-diphenylethylamines prepared by the Leuckart ...
... (INN) (developmental code name TR-5379 or TR-5379M), also known as xorphanol mesylate (USAN), is an opioid analgesic ... Polazzi JO, Kotick MP, Howes JF, Bousquet AR (December 1981). "Analgesic narcotic antagonists. 9. 6-Methylene-8 beta-alkyl-N-( ... 294-. ISBN 978-0-7514-0499-9. Evans SM, Lenz GR, Lessor RA (January 1990). "Analgesics". Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry ... Analgesics, Convulsants, Delta-opioid receptor agonists, Dissociative drugs, Kappa-opioid receptor agonists, Morphinans, ...
Analgesics. Acetaminophen or paracetamol is safe to take during pregnancy, thus is the most commonly prescribed pain reliever ...
... (brand name AGC) is discontinued extracts of Vaccinia-inoculated rabbit skin used as an analgesic, that had been ...
ISBN 978-3-527-30403-5. Cahal DA, Dare JG, Keith D (February 1961). "A sequential trial of analgesics in labour". The Journal ... Benzethidine is a 4-phenylpiperidine derivative that is related to the clinically used opioid analgesic drug pethidine ( ... Maul C, Buschmann H, Sundermann B (2005). "Opioids: 3.3 Synthetic Opioids.". Analgesics. pp. 159-169. ...
Synthetic analgesics - Aralkyl substitution on nitrogen of morphinan. UNODC Bulletin on Narcotics 1958 p 23-42. Hellerbach J, ... Ro4-1539 (furethylnorlevorphanol) is an opioid analgesic drug from the morphinan series that was discovered by the ... Schnider O, Besendorf H, Pellmont B (1966). "Morphinans". Synthetic Analgesics. Part IIA. Pergamon Press. Bulletin on Narcotics ...
Analgesics (painkillers). Increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Anticoagulants (blood thinners). Lofepramine may inhibit ...
Analgesic doses of aspirin decrease sodium loss induced by spironolactone in the urine, however this does not reduce the ... "Analgesics (toxicity)". Merck. Archived from the original on 11 April 2015. Retrieved 19 January 2018. Lappin MR, ed. (2001). ... Derry CJ, Derry S, Moore RA (December 2014). "Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults". The Cochrane ... Aspirin is readily broken down in the body to salicylic acid, which itself has anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and analgesic ...
September 2010). "Social Analgesics". Scientific American. 303 (3): 22-23. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0910-22. PMID 20812469 ...
Other drugs which can potentiate conventional analgesics or have analgesic properties in certain circumstances are called ... Hypnosis with analgesic (painkiller) has been seen to relieve chronic pain for most people and may be a safe and effective ... Opioids are effective analgesics in chronic malignant pain and modestly effective in nonmalignant pain management. However, ... It is mainly the THC strain of medical marijuana that provide analgesic benefits, as opposed to the CBD strain.[medical ...
Kacker IK, Zaheer SH (1951). "Potential Analgesics. Part I. Synthesis of substituted 4-quinazolones". J. Ind. Chem. Soc. 28: ...
... is an opioid analgesic of the morphinan family that was never marketed. It acts as a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) weak ... 403-. ISBN 978-0-12-420177-4. Aldrich JV, Vigil-Cruz SC (2003). "Narcotic Analgesics". Burger's Medicinal Chemistry and Drug ...
New general chemical methods of increasing the analgesic activity of pethidine". Journal of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical ... ISBN 0-444-20525-X. Carabateas PM, Grumbach L (September 1962). "Strong analgesics. Some 1-substituted 4-phenyl-4- ...
September 1984). "[Analgesic activity and toxicity of potent analgesics, ohmefentanyl and mefentanyl]". Zhongguo Yao Li Xue Bao ... 3-Methylfentanyl (3-MF, mefentanyl) is an opioid analgesic that is an analog of fentanyl. 3-Methylfentanyl is one of the most ... Wang ZX, Zhu YC, Chen XJ, Ji RY (1993). "[Stereoisomers of 3-methylfentanyl: synthesis, absolute configuration and analgesic ... May 1981). "Studies on synthesis and relationship between analgesic activity and receptor affinity for 3-methyl fentanyl ...
Simon EJ, Hiller JM, Edelman I (July 1973). "Stereospecific binding of the potent narcotic analgesic (3H) Etorphine to rat- ... Lemke, Thomas L.; Williams, David H.; Foye, William O. (2002). "Opioid Analgesics; Fries, DS". Foye's principles of medicinal ... 2016). "Inhibition of the cAMP/PKA/CREB Pathway Contributes to the Analgesic Effects of Electroacupuncture in the Anterior ... Terenius L (1973). "Stereospecific interaction between narcotic analgesics and a synaptic plasm a membrane fraction of rat ...
It was reported to have 30 times the activity of pethidine and a greater analgesic effect than morphine in rats, and it was ... Elpern B, Wetterau W, Carabateas P, Grumbach L (1958). "Strong Analgesics. The Preparation of Some 4-Acyloxy-1-aralkyl-4- ... Desmethylprodine or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-4-propionoxypiperidine (MPPP, Ro 2-0718) is an opioid analgesic drug developed in the ... This research produced the analgesic alphaprodine (Nisentil, Prisilidine), a very closely related compound. In 1976, a 23-year- ...
ISBN 978-0-553-34631-2; ISBN 978-0-553-17616-2 (British edition); ISBN 978-0-553-05261-9 Fries, DS (2002). "Opioid Analgesics ...
Intravenous fentanyl is often used for anesthesia and as an analgesic. To induce anesthesia, it is given with a sedative- ... Despite being a more potent analgesic, fentanyl tends to induce less nausea, as well as less histamine-mediated itching, than ... May 2015). "Postoperative analgesic effects of either a constant rate infusion of fentanyl, lidocaine, ketamine, ... Fentanyl, also spelled fentanil, is a highly potent synthetic piperidine opioid drug primarily used as an analgesic. Because ...
The hot plate test is used in basic pain research and in testing the effectiveness of analgesics by observing the reaction to ... Both hot plate and tail-flick methods are used generally for centrally acting analgesic, while peripherally acting drugs are ... However, the OPRM1 knockouts still exhibited a slight analgesic effect to tapentadol but not to morphine. This indicated that ... Ripoll N, Hascoet M, Bourin M. The four-plates test: Anxiolytic or analgesic paradigm? Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and ...
Analgesics, Ketones, Opioids, 1-Piperidinyl compounds, All stub articles, Analgesic stubs). ... Analgesics. Part I. Esters and ketones derived from α-amino-ω-cyano-ωωdiarylalkanes". Journal of the Chemical Society (Resumed ... Norpipanone (INN, BAN; Hexalgon) is an opioid analgesic related to methadone which was developed in Germany and distributed in ...
"Miscellaneous Groups of Analgesics". Opioid Analgesics. Springer US. pp. 385-403. doi:10.1007/978-1-4899-0585-7_11. ISBN ... U-47700, also known as U4, pink heroin, pinky, and pink, is an opioid analgesic drug developed by a team at Upjohn in the 1970s ... Kimergård A, Breindahl T, Hindersson P, Deluca P (October 2016). "Tampering of opioid analgesics: a serious challenge for ... Analgesic N-(2-aminocycloaliphatic)benzamides". Cheney BV, Szmuszkovicz J, Lahti RA, Zichi DA (December 1985). "Factors ...
Analgesic nephropathy involves damage to one or both kidneys caused by overexposure to mixtures of medicines, especially over- ... Analgesic nephropathy involves damage to one or both kidneys caused by overexposure to mixtures of medicines, especially over- ... Analgesic nephropathy involves damage within the internal structures of the kidney. It is caused by long-term use of analgesics ... Analgesic nephropathy involves damage to one or both kidneys caused by overexposure to mixtures of medicines, especially over- ...
A new review reveals considerable uncertainty around the efficacy and safety of analgesic medications for acute low back pain. ... The studies compared an analgesic medicine with another analgesic, placebo, or no treatment comprised of usual care or being ... the researchers conducted a systematic review and analysis of controlled trials comparing analgesics with another analgesic, ... Analgesics such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and codeine are widely used to treat nonspecific low-back pain, which is defined ...
Analgesics. Class Summary. Pain control is essential to quality patient care. It ensures patient comfort and promotes pulmonary ... Most analgesics have sedating properties that are beneficial for patients who have sustained trauma. ... Most widow spider envenomations may be managed with opioid analgesics and sedative-hypnotics. Antihypertensives are recommended ...
... opioid analgesics - Featured Topics from the National Center for Health Statistics ... Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use Among Adults: United States, 1999-2012. Prescription opioid analgesics are used to treat pain ... Opioid analgesic sales (in kilograms per 10,000) quadrupled from 1999 to 2010, and from 1999 to 2012, opioid-related deaths ( ... While much attention has been given to deaths involving opioid analgesics, in recent years there has been a steady increase in ...
This is a list of investigational analgesics, or analgesics that are currently under development for clinical use but are not ... "There is an enormous need for novel non-opioid analgesics with no abuse liability," and Vertexs results are an "important ...
Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use Among Adults: United States, 1999-2012 - Featured Topics from the National Center for Health ... From 1999-2002 to 2011-2012, the percentage of opioid analgesic users who used an opioid analgesic stronger than morphine ... Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use Among Adults: United States, 1999-2012. Posted on February 25, 2015. by NCHS ... Prescription opioid analgesics are used to treat pain from surgery, injury, and health conditions such as cancer. Opioid ...
CAPSAICIN EXTERNAL ANALGESIC- capsaicin cream. To receive this label RSS feed. Copy the URL below and paste it into your RSS ... CAPSAICIN EXTERNAL ANALGESIC- capsaicin cream. If this SPL contains inactivated NDCs listed by the FDA initiated compliance ...
Background: Opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines are often misused in clinical practice. We determined whether implementation ... First, we identified all filled prescriptions for 30 or more tablets of an opioid analgesic or a benzodiazepine during a 5-year ... Effect of a centralized prescription network on inappropriate prescriptions for opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines. Colin R ... Monthly percentages of filled prescriptions for opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines deemed inappropriate among residents of ...
... opioid analgesics and serotonin toxicity Br J Anaesth 2005 95(4):434-41 ... There are a number of lesser-known drugs that are MAOIs, such as linezolid and moclobemide; and some opioid analgesics have ... "Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, opioid analgesics and serotonin toxicity" Br J Anaesth. 2005 Oct;95(4):434-41. ...
... in infancy and increased likelihood of developing asthma may actually be due to respiratory infections that prompt analgesic ... Use of analgesics in infancy was associated with an increased likelihood of developing asthma and asthma symptoms, but when the ... Prenatal exposure to analgesics was associated with an increased likelihood of developing asthma and wheeze after controlling ... A number of studies have found a link between use of analgesics such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen in infancy and later ...
The analgesic activity of the oil was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddys hot plate methods while the acute ... The analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Zhumeria majdae essential oil were investigated in mice and rats. ... Analgesic and antiinflammatory activities of the essential oil of the unique plant Zhumeria majdae Nat Prod Commun. 2015 Apr;10 ... The analgesic activity of the oil was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddys hot plate methods while the acute ...
Acupuncture was associated with a greater immediate pain relief effect compared to sham acupuncture and analgesic injections. ... and analgesic injection (SMD, −1.33; 95% CI, −1.94 to −0.72; 3 RCTs). No serious adverse events were ... the immediate analgesic effect of acupuncture has never been reviewed. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of ... In addition, acupuncture appeared to be more effective than analgesic injection (at intragluteal site with analgesic or local ...
... August 21, 2015. Bill Schu ... experimental model of placebo analgesia combining classical conditioning and expectationand found that placebo analgesic ...
Cleft palate is a common craniofacial malformation, requiring surgical repair in late infancy or early toddlerhood. Postoperative use of opioids is common to mitigate pain following palatoplasty. To decrease opioid consumption, improve postoperative pain, and decrease complications associated with general anesthetics, intraoperative regional nerve blocks have been employed for multimodal pain relief. While the literature supports intraoperative nerve block use for postprocedural comfort in children undergoing palatoplasty, the topic has not been systematically summarized.. ...
Analgesic Assessment by Experimental Human Pain Models in Healthy Volunteers. *IX. Analgesic Assessment by Experimental Human ... Human Experimental Pain Models for Assessing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Analgesic Drugs. Anne Estrup Olesen, Trine Andresen, ... In general, the sensitivity to analgesics is better in patients than in healthy volunteers, but the lower number of studies may ... Pain models in animals have shown low predictivity for analgesic efficacy in humans, and clinical studies are often very ...
... suggesting that ketoprofen had analgesic effects in these ducks. The onset of analgesic effects may be longer than 30 minutes ... Abstract Objective-To determine whether administration of ketoprofen would have analgesic effects in spontaneously breathing ... suggesting that ketoprofen had analgesic effects in these ducks. The onset of analgesic effects may be longer than 30 minutes ... suggesting that ketoprofen had analgesic effects in these ducks. The onset of analgesic effects may be longer than 30 minutes ...
Petadolor Analgesic 30ml - A Vogel - Petadolor Analgesic 30ml - ...
To enhance the analgesic effect of Yan Hu Suo (Rhizoma Corydalis), Ru Xiang (Gummi Olibanum) and Mo Yao (Myrrha) are added to ... The formula Empirical Herbal Analgesic is what we call a "adjuct" formula, which means that it should be used with our other ... Listed below is a more comprehensive description of Empirical Herbal Analgesic formula:. *Yan Hu Suo (Rhizoma Corydalis) is the ... Empirical Herbal Analgesic. This pair of herbs is often used together synergistically to relieve a wide range of pain that may ...
Analgesics. Class Summary. Pain control is essential to quality patient care. Analgesics ensure patient comfort, promote ... The goals of therapy are to relieve pain with analgesics and to prevent complications with antibiotics. ...
"Trends in Opioid Analgesic-Prescribing Rates by Specialty, U.S., 2007-2012" 49, no. 3 (2015). Levy, Benjamin et al. "Trends in ... Opioid analgesic prescriptions are driving trends in drug overdoses, but little is known about prescribing patterns among ... Trends in Opioid Analgesic-Prescribing Rates by Specialty, U.S., 2007-2012. ... 2015). Trends in Opioid Analgesic-Prescribing Rates by Specialty, U.S., 2007-2012. 49(3). Levy, Benjamin et al. " ...
Preemptive analgesic effectiveness of single dose intravenous ibuprofen in infants undergoing cleft palate repair: a randomized ...
Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics: United States, 1999-2011 ... NOTES: Opioid analgesic categories are mutually exclusive. Deaths involving more than one opioid analgesic category (e.g., a ... Opioid analgesics: Drugs that are usually prescribed to relieve pain and include: natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics ... Benzodiazepines were involved in 31% of the opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 2011, up from 13% of the opioid-analgesic ...
Therapeutic guidelines : analgesic / Analgesic Expert Group. by Therapeutic Guidelines Limited. Analgesic Expert Group , . ... Therapeutic Guidelines, 2007Other title: Analgesic.Availability: Items available for loan: WHO HQ (1)Call number: QV 95 2007TH ... The design of analgesic clinical trials / editors, Mitchell B. Max, Russell K. Portenoy, Eugene M. Laska. by Max, Mitchell B , ...
Therefore, participants who reported the use of multiple analgesics will have a record for each reported analgesic. ... Analgesic Pain Relievers (RXQ_ANA). Data File: RXQ_ANA.xpt. First Published: June 2002. Last Revised: NA. ... The Analgesic Subsection (RXQ_ANA) is part of the Dietary Supplements and Prescription Medication Section of the Sample Person ... For the question on the number of years of use of an analgesic product nearly every day, some participants reported use for ...
DANTAS, Euler Maciel et al. Analgesic Effect of GaAlAs Laser on Anesthetic Action. Rev. cir. traumatol. buco-maxilo-fac. []. ...
Analgesic Nephropathy - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical ... The diagnosis of analgesic nephropathy is based on history of chronic analgesic use and noncontrast CT. CT signs of analgesic ... Diagnosis is based on a history of analgesic use and results of noncontrast CT. Treatment is stopping the causative analgesic. ... and dyspepsia may be related to long-term analgesic use rather than analgesic nephropathy. ...
The use of analgesics in patients with cirrhosis can be problematic. Although high-dose acetaminophen is a well-known ... What is the role of analgesics in the treatment of cirrhosis?. What is the role of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the treatment ... Opiate analgesics are not contraindicated but must be used with caution in patients with preexisting hepatic encephalopathy on ... Care should be taken to avoid postoperative infection, fluid overload, unnecessary sedatives and analgesics, and potentially ...
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics increased each year from 2,749 deaths in 1999 to 11,693 deaths in 2011 ( Figure 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • During 1999--2007, the number of poisoning deaths involving specified drugs other than opioid analgesics increased from 9,262 to 12,790, and the number involving nonspecified drugs increased from 3,608 to 8,947. (cdc.gov)
  • While much attention has been given to deaths involving opioid analgesics, in recent years there has been a steady increase in the number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin. (cdc.gov)
  • This report highlights trends in drug-poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics (referred to as opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths) and updates previous Data Briefs on this topic ( 1 , 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • NOTES: The number of drug-poisoning deaths in 2011 was 41,340, and the number of drug-poisoning deaths in 2011 involving opioid analgesics was 16,917. (cdc.gov)
  • Increase in fatal poisonings involving opioid analgesics in the United States, 1999--2006. (cdc.gov)
  • In fact, immediate analgesic effect could have clinical significance in determining the ultimate efficacy of acupuncture in pain management because of the following factors. (hindawi.com)
  • Analgesic Efficacy of Intraoperative Nerve Blocks for Primary Palatoplasty. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Pain models in animals have shown low predictivity for analgesic efficacy in humans, and clinical studies are often very confounded, blurring the evaluation. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The present review outlines the concept and limitations of human experimental pain models and addresses analgesic efficacy in healthy volunteers and patients. (aspetjournals.org)
  • This randomised, double-blind study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy of dexmedetomidine as compared with fentanyl as an adjunct to local anaesthetic in thoracic epidural for upper abdominal surgeries. (bvsalud.org)
  • Analgesic nephropathy involves damage to one or both kidneys caused by overexposure to mixtures of medicines, especially over-the-counter pain medicines (analgesics). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Analgesic nephropathy involves damage within the internal structures of the kidney. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Analgesic nephropathy is chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis caused by cumulative lifetime use of large amounts (eg, ≥ 2 kg) of certain analgesics. (msdmanuals.com)
  • However, despite removal of phenacetin from the market, analgesic nephropathy continued to occur. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chronic complaints of musculoskeletal pain, headache, malaise, and dyspepsia may be related to long-term analgesic use rather than analgesic nephropathy. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The diagnosis of analgesic nephropathy is based on history of chronic analgesic use and noncontrast CT. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving synthetic opioid analgesics other than methadone, such as fentanyl, meperidine, and propoxyphene, increased from 730 deaths in 1999 to 2,666 deaths in 2011. (cdc.gov)
  • Butorphanol is a synthetic opioid agonist-antagonist analgesic with a pharmacological and therapeutic profile that has been well established since its launch as a parenteral formulation in 1978. (pharmacycode.com)
  • Opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines are often misused in clinical practice. (cmaj.ca)
  • Benzodiazepines were involved in 31% of the opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 2011, up from 13% of the opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 1999. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2011, 5,188 opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths also involved benzodiazepines (sedatives used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and seizures), up from 527 such deaths in 1999 ( Figure 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Analgesics ensure patient comfort, promote pulmonary toilet, and have sedating properties that benefit patients who have sustained trauma. (medscape.com)
  • Until then, doctors should use caution when prescribing analgesic medicines for adults with nonspecific acute low back pain. (medscape.com)
  • A new NCHS report provides updated estimates and trends in prescription opioid analgesic use among adults aged 20 and over, overall and by selected subgroups. (cdc.gov)
  • The study looked at placebo responsiveness between children and adults in a well-established experimental model of placebo analgesia combining classical conditioning and expectationand found that placebo analgesic responses in children, while present, did not differ in magnitude from those of adults. (hcplive.com)
  • During the past decade, adults aged 55-64 and non-Hispanic white persons experienced the greatest increase in the rates of opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths. (cdc.gov)
  • Using nationwide registries , we identified all adults who filled a prescription for tramadol and other analgesics from 2014 to 2019. (bvsalud.org)
  • To fill this knowledge gap, the researchers conducted a systematic review and analysis of controlled trials comparing analgesics with another analgesic, placebo, or no treatment in patients with acute, nonspecific low back pain. (medscape.com)
  • About 70% of the opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 2011 involved natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics such as hydrocodone, morphine, and oxycodone. (cdc.gov)
  • Some researchers attribute heroin's potent analgesic effects and rapid on-set of action solely to its conversion to morphine. (brainkart.com)
  • Others contend that heroin produces analgesic effects distinct from the conversion to morphine and thus should be considered as a therapeutically useful anal-gesic. (brainkart.com)
  • It is caused by long-term use of analgesics (pain medicines), especially over-the-counter (OTC) medicines that contain phenacetin or acetaminophen, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Analgesics such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and codeine are widely used to treat nonspecific low-back pain, which is defined as pain lasting less than 6 weeks. (medscape.com)
  • A number of studies have found a link between use of analgesics such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen in infancy and later development of asthma. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • The combination of these findings has a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 93% for early diagnosis, but these specificity and sensitivity numbers are based on studies done when use of phenacetin-containing analgesics was widespread. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The models need to be designed with careful consideration of pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The studies compared an analgesic medicine with another analgesic, placebo, or no treatment comprised of usual care or being placed on a wait list. (medscape.com)
  • Does the Analgesic Placebo Response Differ in Children? (hcplive.com)
  • Ease Foot Pain with Trusted Topical Analgesics Today! (topicalanalgesics.com)
  • When it comes to finding effective solutions you can ease foot pain with trusted topical analgesics today! (topicalanalgesics.com)
  • Topical analgesics have proven to be a reliable choice. (topicalanalgesics.com)
  • Discover how trusted topical analgesics can help ease your discomfort today! (topicalanalgesics.com)
  • Each level topical analgesic contains phytocannabinoids from THC-free hemp extract along with quality botanical ingredients to be absorbed directly through the skin. (cbdnstuff.com)
  • The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned consumers in a statement issued on March 26 to avoid certain unapproved over-the-counter topical analgesic products because of the risk for dangerous health effects. (newshealth.biz)
  • Opioid analgesic sales (in kilograms per 10,000) quadrupled from 1999 to 2010, and from 1999 to 2012, opioid-related deaths (per 100,000) more than tripled. (cdc.gov)
  • During 1999-2002, 4.2% of persons aged 18 and over used a prescription opioid analgesic in the past 30 days. (cdc.gov)
  • The age-adjusted rate for opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths nearly quadrupled from 1.4 per 100,000 in 1999 to 5.4 per 100,000 in 2011. (cdc.gov)
  • Although the opioid-analgesic poisoning death rates increased each year from 1999 through 2011, the rate of increase has slowed since 2006. (cdc.gov)
  • Although the age-adjusted opioid-analgesic poisoning death rate nearly quadrupled from 1999 through 2011, the rate of increase has slowed since 2006. (cdc.gov)
  • Natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics were involved in about 11,700 drug-poisoning deaths in 2011, up from about 2,700 deaths in 1999. (cdc.gov)
  • From 1999 to 2007, the number of U.S. poisoning deaths involving any opioid analgesic (e.g., oxycodone, methadone, or hydrocodone) more than tripled, from 4,041 to 14,459, or 36% of the 40,059 total poisoning deaths in 2007. (cdc.gov)
  • In 1999, opioid analgesics were involved in 20% of the 19,741 poisoning deaths. (cdc.gov)
  • Prescription opioid analgesics are used to treat pain from surgery, injury, and health conditions such as cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • Misuse or abuse of prescription drugs, including opioid-analgesic pain relievers, is responsible for much of the recent increase in drug-poisoning deaths ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The Analgesic Subsection (RXQ_ANA) is part of the Dietary Supplements and Prescription Medication Section of the Sample Person Questionnaire. (cdc.gov)
  • Data on lifetime and current, chronic use of specific prescription and nonprescription analgesic medications were collected. (cdc.gov)
  • Note that the data do not differentiate between prescription and nonprescription analgesics. (cdc.gov)
  • The duration of acupuncture stimulation and acupuncture paradigm as well as the assessment of analgesic effect following acupuncture treatment in different clinical trials have been varied, and these time-dependent factors might be a crucial determinant in evaluating the analgesic effect of acupuncture. (hindawi.com)
  • Most analgesics have sedating properties that are beneficial for patients who have sustained trauma. (medscape.com)
  • In general, the sensitivity to analgesics is better in patients than in healthy volunteers, but the lower number of studies may bias the results. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Patients were evaluated for rescue analgesic requirements, haemodynamic stability, postoperative pain , sedation and any adverse events. (bvsalud.org)
  • But these drugs failed miserably as analgesics in human clinical trials, and, although some authors conclude differently, the data in veterinary patients is rife with issues. (mynavas.org)
  • Future studies will need to carefully collect information regarding the reasons for taking such over-the-counter drugs as analgesics during pregnancy," said Dr. Sordillo in the press release. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Some descending pathways possess high levels of opioid receptors believed to be linked to the analgesic effects of the drugs. (brainkart.com)
  • But of course, MAC reduction is not a clinical correlate of analgesia and some drugs that reduce MAC are not analgesic at all, e.g. acepromazine and midazolam. (mynavas.org)
  • Despite decades of research, there's still considerable uncertainty about the comparative effectiveness and safety of analgesics for the treatment of acute low back pain, new research shows. (medscape.com)
  • Although acupuncture is gaining popularity for the treatment of nonspecific pain, the immediate analgesic effect of acupuncture has never been reviewed. (hindawi.com)
  • Acupuncture was associated with a greater immediate pain relief effect compared to sham acupuncture and analgesic injections. (hindawi.com)
  • Human experimental pain models may therefore help to evaluate mechanisms and effect of analgesics and bridge findings from basic studies to the clinic. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Models including deep, tonic pain and hyperalgesia are better to predict the effects of analgesics. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The formula Empirical Herbal Analgesic is what we call a "adjuct" formula, which means that it should be used with our other base formulas that we offer to work to help your dog dog deal with with joint pain or the pain that seems to come along with weakness of the hind legs. (pawhealer.com)
  • The goals of therapy are to relieve pain with analgesics and to prevent complications with antibiotics. (medscape.com)
  • The groups were comparable regarding intraoperative analgesic requirements, recovery times and postoperative pain scores. (bvsalud.org)
  • For the management of pain when the use of an opioid analgesic is appropriate. (pharmacycode.com)
  • The introduction of a transnasal formulation of butorphanol represents a new and noninvasive presentation of an analgesic for moderate to severe pain. (pharmacycode.com)
  • Deaths involving more than one opioid analgesic category (e.g., a death involving both methadone and a natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesic such as oxycodone) are counted in both categories. (cdc.gov)
  • Methadone was involved in 26% of all opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 2011, compared with 38% of all opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 2007. (cdc.gov)
  • 41% (16,917 deaths) of them involved opioid analgesics. (cdc.gov)
  • To date, most clinical trials and systematic reviews have focused on the cumulative analgesic effects. (hindawi.com)
  • The design of analgesic clinical trials / editors, Mitchell B. Max, Russell K. Portenoy, Eugene M. Laska. (who.int)
  • Title : Trends in Opioid Analgesic-Prescribing Rates by Specialty, U.S., 2007-2012 Personal Author(s) : Levy, Benjamin;Paulozzi, Leonard;Mack, Karin A.;Jones, Christopher M. (cdc.gov)
  • The analgesic activity of the oil was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddy's hot plate methods while the acute anti-inflammatory effect was investigated by inflammatory paw edema in rat. (nih.gov)
  • Also it exhibited a central analgesic effect as evidenced by a significant increase in reaction time in the hot plate method. (nih.gov)
  • To enhance the analgesic effect of Yan Hu Suo (Rhizoma Corydalis), Ru Xiang (Gummi Olibanum) and Mo Yao (Myrrha) are added to Empirical Herbal Analgesic. (pawhealer.com)
  • 2021) in which there was a reported positive effect of maropitant on analgesic outcomes, the drug was administered as an infusion at 100 mcg/kg/hr following a 1 mg/kg IV loading dose. (mynavas.org)
  • Use of tramadol and other analgesics following media attention and risk minimization actions from regulators: a Danish nationwide drug utilization study. (bvsalud.org)
  • We also described switching between analgesics , treatment duration , skewness in drug use, and doctor-shopping. (bvsalud.org)
  • Use of analgesics in infancy was associated with an increased likelihood of developing asthma and asthma symptoms, but when the researchers controlled for respiratory infections and ear infections in the first year of life, this association disappeared in most cases. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Those sequelae might occur with each Lyme disease manifestation and are heterogenous, ranging from mild, self-resolving symptoms to debilitating syndromes that greatly impair the quality of life and require regular use of analgesics ( 7 - 13 , 15 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Objective -To determine whether administration of ketoprofen would have analgesic effects in spontaneously breathing ducks anesthetized with isoflurane. (avma.org)
  • Conclusion and Clinical Relevance -Ketoprofen reduced the increases in heart and respiratory rates associated with application of a noxious stimulus in spontaneously breathing adult Mallard ducks anesthetized with isoflurane delivered at approximately 2.9%, suggesting that ketoprofen had analgesic effects in these ducks. (avma.org)
  • The onset of analgesic effects may be longer than 30 minutes in some ducks. (avma.org)
  • It has been shown that μ 1 -receptors mediate the analgesic and euphoric effects of the opioids and physical dependence on them, whereas μ 2 -receptors mediate the bradycardiac and respiratory depressant effects. (brainkart.com)
  • δ -Receptors, of which at least two subtypes have been identified pharmacolog-ically, mediate spinal analgesic effects and have been im-plicated in the modulation of tolerance to μ -opioids. (brainkart.com)
  • The combination of a plausible mechanism for analgesic effects and some favorable preclinical work led to enthusiasm for their development as marketable products. (mynavas.org)
  • In the postoperative period patient -controlled analgesic pumps were used to deliver similar types of mixtures via the epidural catheter . (bvsalud.org)
  • We described incidence rates , prevalence proportions, and total use of tramadol and other analgesics over time . (bvsalud.org)
  • However, the researchers had no information on why the mothers took analgesics during pregnancy, so they could not adjust for these potentially confounding factors. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • These results suggest that respiratory infections in infancy, and not analgesic use, are the actual underlying risk factor for asthma and wheeze in children," said lead study author Joanne Sordillo, ScD, instructor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, in a press release. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Diagnosis is based on a history of analgesic use and results of noncontrast CT. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Zhumeria majdae essential oil were investigated in mice and rats. (nih.gov)
  • NOTES: Opioid analgesic categories are mutually exclusive. (cdc.gov)

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