Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.
A pair of anal glands or sacs, located on either side of the ANUS, that produce and store a dark, foul-smelling fluid in carnivorous animals such as MEPHITIDAE and DOGS. The expelled fluid is used as a defensive repellent (in skunks) or a material to mark territory (in dogs).
Perianal glands, also known as hepatoid glands, are sebaceous glands located in the perianal region of many mammals, including humans, that produce and secret lubricating oils for skin protection and cleanliness.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
Sebaceous gland neoplasms are uncommon cutaneous tumors that originate from the sebaceous glands, which can be benign (e.g., seborrheic keratosis, syringoma, trichofolliculoma) or malignant (e.g., sebaceous carcinoma, sebaceomatosis, mucoepidermoid carcinoma).
Neoplasms of the sublingual glands.
A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.
A tumor of both low- and high-grade malignancy. The low-grade grow slowly, appear in any age group, and are readily cured by excision. The high-grade behave aggressively, widely infiltrate the salivary gland and produce lymph node and distant metastases. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas account for about 21% of the malignant tumors of the parotid gland and 10% of the sublingual gland. They are the most common malignant tumor of the parotid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240)
Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.
Toxic, possibly carcinogenic, monomer of neoprene, a synthetic rubber; causes damage to skin, lungs, CNS, kidneys, liver, blood cells and fetuses. Synonym: 2-chlorobutadiene.
Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A usually benign tumor made up predominantly of myoepithelial cells.
A benign tumor characterized histologically by tall columnar epithelium within a lymphoid tissue stroma. It is usually found in the salivary glands, especially the parotid.
Submandibular Gland Neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors, which can be benign or malignant, originating from the glandular tissues of the submandibular salivary gland located beneath the mandible (jawbone).
Accessory salivary glands located in the lip, cheek, tongue, floor of mouth, palate and intramaxillary.
Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).
Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.
Sweat gland neoplasms are abnormal growths that can be benign or malignant, originating from the sweat glands (eccrine or apocrine) and found anywhere on the skin surface.
MAMMARY GLANDS in the non-human MAMMALS.
Glands of external secretion that release its secretions to the body's cavities, organs, or surface, through a duct.
One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in five dogs. (1/21)

Tumors of the perianal area of dogs are common and include multiple tumor types. Whereas perianal adenomas occur often, adenocarcinomas of the apocrine glands of the anal sac occur less frequently. A review of the literature revealed no reports of squamous cell carcinomas arising from the epithelial lining of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinomas originating from the lining of the anal sac were diagnosed in five dogs. Microscopically, the tumors consisted of variably sized invasive nests and cords of epithelial cells displaying squamous differentiation. Four of the five dogs were euthanatized because of problems associated with local infiltration by the tumors. In the fifth dog, there was no evidence of tumor 7 months after surgical removal, but further follow up was not available.  (+info)

Metastatic anal sac adenocarcinoma in a dog presenting for acute paralysis. (2/21)

A 4-year old, female spayed terrier was referred for hind end paresis that rapidly progressed to paralysis. Spinal radiographs revealed vertebral collapse and bony lysis. Myelography confirmed spinal cord compression and surgical exploration found an extradural soft tissue mass. Metastatic anal sac adenocarcinoma was diagnosed at postmortem examination.  (+info)

Effective treatment of perianal tumors in dogs with electrochemotherapy. (3/21)

BACKGROUND: Electrochemotherapy is an antitumor therapy that utilizes locally-delivered, short intense direct current electric pulse to the tumor nodule plus chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the electrochemotherapy treatment of perianal tumors of different sizes in dogs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 12 dogs, 26 tumor nodules of perianal tumors of different size, and clinically expected to be of different histological type, were treated with electrochemotherapy. Electrochemotherapy consisted of intratumoral injection of cisplatin (1 mg/cm3) or bleomycin (3 mg/cm3), followed by application of electric pulses (8 electric pulses; amplitude, 910 V, duration, 100 micros, frequency, 1 Hz) to the tumor nodule. RESULTS: Responses to treatment were assessed 4 weeks after the therapy; 82% of all tumors treated with electrochemotherapy responded with objective response (OR) (complete response (CR)=41%, partial response (PR)=41%), 16% responded with no change (NC) and 1 tumor (2%) went to progressive disease (PD). At the end of the observation period for each tumor, ranging from 1 to 34 months, 92% OR (CR=65%, PR=27%), 8% NC and no PD were obtained. No major local or general side-effects were noted. CONCLUSION: Electrochemotherapy with cisplatin or bleomycin is an effective treatment of perianal tumors in dogs. The advantages of this therapy are its simplicity, short duration of treatment sessions, low chemotherapeutic doses and insignificant side-effects, as well as the fact that the subject does not have to stay in hospital.  (+info)

Lectin histochemistry on squamous metaplasia in different epithelial tumors of dogs. (4/21)

Biotinylated lectins and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex were used to study the correlation between cellular glycoconjugates' expression and squamous maturation in normal canine skin and in various epithelial neoplasms. Normal skin tissue was obtained from five, male, random-source dogs, 5 to 7 years old. The tumors tested, selected from the files of our Department, were fifteen squamous cell carcinomas from different tissue origin, five hepatoid perianal gland adenocarcinomas with squamous metaplasia, and fourteen solid mammary carcinomas with and without histologic evidence of squamous metaplasia. Except for mammary gland carcinomas, all tumors had been surgically excised from male dogs. Intermediate filament aggregation of twelve solid mammary gland carcinomas were studied electron microscopically. The basal and the lower spinous cells in normal skin and the less differentiated cells in squamous cell carcinomas stained moderately with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I. Spinous and granular cell layers stained strongly with Phytolacca americana mitogen and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin. Both lectins stained well-differentiated cells in squamous cell carcinomas. The electron microscopic study carried out in solid carcinomas of mammary glands revealed some relationship between the presence of intracytoplasmic tonofibrils and the binding of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I and Phytolacca americana mitogen to the tumors tested. Our results suggest that the glycosylation pattern occurring during normal keratinocyte differentiation is conserved in squamous cell carcinomas and that Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I and Phytolacca americana mitogen may represent useful tools in distinguishing poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas from other poorly differentiated mammary epithelial tumors.  (+info)

Anal sac gland carcinoma in a cat. (5/21)

A perianal mass in a 15-year-old domestic shorthair cat with a history of a firm, painful swelling in the left ventrolateral perianal region was surgically excised and submitted for light microscopic evaluation. Histologically, this was a poorly demarcated, unencapsulated, multilobulated neoplasm that invaded surrounding perirectal skeletal muscle bundles. Lobules were composed of sheets and acinar arrangements of cuboidal to round neoplastic epithelial cells with scant to moderate eosinophilic to amphophilic cytoplasm and a round or oval nucleus with coarse chromatin. Mitotic figures were 2 per 40 x objective field. Acinar lumina sometimes contained eosinophilic proteinaceous material or cell debris. These microscopic features are consistent with anal sac gland carcinoma. This is the second report of this neoplasm in a cat.  (+info)

Adjuvant electrochemotherapy for incompletely excised anal sac carcinoma in a dog. (6/21)

Canine anal sac gland carcinoma (ASGC) is a frequently described neoplasm that is highly aggressive and can frequently lead to metastatic spread. In this paper, we describe the successful treatment of an incompletely excised ASGC by using cisplatin selectively driven within the tumor cells by trains of biphasic pulses. The dog received two courses of electrochemotherapy 14 days apart. Neither systemic nor local toxicities were detected during the whole course of therapy. The dog is still in complete remission after 18 months. Electrochemotherapy is a safe and efficacious adjuvant therapy for ASGC and warrants further investigation in order to standardize its protocols.  (+info)

Biphasic pulses enhance bleomycin efficacy in a spontaneous canine genital tumor model of chemoresistance: Sticker sarcoma. (7/21)

 (+info)

Anal sac gland carcinoma in 64 cats in the United kingdom (1995-2007). (8/21)

 (+info)

Anal gland neoplasms, also known as anal sac tumors, are abnormal growths that develop from the cells lining the anal glands. These glands are located on either side of the anus in dogs and some other animals, and they produce a scent used for marking territory.

Anal gland neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Malignant tumors are more common and tend to grow quickly, invading surrounding tissues and spreading to other parts of the body (metastasis). Common symptoms of anal gland neoplasms include straining to defecate, bleeding from the rectum, and a firm mass that can be felt near the anus.

Treatment for anal gland neoplasms typically involves surgical removal of the tumor. In some cases, radiation therapy or chemotherapy may also be recommended. The prognosis for animals with anal gland neoplasms depends on several factors, including the size and location of the tumor, whether it has spread to other parts of the body, and the overall health of the animal.

Anal sacs, also known as scent glands or scent sacs, are small paired sac-like structures located on either side of the anus in many mammals, including dogs and cats. These sacs produce a foul-smelling liquid that is used for marking territory and communication with other animals. In some cases, the ducts leading from the anal sacs can become blocked, causing discomfort or infection, which may require medical intervention.

Perianal glands, also known as hepatoid glands or circumanal glands, are specialized sebaceous glands located in the perianal region of many mammals, including dogs and cats. These glands are found in the skin around the anus and are responsible for producing a scent that is unique to each individual animal. The secretions from these glands play a role in territorial marking and communication.

In humans, there are no true perianal glands, but there are some sweat glands located in the perianal region that can sometimes become inflamed or infected, leading to conditions such as hidradenitis suppurativa or perianal abscesses. However, these conditions are not related to the perianal glands found in animals.

Salivary gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the salivary glands. These glands are responsible for producing saliva, which helps in digestion, lubrication of food and maintaining oral health. Salivary gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as swelling, painless lumps, or difficulty swallowing if they grow large enough to put pressure on surrounding tissues.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and have the potential to invade nearby structures and metastasize (spread) to distant organs. Symptoms of malignant salivary gland neoplasms may include rapid growth, pain, numbness, or paralysis of facial nerves.

Salivary gland neoplasms can occur in any of the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) or in the minor salivary glands located throughout the mouth and throat. The exact cause of these neoplasms is not fully understood, but risk factors may include exposure to radiation, certain viral infections, and genetic predisposition.

Sebaceous gland neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the sebaceous glands, which are small oil-producing glands found in the skin. These glands are responsible for producing sebum, a natural oil that helps keep the skin and hair moisturized. Sebaceous gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign sebaceous gland neoplasms include:

* Seborrheic keratosis: These are common, harmless growths that appear as rough, scaly patches on the skin. They can be tan, brown, or black in color and vary in size from small to large.
* Sebaceous adenoma: This is a benign tumor that arises from the sebaceous glands. It typically appears as a small, yellowish bump on the skin.

Malignant sebaceous gland neoplasms include:

* Sebaceous carcinoma: This is a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer that arises from the sebaceous glands. It often appears as a hard, painless nodule on the eyelid or other areas of the face and can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
* Basal cell carcinoma: While not exclusively a sebaceous gland neoplasm, basal cell carcinomas can sometimes arise from the sebaceous glands. These are slow-growing but invasive skin cancers that typically appear as pearly or flesh-colored bumps on the skin.

It is important to have any new or changing growths on the skin evaluated by a healthcare professional to determine whether they are benign or malignant and to develop an appropriate treatment plan if necessary.

Sublingual gland neoplasms refer to the abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the sublingual salivary glands, which are located beneath the tongue in the floor of the mouth. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign sublingual gland neoplasms are typically slow-growing and cause little to no discomfort, although they may become large enough to interfere with speaking, swallowing, or breathing. Malignant sublingual gland neoplasms, on the other hand, can grow rapidly, invade surrounding tissues, and potentially spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

The most common type of benign sublingual gland neoplasm is a pleomorphic adenoma, while malignant tumors may include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment options for sublingual gland neoplasms depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor but often involve surgical excision, with or without radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis.

A pleomorphic adenoma is a type of benign (non-cancerous) tumor that typically develops in the salivary glands, although they can also occur in other areas such as the nasopharynx and skin. "Pleomorphic" refers to the diverse appearance of the cells within the tumor, which can vary in size, shape, and arrangement.

Pleomorphic adenomas are composed of a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, which can form glandular structures, squamous (scale-like) cells, and areas that resemble cartilage or bone. These tumors tend to grow slowly and usually do not spread to other parts of the body.

While pleomorphic adenomas are generally not dangerous, they can cause problems if they become large enough to press on surrounding tissues or structures. In some cases, these tumors may also undergo malignant transformation, leading to a cancerous growth known as carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma. Surgical removal is the standard treatment for pleomorphic adenomas, and the prognosis is generally good with proper management.

Parotid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the parotid gland, which is the largest of the salivary glands and is located in front of the ear and extends down the neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign parotid neoplasms are typically slow-growing, painless masses that may cause facial asymmetry or difficulty in chewing or swallowing if they become large enough to compress surrounding structures. The most common type of benign parotid tumor is a pleomorphic adenoma.

Malignant parotid neoplasms, on the other hand, are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. They may present as rapidly growing masses that are firm or fixed to surrounding structures. Common types of malignant parotid tumors include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

The diagnosis of parotid neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to determine the nature of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is a type of cancer that develops in the salivary glands or, less commonly, in other areas such as the lungs or skin. It is called "mucoepidermoid" because it contains two types of cells: mucus-secreting cells and squamous (or epidermoid) cells.

Mucoepidermoid carcinomas can vary in their behavior, ranging from low-grade tumors that grow slowly and rarely spread to other parts of the body, to high-grade tumors that are aggressive and can metastasize. The treatment and prognosis for mucoepidermoid carcinoma depend on several factors, including the grade and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health.

It is important to note that while I strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, this definition may not capture all the nuances of this medical condition. Therefore, it is always best to consult with a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Palatal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur on the palate, which is the roof of the mouth. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slower growing and less likely to spread, while malignant neoplasms are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and organs.

Palatal neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic factors, environmental exposures, and viral infections. They may present with symptoms such as mouth pain, difficulty swallowing, swelling or lumps in the mouth, bleeding, or numbness in the mouth or face.

The diagnosis of palatal neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies, and sometimes biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or spread of the neoplasm.

Chloroprene is a colorless liquid with a mild, rubbery odor. It is chemically known as 2-chlorobuta-1,3-diene and is primarily used in the industrial production of polychloroprene, a type of synthetic rubber that is resistant to heat, oil, and weathering.

In a medical context, chloroprene itself is not commonly used or encountered. However, exposure to chloroprene during its manufacture or use in industrial settings has been associated with an increased risk of certain health effects, including neurological damage, liver toxicity, and cancer. Therefore, occupational safety regulations exist to limit worker exposure to this chemical.

Adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is a rare type of cancer that can occur in various glands and tissues of the body, most commonly in the salivary glands. AdCC is characterized by its slow growth and tendency to spread along nerves. It typically forms solid, cystic, or mixed tumors with distinct histological features, including epithelial cells arranged in tubular, cribriform, or solid patterns.

The term "carcinoma" refers to a malignant tumor originating from the epithelial cells lining various organs and glands. In this case, adenoid cystic carcinoma is a specific type of carcinoma that arises in the salivary glands or other glandular tissues.

The primary treatment options for AdCC include surgical resection, radiation therapy, and sometimes chemotherapy. Despite its slow growth, adenoid cystic carcinoma has a propensity to recur locally and metastasize to distant sites such as the lungs, bones, and liver. Long-term follow-up is essential due to the risk of late recurrences.

Myoepithelioma is a very rare, benign (non-cancerous) tumor that arises from the myoepithelial cells, which are found in various glands throughout the body, including salivary glands, sweat glands, and mammary glands. These tumors typically appear as slow-growing, painless masses. While they are usually benign, some myoepitheliomas can become malignant (cancerous) and invasive, leading to more serious health concerns. Treatment for myoepithelioma typically involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Adenolymphoma is a rare, benign tumor that arises from the lymphoid tissue found in glandular structures, such as the salivary glands. It is also known as Warthin's tumor or cystic papillary adenolymphoma.

The tumor is composed of multiple cyst-like spaces lined by columnar epithelial cells and surrounded by lymphoid tissue, which may contain lymphocytes, plasma cells, and occasionally, germinal centers. The etiology of adenolymphoma is unclear, but it has been associated with smoking and genetic factors.

Adenolymphomas are typically slow-growing and painless, although they can cause discomfort or facial asymmetry if they become large enough. They are usually diagnosed through imaging studies such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, followed by a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment of adenolymphoma typically involves surgical excision, which is usually curative. Recurrence after surgery is rare, but long-term follow-up is recommended due to the potential for malignant transformation into squamous cell carcinoma or other malignancies.

Submandibular gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the submandibular glands. These are one of the three pairs of major salivary glands located beneath the jaw and produce saliva that helps in digestion. Submandibular gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing, do not invade surrounding tissues, and rarely spread to other parts of the body. Common types of benign submandibular gland neoplasms include pleomorphic adenomas and monomorphic adenomas.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, are aggressive and can invade nearby structures or metastasize (spread) to distant organs. Common types of malignant submandibular gland neoplasms include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and acinic cell carcinoma.

Symptoms of submandibular gland neoplasms may include a painless swelling or mass in the neck, difficulty swallowing, speaking, or breathing, numbness or tingling in the tongue or lips, and unexplained weight loss. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor but often involve surgical excision, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis.

Minor salivary glands are numerous small exocrine glands that produce saliva and are distributed throughout the oral cavity, nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx, and paranasal sinuses. They are classified as "minor" due to their smaller size compared to the three pairs of major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual). The minor salivary glands are primarily mucous glands, although some contain serous cells. They are responsible for producing approximately 5-10% of the total saliva in the mouth. These glands help moisten the oral cavity, protect the mucosal lining, and facilitate speaking, chewing, and swallowing.

Salivary glands are exocrine glands that produce saliva, which is secreted into the oral cavity to keep the mouth and throat moist, aid in digestion by initiating food breakdown, and help maintain dental health. There are three major pairs of salivary glands: the parotid glands located in the cheeks, the submandibular glands found beneath the jaw, and the sublingual glands situated under the tongue. Additionally, there are numerous minor salivary glands distributed throughout the oral cavity lining. These glands release their secretions through a system of ducts into the mouth.

Endocrine gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths (tumors) that develop in the endocrine glands. These glands are responsible for producing hormones, which are chemical messengers that regulate various functions and processes in the body. Neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms tend to grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can invade nearby tissues and organs and may also metastasize (spread) to distant sites.

Endocrine gland neoplasms can occur in any of the endocrine glands, including:

1. Pituitary gland: located at the base of the brain, it produces several hormones that regulate growth and development, as well as other bodily functions.
2. Thyroid gland: located in the neck, it produces thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism and calcium balance.
3. Parathyroid glands: located near the thyroid gland, they produce parathyroid hormone that regulates calcium levels in the blood.
4. Adrenal glands: located on top of each kidney, they produce hormones such as adrenaline, cortisol, and aldosterone that regulate stress response, metabolism, and blood pressure.
5. Pancreas: located behind the stomach, it produces insulin and glucagon, which regulate blood sugar levels, and digestive enzymes that help break down food.
6. Pineal gland: located in the brain, it produces melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles.
7. Gonads (ovaries and testicles): located in the pelvis (ovaries) and scrotum (testicles), they produce sex hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone that regulate reproductive function and secondary sexual characteristics.

Endocrine gland neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on the type and location of the tumor. For example, a pituitary gland neoplasm may cause headaches, vision problems, or hormonal imbalances, while an adrenal gland neoplasm may cause high blood pressure, weight gain, or mood changes.

Diagnosis of endocrine gland neoplasms typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and laboratory tests to measure hormone levels. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormonal therapy, depending on the type and stage of the tumor.

Sweat gland neoplasms are abnormal growths that develop in the sweat glands. These growths can be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign sweat gland neoplasms include hidradenomas and syringomas, which are usually slow-growing and cause little to no symptoms. Malignant sweat gland neoplasms, also known as sweat gland carcinomas, are rare but aggressive cancers that can spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as a lump or mass under the skin, pain, swelling, and redness. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the growth.

Mammary glands are specialized exocrine glands found in mammals, including humans and other animals. These glands are responsible for producing milk, which is used to nurse offspring after birth. The mammary glands are located in the breast region of female mammals and are usually rudimentary or absent in males.

In animals, mammary glands can vary in number and location depending on the species. For example, humans and other primates have two mammary glands, one in each breast. Cows, goats, and sheep, on the other hand, have multiple pairs of mammary glands located in their lower abdominal region.

Mammary glands are made up of several structures, including lobules, ducts, and connective tissue. The lobules contain clusters of milk-secreting cells called alveoli, which produce and store milk. The ducts transport the milk from the lobules to the nipple, where it is released during lactation.

Mammary glands are an essential feature of mammals, as they provide a source of nutrition for newborn offspring. They also play a role in the development and maintenance of the mother-infant bond, as nursing provides opportunities for physical contact and bonding between the mother and her young.

Exocrine glands are a type of gland in the human body that produce and release substances through ducts onto an external or internal surface. These glands are responsible for secreting various substances such as enzymes, hormones, and lubricants that help in digestion, protection, and other bodily functions.

Exocrine glands can be further classified into three types based on their mode of secretion:

1. Merocrine glands: These glands release their secretions by exocytosis, where the secretory product is enclosed in a vesicle that fuses with the cell membrane and releases its contents outside the cell. Examples include sweat glands and mucous glands.
2. Apocrine glands: These glands release their secretions by pinching off a portion of the cytoplasm along with the secretory product. An example is the apocrine sweat gland found in the armpits and genital area.
3. Holocrine glands: These glands release their secretions by disintegrating and releasing the entire cell, including its organelles and secretory products. An example is the sebaceous gland found in the skin, which releases an oily substance called sebum.

The submandibular glands are one of the major salivary glands in the human body. They are located beneath the mandible (jawbone) and produce saliva that helps in digestion, lubrication, and protection of the oral cavity. The saliva produced by the submandibular glands contains enzymes like amylase and mucin, which aid in the digestion of carbohydrates and provide moisture to the mouth and throat. Any medical condition or disease that affects the submandibular gland may impact its function and could lead to problems such as dry mouth (xerostomia), swelling, pain, or infection.

... anal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.445 - duodenal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.501 - ileal neoplasms MeSH ... sebaceous gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.805.776 - sweat gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.839.500 - muscle neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... lip neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.591.692 - palatal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.591.824 - salivary gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... peritoneal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078 - adrenal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078.265 - adrenal cortex neoplasms MeSH ...
... rectal neoplasms MeSH C06.301.371.411.307.790.040 - anus neoplasms MeSH C06.301.371.411.307.790.040.040 - anal gland neoplasms ... rectal neoplasms MeSH C06.405.249.411.307.790.040 - anus neoplasms MeSH C06.405.249.411.307.790.040.040 - anal gland neoplasms ... rectal neoplasms MeSH C06.405.469.491.307.790.040 - anus neoplasms MeSH C06.405.469.491.307.790.040.040 - anal gland neoplasms ... rectal neoplasms MeSH C06.405.469.860.180.500.040 - anus neoplasms MeSH C06.405.469.860.180.500.040.040 - anal gland neoplasms ...
... urinary adrenal glands kidneys ureter circulatory aorta inferior vena cava digestive anal canal Secondarily retroperitoneal, ... Retroperitoneal fibrosis Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection It is also possible to have a neoplasm in this area, more ... It contains the following structures: Adrenal gland Kidney Renal vessels Perirenal fat, which is also called the "adipose ... commonly a metastasis; or very rarely a primary neoplasm. The most common type is a sarcoma followed by lymphoma, extragonadal ...
Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma Mast cell leukemia Mediastinal large B cell lymphoma Multiple myeloma/plasma cell neoplasm ... carcinoma Oral cancer Oropharyngeal cancer Paranasal sinus and nasal cavity cancer Pharyngeal cancer Salivary gland cancer ... Parathyroid cancer Pheochromocytoma Thyroid cancer Merkel cell carcinoma Uveal melanoma Retinoblastoma Optic nerve glioma Anal ...
... familial Adrenal cancer Adrenal disorder Adrenal gland hyperfunction Adrenal gland hypofunction Adrenal hyperplasia Adrenal ... Abdominal neoplasms Aberrant subclavian artery Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome Abnormal systemic venous return Abruzzo-Erickson ... recessive Acrorenoocular syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ACTH resistance Actinic keratosis Actinomycetales causes anal ... X-linked Adrenal incidentaloma Adrenal insufficiency Adrenal macropolyadenomatosis Adrenal medulla neoplasm Adrenocortical ...
Thickening of internal anal sphincter. Thickening of external anal sphincter. Thickening of submucosal layer. Intussusception. ... Gland entrapment in the submucosa is sometimes seen, which is termed colitis cystica profunda. Treatment of SRUS is difficult ... The differential diagnosis is as follows: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). rectal neoplasms (bowel cancer). Chronic vascular ... usually 10 cm from the anal verge. Less commonly there may be ulcers in the anal canal or even in the sigmoid colon. The nature ...
However, subsequent studies have found gene mutations in FHI tumor cells and conclude that it is a true neoplasm, i.e. a growth ... and anal area. Most cases presented as solitary masses but 3 cases presenting with 2 tumors and 1 case presenting with 5 tumors ... sweat gland enlargement, and/or increased hair overlaying the tumor. Sixty-eight percent of these cases were diagnosed in the ... In any event, the identification of these EGFR can help distinguish FHI from other pediatric spindle cell neoplasms with ...
A Case Report About the Relationship Between Neoplasms of the Mammary-Like-Glands and Hormones". Cureus. 13 (2): e13061. doi: ... Spindler L, Pommaret E, Moyal Barracco M, Fathallah N, Plantier F, Duchatelle V, de Parades V (September 2019). "[Anal and ... MLAGs are a type of apocrine gland. MLAGs were once classified as abnormally located breast tissue glands (see accessory breast ... Ectopic papillary hidradenomas are thought to be tumors of apocrine glands which have an as yet unclear relationship to MLAGs. ...
Parietal cell adenocarcinoma M8215/3 Adenocarcinoma of anal glands (C21.1) Adenocarcinoma of anal ducts M8220/0 Adenomatous ... NOS M8000/6 Neoplasm, metastatic Neoplasm, metastatic Tumor, metastatic Tumor, secondary Tumor embolus M8000/9 Neoplasm, ... NOS M8400/1 Sweat gland tumor, NOS (C44._) M8400/3 Sweat gland adenocarcinoma (C44._) Sweat gland carcinoma Sweat gland tumor, ... benign M8000/1 Neoplasm, uncertain whether benign or malignant Neoplasm, NOS Tumor, NOS Unclassified tumor, uncertain whether ...
Adrenal gland - The adrenal glands (also known as suprarenal glands) are endocrine glands that produce a variety of hormones ... Anal+Canal at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) "anal canal" at Dorland's Medical ... Papillary - In oncology, papillary refers to neoplasms with projections ("papillae", from Latin, 'nipple') that have ... Salivary gland - The salivary glands in mammals are exocrine glands that produce saliva through a system of ducts. Humans have ...
In the embryo, the epidermis, hair, and glands form from the ectoderm, which is chemically influenced by the underlying ... neoplasms, and cysts are skin lesions that develop from the epidermal layer of the skin. Aberrant basal cell carcinoma ... syndrome Childhood tumor syndrome Chondrodysplasia punctata Cicatricial junctional epidermolysis bullosa Craniosynostosis-anal ... Within the latter type, the hairs occur in structures called pilosebaceous units, each with hair follicle, sebaceous gland, and ...
The seminal vesicles (also called vesicular glands, or seminal glands) are a pair of convoluted tubular glands that lie behind ... This, over the fourth to the seventh week, divides into a urogenital sinus and the beginnings of the anal canal, with a wall ... Even rarer neoplasms include sarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, yolk sac tumor, neuroendocrine carcinoma, paraganglioma, ... Male accessory gland infection (MAGI) Male accessory glands Ejaculatory duct Urethra Prostate List of distinct cell types in ...
Age group 12-49 (Paternal age effect) Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes Centriole Neoplasm, e.g. seminoma ... Female infertility Fertility preservation Fertility testing Infertility Male accessory gland infection (MAGI) Meiosis ... failure of immunosuppression and unprotected receptive anal or oral sex with men. Chromosomal anomalies and genetic mutations ... male accessory gland infection Retrograde ejaculation Ejaculatory duct obstruction Hypospadias Impotence The diagnosis of ...
Dryness The salivary glands and tear glands have a radiation tolerance of about 30 Gy in 2 Gy fractions, a dose which is ... For example, non-melanoma skin cancer, head and neck cancer, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer, anal ... Hypopituitarism commonly develops after radiation therapy for sellar and parasellar neoplasms, extrasellar brain tumours, head ... Similarly, sweat glands in treated skin (such as the armpit) tend to stop working, and the naturally moist vaginal mucosa is ...
... the body's widely distributed major type of sweat glands, as opposed to the apocrine sweat glands which are located primarily ... McEvoy CR, Fox SB, Prall OW (June 2020). "Emerging entities in NUTM1-rearranged neoplasms". Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer. 59 (6 ... or around the anal area (0.6%) and had been present for as little as 4 days or as long as 60 years (average 5.6 years). ... And 4) eccrine poromas are eccrine sweat gland tumors that consist of three cell types (see the histopathology section of ...
The lower rectum to the anal canal above the pectinate line drain to the internal ileocolic nodes. The anal canal below the ... The gland somewhat resembles a caecum in structure but is not a homologous structure. Intestines Colon. Deep dissection. ... and left-sided colorectal neoplasms after colonoscopy: population-based study". J Natl Cancer Inst. 102 (2): 89-95. doi:10.1093 ... and anal canal. Some other sources exclude the anal canal. In humans, the large intestine begins in the right iliac region of ...
Trans-anal (endo-anal) procedures are also described where access to the internal rectum is gained through the anus itself. ... Rarely, a neoplasm (tumour) may form on the leading edge of the intussusceptum. In addition, patients are frequently elderly ... Complications are uncommon, but include massive rectal bleeding, ulceration into the prostate gland or formation of a stricture ... Recto-anal (low) intussusception (intra-anal intussusception) is where the intussusception starts in the rectum and protrudes ...
These glands, along with additional minor salivary glands, secrete a rich mixture of biological chemicals, electrolytes, ... J Anal Toxicol. 2011 Jan;35(1):32-9. Oral fluid is a viable alternative for monitoring drug abuse: detection of drugs in oral ... and neoplasms. The following conditions are among those that can be detected through saliva testing (list not comprehensive): ... Anal. 25 (2): 134-41. doi:10.1002/jcla.20447. PMC 6647618. PMID 21438008. Tourinho RS, Amado LA, Villar LM, et al. (May 2011 ...
Similar considerations apply to the submandibular gland, but xerostomia is less common if only one parotid gland is included in ... Risk factors include having a large number of sexual partners, a history of oral-genital sex or anal-oral sex, having a female ... unlike other head and neck primary tumours that may have associated second neoplasms, that may occur at the same time ( ... The probability of xerostomia at one year increases by 5% for every 1Gy increase in dose to the parotid gland. Doses above 25- ...
Stewart SE, Eddy BE, Borgese N (June 1958). "Neoplasms in mice inoculated with a tumor agent carried in tissue culture". ... Gross L (June 1953). "A filterable agent, recovered from Ak leukemic extracts, causing salivary gland carcinomas in C3H mice". ... Human papillomavirus infection is a major cause of cervical cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, penis cancer, anal cancer, ... Rous P (September 1910). "A Transmissible Avian Neoplasm. (Sarcoma of the Common Fowl.)". The Journal of Experimental Medicine ...
... also termed MALT lymphoma of the salivary glands) or, in cases primarily involving the lacrimal glands, primary lacrimal gland ... usually presents at an early stage of disease with anal bleeding and/or blood in the stool. Endoscopic examination reveals a ... "The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms". Blood. 127 (20): 2375-90. doi:10.1182 ... salivary gland, and thyroid gland EMZL. TNFAIP3 inactivation generally takes place in cases which do not have any of the above ...
... anal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.445 - duodenal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.501 - ileal neoplasms MeSH ... sebaceous gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.805.776 - sweat gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.839.500 - muscle neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... lip neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.591.692 - palatal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.591.824 - salivary gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... peritoneal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078 - adrenal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078.265 - adrenal cortex neoplasms MeSH ...
D35.7 is a billable diagnosis code used to specify benign neoplasm of other specified endocrine glands. View D35.7 free coding ... D12 - Benign neoplasm of colon, rectum, anus and anal canal * D13 - Benign neoplasm of other and ill-defined parts of digestive ... Benign neoplasm of left adrenal gland* D35.1 - Benign neoplasm of parathyroid gland* D35.2 - Benign neoplasm of pituitary gland ... D35.0 - Benign neoplasm of adrenal gland* D35.00 - Benign neoplasm of unspecified adrenal gland* D35.01 - Benign neoplasm of ...
Anal Gland Neoplasms [C22.073] Anal Gland Neoplasms * Anaplasmosis [C22.085] Anaplasmosis * Bird Diseases [C22.131] ...
Anal Gland Neoplasms. *Anaplasmosis. *Bird Diseases. *Borna Disease. *Cat Diseases. *Cattle Diseases ...
Anal Gland Neoplasms. *Anaplasmosis. *Bird Diseases. *Borna Disease. *Cat Diseases. *Cattle Diseases ...
Adrenal Gland Cancer * View other providers who treat Adrenal Gland Cancer Anal Fissure ... Benign Lung Neoplasms * View other providers who treat Benign Lung Neoplasms Biliary Atresia ... Repair of Anal and Rectal Defects (Anoplasty, Repair of Imperforate Anus, Sphincteroplasty, Rectal Graft) ... Repair of Anal and Rectal Defects (Anoplasty, Repair of Imperforate Anus, Sphincteroplasty, Rectal Graft) ...
Importantly, anal gland/transitional-type cancers, which poorly respond to standard treatments, displayed less mutations in ... The present article aimed at addressing this information gap by in-depth characterising the anal glandular neoplasms at the ... that glandular neoplasms of the anal canal arise by HPV-dependent or independent pathways. These etiological differences leads ... Anal and oropharyngeal HPV distribution in HIV-negative multipartner MSM using self-sampling kits for HIV and sexually ...
... including anal duct/gland cysts and sacrococcygeal teratomas. Before reviewing the anatomy of the region, defining specific ... Anal duct/gland cysts. The etiology of anal duct cysts is unknown. One theory states that anal glands lose their communication ... 6] Sacrococcygeal teratoma is the most common neoplasm in newborns [7] ; it rarely presents in adulthood. [8] Unlike teratomas ... The anal canal has an average of six to 12 anal ducts, which open into anal crypts (also known as anal sinuses or Morgagni ...
Plasma Cell Neoplasm (1) * Sarcomas(5). * Soft Tissue Sarcoma(4). * Leiomyosarcoma (1) ...
Take advantage of our experts and learn about neoplasms of the gastrointestinal system! This course covers all essentials: ... The pancreas is covered with a very thin connective tissue capsule that extends inward as septa, partitioning the gland into ... and anal canal. The primary function of the colon is to remove water and compact the stool prior to expulsion from the body via ... Each part has subsets of benign and malignant neoplasms that can cause various complications. At times, neoplasms of the GI ...
Treatment of anal stenosis with sphincterotomy and sphincteroplasty in Germany ★ Direct prices from the best hospitals in ... thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, and adrenal glands. Particular competence is in the surgical treatment of stomach cancer, ... and especially important focus of work of the medical facility is the surgical resection of benign and malignant neoplasms in ... The departments therapeutic offer is complemented by surgical interventions on the thyroid gland, parathyroid glands and ...
Benign neoplasm of thyroid glands 227 Benign neoplasm of other endocrine glands and related structures 227.0 Suprarenal gland ... Anal fissure Tear of anus, nontraumatic 565.1 Anal fistula Fistula of rectum to skin 566 Abscess of anal and rectal regions ... Suprarenal gland Adrenal gland 194.1 Parathyroid gland 194.3 Pituitary gland and craniopharyngeal duct 194.4 Pineal gland 194.5 ... Suprarenal gland Adrenal gland 237.3 Paraganglia 237.4 Other and unspecified endocrine glands Parathyroid gland Thyroid gland ...
View other providers who treat Adrenal Gland Cancer Anal and Rectal Cancer ... Benign Neoplasm of the Digestive System * View other providers who treat Benign Neoplasm of the Digestive System ...
Reduces the risk of mammary gland tumors in females.. *Minimizes the risk of pyometra (uterine infection), which kills ... Helps prevent the appearance of prostate, testicular and anal tumors.. According to the American Animal Hospital Association ( ... Reduces the risk of developing testicular neoplasms.. *Reduces the risk of prostate diseases. ...
Tumor-permissive Collagen Signatures in Canine Mammary Gland Tumors: Development of Prognostic Markers and Targeted Therapies ... Optical Coherence Tomography for Margin Evaluation of Canine Skin and Subcutaneous Neoplasms ... Identification of genetic mutations in anal sac carcinoma in English Cocker Spaniels. ... Continued Investigation into Tumor-permissive Collagen Signatures in Canine Mammary Gland Tumors: Development of Prognostic ...
Parotid Gland Cancer see Salivary Gland Cancer * Pharyngeal Cancer see Throat Cancer ... Anal Cancer * Basal Cell Carcinoma see Skin Cancer * Benign Tumors * Bile Duct Cancer ... Neoplasms see Cancer * Nephroblastoma see Wilms Tumor * Neuroblastoma * Neurofibromatosis * Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma see Lymphoma ...
S275.0 Symptoms of lymph glands (or nodes) S275.1 Swollen or enlarged glands S275.2 Sore glands S280.0 Other symptoms referable ... Benign neoplasms D140.0 Fibroids and other uterine neoplasms Includes: Myoma Leiomyomata Cervical polyp Nabothian cyst D145.0 ... anal Fissure--rectal, anal Excludes: Intestinal virus (S540.0) D670.0 Diseases of liver, gallbladder, and pancreas Includes: ... Neoplasms Malignant neoplasms D100.0 Cancer, gastrointestinal tract Includes: Esophagus Stomach Small intestine Colon D105.0 ...
Symptoms of lymph glands (or nodes) 1275.1 Swollen or enlarged glands 1275.2 Sore glands 1280.0 Other symptoms referable to the ... Benign Neoplasms 2140.0 Fibroids and other uterine neoplasms Includes: Myoma Leiomyomata Cervical polyp Nabothian cyst 2145.0 ... anal Fissure - rectal, anal Excludes: Intestinal virus (1540.0) 2670.0 Diseases of the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas ... Neoplasms Malignant Neoplasms 2100.0 Cancer, gastrointestinal tract Includes: Esophagus Stomach Small intestine Colon 2105.0 ...
Malignant Pituitary Gland Tumor. *. Malignant Pleura Secondary. *. Mantle Cell Lymphoma. *. Marginal Zone Lymphoma. ... Anal and Rectal Cancer. *. Anemia. *. Asymptomatic Post-Menopausal Status. *. Atrophic Vaginitis. *. Birth Control. ... Neoplasm of Gastrointestinal Tract. *. Nerve Sheath Tumors. *. Neuroendocrine Tumors. *. Neutropenia. *. Nodular Lymphoma. ...
... pathways Anal squamous dysplasia Diagnostic molecular pathology P16 and HPV testing is recommended Neuroendocrine neoplasms ( ... Rare subtypes are described, such as gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic‐gland type Gastric adenocarcinoma Prognosis and ... Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm and intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasms are now separated from the other subtypes of ... intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms are now classified into two tiers of dysplasia, based on ...
Specialized apocrine glands by location Anal sac glands - Perineum. Endoscopic thoracic sympathetic surgery is a last-line ... Carcinomas of the skin appendices are rare neoplasms but for prognostic reasons it is important to differentiate them from the ... Sebaceous glands are holocrine glands, and sweat glands (both eccrine and apocrine ones) are merocrine glands. It has been ... Eccrine glands are considered as major sweat glands that are present in the body. Sweat glands, classified as simple, coiled ...
In cases of neoplasm of intestines, the affected portion of the intestine is removed and the healthy portions of the intestine ... Anal Glands on Dogs. Barri J. Morrison, DVM. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and Pancreatic Insufficiency ... Painkillers are advised for lessening the pain associated with this neoplasm.. Living and Management. If surgery is performed ... In cases of gastric adenocarcinoma, the survival time is usually two months, whereas in cases of intestinal neoplasm it is ...
Colonic neoplasm. Colonic neoplasm means new tissue growing in the colon, or large intestine. This neoplasm may be either ... Anal fissure. An anal fissure is a break, or tear, in the mucous membrane lining of the anus. The anus is the opening at the ... Chronic prostatitis is an ongoing inflammation or infection of the prostate gland, the small, walnut-shaped organ just below ... Anal Pain (Proctalgia). NHS. Updated July 26, 2016. NHS Link. *Anal Discomfort and How to Deal with It. IFFGD. Updated ...
The anal glands open into the bases of the anal crypts at this location. ... and the possibility of IBD or local neoplasm. (Anal sphincter disruptions are commonly seen in association with RVFs of ... The anal sphincters are located in the posterior portion of the perineal body. The transverse perineal muscle traverses the ... Anal sphincter integrity and function influences outcome in rectovaginal fistula repair. Dis Colon Rectum. 1998 Sep. 41(9):1141 ...
Anal Quant Cytol Histol. 2000; 22: 486-92.. *Stich HF, San RH, Rosin MP. Adaptation of the DNA repair and micronucleus tests to ... Perel Y, Leverger G, Carrere A, Caudry M, Garabedian EN, Ansoborlo S, Vergnes P. Second thyroid neoplasms after prophylactic ... The enigmatic mechanisms of irradiation induced damage to major salivary glands. Oral Dis. 2002; 8: 1416. ... The etiology of second primary neoplasms. In vivo. 1998; 12: 89-93. ...
Moreover, mucosal, anal and fluid swab samples were clearly positive for viral genomes and the high viral load in the mucosa of ... an endothelial neoplasm of the dermis, oral cavity and intestinal organs. The tumors are highly vascularized and characterized ... the eye and in the lacrimal glands might be explained by Kaposi sarcoma in unusual locations (16). Finally, CbGHV1-negative ...
  • The enigmatic mechanisms of irradiation induced damage to major salivary glands. (ijmhr.org)
  • Each part has subsets of benign and malignant neoplasms that can cause various complications. (lecturio.com)
  • Malignant morphology, and 3 (1.6%) did not register histology and coded neoplasms of gum, floor of mouth and other and unspecified parts topography to ICD-9. (who.int)
  • Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. (mdpi.com)
  • Perianal skin contains apocrine sweat glands (ie, sweat glands associated with hair follicles that secrete a viscous, odorless sweat) and eccrine sweat glands (ie, coiled sweat glands). (medscape.com)
  • This skin can be differentiated from the distal anal canal by the presence of the epidermal appendages mentioned previously (ie, sweat glands and hair follicles). (medscape.com)
  • It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG , the PANCREAS , the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS . (lookformedical.com)
  • The thyroid is a small gland that is responsible for regulating metabolism, that is, the rate at which food intake is converted into energy. (myspecialdoctor.it)
  • Pulmonary carcinoids are well differentiated low to intermediate grade lung neuroendocrine tumours (LNETs), that belong to the group of lung neuroendocrine neoplasms which also include highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine carcinomas (LNECs). (who.int)
  • These data have been combined with previously published LNET data to perform integrative analysis using multi-omics factor analysis (MOFA), resulting in a molecular map of lung neuroendocrine neoplasms for exploration. (who.int)
  • The anal canal has an average of six to 12 anal ducts, which open into anal crypts (also known as anal sinuses or Morgagni sinuses). (medscape.com)
  • Most of these ducts have orifices in the posterior portion of the anal canal. (medscape.com)
  • Communicating with the ducts are straight or spiral, slender, tubular structures called anal glands. (medscape.com)
  • One theory states that anal glands lose their communication with the anal ducts during development but retain their ability to secrete fluid and, thus, create a cyst. (medscape.com)
  • Neoplasms may affect nearly any part of the gastrointestinal tract-the esophagus, stomach, hepatobiliary system, and pancreas. (lecturio.com)
  • Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal canal (SCCA) is a rare disease associated with a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection in most cases, predominantly the HPV16 genotype. (bvsalud.org)
  • The anal verge is the transitional zone between the perianal skin and the moist, hairless, modified skin of the anal canal. (medscape.com)
  • The anal canal is the portion of the distal segment of the intestinal tract that lies between the termination of the rectal mucosa superiorly and the beginning of the perianal skin. (medscape.com)
  • These glands, imbedded in the mucous membrane of the anus, secrete a viscous sweat, lubricating the anal canal. (medscape.com)
  • Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), a member of the genus Rhadinovirus , is the causative agent of Kaposi sarcoma ( 1 ), an endothelial neoplasm of the dermis, oral cavity and intestinal organs. (cdc.gov)
  • The use of biopsy to differentiate radiation-related change at the fistula from a recurrent tumor is imperative, because neoplasms (primary, recurrent, or metastatic) can produce RVFs. (medscape.com)
  • We took advantage of the MémoDépistages study to evaluate HPV distribution at anal and oropharyngeal sites in HIV-negative multipartner MSM. (bvsalud.org)
  • The main risk factor associated with HPV detection was frequenting gay meeting places, living in large cities, and having an anal Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection. (bvsalud.org)
  • Reduces the risk of developing testicular neoplasms. (thecostaricanews.com)
  • Multiple HPV types were detected in 70% of anal samples, and single HPV types in 91% of oropharyngeal samples. (bvsalud.org)
  • The expression of H3K9Ac, H3K18Ac, H3K9Me3 and Ki-67 in 70 specimens of salivary gland neoplasms, consisting of 30 mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), 20 adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and 20 pleomorphic adenoma (PA), were investigated immunohistochemically. (nih.gov)
  • An adenoma carcinoma that originates in the anal canal. (nih.gov)
  • Primary hyperparathyroidism is an inherent disease of parathyroid glands associated with abnormal secretion of PTH. (lecturio.com)
  • Secondary hyperparathyroidism results from abnormalities of calcium metabolism, which, if left untreated, can progress to tertiary hyperparathyroidism, which is associated with hypertrophy of the parathyroid gland and oversecretion of PTH even if the primary cause is eliminated. (lecturio.com)
  • This study aimed to examine the degree of histone H3 modifications in salivary gland neoplasms and their associations with tumor pathologic characteristics and proliferative activity. (nih.gov)
  • 13. Intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms of the gastric and intestinal types may have less malignant potential than the pancreatobiliary type. (nih.gov)
  • Papillary transitional cell neoplasm of low malignant potential (C67. (facs.org)
  • Referred to as complete androgen blockade, or CAB, this treatment choice combines an orchiectomy or LH-RH antagonist with anti-androgens, drugs that block the effects of adrenal gland hormones by influencing a receptor in the nucleus of the prostate cancer cell. (bcm.edu)
  • A pair of anal glands or sacs, located on either side of the ANUS, that produce and store a dark, foul-smelling fluid in carnivorous animals such as MEPHITIDAE and DOGS. (bvsalud.org)
  • These glands, imbedded in the mucous membrane of the anus, secrete a viscous sweat, lubricating the anal canal. (medscape.com)
  • Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is due to persistent inflammation, fibrosis, and irreversible cell damage to the pancreas, resulting in a loss of endocrine and exocrine gland function. (lecturio.com)
  • Tumors or cancer of the anal gland. (nih.gov)
  • Surgical removal of the gland is used for early and confined tumors. (bcm.edu)
  • J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia 3(1):95-103, PMID: 10819508. (nih.gov)
  • 2. The discrete nature and distinguishing molecular features of pancreatic intraductal tubulopapillary neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the gastric type, pyloric gland variant. (nih.gov)
  • 5. GNAS mutation is a frequent event in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and associated adenocarcinomas. (nih.gov)
  • 10. Fundic gland differentiation of oncocytic/pancreatobiliary subtypes of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. (nih.gov)
  • 6. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. (nih.gov)
  • 17. Clinical implication of morphological subtypes in management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. (nih.gov)
  • Communicating with the ducts are straight or spiral, slender, tubular structures called anal glands. (medscape.com)
  • Some specific varieties of cysts are only found in the perianal region, including anal duct/gland cysts and sacrococcygeal teratomas. (medscape.com)
  • Perianal skin contains apocrine sweat glands (ie, sweat glands associated with hair follicles that secrete a viscous, odorless sweat) and eccrine sweat glands (ie, coiled sweat glands). (medscape.com)
  • In addition, a variable number of sebaceous (ie, oil-secreting) glands are present in the perianal region, either opening into a hair follicle or existing as individual free sebaceous glands at the anal verge. (medscape.com)
  • Characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings depend on the severity and range from mild ductal dilatation and gland enlargement to severe ductal dilatation, large cavity formations, and calcifications. (lecturio.com)
  • The search might begin with Breast Neoplasms, but it is seen after viewing the hierarchy that the more specific Descriptor Breast Neoplasms, Male is wanted. (nih.gov)
  • One theory states that anal glands lose their communication with the anal ducts during development but retain their ability to secrete fluid and, thus, create a cyst. (medscape.com)
  • Testosterone can be reduced by removing the testes during a bilateral orchiectomy, surgically opening the scrotum, and freeing blood vessels and nerves before cutting the glands away from surrounding tissue. (bcm.edu)