Amoebozoa: A supergroup (some say phylum) of ameboid EUKARYOTES, comprising ARCHAMOEBAE; LOBOSEA; and MYCETOZOA.Ribosome Subunits, Small: The small ribonucleoprotein component of RIBOSOMES. It contains the MESSENGER RNA binding site and two TRANSFER RNA binding sites - one for the incoming AMINO ACYL TRNA (A site) and the other (P site) for the peptidyl tRNA carrying the elongating peptide chain.Eukaryota: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Dictyostelium: A genus of protozoa, formerly also considered a fungus. Its natural habitat is decaying forest leaves, where it feeds on bacteria. D. discoideum is the best-known species and is widely used in biomedical research.Naegleria fowleri: A species of parasitic protozoa having both an ameboid and flagellate stage in its life cycle. Infection with this pathogen produces PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS.Amebiasis: Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.Air Conditioning: The maintenance of certain aspects of the environment within a defined space to facilitate the function of that space; aspects controlled include air temperature and motion, radiant heat level, moisture, and concentration of pollutants such as dust, microorganisms, and gases. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Central Nervous System Protozoal Infections: Infections of the brain, spinal cord, or meninges by single celled organisms of the former subkingdom known as protozoa. The central nervous system may be the primary or secondary site of protozoal infection. These diseases may occur as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS or arise in immunocompetent hosts.Naegleria: A free-living soil amoeba pathogenic to humans and animals. It occurs also in water and sewage. The most commonly found species in man is NAEGLERIA FOWLERI which is the pathogen for primary amebic meningoencephalitis in primates.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Erysipelothrix: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that has a tendency to form long filaments. Its organisms are widely distributed in nature and are found in MAMMALS; BIRDS; and FISHES. Erysipelothrix may appear gram-negative because they decolorize easily.Amoeba: A genus of ameboid protozoa. Characteristics include a vesicular nucleus and the formation of several lodopodia, one of which is dominant at a given time. Reproduction occurs asexually by binary fission.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Mycetozoa: A group of AMOEBOZOA comprising two distinct groups with the ability to form fruiting bodies: DICTYOSTELIIDA (dictyostelid cellular slime molds) and MYXOMYCETES (plasmodial slime molds).Dysentery: Acute inflammation of the intestine associated with infectious DIARRHEA of various etiologies, generally acquired by eating contaminated food containing TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL derived from BACTERIA or other microorganisms. Dysentery is characterized initially by watery FECES then by bloody mucoid stools. It is often associated with ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and DEHYDRATION.Spores, Bacterial: Heat and stain resistant, metabolically inactive bodies formed within the vegetative cells of bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.Myxomycetes: A division of organisms that exist vegetatively as complex mobile plasmodia, reproduce by means of spores, and have complex life cycles. They are now classed as protozoa but formerly were considered fungi.Dictyosteliida: An order of protozoa characterized by their ability to aggregate to form a multicellular pseudoplasmodium, which gives rise to a multispored fruiting body. A stalk tube is present.Phytophthora infestans: A species of parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae that is the causative agent of late blight of potato.Physarum polycephalum: A protozoan, previously also considered a fungus. Characteristics include sporangia that are stalked and multilobed. It is widely used in biomedical research.Physarum: A genus of protozoa, formerly also considered a fungus. Characteristics include the presence of violet to brown spores.Biometry: The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.Madagascar: One of the Indian Ocean Islands off the southeast coast of Africa. Its capital is Antananarivo. It was formerly called the Malagasy Republic. Discovered by the Portuguese in 1500, its history has been tied predominantly to the French, becoming a French protectorate in 1882, a French colony in 1896, and a territory within the French union in 1946. The Malagasy Republic was established in the French Community in 1958 but it achieved independence in 1960. Its name was changed to Madagascar in 1975. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p714)Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Amoebida: An order of ameboid protozoa that is commonly uninucleate and possess mitochondria. Most organisms are nonpathogenic.Lobosea: A class of amoeboid EUKARYOTES that forms either filiform subpseudopodia or lobopodia. Characteristics include the absence of sorocarps, sporangia, or similar fruiting bodies. Lobosea were formerly members of the phylum Sarcomastigophora, subphylum Sarcodina, under the old five kingdom paradigm.VenezuelaRhizaria: A large supergroup of mostly amoeboid EUKARYOTES whose three main subgroups are CERCOZOA; FORAMINIFERA; and HAPLOSPORIDA. Nearly all of the species possess MITOCHONDRIA and historically many were considered ANIMALS.Plasmodiophorida: A group of EUKARYOTES that are parasites of plants. Life cycle stages include zoospores and plasmodia.Foraminifera: An order of amoeboid EUKARYOTES characterized by reticulating pseudopods and a complex life cycle with an alternation of generations. Most are less than 1mm in size and found in marine or brackish water.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Cryptophyta: A class of EUKARYOTA (traditionally algae), characterized by biflagellated cells and found in both freshwater and marine environments. Pigmentation varies but only one CHLOROPLAST is present. Unique structures include a nucleomorph and ejectosomes.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Entamoeba histolytica: A species of parasitic protozoa causing ENTAMOEBIASIS and amebic dysentery (DYSENTERY, AMEBIC). Characteristics include a single nucleus containing a small central karyosome and peripheral chromatin that is finely and regularly beaded.Entamoeba: A genus of ameboid protozoa characterized by the presence of beaded chromatin on the inner surface of the nuclear membrane. Its organisms are parasitic in invertebrates and vertebrates, including humans.Entamoebiasis: Infection with amoebae of the genus ENTAMOEBA. Infection with E. histolytica causes DYSENTERY, AMEBIC and LIVER ABSCESS, AMEBIC.Dysentery, Amebic: DYSENTERY caused by intestinal amebic infection, chiefly with ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA. This condition may be associated with amebic infection of the LIVER and other distant sites.Liver Abscess, Amebic: Single or multiple areas of PUS due to infection by any ameboid protozoa (AMEBIASIS). A common form is caused by the ingestion of ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA.Trophozoites: Cells or feeding stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. In the malarial parasite, the trophozoite develops from the MEROZOITE and then splits into the SCHIZONT. Trophozoites that are left over from cell division can go on to form gametocytes.Amebicides: Agents which are destructive to amebae, especially the parasitic species causing AMEBIASIS in man and animal.Sin Nombre virus: A species of HANTAVIRUS which emerged in the Four Corners area of the United States in 1993. It causes a serious, often fatal pulmonary illness (HANTAVIRUS PULMONARY SYNDROME) in humans. Transmission is by inhaling aerosolized rodent secretions that contain virus particles, carried especially by deer mice (PEROMYSCUS maniculatus) and pinyon mice (P. truei).Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Tourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Ulnar Neuropathies: Disease involving the ULNAR NERVE from its origin in the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its termination in the hand. Clinical manifestations may include PARESIS or PARALYSIS of wrist flexion, finger flexion, thumb adduction, finger abduction, and finger adduction. Sensation over the medial palm, fifth finger, and ulnar aspect of the ring finger may also be impaired. Common sites of injury include the AXILLA, cubital tunnel at the ELBOW, and Guyon's canal at the wrist. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51 pp43-5)Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Esophageal Sphincter, Lower: The physiologic or functional barrier to GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX at the esophagogastric junction. Sphincteric muscles remain tonically contracted during the resting state and form the high-pressure zone separating the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS from that of the STOMACH. (Haubrich et al, Bockus Gastroenterology, 5th ed., pp399, 415)

Balamuthia mandrillaris meningoencephalitis: survival of a pediatric patient. (1/24)

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Abundant 5S rRNA-like transcripts encoded by the mitochondrial genome in amoebozoa. (2/24)

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Successful treatment of Balamuthia mandrillaris amoebic infection with extensive neurological and cutaneous involvement. (3/24)

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A phylogenetic survey of myotubularin genes of eukaryotes: distribution, protein structure, evolution, and gene expression. (4/24)

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Demographic and ecological effects on patterns of parasitism in eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. (5/24)

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Balamuthia mandrillaris transmitted through organ transplantation --- Mississippi, 2009. (6/24)

On December 14, 2009, a physician in Mississippi contacted CDC to report possible transplant-transmitted encephalitis in two kidney transplant recipients who shared the same organ donor. Histopathologic testing of donor autopsy brain tissue at CDC showed amebae, and subsequent testing of specimens from the donor and the two kidney recipients confirmed transmission by transplantation of Balamuthia granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE), a rare disease caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris, a free-living ameba found in soil. One kidney recipient, a woman aged 31 years, died; the other recipient, a man aged 27 years, survived with neurologic sequelae. Recipients of the heart and liver from the same donor received preemptive therapy and have shown no signs of infection. The donor, a previously healthy boy aged 4 years, was presumed to have died from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), an autoimmune neurologic disease, after infection with influenza A. An investigation was conducted by the state health departments in Mississippi, Kentucky, Florida, and Alabama and CDC to characterize the cases, elucidate possible exposures in the donor, and develop recommendations for early detection and prevention. This is the first reported transmission of Balamuthia by organ transplantation. Clinicians should be aware of Balamuthia infection as a potentially fatal cause of encephalitis. Organ procurement organizations (OPOs) and transplant centers should be aware of the potential for Balamuthia infection in donors with encephalitis of uncertain etiology, and OPOs should communicate this elevated risk for infection to transplant centers so they can make an informed risk assessment in the decision to accept an organ.  (+info)

Notes from the field: transplant-transmitted Balamuthia mandrillaris --- Arizona, 2010. (7/24)

On August 23, 2010, CDC was notified regarding two organ transplant recipients in Arizona who had encephalitis with multiple ring-enhancing lesions revealed by cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. The common organ donor, a Hispanic male landscaper aged 27 years, had died in Arizona from a presumed stroke on July 21. He had a large skin lesion for approximately 6 months on his back that he had attributed to an insect bite. The ill recipients, a male liver recipient aged 56 years, and a male recipient of a kidney and pancreas aged 24 years, received organ transplants on July 22. In addition, two other recipients received organs from this donor: an adult male heart recipient received his transplant in California on July 22, and an adult male kidney recipient received his transplant in Utah on July 23.  (+info)

dictyBase update 2011: web 2.0 functionality and the initial steps towards a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. (8/24)

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Free-living amoebae (or "FLA") in the Amoebozoa group are important causes of disease in humans and animals. Naegleria fowleri is sometimes included in the group "free-living amoebae", and it causes a condition traditionally called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. However, Naegleria is now considered part of the Excavata, not the Amoebozoa, and is considered to be much more closely related to Leishmania and Trypanosoma. Acanthamoeba spp. and Balamuthia mandrillaris are opportunistic free-living amoebae capable of causing granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) in individuals with compromised immune systems. Acanthamoeba spp. have been found in soil; fresh, brackish, and sea water; sewage; swimming pools; contact lens equipment; medicinal pools; dental treatment units; dialysis machines; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems; mammalian cell cultures; vegetables; human nostrils and throats; and human and animal brain, skin, and lung tissues. B. mandrillaris however, has not been ...
The Amoebozoa are a major group of amoeboid protozoa, comprising the majority of the amoebae that move using blunt or lobose pseudopods. Most members are unicellular, for instance the famous species Amoeba proteus, which is often studied in laboratories. They include the most common protists in soils and aquatic habitats. Some are symbiotic on other organisms, including some pathogens, responsible for amoebiasis (dysentery) and other diseases. They also include most slime moulds (Mycetozoa), multinucleate or multicellular forms that produce spores, and are often visible to the unaided eye. Amoebozoans rely on pseudopods for both locomotion and feeding. The majority lack flagella, and more generally do not form microtubule-supported structures except during mitosis. The cell is typically divided into an outer layer of clear ectoplasm and an inner layer of granular endoplasm. In the active form there is usually one or more pseudopods along the anterior margin and sometimes a posterior bulb called ...
The ultra-structure of the shell and the morphometric variability of soil inhabiting testate amoeba Lamtopyxis callistoma from Madagascar were studied by using light- and scanning electron microscopy. The biometrical characteristic of the species was made on the basis of 75 specimens measured. In addition to the diameter of the shell, six other shell characters were described biometrically for the first time. The analysis of the variation coefficients shows that the studied population of L. callistoma is comparatively homogeneous and almost all measured characters are weakly to moderate variable (CV less than 10%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on the shell ultra-morphology show that it has a smooth apertural surface with a thick layer of porous and fibrous organic cement and a rough dorsal surface composed of bigger and angular pieces of quartz. The shell wall has a thickness of about 5-6 µm and is composed of three layers. Unlike the previously accepted opinion that species is
Minge, M.A.; Silberman, J.D.; Orr, R.J.S.; Cavalier-Smith, T.; Shalchian-Tabrizi, K.; Burki, F.; Skjæveland, A.; Jakobsen, K.S. 2009: Evolutionary position of breviate amoebae and the primary eukaryote divergence. Proceedings of the Royal Society (B), 276: 597-604. DOI: 10.1098/rspb. ...
Myxomycetes (Amoebozoa, plasmodial slime molds) are one of the last larger groups of organisms where the biodiversity is not yet investigated by molecular methods, except for a very few cultivable model species. Based on the first phylogenies for the group produced in 2012 and 2013, this thesis work explores the genetic diversity of wild populations of myxomycetes, addressing two questions: 1. Does diversity and phylogenetic trees found with barcode markers fit the current morphological species concept, and do barcode markers reveal a lower or higher diversity than found by morphological characters? In the first case, morphological characters seen as decisive for species differentiation would be plastic (shaped by the environment), in the second case we must assume the existence of cryptic species. 2. Can genetic markers be used to see if natural populations of myxomycetes reproduce mainly sexual or asexual? Sexuality is proven to occur in the Amoebozoa, but asexual reproduction should be ...
Dagiti unikonta ket addaan iti tallo a panagtitipon ti gene nga awan kadagiti bikonta. Dagiti tallo a genes a naitiptipon kadagiti unikonta ngem saan a ti bakteria wenno dagiti naikodigo nga ensima dagiti bikonta para iti sintesis dagiti pirimidina nukleotido: carbamoyl phosphate synthase, dihydroorotase, aspartate carbamoyltransferase. Daytoy ket mabalin a nakairamanan ti dua a panagtitipon, ti manmano a paris kadagiti pasamak, amangsupsuporat ti nakibinningayan a tinaudan ti Opisthokonta ken Amoebozoa. Ni Cavalier-Smith[4] ket kasisigud a nagisingasing a dagiti unikonta ket nagtaudda nga addaan iti agmaymaysa a flagelo ken agmaymaysa a basal a bagi. Daytoy ket saan a mabalin a kasta, nupay kasta, a kas dagiti adda ti flagelo nga opisthokonta, ken dagiti pay adda ti flagelo nga Amoebozoa, a mairaman ti Breviata, ket pudno nga adda ti dua a basal a bagbagi, a kas dagiti kadawyan a bikonta (urayno maymaysa laeng ti addaan iti flagelo iti kaaduan kadagiti unikonta). Daytoy naparisan a ...
The unikonts have a triple-gene fusion that is lacking in the bikonts. The three genes that are fused together in the unikonts, but not bacteria or bikonts, encode enzymes for synthesis of the pyrimidine nucleotides: carbamoyl phosphate synthase, dihydroorotase, aspartate carbamoyltransferase. This must have involved a double fusion, a rare pair of events, supporting the shared ancestry of Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa.. Cavalier-Smith[1] originally proposed that unikonts ancestrally had a single flagellum and single basal body. This is unlikely, however, as flagellated opisthokonts, as well as some flagellated Amoebozoa, including Breviata, actually have two basal bodies, as in typical bikonts (even though only one is flagellated in most unikonts). This paired arrangement can also be seen in the organization of centrioles in typical animal cells. In spite of the name of the group, the common ancestor of all unikonts was probably a cell with two basal bodies.. ...
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Acanthodii (8) Acanthomorpha (17) Acanthomorphata (9) Acariformes (4) Acaromorpha (17) Acoela (2) Actinopteri (17) Actinopterygii (15) Aculeata (21) Adephaga (7) Aequorlitornithes (2) Aetogate (2) Agaonidae (1) Agoniatitina (1) Alismatanae (4) Allotriocarida (5) Alveolata (14) Amaurobioidea (1) Ammonoidea (3) Amoebozoa (9) Amorphea (12) Amphipoda (1) Anabantiformes (1) Angiospermae (35) Anguilliformes (1) Angusteradulata (2) Animalia (102) Annelida (12) Anomalogonatae (16) Anthophila (1) Antliophora (14) Anura (1) Anystides (1) Anystina (1) Apiales (1) Apiformes (1) Apo-Tracheophyta (3) Apocrita (26) Apoditrysia (1) Apoidea (7) Apoikozoa (6) Apotracheophyta (7) Arachnida (85) Araneae (18) Araneida (1) Araneomorphae (17) Archaea (3) Archaeobranchia (1) Archaeognatha (1) Archosauria (10) Archosauromorpha (9) Archostemata (2) Arthropoda (59) Artiopoda (1) Ascomycota (13) Asgard (5) Asioryctitheria (39) Asparagales (7) Assamioidea (1) Asteiidae (1) Asteraceae (1) Asterales (2) Asteridae (18) ...
Acanthodii (8) Acanthomorpha (17) Acanthomorphata (9) Acariformes (9) Acaromorpha (17) Acoela (2) Actinobacteria (1) Actinopteri (17) Actinopterygii (15) Aculeata (25) Adephaga (8) Aequorlitornithes (2) Aetogate (2) Agaonidae (1) Agoniatitina (1) Aleocharinae (1) Alismatanae (4) Allotriocarida (5) Alveolata (14) Amaurobioidea (1) Ammonoidea (3) Amoebozoa (9) Amorphea (14) Amphipoda (1) Anabantiformes (1) Angiospermae (35) Anguilliformes (1) Angusteradulata (2) Animalia (102) Annelida (12) Anomalogonatae (16) Anthophila (5) Antliophora (14) Anura (1) Anystides (1) Anystina (1) Apiales (1) Apiformes (1) Apo-Tracheophyta (3) Apocrita (28) Apoditrysia (1) Apoidea (11) Apoikozoa (6) Apotracheophyta (7) Arachnida (87) Araneae (18) Araneida (1) Araneomorphae (17) Archaea (3) Archaeobranchia (1) Archaeognatha (1) Archosauria (10) Archosauromorpha (9) Archostemata (2) Arthropoda (59) Artiopoda (1) Ascomycota (13) Asgard (10) Asioryctitheria (39) Asparagales (7) Assamioidea (1) Asteiidae (1) Asteraceae ...
Genome Search allows to easily search for genomes by keyword (e.g. plants, Eukaryota), name, taxonId or NCBI BioProject ID. Just start typing and a pull-down will appear with relevant search term choices. Then click Search to see a table of matching genomes (described in more detail here). Just type in the search field and a list of suggestions will pop-up with relevant terms. Please find below a filter that you can apply for the Genome Portals search results:. ...
Protozoa are largely defined by their method of locomotion, including flagella, cilia, and pseudopodia.[34] While there has been considerable debate on the classification of protozoa caused by their sheer diversity, in one system there are currently seven phyla recognized under the kingdom Protozoa: Euglenozoa, Amoebozoa, Choanozoa sensu Cavalier-Smith, Loukozoa, Percolozoa, Microsporidia and Sulcozoa.[35][36] Protozoa, like plants and animals, can be considered heterotrophs or autotrophs.[32] Autotrophs like Euglena are capable of producing their energy using photosynthesis, while heterotrophic protozoa consume food by either funneling it through a mouth-like gullet or engulfing it with pseudopods, a form of phagocytosis.[32] While protozoa reproduce mainly asexually, some protozoa are capable of sexual reproduction.[32] Protozoa with sexual capability include the pathogenic species Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma brucei, Giardia intestinalis and Leishmania ...
Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements (TEs) plays a key role in prokaryotic evolution, and mounting evidence suggests that it has also had an important impact on eukaryotic evolution. Although many prokaryote-to-prokaryote and eukaryote-to-eukaryote HTs of TEs have been characterized, only few cases have been reported between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we carried out a comprehensive search for all major groups of prokaryotic insertion sequences (ISs) in 430 eukaryote genomes. We uncovered a total of 80 sequences, all deriving from the IS607 family, integrated in the genomes of 14 eukaryote species belonging to four distinct phyla (Amoebozoa, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, and Stramenopiles). Given that eukaryote IS607-like sequences are most closely related to cyanobacterial IS607 and that their phylogeny is incongruent with that of their hosts, we conclude that the presence of IS607-like sequences in eukaryotic genomes is the result of several HT events. Selection analyses further
Recent molecular and cellular evidence indicates that eukaryotes comprise three major lineages: the probably ancestrally uniciliate protozoan phylum Amoebozoa; the ancestrally posteriorly uniciliate opisthokont clade (animals, Choanozoa, and fungi); and a very diverse ancestrally biciliate clade, the bikonts-plants, chromalveolates, and excavate and rhizarian Protozoa. As Heliozoa are the only eukaryote phylum not yet placed on molecular sequence trees, we have sequenced the 18S rRNA genes of three centrohelid heliozoa, Raphidiophrys ambigua, Heterophrys marina, and Chlamydaster sterni, to investigate their phylogenetic position. Phylogenetic analysis by distance and maximum likelihood methods allowing for intersite rate variation and invariable sites confirms that centrohelid heliozoa are a robust clade that does not fall within any other phyla. In particular, they are decisively very distant from the heterokont pedinellid chromists, at one time thought to be related to heliozoa, and lack the ...
ID L8GWF8_ACACA Unreviewed; 916 AA. AC L8GWF8; DT 03-APR-2013, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 03-APR-2013, sequence version 1. DT 22-NOV-2017, entry version 16. DE SubName: Full=Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ELR17267.1}; GN ORFNames=ACA1_059840 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ELR17267.1}; OS Acanthamoeba castellanii str. Neff. OC Eukaryota; Amoebozoa; Discosea; Longamoebia; Centramoebida; OC Acanthamoebidae; Acanthamoeba. OX NCBI_TaxID=1257118 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ELR17267.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000011083}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ELR17267.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000011083} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=Neff {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ELR17267.1, RC ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000011083}; RX PubMed=23375108; DOI=10.1186/gb-2013-14-2-r11; RA Clarke M., Lohan A.J., Liu B., Lagkouvardos I., Roy S., Zafar N., RA Bertelli C., Schilde C., Kianianmomeni A., Burglin T.R., Frech C., RA Turcotte B., Kopec K.O., Synnott J.M., Choo C., Paponov I., RA Finkler A., Soon Heng ...
The IEDB track in Figure 2 shows that the protein encoded by the nucleotide sequence in this view is partially targeted by four previously published antibodies: an unnamed one from a screen (TGEESA), 12B5-1-1, 14G7 and 4G7. Detailed information about each of these antibodies can be viewed by clicking on the antibody name in the display. In this instance, the details reveal that 14G7 and 4G7 were first described by Olal et al. (2012)17 and Qiu et al. (2011)18, respectively. Comparing the IEDB and PDB tracks, note that the 14G7 IEDB feature maps to the same region as the 2y6s feature in the PDB track: a crystal structure of the antibody 14G7 is available in the Protein Data Bank under accession 2y6s. A click on the 2y6s feature in the display will show this structure and a link to the primary citation. Olal et al. note that the most significant residues for 14G7 antibody binding are TIAG. Note that there is no matching PDB track feature for the 4G7 antibody: a crystal structure for that antibody, ...
dictyBase is an integrated genetic and literature database that contains published Dictyostelium discoideum literature, genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), as well as the chromosomal and mitochondrial genome sequences. Direct access to the genome browser, a Blast search tool, the Dictyostelium Stock Center, research tools, colleague databases, and much much more are just a mouse click away. Dictybase is a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. dictyBase is funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences ...
Acinetobacter baumannii is a strain of bacteria in the Acinetobacter genus. This genome was published to the ATCC Genome Portal on 2020-08-03
Mouse anti Human Major vault protein antibody, clone 2H3-1A6 recognizes human major vault protein, also known as lung resistance-related p
Natura - nature Mundus - physical world;material world Naturalia Biota Domain Eukaryota - eukaryotes Kingdom Protozoa - protozoa Subkingdom Sarcomastigota Phylum Amoebozoa [Subphylum Lobosa] 1.0 [ Gymnamoebae] - naked ramicristate amoebae H,N,P,R,B,L; Ref:A. Rogerson & D.J. Patterson, 2000[2002]:1023 (indirect position ...
Redirect,Life on Earth,the [[BBC]] series,Life on Earth (TV series)}} {{Distinguish,Orgasm}} {{Taxobox , color = limegreen , name = Life on Earth , fossil_range = [[Archaean]] - Recent , image = EscherichiaColi NIAID.jpg , image_width = 99px , image_caption = These [[Escherichia coli]] cells provide an example of a [[prokaryote,prokaryotic]] [[microorganism]] , unranked_classis = Life on Earth (Gaeabionta) ,subdivision_ranks = [[Domain (biology),Domain]]s and [[Kingdom (biology),Kingdom]]s , subdivision = * [[Cellular life]] ** [[Bacteria]] ** [[Archaea]] ** [[Eukarya]] *** [[Bikonta]] **** [[Rhizaria]] **** [[Excavata]] **** [[Heterokonta]] **** [[Alveolata]] **** [[Plantae]] *** [[Unikonta]] **** [[Amoebozoa]] **** [[Fungi]] **** [[Animalia]] * [[Non-cellular life]] ([[virus]]es) [[Paraphyly,,span title="May be paraphyletic as the evolution of viruses and other similar forms is still uncertain, cellular life might have evolved from non-cellular ...
Acanthodii (3) Acanthomorpha (1) Acanthomorphata (2) Acariformes (115) Acaromorpha (19) Accipitridae (2) Accipitriformes (6) Achatinina (1) Achipterioidea (1) Actinopteri (4) Actinopterygii (4) Aculeata (129) Aculifera (1) Adephaga (88) Aequorlitornithes (35) Afrotheria (2) Agaonidae (3) Agnostida (1) Agromyzidae (3) Alismatales (1) Alismatanae (10) Allogromiidae (1) Allosauroidea (1) Allotheria (2) Allotriocarida (108) Alveolata (18) Amaurobioidea (26) Ameroidea (5) Ameronothroidea (2) Amoebozoa (10) Amorphea (45) Ampulicidae (1) Ampullarioidea (1) Angiospermae (234) Angusteradulata (31) Animalia (233) Ankyroida (2) Annelida (24) Anomalogonatae (48) Anthocerotophyta (1) Anthribidae (1) Antliophora (8) Anystae (1) Anystina (4) Aphelinidae (5) Apiales (3) Apiformes (15) Apo-Spermatophyta (4) Apo-Tracheophyta (11) Apocrita (97) Apoditrysia (73) Apoidea (49) Apoikozoa (3) Apotracheophyta (30) Arachnida (481) Araneae (39) Araneida (61) Araneoidea (13) Araneomorphae (39) Archaeobranchia (3) ...
Acanthodii (3) Acanthomorpha (1) Acanthomorphata (2) Acariformes (115) Acaromorpha (19) Accipitridae (2) Accipitriformes (6) Achatinina (1) Achipterioidea (1) Actinopteri (4) Actinopterygii (4) Aculeata (129) Aculifera (1) Adephaga (88) Aequorlitornithes (35) Afrotheria (2) Agaonidae (3) Agnostida (1) Agromyzidae (3) Alismatales (1) Alismatanae (10) Allogromiidae (1) Allosauroidea (1) Allotheria (2) Allotriocarida (108) Alveolata (18) Amaurobioidea (26) Ameroidea (5) Ameronothroidea (2) Amoebozoa (10) Amorphea (45) Ampulicidae (1) Ampullarioidea (1) Angiospermae (245) Angusteradulata (31) Animalia (233) Ankyroida (2) Annelida (24) Anomalogonatae (48) Anthocerotophyta (1) Anthribidae (1) Antliophora (8) Anystae (1) Anystina (4) Aphelinidae (5) Apiales (3) Apiformes (15) Apo-Spermatophyta (4) Apo-Tracheophyta (11) Apocrita (97) Apoditrysia (73) Apoidea (49) Apoikozoa (3) Apotracheophyta (30) Arachnida (481) Araneae (39) Araneida (61) Araneoidea (13) Araneomorphae (39) Archaeobranchia (3) ...
International peer-reviewed papers [5] Optimized probe masking for comparative transcriptomics of closely related species. (Pöschl Y, Delker C, Trenner J, Ullrich KK, Quint M, Grosse I) Plos ONE 2013 Nov 08. [4] Toward a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the plant kingdom. (Janitza P, Ullrich KK, Quint M) frontiers in PLANT SCIENCE 2012 Dec 06. [3] A transcriptomic hourglass in plant embryogenesis. (Quint M, Drost H-G, Gabel A, Ullrich KK, Boenn M, Grosse I) Nature 2012 Oct 04. [2] Molecular Evolution and Selection Patterns of Plant F-box Proteins with C-terminal Kelch Repeats. (Schumann N, Navarro-Quezada AR, Ullrich K, Kuhl C and Quint M) Plant Physiology 2011 Feb. [1] Natural Variation of Transcriptional Auxin Response Networks in Arabidopsis thaliana. (Delker C, Pöschl Y, Raschke A, Ullrich K, Ettingshausen S, Hauptmann V, Grosse I, Quint M) Plant Cell. 2010 Jul 09. Theses Ullrich KK 2013. Population and ...
International peer-reviewed papers [5] Optimized probe masking for comparative transcriptomics of closely related species. (Pöschl Y, Delker C, Trenner J, Ullrich KK, Quint M, Grosse I) Plos ONE 2013 Nov 08. [4] Toward a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the plant kingdom. (Janitza P, Ullrich KK, Quint M) frontiers in PLANT SCIENCE 2012 Dec 06. [3] A transcriptomic hourglass in plant embryogenesis. (Quint M, Drost H-G, Gabel A, Ullrich KK, Boenn M, Grosse I) Nature 2012 Oct 04. [2] Molecular Evolution and Selection Patterns of Plant F-box Proteins with C-terminal Kelch Repeats. (Schumann N, Navarro-Quezada AR, Ullrich K, Kuhl C and Quint M) Plant Physiology 2011 Feb. [1] Natural Variation of Transcriptional Auxin Response Networks in Arabidopsis thaliana. (Delker C, Pöschl Y, Raschke A, Ullrich K, Ettingshausen S, Hauptmann V, Grosse I, Quint M) Plant Cell. 2010 Jul 09. Theses Ullrich KK 2013. Population and ...
Vocal sequences - utterances consisting of calls produced in close succession - are common phenomena in animal communication. While many studies have explored the adaptive benefits of producing such sequences, very little is known about how the costs and constraints involved in their production affect their form. Here, we investigated this issue in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) pant hoot, a long and structurally complex vocal sequence comprising four acoustically distinct phases - introduction, build-up, climax and let-down. We found that in each of these phases, and for the sequence as a whole, there was a negative relationship between the number of calls produced and their average duration. There was also a negative relationship between the total duration of some adjacent phases. Significant relationships between the fundamental frequency of calls and their number or duration were found for some phases of the sequence, but the direction of these relationships differed between
Description: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the Double-antibody Sandwich method for detection of Human Major Vault Protein (MVP) in samples from serum, plasma, tissue homogenates and other biological fluids with no significant corss-reactivity with analogues from other species ...
Hu, Y., Stephen, A. G., Cao, J., Tanzer, L. R., Slapak, C. A., Harrison, S. D., Devanarayan, V., Dantzig, A. H., Starling, J. J., Rome, L. H. and Moore, R. E. (2002), A very early induction of major vault protein accompanied by increased drug resistance in U-937 cells. Int. J. Cancer, 97: 149-156. doi: 10.1002/ijc.1590 ...
Major Vault Protein (MVP) Antibody - Without BSA and Azide, Mouse Monoclonal Antibody [Clone 1032] validated in IHC, IF, FC (AH12835-100), Abgent
Identify the name of the portal before you can download. You can find that using our JGI Portal search on the home page. Use any search terms necessary to find the portal you want, click on the "Download" link in the "Resources" column, then make a note of the short portal name in the URL. It is located between the second and third "/" characters in the path after the web host. For example, in the URL https://genome.jgi.doe.gov/portal/Aurpu_var_sub1/... the portal name to use for API download is "Aurpu_var_sub1" You can also export the full search results into CSV format by clicking "Project Overview Report", then you could iterate over all your projects.The short portal name is identified in "Portal ID" column. ...
Dr. Jane Goodall is an environmentalist, humanitarian, author, UN Messenger of Peace and one of the most famous scientists alive. Her groundbreaking studies of chimpanzees changed our perception of our primate cousins and consequently, how humans looked at themselves.. Goodall was 23 when she first visited Africa and met the famous palaeontologist Louis Leakey. Although she didnt have a university degree, Leakey was so impressed with Goodalls knowledge of Africa and its wildlife, he hired her as his assistant. Goodall was the first of Leakeys Trimates who were chosen to study primates in the wild, the other two being Diane Fossey (gorillas) and Birute Galdikas (orang-utans). In 1960, aged 26, Goodall arrived at what is now known as Gombe National Park where she began her painstaking study of chimpanzees, living among them in their natural habitat.. Besides being the first human to be accepted into a chimpanzee community, Goodall made several pioneering discoveries. She was the first to ...
We present a collection of small multiple graphics that support analysis and understanding of the geography of labour-market self-containment across Londons 33 boroughs. Ratios describing supply-side self-containment, the extent to which working residents access jobs locally, and demand-side self containment, the extent to which local jobs are filled by local resident workers, are first calculated for professional and non-professional occupations and encoded directly through geographically-arranged bar charts. The full distribution of workers into-and out-of- boroughs that underpins these ratios is then revealed via Origin-Destination flows maps (OD maps) - sets of geographically-arranged choropleths. In order to make relative and absolute comparison of borough-to-borough frequencies between occupation types, these OD maps are coloured according to signed chi-square residuals: for every borough-to-borough pair, we compare the observed number of flows to access professional versus ...
Downloadable! Accessibility measures the potential of opportunities for interaction. This paper proposes and explores a new flow-based measure, place rank using origin-destination information. Both impedance and value of opportunities are embedded in the dataset that includes the origin and destination of each person within the studied region. Individuals contribute to the place rank at their destination (work) zone with a power that depends on the attractiveness of the zone of origin. In this paper we demonstrate this place rank measure for three activities (Jobs, Resident Workers, and Health Services) in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan region and Jobs in Montreal, Canada. We compare place rank to traditional measures of accessibility. Since place rank is based on actual choices of origins and destinations it is a measure of realized rather than potential opportunities, and so unlike accessibility measures. Also it does not require the knowledge of travel time between all origins and
About the i5k [email protected] The i5k Workspace (https://i5k.nal.usda.gov) is an inclusive genome portal for any arthropod genome project that would like to make use of our resources. We provide download services, BLAST, the JBrowse genome browser, and the Apollo manual curation service. Over 50 arthropod genomes are now part of the i5k Workspace, and users are encouraged to browse the genomes that we host, and contribute to the curation of each genome. For more information about the i5k Workspace, you can read our paper on the i5k Workspace, view our posters and talks, and find our software projects on github. The Ag Data Commons is now hosting a growing number of i5k Workspace datasets.. About the i5k initiative. The i5k initiative is a transformative project that aims to sequence and analyze the genomes of 5,000 arthropod species. The National Agricultural Library has partnered with the i5k initiative to create the i5k [email protected], which serves any orphaned arthropod genome projects ...
About the i5k [email protected] The i5k Workspace (https://i5k.nal.usda.gov) is an inclusive genome portal for any arthropod genome project that would like to make use of our resources. We provide download services, BLAST, the JBrowse genome browser, and the Apollo manual curation service. Over 50 arthropod genomes are now part of the i5k Workspace, and users are encouraged to browse the genomes that we host, and contribute to the curation of each genome. For more information about the i5k Workspace, you can read our paper on the i5k Workspace, view our posters and talks, and find our software projects on github. The Ag Data Commons is now hosting a growing number of i5k Workspace datasets.. About the i5k initiative. The i5k initiative is a transformative project that aims to sequence and analyze the genomes of 5,000 arthropod species. The National Agricultural Library has partnered with the i5k initiative to create the i5k [email protected], which serves any orphaned arthropod genome projects ...
Governor Inuwa Yahaya of Gombe State has expressed happiness over the drop in HIV prevalence in the state from 3.4 per cent in 2014 to 1.3 per cent in 2019.
When Governor Muhammadu InuwaYahaya assumed the mantle of leadership in Gombe State, he knew there would be challenges but the nature and degree of crises in all sectors of governance were however hidden with the cosmetics of politics and propaganda by the immediate past administration.
Published by the Anglican Communion Office © 2017 Anglican Consultative Council. Built thanks to the generosity of the Church Mission Publishing Company and the Compass Rose Society. Web Design by Zebedee Creations. ...
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Please note that the scores are only based on tests carried out automatically. About 20% of the conceivable tests can be automated, and the Tingtun Checker tool covers a part of these tests. Therefore, the evaluated pages may contain barriers not found by the Tingtun checkers. For reference see the list of currently implemented tests, and the list of specified tests. Full disclaimer.. ...
Dictyostelid social amoebae are a large and ancient group of soil microbes with an unusual multicellular stage in their life cycle. Taxonomically, they belong to the eukaryotic supergroup Amoebozoa, the sister group to Opisthokonta (animals + fungi). Roughly half of the similar to 150 known dictyostelid species were discovered during the last five years and probably many more remain to be found. The traditional classification system of Dictyostelia was completely overturned by cladistic analyses and molecular phylogenies of the past six years. As a result, it now appears that, instead of three major divisions there are eight, none of which correspond to traditional higher-level taxa. In addition to the widely studied Dictyostelium discoideum, there are now efforts to develop model organisms and complete genome sequences for each major group. Thus Dictyostelia is becoming an excellent model for both practical, medically related research and for studying basic principles in cell-cell communication ...
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The potential of human activities, including research, to alter parasite transmission ecology in wildlife is unknown. We examined gastrointestinal parasitism in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Budongo Forest, Uganda. Trail use and time spent on the ground was recorded during 10 months of observations in four sites with differing human disturbance. Disturbance was quantified using transect plots (n = 320). Fecal (n = 435) samples were examined for helminth eggs, larvae, and for protozoan cysts. Individuals that spent more time on the ground had more infections and higher intensity infections. Prevalence of 13 parasite species was similar across sites, but percentage of multiple infections and infection intensity differed, as did ground use. Chimpanzees at the long-term research site spent more time on the ground or on human trails. We hypothesize that researcher presence and trail creation may influence ground use, and thereby parasite burden, by altering trade-offs between foraging and
The discovery that viruses related to HIV were found naturally in healthy African primates was first made in the mid-1980s, and in 1989 came the first publication (by Martine Peeters group) demonstrating that SIVs that were related to HIV-1 were found in common chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes. (The actual genetic sequences were published by Simon Wain-Honbsons group in 1990.) Given this sound start, it is rather surprising that so little progress was made in SIV research in central Africa during the next nine years. Early in 1999, the Hahn/Sharp group claimed that they had found the most closely related SIV to HIV-1 in Pan troglodytes troglodytes (Ptt), a chimpanzee subspecies found in Congo Brazzaville, Gabon, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea, and drew a distinction between these SIVs, and others SIVs found in Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii (Pts), the chimp subspecies that is located further east, in the DRC, Uganda and Tanzania. Superficially, this seemed reasonable, in that those Ptt SIVs that ...
Recent studies have shown that all protosteloid amoebae studied to date are probably included in the group known as Amoebozoa ... Lahr, Daniel JG; J Grant; T Nguyen; JH Lin; LA Katz (28 July 2011). "Comprehensive Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Amoebozoa ... Shadwick, Lora L.; FW Spiegel; JDL Shadwick; MW Brown; JD Silberman (August 2009). "Eumycetozoa=Amoebozoa?: SSUrDNA Phylogeny ...
A phylogeny based on the proteome showed that the amoebozoa deviated from the animal-fungal lineage after the plant-animal ... "Eumycetozoa = Amoebozoa?: SSUrDNA Phylogeny of Protosteloid Slime Molds and Its Significance for the Amoebozoan Supergroup". ... Dictyostelium discoideum is a species of soil-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Amoebozoa, infraphylum Mycetozoa. Commonly ... Latest phylogenetic data place dictyostelids firmly within supergroup Amoebozoa, along with myxomycetes. Meanwhile, ...
Mycetozoa, belong to the supergroup Amoebozoa and include: *Myxogastria:[4] syncytial or plasmodial slime molds, the most ...
... is a functional genomics database for the genetics of amoebozoa. amoebozoa Aurrecoechea, Cristina; Barreto, Ana; ... functional genomic resources for Amoebozoa and Microsporidia species". Nucleic Acids Res. England. 39 (Database issue): D612-9 ...
... is an Amoebozoa genus. Tekle YI, Grant J, Anderson OR, et al. (April 2008). "Phylogenetic placement of diverse ... amoebae inferred from multigene analyses and assessment of clade stability within 'Amoebozoa' upon removal of varying rate ...
... is an Amoebozoa grouping. Smirnov A; Nassonova E; Berney C; Fahrni J; Bolivar I; Pawlowski J (August 2005). " ...
... is an Amoebozoa family. Dermamoeba has been classified in this group. However, there is recent evidence that it ... and the phylogeny of Amoebozoa". Protist. 156 (2): 215-224. doi:10.1016/j.protis.2005.03.003. PMID 16171188. ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the species Arcyria ferruginea . Arcyria affinis Arcyria afroalpina Arcyria ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. Hartmannella abertawensis Hartmannella agricola Hartmannella cantabrigiensis Hartmannella ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the species Trichamoeba villosa. Bhowmick DK (March 1967). "Electron ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes: Mayorella bigemma Mayorella palestinensis A. A. Schaeffer (November 1928). " ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. Sutherland Maciver. "The Amoebae". University of Edinburgh. Archived from the original on ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the species Heleopera sphagni. Enrique Lara; Thierry J. Heger; Flemming Ekelund ... Amoebozoa: Arcellinida)". Protist. 159 (2): 165-176. doi:10.1016/j.protis.2007.09.003. PMID 18023614. ...
... is a grouping of Amoebozoa. Cavalier-Smith T (August 1998). "A revised six-kingdom system of life". Biol Rev Camb ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the following species: Vannella aberdonica Vannella anglica Vannella arabica ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the species Korotnevella hemistylolepis. O'Kelly J, Peglar MT, Black MN, ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. Dyková, I.; Fiala; Pecková; Dvoráková (2008). "Phylogeny of Flabellulidae (Amoebozoa: ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. As of 2015, there are four species in the genus. "Synonymy: Amaurochaete Rostaf". Species ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. Species contain intracellular kinetoplastid parasites, of the genus Perkinsela, which are ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. As of 2015, Index Fungorum includes 39 species in the genus. Comatricha afroalpina ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. Ralf Meisterfeld & Edward Mitchell (September 2, 2008). "Apodera Loeblich & Tappan, 1981". ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It is possible for it to be present in swimming pools. Vesaluoma M, Kalso S, Jokipii L, ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. It is sometimes spelled "Flabelulla". Dyková, I.; Fiala; Pecková; Dvoráková (2008). " ... "Phylogeny of Flabellulidae (Amoebozoa: Leptomyxida) inferred from SSU rDNA sequences of the type strain of Flabellula citata ...
... is a genus of Amoebozoa. Kudryavtsev A, Wylezich C, Schlegel M, Walochnik J, Michel R (February 2009). " ... "Ultrastructure, SSU rRNA gene sequences and phylogenetic relationships of Flamella Schaeffer, 1926 (Amoebozoa), with ...
Thomas Cavalier-Smith, Ema E.-Y. Chao, Brian Oates, Molecular phylogeny of Amoebozoa and the evolutionary significance of the ... Centropyxidae is a family of Amoebozoa. WoRMS (2010). "Centropyxidae". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved May 14, 2011 ...
Domain: Eukaryota • Phylum: Amoebozoa • Classis: Archamoebae • Familia: Entamoebidae • Genus: Entamoeba • Species: Entamoeba ...
Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=Amoebozoa&oldid=44299223" ...
Amoebozoa vary greatly in size. Some are only 10-20 μm in diameter, while others are among the largest protozoa. The well-known ... Amoebozoa is a large and diverse group, but certain features are common to many of its members. The amoebozoan cell is ... Species of Amoebozoa may be either shelled (testate), or naked, and cells may possess flagella. Free-living species are common ... In all amoebozoa, the primary mode of nutrition is phagocytosis, in which the cell surrounds potential food particles with its ...
However, Naegleria is now considered part of the Excavata, not the Amoebozoa, and is considered to be much more closely related ... Free-living amoebae (or "FLA") in the Amoebozoa group are important causes of disease in humans and animals. Naegleria fowleri ...
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Other Amoebozoa biologists and enthusiasts. * Thierry Heger University of British Columbia (Arcellinida) ... Petersburg, Russia (Amoebozoa, Archamoebae, Eumycetozoa, Lobosea) * Frederick W Spiegel University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, ... Arkansas, USA (Amoebozoa, Archamoebae, Eumycetozoa, Lobosea) ToL Media Contributors for Amoebozoa. * Greg and Marybeth Dimijian ... ToL Scientific Contributors for Amoebozoa. * Ralf Meisterfeld Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Germany ( ...
Incertae sedis Amoebozoa: Gibbodiscus, Hartmannia, Janickia [see Janickina Chatton, 1953; not Janickia Rašín, 1929] Malamoeba, ... Amoebozoa in the World Register of Marine Species. Vernacular names[edit]. English: amoebozoans. français: Amibe. lietuvių: ... Amoebozoa). Cavalier-Smith (1996/97)[edit]. From Amoeboflagellates and mitochondrial cristae in eukaryote evolution: ... Cavalier-Smith, T.; Chao, E.E.-Y.; Oates, B. 2004: Molecular phylogeny of Amoebozoa and the evolutionary significance of the ...
Amoebozoa includes many of the best-known amoeboid organisms, such as Chaos, Entamoeba, Pelomyxa and the genus Amoeba itself. ... The Amoebozoa are a eukaryote phylum of Amoeba-like protozoa.[2] Most move by internal cytoplasmic flow. Their finger-like ... The Amoebozoa also include the mycetozoan slime moulds, multinucleate or multicellular forms which produce spores and are ... Most Amoebozoa lack flagella and more generally do not form microtubule-supported structures except during mitosis. However, ...
The Amoebozoa are a major group of amoeboid protozoa, including the majority that move by means of internal cytoplasmic flow. ... Amoebozoa vary greatly in size. Many are only 10-20 μm in size, but they also include many of the larger protozoa. The famous ... The Amoebozoa also include the slime moulds, multinucleate or multicellular forms that produce spores and are usually visible ... Most Amoebozoa lack flagella and more generally do not form microtubule-supported structures except during mitosis. However, ...
"Amoebozoa" kategoriako artikuluak. Jarraian ageri diren 5 orriak kategoria honetan daude. Kategoria honetan, guztira, 5 orri ... "https://eu.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kategoria:Amoebozoa&oldid=4651245"(e)tik eskuratuta ...
Amoebae that make fruiting bodies consisting of a stalk and spores and classified as closely related to the myxogastrids have classically been placed in the taxon Eumycetozoa. Traditionally, there are three groups comprising Eumycetozoa: myxogastrids, dictyostelids, and the so-called protostelids. Dictyostelids and myxogastrids both make multicellular fruiting bodies that may contain hundreds of spores. Protostelids are those amoebae that make simple fruiting bodies consisting of a stalk and one or a few spores. Protostelid-like organisms have been suggested as the progenitors of the myxogastrids and dictyostelids, and they have been used to formulate hypotheses on the evolution of fruiting within the group. Molecular phylogenies have been published for both myxogastrids and dictyostelids, but little molecular phylogenetic work has been done on the protostelids. Here we provide phylogenetic trees based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU) that include 21 protostelids along with publicly
... such as the Amoebozoa [27]. The Amoebozoa are a phylum of amoeboid protozoa that move by the means of pseudopodia. They are ... dictyBase update 2011: web 2.0 functionality and the initial steps towards a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. Nucleic acids ... Smirnov AV, Chao E, Nassonova ES, Cavalier-Smith T. A revised classification of naked lobose amoebae (Amoebozoa: lobosa). ... Of the examined Amoebozoa species, H. vermiformis is the only one that possesses an SDFgb. Its closest relative is a globin of ...
Amoebozoa. One of the most familiar genera of microbes, Amoeba, belong here. It evolved in a lineage with other soft ...
The Amoebozoa are a major group of amoeboid protozoa, comprising the majority of the amoebae that move using blunt or lobose ... Subsequently they emended the older phylum Amoebozoa to refer to this supergroup. Studies based on other genes have provided ... www.unige.ch/sciences/biologie/biani/msg/Amoeboids/Amoebozoa.html) ... Molecular Phylogeny of Amoeboid Protists - Tree of Amoebozoa (http:// ...
Amoebozoa. The Amoebozoa are a diverse collection of protozoan eukaryotes, almost all of which are amoebae (i.e. cells that ... Amoebozoa includes lineages of lobose amoebae (e.g the well known Amoeba and Chaos), the lobose testate amoebae (with the ... Amoebozoa were only recently united as group. Detailed microscopy studies had shown that amoebae as a whole were polyphyletic, ... rather than the broad pseudopodia seen in many Amoebozoa - see below.) However, analyses of molecular phylogenies based on ...
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Amoebozoa[edit]. Amoebozoa are a group of motile amoeboid protists, members of this group move or feed by means of temporary ...
... / Смирнов, Алексей Валерьевич.. Proceedings 15th International Congress of ... В. (2017). Phylogeny, evolution and systematics of Amoebozoa. In Proceedings 15th International Congress of Protistology , 30th ... Смирнов, АВ 2017, Phylogeny, evolution and systematics of Amoebozoa. in Proceedings 15th International Congress of Protistology ... Phylogeny, evolution and systematics of Amoebozoa. In Proceedings 15th International Congress of Protistology , 30th July - 4th ...
Amoebozoa The amoebozoans characteristically exhibit pseudopodia that extend like tubes or flat lobes, rather than the hair- ... Alveolate, Amoeba, Amoebozoa, Apicomplexan, Archaeplastida, Biological Carbon Pump, Bioluminescence, Brown Algae, Chlorophyte, ... Amoebozoa, and Opisthokonta. The goal of this classification scheme is to create clusters of species that all are derived from ... like pseudopodia of rhizarian amoeba (Figure). The Amoebozoa include several groups of unicellular amoeba-like organisms that ...
Mycetozoa, belong to the supergroup Amoebozoa and include: *Myxogastria:[4] syncytial or plasmodial slime molds, the most ...
The ultra-structure of the shell and the morphometric variability of soil inhabiting testate amoeba Lamtopyxis callistoma from Madagascar were studied by using light- and scanning electron microscopy. The biometrical characteristic of the species was made on the basis of 75 specimens measured. In addition to the diameter of the shell, six other shell characters were described biometrically for the first time. The analysis of the variation coefficients shows that the studied population of L. callistoma is comparatively homogeneous and almost all measured characters are weakly to moderate variable (CV less than 10%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on the shell ultra-morphology show that it has a smooth apertural surface with a thick layer of porous and fibrous organic cement and a rough dorsal surface composed of bigger and angular pieces of quartz. The shell wall has a thickness of about 5-6 µm and is composed of three layers. Unlike the previously accepted opinion that species is
... supergroup Amoebozoa) rivals that of animals, fungi, and plants ... Amoebozoa; Fungi. Abstract. We present a combined proteomic and ... supergroup Amoebozoa) rivals that of animals, fungi, and plants. From National Research Council Canada ... of the eukaryotic supergroup Amoebozoa. Through a combination of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and in silico data mining, we ... the first such comprehensive investigation in a free-living member of the supergroup Amoebozoa. This protist was chosen both ...
What features distinguish the amoebozoa from the rhizarians?. Biology (MindTap Course List) ...
This Amoebozoa-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. *v ... The Tubulinea are a major grouping of Amoebozoa, including most of the larger and more familiar amoebae like Amoeba, Arcella, ... Cavalier-Smith, T., Chao, E-Y, Oates, B. (2004). "Molecular phylogeny of the Amoebozoa and evolutionary significance of the ...
a) Amoebozoa. The Amoebozoa are a higher-level grouping encompassing over 5000 species, currently divided into approximately 14 ... Distribution and types of evidence for sex in the main lineages of the two largest amoeboid groups: (a) Amoebozoa and (b) ... Three lineages within Amoebozoa have direct evidence of sexual life cycles: the free-living thecamoebids, the sorocarpic slime ... 2009 Eumycetozoa = Amoebozoa? SSU-rDNA phylogeny of protosteloid slime molds and its significance for the amoebozoan supergroup ...
  • The Amoebozoa are a major group of amoeboid protozoa, including the majority that move by means of internal cytoplasmic flow. (wikidoc.org)
  • The Amoebozoa are a major group of amoeboid protozoa, comprising the majority of the amoebae that move using blunt or lobose pseudopods. (academickids.com)
  • It appears (based on molecular genetics) that the members of Amoebozoa form a sister group to animals and fungi, diverging from this lineage after it had split from the other groups, as illustrated below in a simplified diagram: Strong similarities between Amoebozoa and Opisthokonts lead to the hypothesis that they form a distinct clade. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Amoebozoa represent a clade of unicellular amoeboid organisms that display a wide variety of lifestyles, including free-living and parasitic species. (ijbs.com)
  • Dictyostelia evolved from unicellular Amoebozoa, which, like many protists, survive starvation by encapsulating individually to form a dormant cyst. (nature.com)
  • Amoebozoa are mostly amorphous unicellular organisms, but also include the slime molds. (rationalwiki.org)
  • Solitary Amoebozoa usually feed on bacteria and differentiate individually into walled dormant cysts when food runs out. (nature.com)
  • The Amoebozoa also include the mycetozoan slime moulds , multinucleate or multicellular forms which produce spores and are usually visible to the unaided eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Master thesis in Biogeosciences: Design and evaluation of a new mitochondrial marker for Arcellinida (Amoebozoa) (Laboratory of soil Biology, Universities of Neuchâtel and Lausanne). (unine.ch)
  • Amoebozoa is a major taxonomic group containing about 2,400 described species of amoeboid protists, often possessing blunt, fingerlike, lobose pseudopods and tubular mitochondrial cristae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dictyostelium Discoideum Protocols: Methods and Protocols offers an introduction to the amoebozoa, presents large-scale analysis methods made possible by the completion of the Dictyostelium genome sequence, and details molecular genetics techniques, cell biological, biochemical and biophysical methods. (nhbs.com)
  • Species of Amoebozoa may be either shelled (testate), or naked, and cells may possess flagella. (wikipedia.org)
  • In all amoebozoa, the primary mode of nutrition is phagocytosis, in which the cell surrounds potential food particles with its pseudopods, sealing them into vacuoles within which they may be digested and absorbed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another set of protist lineages are probably most closely related to Amoebozoa and Obazoa, including Ancyromonadida and perhaps Malawimonadidae (though the latter may well be more closely related to Metamonada). (springer.com)