Surface-Active Agents: Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.Micelles: Particles consisting of aggregates of molecules held loosely together by secondary bonds. The surface of micelles are usually comprised of amphiphatic compounds that are oriented in a way that minimizes the energy of interaction between the micelle and its environment. Liquids that contain large numbers of suspended micelles are referred to as EMULSIONS.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Polyanhydrides: Anhydride polymers with a repeating structure of RC(=O)OC(=O)R. They readily hydrolyze in water making them useful for DELAYED-ACTION PREPARATIONS.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Poloxalene: A copolymer of polyethylene and polypropylene ether glycol. It is a non-ionic polyol surface-active agent used medically as a fecal softener and in cattle for prevention of bloat.Lipidoses: Conditions characterized by abnormal lipid deposition due to disturbance in lipid metabolism, such as hereditary diseases involving lysosomal enzymes required for lipid breakdown. They are classified either by the enzyme defect or by the type of lipid involved.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dendrimers: Tree-like, highly branched, polymeric compounds. They grow three-dimensionally by the addition of shells of branched molecules to a central core. The overall globular shape and presence of cavities gives potential as drug carriers and CONTRAST AGENTS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Wasp Venoms: Venoms produced by the wasp (Vespid) family of stinging insects, including hornets; the venoms contain enzymes, biogenic amines, histamine releasing factors, kinins, toxic polypeptides, etc., and are similar to bee venoms.Framycetin: A component of NEOMYCIN that is produced by Streptomyces fradiae. On hydrolysis it yields neamine and neobiosamine B. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Liposomes: Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Chlorpromazine: The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking DOPAMINE RECEPTORS. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup.Acetylcholinesterase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Melitten: Basic polypeptide from the venom of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). It contains 26 amino acids, has cytolytic properties, causes contracture of muscle, releases histamine, and disrupts surface tension, probably due to lysis of cell and mitochondrial membranes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Nanocapsules: Nanometer-sized, hollow, spherically-shaped objects that can be utilized to encapsulate small amounts of pharmaceuticals, enzymes, or other catalysts (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology, 4th ed).Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Cations: Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.Dibucaine: A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006)Liquid Crystals: Materials in intermediate state between solid and liquid.Poloxamer: A nonionic polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block co-polymer with the general formula HO(C2H4O)a(-C3H6O)b(C2H4O)aH. It is available in different grades which vary from liquids to solids. It is used as an emulsifying agent, solubilizing agent, surfactant, and wetting agent for antibiotics. Poloxamer is also used in ointment and suppository bases and as a tablet binder or coater. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Polyethyleneimine: Strongly cationic polymer that binds to certain proteins; used as a marker in immunology, to precipitate and purify enzymes and lipids. Synonyms: aziridine polymer; Epamine; Epomine; ethylenimine polymer; Montrek; PEI; Polymin(e).Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Maleic Anhydrides: Used in copolymerization reactions, in the Diels-Alder(diene)synthesis, in the preparation of resins, pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals. It is a powerful irritant and causes burns.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Membrane Lipids: Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.Chlorphentermine: A sympathomimetic agent that was formerly used as an anorectic. It has properties similar to those of DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. It has been implicated in lipid storage disorders and pulmonary hypertension. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1223)Imipramine: The prototypical tricyclic antidepressant. It has been used in major depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, attention-deficit disorders, agoraphobia, and panic disorders. It has less sedative effect than some other members of this therapeutic group.Adsorption: The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Surface Tension: The force acting on the surface of a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Biomimetic Materials: Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.Phosphatidylcholines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Cobra Cardiotoxin Proteins: Most abundant proteins in COBRA venom; basic polypeptides of 57 to 62 amino acids with four disulfide bonds and a molecular weight of less than 7000; causes skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction, interferes with neuromuscular and ganglionic transmission, depolarizes nerve, muscle and blood cell membranes, thus causing hemolysis.Peptoids: Polymers of N-SUBSTITUTED GLYCINES containing chiral centers at the a-position of their side chains. These oligomers lack HYDROGEN BONDING donors, preventing formation of the usual intrachain hydrogen bonds but can form helices driven by the steric influence of chiral side chains.Alkanes: The generic name for the group of aliphatic hydrocarbons Cn-H2n+2. They are denoted by the suffix -ane. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Physicochemical Phenomena: The physical phenomena describing the structure and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.trans-1,4-Bis(2-chlorobenzaminomethyl)cyclohexane Dihydrochloride: An anticholesteremic agent that inhibits sterol biosynthesis in animals.Detergents: Purifying or cleansing agents, usually salts of long-chain aliphatic bases or acids, that exert cleansing (oil-dissolving) and antimicrobial effects through a surface action that depends on possessing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties.Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Hemolysis: The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Bee Venoms: Venoms obtained from Apis mellifera (honey bee) and related species. They contain various enzymes, polypeptide toxins, and other substances, some of which are allergenic or immunogenic or both. These venoms were formerly used in rheumatism to stimulate the pituitary-adrenal system.Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.Quaternary Ammonium Compounds: Derivatives of ammonium compounds, NH4+ Y-, in which all four of the hydrogens bonded to nitrogen have been replaced with hydrocarbyl groups. These are distinguished from IMINES which are RN=CR2.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Chemistry, Physical: The study of CHEMICAL PHENOMENA and processes in terms of the underlying PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and processes.Spectrometry, Fluorescence: Measurement of the intensity and quality of fluorescence.Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine: A synthetic phospholipid used in liposomes and lipid bilayers for the study of biological membranes.Siderophores: Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Phosphatidylglycerols: A nitrogen-free class of lipids present in animal and particularly plant tissues and composed of one mole of glycerol and 1 or 2 moles of phosphatidic acid. Members of this group differ from one another in the nature of the fatty acids released on hydrolysis.Inorganic Chemicals: A broad class of substances encompassing all those that do not include carbon and its derivatives as their principal elements. However, carbides, carbonates, cyanides, cyanates, and carbon disulfide are included in this class.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Cadmium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain cadmium as an integral part of the molecule.Amines: A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Quantum Dots: Nanometer sized fragments of semiconductor crystalline material which emit PHOTONS. The wavelength is based on the quantum confinement size of the dot. They can be embedded in MICROBEADS for high throughput ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES.Glycerophospholipids: Derivatives of phosphatidic acid in which the hydrophobic regions are composed of two fatty acids and a polar alcohol is joined to the C-3 position of glycerol through a phosphodiester bond. They are named according to their polar head groups, such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine.Phosphatidylinositol Diacylglycerol-Lyase: A phosphorus-oxygen lyase found primarily in BACTERIA. The enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of a phosphoester linkage in 1-phosphatidyl-1D-myo-inositol to form 1D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic phosphate and diacylglycerol. The enzyme was formerly classified as a phosphoric diester hydrolase (EC 3.1.4.10) and is often referred to as a TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. However it is now known that a cyclic phosphate is the final product of this enzyme and that water does not enter into the reaction.Marinobacter: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria in the family ALTEROMONADACEAE. The inability to utilize carbohydrates is a distinguishing feature from other genera in the family.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Magainins: A class of antimicrobial peptides discovered in the skin of XENOPUS LAEVIS. They kill bacteria by permeabilizing cell membranes without exhibiting significant toxicity against mammalian cells.Polymerization: Chemical reaction in which monomeric components are combined to form POLYMERS (e.g., POLYMETHYLMETHACRYLATE).Endorphins: One of the three major groups of endogenous opioid peptides. They are large peptides derived from the PRO-OPIOMELANOCORTIN precursor. The known members of this group are alpha-, beta-, and gamma-endorphin. The term endorphin is also sometimes used to refer to all opioid peptides, but the narrower sense is used here; OPIOID PEPTIDES is used for the broader group.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Phase Transition: A change of a substance from one form or state to another.Fatty Alcohols: Usually high-molecular-weight, straight-chain primary alcohols, but can also range from as few as 4 carbons, derived from natural fats and oils, including lauryl, stearyl, oleyl, and linoleyl alcohols. They are used in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, detergents, plastics, and lube oils and in textile manufacture. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides: Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.Phosphoinositide Phospholipase C: A type C phospholipase with specificity towards PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS that contain INOSITOL 1,4,5-TRISPHOSPHATE. Many of the enzymes listed under this classification are involved in intracellular signaling.Anions: Negatively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the anode or positive pole during electrolysis.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Hemolytic Agents: Substances that are toxic to blood in general, including the clotting mechanism; hematotoxins may refer to the hematopoietic system.Protein Sorting Signals: Amino acid sequences found in transported proteins that selectively guide the distribution of the proteins to specific cellular compartments.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Tripelennamine: A histamine H1 antagonist with low sedative action but frequent gastrointestinal irritation. It is used to treat ASTHMA; HAY FEVER; URTICARIA; and RHINITIS; and also in veterinary applications. Tripelennamine is administered by various routes, including topically.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)AcrylatesDrug Design: The molecular designing of drugs for specific purposes (such as DNA-binding, enzyme inhibition, anti-cancer efficacy, etc.) based on knowledge of molecular properties such as activity of functional groups, molecular geometry, and electronic structure, and also on information cataloged on analogous molecules. Drug design is generally computer-assisted molecular modeling and does not include pharmacokinetics, dosage analysis, or drug administration analysis.Chitosan: Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.Aspartate-tRNA Ligase: An enzyme that activates aspartic acid with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.12.Halomonas: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped or pleomorphic bacteria which are halotolerant. Members of this genus are capable of growth in sodium chloride concentrations of up to 20% or more. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Selenium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain selenium as an integral part of the molecule.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Nebramycin: A complex of antibiotic substances produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius.Static Electricity: The accumulation of an electric charge on a objectCyanoacrylates: A group of compounds having the general formula CH2=C(CN)-COOR; it polymerizes on contact with moisture; used as tissue adhesive; higher homologs have hemostatic and antibacterial properties.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Tetracaine: A potent local anesthetic of the ester type used for surface and spinal anesthesia.Nylons: Polymers where the main polymer chain comprises recurring amide groups. These compounds are generally formed from combinations of diamines, diacids, and amino acids and yield fibers, sheeting, or extruded forms used in textiles, gels, filters, sutures, contact lenses, and other biomaterials.Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of one of the two ester bonds in a phosphodiester compound. EC 3.1.4.Phosphatidylethanolamines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to an ethanolamine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and ethanolamine and 2 moles of fatty acids.Polystyrenes: Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.Lysophosphatidylcholines: Derivatives of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES obtained by their partial hydrolysis which removes one of the fatty acid moieties.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Trifluoroethanol: A non-aqueous co-solvent that serves as tool to study protein folding. It is also used in various pharmaceutical, chemical and engineering applications.Calorimetry, Differential Scanning: Differential thermal analysis in which the sample compartment of the apparatus is a differential calorimeter, allowing an exact measure of the heat of transition independent of the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and other variables of the sample.Nephelometry and Turbidimetry: Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Colloids: Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate: An anionic surfactant, usually a mixture of sodium alkyl sulfates, mainly the lauryl; lowers surface tension of aqueous solutions; used as fat emulsifier, wetting agent, detergent in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and toothpastes; also as research tool in protein biochemistry.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Unilamellar Liposomes: Single membrane vesicles, generally made of PHOSPHOLIPIDS.Alamethicin: A cyclic nonadecapeptide antibiotic that can act as an ionophore and is produced by strains of Trichoderma viride. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Anesthetics, General: Agents that induce various degrees of analgesia; depression of consciousness, circulation, and respiration; relaxation of skeletal muscle; reduction of reflex activity; and amnesia. There are two types of general anesthetics, inhalation and intravenous. With either type, the arterial concentration of drug required to induce anesthesia varies with the condition of the patient, the desired depth of anesthesia, and the concomitant use of other drugs. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p.173)Diphenylhexatriene: A fluorescent compound that emits light only in specific configurations in certain lipid media. It is used as a tool in the study of membrane lipids.Membrane Fluidity: The motion of phospholipid molecules within the lipid bilayer, dependent on the classes of phospholipids present, their fatty acid composition and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains, the cholesterol concentration, and temperature.1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine: Synthetic phospholipid used in liposomes and lipid bilayers to study biological membranes. It is also a major constituent of PULMONARY SURFACTANTS.beta-Endorphin: A 31-amino acid peptide that is the C-terminal fragment of BETA-LIPOTROPIN. It acts on OPIOID RECEPTORS and is an analgesic. Its first four amino acids at the N-terminal are identical to the tetrapeptide sequence of METHIONINE ENKEPHALIN and LEUCINE ENKEPHALIN.Acrylamides: Colorless, odorless crystals that are used extensively in research laboratories for the preparation of polyacrylamide gels for electrophoresis and in organic synthesis, and polymerization. Some of its polymers are used in sewage and wastewater treatment, permanent press fabrics, and as soil conditioning agents.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Gramicidin: A group of peptide antibiotics from BACILLUS brevis. Gramicidin C or S is a cyclic, ten-amino acid polypeptide and gramicidins A, B, D are linear. Gramicidin is one of the two principal components of TYROTHRICIN.Procaine: A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a slow onset and a short duration of action. It is mainly used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and spinal block. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1016).Oxazoles: Five-membered heterocyclic ring structures containing an oxygen in the 1-position and a nitrogen in the 3-position, in distinction from ISOXAZOLES where they are at the 1,2 positions.Biomimetics: An interdisciplinary field in materials science, ENGINEERING, and BIOLOGY, studying the use of biological principles for synthesis or fabrication of BIOMIMETIC MATERIALS.PolyaminesChromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Octoxynol: Nonionic surfactant mixtures varying in the number of repeating ethoxy (oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) groups. They are used as detergents, emulsifiers, wetting agents, defoaming agents, etc. Octoxynol-9, the compound with 9 repeating ethoxy groups, is a spermatocide.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular: NMR spectroscopy on small- to medium-size biological macromolecules. This is often used for structural investigation of proteins and nucleic acids, and often involves more than one isotope.Drug Stability: The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.Intracellular Membranes: Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.Porphyrins: A group of compounds containing the porphin structure, four pyrrole rings connected by methine bridges in a cyclic configuration to which a variety of side chains are attached. The nature of the side chain is indicated by a prefix, as uroporphyrin, hematoporphyrin, etc. The porphyrins, in combination with iron, form the heme component in biologically significant compounds such as hemoglobin and myoglobin.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Fluoresceins: A family of spiro(isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-(9H)xanthen)-3-one derivatives. These are used as dyes, as indicators for various metals, and as fluorescent labels in immunoassays.Acrylic ResinsCell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Ion Channels: Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Membranes: Thin layers of tissue which cover parts of the body, separate adjacent cavities, or connect adjacent structures.Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Carbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Models, Structural: A representation, generally small in scale, to show the structure, construction, or appearance of something. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Glycolipids: Any compound containing one or more monosaccharide residues bound by a glycosidic linkage to a hydrophobic moiety such as an acylglycerol (see GLYCERIDES), a sphingoid, a ceramide (CERAMIDES) (N-acylsphingoid) or a prenyl phosphate. (From IUPAC's webpage)Magnetics: The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.Palmitic Acids: A group of 16-carbon fatty acids that contain no double bonds.Polyglycolic Acid: A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Phospholipase D: An enzyme found mostly in plant tissue. It hydrolyzes glycerophosphatidates with the formation of a phosphatidic acid and a nitrogenous base such as choline. This enzyme also catalyzes transphosphatidylation reactions. EC 3.1.4.4.Bacteriocins: Substances elaborated by specific strains of bacteria that are lethal against other strains of the same or related species. They are protein or lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes used in taxonomy studies of bacteria.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Calmodulin: A heat-stable, low-molecular-weight activator protein found mainly in the brain and heart. The binding of calcium ions to this protein allows this protein to bind to cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and to adenyl cyclase with subsequent activation. Thereby this protein modulates cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels.Ultracentrifugation: Centrifugation with a centrifuge that develops centrifugal fields of more than 100,000 times gravity. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cross-Linking Reagents: Reagents with two reactive groups, usually at opposite ends of the molecule, that are capable of reacting with and thereby forming bridges between side chains of amino acids in proteins; the locations of naturally reactive areas within proteins can thereby be identified; may also be used for other macromolecules, like glycoproteins, nucleic acids, or other.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Vibrio: A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Ferric Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A computer simulation developed to study the motion of molecules over a period of time.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
"Self-Assembling Amphiphilic Peptides." doi:10.1002/psc.2633 Hamley, I.W. Lipopeptides: From Self-Assembly to Bioactivity. Chem ... "Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Peptides." doi:10.1039/C0SM01218A Hamley IW. "Lipopeptides: From Self-Assembly to Bioactivity." ... "Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Peptides." doi:10.1039/C0SM01218A Dehsorkhi A, Castelletto V, Hamley IW. " ... "Self-Assembling Amphiphilic Peptides." doi:10.1002/psc.2633. ...
This makes polyene antifungals amphiphilic. The polyene antimycotics bind with sterols in the fungal cell membrane, principally ...
... is an amphiphilic (nonpolar) solute. While displaying a preference for solvents with low relative static permittivity ( ...
Sørensen, S.H.; Norén, O.; Sjöström, H.; Danielsen, E.M. (1982). "Amphiphilic pig intestinal microvillus maltase/glucoamylase. ...
The CuAAC click reaction also effectively couples polystyrene and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The result is an amphiphilic ...
Becker T, Weber K, Johnsson N (Dec 1990). "Protein-protein recognition via short amphiphilic helices; a mutational analysis of ...
... this makes them water-soluble and amphiphilic. The length of the fatty tail and degree of exothylation will determine the ...
They can be considered a sub-class of amphipols and are based on earlier fundamental explorations of amphiphilic secondary ... Kaiser, ET; Kézdy, FJ (20 January 1984). "Amphiphilic secondary structure: design of peptide hormones". Science. 223 (4633): ...
G. Xu, J. S. Martinez, J. T. Groves and A. Butler (2002). "Membrane affinity of the amphiphilic marinobactin siderophores". J. ...
These molecules are called amphipathic or amphiphilic. Commercial protein skimmers work by generating a large air/water ...
Chou KC, Zhang CT, Maggiora GM (May 1997). "Disposition of amphiphilic helices in heteropolar environments". Proteins. 28 (1): ... Maggiora for helping intuitively analyze the disposition of amphiphilic alpha helices in heteropolar environments It is closely ...
Chou KC, Zhang CT, Maggiora GM (May 1997). "Disposition of amphiphilic helices in heteropolar environments". Proteins. 28 (1): ...
Phospholipids, a class of amphiphilic molecules, are the main components of biological membranes. The amphiphilic nature of ... Such a compound is called amphiphilic or amphipathic. This forms the basis for a number of areas of research in chemistry and ... Often, amphiphilic species have several lipophilic parts, several hydrophilic parts, or several of both. Proteins and some ... Common amphiphilic substances are soaps, detergents and lipoproteins. The lipophilic group is typically a large hydrocarbon ...
Aseyev, Vladimir; Tenhu, Heikki; Winnik, Françoise M. (2010). Self Organized Nanostructures of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers II ...
Functional analysis of the N-terminal putative amphiphilic helix". J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8): 6014-23. PMID 8449960. Suzuki Y, ... and evolving amphiphilic helix of human aspartyl-tRNA synthetase". J Biol Chem. 264 (28): 16608-12. PMID 2674137. "Entrez Gene ...
Sorensen SH, Noren O, Sjostrom H, Danielsen EM (1982). "Amphiphilic pig intestinal microvillus maltase/glucoamylase Structure ...
Sauvet, G.; Fortuniak, W.; Kazmierski, K.; Chojnowski, J. (2003). "Amphiphilic block and statistical siloxane copolymers with ...
Such as amphiphilic α-helixes, exposed nonpolar loops, post-translationally acylated or lipidated amino acid residues, or acyl ... Association of amphiphilic α-helices with membranes occurs similarly. Intrinsically unstructured or unfolded peptides with ... They may also occur in BcL-2 like protein , in some amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides , and in certain annexins . These ...
"Self-assembly of amphiphilic dendritic dipeptides into helical pores". Nature. 430 (7001): 764. Bibcode:2004Natur.430..764P. ...
"Synthesis and Hierarchical Structures of Amphiphilic Polyphenylacetylenes Carryingl-Valine Pendants". Macromolecules. 36: 77. ...
"Polystyrene-Dendrimer Amphiphilic Block Copolymers with a Generation-Dependent Aggregation". Science. 268 (5217): 1592-1595. ...
They can form lipid bilayers because of their amphiphilic characteristic. The structure of the phospholipid molecule generally ...
Yoshimura SH, Hirano T (2016). "HEAT repeats - versatile arrays of amphiphilic helices working in crowded environments?". J. ...
... is a amphiphilic compound and a cation at neutral pH. Jacobs GS (Spring 2004). "Atiprimod: A New Drug Candidate in ...
This makes them amphiphilic molecules (having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions). In the case of cholesterol, the polar ...
Membranes composed of amphiphilic molecules are highly flexible surfaces that determine the architecture of biological systems ... The Structure and Conformation of Amphiphilic Membranes: Overview. * The Structure and Conformation of Amphiphilic Membranes: ... The Structure and Conformation of Amphiphilic Membranes. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Amphiphilic Membranes, ... Membranes composed of amphiphilic molecules are highly flexible surfaces that determine the architecture of biological systems ...
Some amphiphilic cations block the mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel, MAC.. Martinez-Caballero S1, Dejean LM, Kinnally KW ...
Structures of amphiphilic siderophores produced by Halomonas meridiana str. HC4321C1 and Vibrio sp. HC0601C5 ... Identification of new members within suites of amphiphilic marine siderophores.. Vraspir JM1, Holt PD, Butler A. ... Amphiphilic marine siderophores including marinobactins (), loihichelins (), synechobactins (), aquachelins (), amphibactins ... isolated off the coast of southern California and were found to produce an expanded suite of previously identified amphiphilic ...
Keywords: amphiphilic polymers; fluorescence spectroscopy; molecular rotor; pyrene; viscometry Document Type: Research Article ... These amphiphilic polymers are comb poly(meth)acrylamides laterally substituted by groups containing a quaternary ammonium site ... BACKGROUND: Following our recent synthesis and characterization of three new families of cationic amphiphilic polymers with ...
"Inversed" Surface Micelle Array Fabrication of an Amphiphilic Block Copolymer on Water Surface ...
1. PEG-stabilized lipid disks as carriers for amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. Open this publication in new window or tab ,, ... 3. EGF-targeting lipodisks for specific delivery of cationic amphiphilic peptides to tumour cells. Open this publication in new ... Open this publication in new window or tab ,,Characterizing and controlling the loading and release of cationic amphiphilic ... It is shown that the modified sensors can be used to characterize the interaction of lipodisks with α-helical amphiphilic ...
Accepted Manuscript: Detection of Lipid and Amphiphilic Biomarkers for Disease Diagnostics. Title: Detection of Lipid and ... Amphiphilic Janus particles self-assemble into complex metastructures, but little is known about how their assembly might be ... Lipid membrane-assisted condensation and assembly of amphiphilic Janus particles Journal Article Chambers, Mariah ; Mallory, ... Interestingly, many such biomarkers are composed of lipids, and are amphiphilic in biochemistry, which leads them to be often ...
Interestingly, many such biomarkers are composed of lipids, and are amphiphilic in biochemistry, which leads them to be often ... Here, we review techniques and methods used to detect lipid and amphiphilic biomarkers associated with disease, as well as ... Many of the physiologically relevant molecules involved in pathogenesis and disease are indeed amphiphilic. This chemical ... it is important to account for the biochemistry of lipid and amphiphilic biomarkers when creating novel techniques for the ...
Endogenous exosome labelling with an amphiphilic NIR-fluorescent probe M. P. Monopoli, A. Zendrini, D. Wu, S. Cheung, G. ... We report for the first time an endogenous method to NIR-fluorescent labelled exosomes using an amphiphilic probe without the ...
... amphiphilic diblock copolymer stars in solution, by employing a lattice model and applying Grand Canonical Monte Carlo ... Phase behavior of rigid, amphiphilic star polymers. Christian Koch,*a Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos,b Federica Lo Versoc and ... Phase behavior of rigid, amphiphilic star polymers. C. Koch, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, F. Lo Verso and C. N. Likos, Soft Matter, ... We determine the phase behavior of rigid, amphiphilic diblock copolymer. stars in solution, by employing a lattice model and ...
37: Self-assembly of an amphiphilic discotic into (left) one-dimensional helical fibres at low water content and (right) triple ... we have now unravelled how the self-assembly behaviour in water of an amphiphilic discotic molecule (Figure 37, middle) is ...
We have prepared the amphiphilic molecular catalyst [Co III(L OC18)(pyrr) 2]ClO 4, where L OC18 is the deprotonated form of N,N ... Magneto-capillary dynamics of amphiphilic Janus particles at curved liquid interfaces Journal Article - in OSTI.gov collection ... Detection of Lipid and Amphiphilic Biomarkers for Disease Diagnostics Journal Article Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z. ; Vu, Dung ... Amphiphilic Janus particles self-assemble into complex metastructures, but little is known about how their assembly might be ...
A novel amphiphilic LA-g-QC copolymer was synthesized according to the schemes shown in Figures 2 and 3. It can be seen from ... A novel amphiphilic derivative of chitosan, namely, a linoleic acid-g-quaternary chitosan (LA-g-QC), was designed and ... In this study, with an aim to improve the solubility of chitosan, an amphiphilic LA-g-quaternary chitosan (LA-g-QC) copolymer ... Synthesis and Characterization of an Amphiphilic Linoleic Acid-g-Quaternary Chitosan with Low Toxicity. Xiaobin Fang,1 Yingqi ...
Protein-Resistant Biodegradable Amphiphilic Graft Copolymer Vesicles as Protein Carriers.. [Yupeng Wang, Lesan Yan, Bin Li, ... Diverse nanostructures including vesicles can be assembled from the amphiphilic graft copolymers with well-defined nano-sizes. ...
Differential Effects of Linkers on the Activity of Amphiphilic Tobramycin Antifungals. Marina Y. Fosso. ... "Differential Effects of Linkers on the Activity of Amphiphilic Tobramycin Antifungals." Molecules 23, no. 4: 899. ... Differential Effects of Linkers on the Activity of Amphiphilic Tobramycin Antifungals. Molecules 2018, 23, 899. ... Differential Effects of Linkers on the Activity of Amphiphilic Tobramycin Antifungals. Molecules. 2018; 23(4):899. ...
Abstract A series of amphiphilic hierarchically meso/macroporous phosphotungstic acid (HPW)/SiO2materials have been synthesized ... A series of amphiphilic hierarchically meso/macroporous phosphotungstic acid (HPW)/SiO2 materials have been synthesized via a ... Amphiphilic catalyst Hierarchical pores Phosphotungstic acid Oxidative desulfurization Electronic supplementary material. The ... Nur H, Ikeda S, Ohtani B (2001) Phase-boundary catalysis of alkene epoxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide using amphiphilic ...
... we demonstrate that amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate ... Amphiphilic core shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer ... Amphiphilic core shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer ... These results demonstrate that the [email protected] NPs with a unique amphiphilic core-shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers ...
... Kaldéus, ... reactive amphiphilic macromolecules with targeted side-chain functionalities were used to compatibilise the CNF surface by ...
The purpose of this study was to develop a self-aggregated nanoparticulate vehicle using an amphiphilic poly(lactic acid)- ... Self-aggregated nanoparticles based on amphiphilic poly(lactic acid)-grafted-chitosan copolymer for ocular delivery of ... Background: The purpose of this study was to develop a self-aggregated nanoparticulate vehicle using an amphiphilic poly(lactic ... Self-aggregated nanoparticles based on amphiphilic poly(lactic acid)-grafted-chitosan copolymer for ocular delivery of ...
Many of these chemicals are known to bind to monoamine-receptors in higher eukaryotes and are cationic amphiphilic drugs. A ...
An amphiphilic polymer (CmPOX) based on poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) linked to a hydrophobic part composed of an aliphatic chain ... Summary of "Amphiphilic polymers based on polyoxazoline as relevant nanovectors for photodynamic therapy.". An amphiphilic ... Amphiphilic polymers based on polyoxazoline as relevant nanovectors for photodynamic therapy.. 08:00 EDT 14th August 2019 , ... We discuss the structure and activity of antibacterial peptides and polymers in the context of "amphiphilic balance" and how ...
In the present work, we have synthesised and characterised several second generation amphiphilic polylysine dendrons to be used ...
... amphiphilic core-shell particles in nano- to micro-scaled sizes. Novel feature of this synthetic approach is that it combines ... graft copolymerization, in situ self-assembly of the resulting amphiphilic graft copolymers and emulsion polymerization in a ... Keywords: amphiphilic, core-shell, particle, synthesis. Abstract:. We have developed a novel and commericial viable route to a ... Amphiphilic Polymeric Core-Shell Particles: Novel Synthetic Strategy and Potential Applications of the Particles. Authors: P. ...
Oleo-reduction of amphiphilic graphene is amenable to industrially viable processes to produce future graphene-based polymer ... Amphiphilic reduced graphene oxide is obtained by oleo-functionalization with epoxidized methyl oleate (renewable feedstock) ... Synthesis and characterization of amphiphilic reduced graphene oxide with epoxidized methyl oleate.. [B Kollbe Ahn, Jonggeun ... The excellent diverse solvent-dispersivity of the oleo-reduced amphiphilic graphene and its reduction chemistry are confirmed ...
Design of amphiphilic diblock copolymer: Schematic representation of amphiphilic block copolymer which can respond to three ... Thus the proposed amphiphilic block copolymer has the potential to be used as a redox, acid, and temperature responsive system ... Our amphiphilic BCP was shown to self-assemble into micellar structure in aqueous solution and is capable of encapsulating ... Multi-Stimuli Sensitive Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Assemblies. Akamol Klaikherd, Chikkannagari Nagamani, and S. Thayumanavan* ...
  • Amphiphilic triblock copolymers of methoxy-polyethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide)-poly(L-lysine) (MPEG-b-PLLA-b-PLL) (M(n) = 8540-22 240) were synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of N(epsilon)-(Z)-lysine-N-carboxyanhydrides (N(epsilon)-(Z)-Lys-NCA) using MPEG-b-PLLA-NH(2) as a macroinitiator. (edu.au)
  • Amphiphilic drug persuaded collapse of polyvinylpyrrolidone and poly(ethylene glycol) chains: a dynamic light scattering study. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and Pluronic P-85 were used as polymer controls to compare the role of PEG and amphiphilic behavior in the ASMs. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Amphiphilic poly[(propylene glycol)-block-(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)] copolymers for gene transfer in skeletal muscle. (openrepository.com)
  • A commercial biomedical poly(ether urethane), Pellethane 2363-80AE, was surface modified through the use of amphiphilic polymeric additives, and through surface grafting with poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. (lu.se)
  • Effects of pH and amphiphilic chemicals on the adsorption and transport of quinolone antibiotics. (epa.gov)
  • Adsorption of fibrinogen, in particular, was significantly reduced by the amphiphilic additives to levels similar to those obtained for Pellethane surfaces grafted with PEG 20000. (lu.se)
  • The intrinsic amphiphilic nature of cellulose became efficient in a system where adsorption was not ruled by strong electrostatic forces. (aalto.fi)
  • We report a simple nanofluid of graphene-based Janus amphiphilic nanosheets for enhanced oil recovery with efficiency of about 15.2%, comparable to chemical methods, which is both economically and environmentally beneficial to the petroleum industry. (pnas.org)
  • So as to consider their size of the amphiphilic nanoparticle dual-surface structure containing body called as janus particle introduced since about twenty years in industry with purpose of drug delivery and diagnostic purpose in the field of paramedical areas. (pharmatutor.org)
  • Interestingly, many such biomarkers are composed of lipids, and are amphiphilic in biochemistry, which leads them to be often sequestered by host carriers. (osti.gov)
  • Previously, we published several reports on the use of facially amphiphilic (FA) monomers which led to polynorbornenes with excellent antimicrobial activities and selectivities. (umass.edu)