A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria in the family SUCCINIVIBRIONACEAE. It has been isolated from the THROAT and COLON of beagle dogs and from human FECES.
A sugar alcohol formed by the reduction of ribose.
A family of spiral bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.
A large group of anaerobic bacteria which show up as pink (negative) when treated by the Gram-staining method.
'Anaerobic Bacteria' are types of bacteria that do not require oxygen for growth and can often cause diseases in humans, including dental caries, gas gangrene, and tetanus, among others.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.

Ileocolitis associated with Anaerobiospirillum in cats. (1/7)

Ileocolitis associated with spiral bacteria identified as an Anaerobiospirillum sp. was found in six cats. Two cats had acute onset of gastrointestinal signs characterized by vomiting and diarrhea in one cat and vomiting in another cat, one cat had chronic diarrhea that was refractory to medical therapy; one cat had acute onset of anorexia and lethargy, and two cats had clinical signs that were not related to the gastrointestinal tract. The presence of an Anaerobiospirillum sp. was demonstrated on the basis of ultrastructural morphology of spiral bacteria associated with intestinal lesions and PCR amplification of a genus-specific 16S rRNA gene from affected tissues from each cat. The colons of three clinically healthy cats without lesions and one cat with mild colitis not associated with spiral bacteria were negative for Anaerobiospirillum spp. in the same assay. Comparative nucleotide sequence analysis of cloned PCR products from three affected cats further suggested that the spiral bacteria were closely related to Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens.  (+info)

Fatal bacteremia due to Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens: first description in Brazil. (2/7)

Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens is an anaerobic, Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacteria, which is motile by means of bipolar tuffs of flagella. This organism appears to be a rare cause of bacteremia in humans, and it usually affects patients submitted to immunosuppressive therapy. Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens resembles Campylobacter spp. in Gram-stained preparations, however, it is considered resistant to most antimicrobial drugs that are used to treat Campylobacter infections. We observed Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacteria in Gram-stained preparations from blood culture flasks. Growth occurred only under anaerobic incubation, and identification to the species level was achieved by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, followed by direct sequencing and a GenBank homology search. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported Brazilian case of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bacteremia.  (+info)

Cell recycled culture of succinic acid-producing Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens using an internal membrane filtration system. (3/7)

Cell recycled culture of succinic acid-producing Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was anaerobically carried out using an internal membrane filter module in order to examine the physiological response of A. succiniciproducens to a high-cell-density environment. The optimal growth of A. succiniciproducens and its enhanced succinic acid productivity were observed under CO2-rich conditions, established by adding NaHCO3 and Na2CO3, in the cell recycled system. A. succiniciproducens grew up to 6.50 g-DCW/l, the highest cell concentration obtained so far, in cell recycled cultures. The cells did not change their morphology, which is known to be easily changed in unfavorable or stress environments. The maximum productivity of succinic acid was about 3.3 g/l/h, which is 3.3 times higher than those obtained in batch cultures. These results can serve as a guide for designing highly efficient cell recycled systems for succinic acid at a commercial level.  (+info)

Succinic acid production by Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens ATCC 29305 growing on galactose, galactose/glucose, and galactose/lactose. (4/7)

Succinic acid-producing Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was anaerobically grown on galactose, galactose/glucose, or galactose/lactose in order to study its galactose fermentation. Unlike a previous report, A. succiniciproducens was found to efficiently metabolize galactose as the sole carbon source at a rate of 2.4 g/g-DCW/h and produced succinic acid with as high a yield of 87% as with using glucose. When glucose and galactose were present, A. succiniciproducens metabolized both sugars simultaneously. Furthermore, when lactose and galactose coexisted, lactose did not inhibit the galactose fermentation of A. succiniciproducens. Therefore, co-utilization of galactose and other sugars can improve the productivity and economy of bio-based succinic acid processes.  (+info)

Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bacteraemia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. (5/7)

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Kinetic study of organic acid formations and growth of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens during continuous cultures. (6/7)

Succinic acid-producing Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was anaerobically grown in glucose-fed continuous cultures using glucose as a carbon source, and the metabolic flexibility of A. succiniciproducens in response to varying glucose concentrations and dilution rates was examined. Both succinic acid (SA) and acetic acid (AA) formation was growth-associated, and their growth-rate-related coefficients (KSA/X, KAA/X) and nongrowth-rate-related coefficients (K'SA/X, K'AA/X) were slightly influenced by glucose concentrations. A high glucose concentration (38 g/l) and high growth rate (0.63 h-1) did not induce by-product formation.  (+info)

First report of treatment of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bloodstream infection with levofloxacin. (7/7)

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Anaerobiospirillum is a genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that are capable of growing under both anaerobic and microaerophilic conditions. These bacteria are commonly found in the human oral cavity, intestinal tract, and aquatic environments. They are known to cause various infections in humans, including bacteremia, endocarditis, and brain abscesses.

The name "Anaerobiospirillum" is derived from three Greek words: anaerobios (without air), spira (coil or spiral), and ellus (small). Therefore, the medical definition of 'Anaerobiospirillum' is a genus of small, spiral-shaped bacteria that can grow in environments with little to no oxygen.

Ribitol is a sugar alcohol, specifically a pentitol, that is a reduced form of the pentose sugar ribose. It is found in some fruits and vegetables, and it can also be produced synthetically. In biochemistry, ribitol plays a role as a component of certain coenzymes and as a constituent of the structural polysaccharides in the cell walls of some bacteria. It has been used in research and medical applications, such as in the study of bacterial metabolism and in the development of potential drugs.

Spirochaetaceae is a family of spiral-shaped, gram-negative bacteria known as spirochetes. These bacteria are characterized by their unique morphology, which includes a flexible helical shape and the presence of endoflagella, which are located inside the cell wall and run lengthwise along the entire length of the organism. This arrangement of flagella allows the spirochete to move in a corkscrew-like motion.

Spirochaetaceae includes several genera of medically important bacteria, such as:

* Treponema: This genus includes the bacterium that causes syphilis (Treponema pallidum) and other treponemal diseases like yaws and pinta.
* Borrelia: This genus includes the spirochetes responsible for Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) and relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis).
* Leptospira: This genus contains the bacteria that cause leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease transmitted through the urine of infected animals.

Spirochetes are often found in aquatic environments and can be part of the normal microbiota of some animals, including humans. However, certain species can cause significant diseases in humans and animals, making them important pathogens. Proper identification and appropriate antibiotic treatment are crucial for managing spirochetal infections.

Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not require oxygen to grow and are characterized by their cell wall structure, which does not retain crystal violet dye in the Gram staining procedure. This is because they lack a thick peptidoglycan layer in their cell walls, which is typically stained dark purple in Gram-positive bacteria. Instead, gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane that contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which can be toxic to human cells and contribute to the pathogenicity of these organisms.

Examples of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria include Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella species, and Porphyromonas species. These bacteria are commonly found in the human mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, and can cause a variety of infections, including abscesses, wound infections, and bacteremia.

It's important to note that while gram-negative anaerobic bacteria do not require oxygen to grow, some may still tolerate or even prefer oxygen-rich environments. Therefore, the term "anaerobe" can be somewhat misleading when used to describe these organisms.

Anaerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not require oxygen to grow and survive. Instead, they can grow in environments that have little or no oxygen. Some anaerobic bacteria can even be harmed or killed by exposure to oxygen. These bacteria play important roles in many natural processes, such as decomposition and the breakdown of organic matter in the digestive system. However, some anaerobic bacteria can also cause disease in humans and animals, particularly when they infect areas of the body that are normally oxygen-rich. Examples of anaerobic bacterial infections include tetanus, gas gangrene, and dental abscesses.

Gram-negative bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that do not retain crystal violet dye during the Gram staining procedure used in microbiology. This characteristic is due to the structure of their cell walls, which contain a thin layer of peptidoglycan and an outer membrane composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), proteins, and phospholipids.

The LPS component of the outer membrane is responsible for the endotoxic properties of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the host. Common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Proteus mirabilis, among others.

Gram-negative bacterial infections can cause a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. The severity of these infections can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the patient's immune status, the site of infection, and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

Effective antibiotic therapy is crucial for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, but the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern. Therefore, accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship are essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes and prevent further spread of resistance.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

... thomasii Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine at GBIF Portal. N4L Name DOI Record. Portal: Biology ... Anaerobiospirillum is a genus of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria recognized as human flora in human gastrointestinal tract, ...
Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens Davis, Cleven, Brown & Balish, 1976 - family Succinivibrionaceae. A bacterium found in ... Pienaar, C.; Kruger, A. J.; Venter, E. C.; Pitout, J. D. (2003). "Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bacteraemia". Journal ... "First description of an Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens prosthetic joint infection". New Microbes and New Infections. 18 ...
Anaerobiospirillum thomasii, Succinimonas amylolytica and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens and proposal of Succinivibrionaceae fam ...
Various other potential succinic acid producers have been examined, such as Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens, Escherichia ... In comparison with other bacteria, particularly Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens, Escherichia coli, and Actinobacillus ...
Mannheimia succiniciproducens and Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens or genetically modified Escherichia coli, ...
Anaerobiospirillum MeSH B03.440.425.410.194 - bacteroidaceae MeSH B03.440.425.410.194.152 - Bacteroides MeSH B03.440.425.410. ... Anaerobiospirillum MeSH B03.660.250.770 - thiotrichaceae MeSH B03.660.250.830 - vibrionaceae MeSH B03.660.250.830.590 - ...
Anaerobiospirillum thomasii Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine at GBIF Portal. N4L Name DOI Record. Portal: Biology ... Anaerobiospirillum is a genus of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria recognized as human flora in human gastrointestinal tract, ...
... and Anaerobiospirillum thomasii. Infections due to AGNB are common, yet the specific identification of AGNB in these infections ...
Anaerobiospirillum RSV_genus1148 Bacteria;Proteobacteria;Gammaproteobacteria;Aeromonadales;Succinivibrionaceae;NA RSV_genus1149 ...
134 ] has reported the method of production of succinic acid by fermentation of glycerol by using Anaerobiospirillum ...
Seventeen microbial species from the genera Anaerobiospirillum, Alistipes, Barnesiella, and Butyricimonas differed ...
... and Anaerobiospirillum thomasii. Infections due to AGNB are common, yet the specific identification of AGNB in these infections ...
... and Anaerobiospirillum were enriched, but Promicromonospora, Duganella, Herbaspirillum, Glaciecola, Eisenbergiella, Sva0996_ ...
Anaerobiospirillum [B03.440.425.410.145] * Bacteroidaceae [B03.440.425.410.194] * Bilophila [B03.440.425.410.200] ...
Anaerobiospirillum [B03.440.425.410.145] Anaerobiospirillum * Bacteroidaceae [B03.440.425.410.194] Bacteroidaceae * Bilophila [ ...
Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. ...
Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. ...
Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. ...
Anaerobiospirillum, Anaerorhabdus, Anaplasma, Arachnia, Arcanobacterium, Arcobacter, Arizona, Arsenophonus, Arthrobacter, ...
"Anaerobiospirillum pullistercoris" "Gemmiger excrementipullorum" "Evtepia faecigallinarum" "Anaerofilum excrementigallinarum" ...
Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens-induced bacteremia in a healthy man. Inokuchi R, Ishida T, Maeda J, Nakajima S, Yahagi N ...
MALDI-TOF MS in Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bacteremia: A report of 4 cases in different hosts.. Fox B; Berger MA; ...
... and Anaerobiospirillum thomasii. Infections due to AGNB are common, yet the specific identification of AGNB in these infections ...
... and Anaerobiospirillum thomasii. Infections due to AGNB are common, yet the specific identification of AGNB in these infections ...
Anaerobiospirillum B03.440.425.410.194 Bacteroidaceae B03.440.425.410.194.152 Bacteroides B03.440.425.410.194.152.400 ... Anaerobiospirillum B03.660.250.019 Alcanivoraceae B03.660.250.021 Alteromonadaceae B03.660.250.021.020 Alteromonas B03.660. ...
Anaerobiospirillum - Preferred Concept UI. M0444298. Scope note. A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria in the family ... Anaerobiospirillum. Scope note:. Género de bacterias gramnegativas espiriladas de la familia SUCCINIVIBRIONACEAE. Se ha aislado ...
Anaerobiospirillum Preferred Term Term UI T529585. Date01/02/2003. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2004). ... Anaerobiospirillum Preferred Concept UI. M0444298. Registry Number. txid13334. Scope Note. A genus of gram-negative, spiral- ... Anaerobiospirillum. Tree Number(s). B03.440.425.410.145. B03.660.250.018.750.050. Unique ID. D044064. RDF Unique Identifier. ...
Anaerobiospirillum Preferred Term Term UI T529585. Date01/02/2003. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2004). ... Anaerobiospirillum Preferred Concept UI. M0444298. Registry Number. txid13334. Scope Note. A genus of gram-negative, spiral- ... Anaerobiospirillum. Tree Number(s). B03.440.425.410.145. B03.660.250.018.750.050. Unique ID. D044064. RDF Unique Identifier. ...
Genus Anaerobiospirillum (organism) {55757006 , SNOMED-CT } Parent/Child (Relationship Type) Anaerobiospirillum ...
Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. ...
This process we found that Phascolarctobaterium and Anaerobiospirillum may provide energy for ABC transporter system by ...
... and Anaerobiospirillum thomasii. Infections due to AGNB are common, yet the specific identification of AGNB in these infections ...
HN - 2004 MH - Anaerobiospirillum UI - D044064 MN - B3.440.425.410.145 MN - B3.660.250.740.50 MS - A genus of gram-negative, ...
Anaerobiospirillum, Lactobacillus, Propionibacterium, Rhizopus, Clostridium, Schizophyllum and Sclerotium, in particular from ... Anaerobiospirillum succiniproducens, Actinobacillus succinogenes, Lactobacillus delbruckii, Lactobacillus leichmannii, ...
Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaerobiospirillum. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. Anaplasma centrale. ...
Anaerobiospirillum Anagallis Anal Canal Anal Gland Neoplasms Anal Sacs Analgesia Analgesia, Epidural Analgesia, Obstetrical ...
  • Anaerobiospirillum thomasii Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine at GBIF Portal. (wikipedia.org)