An enzyme that plays a role in the GLUTAMATE and butanoate metabolism pathways by catalyzing the oxidation of succinate semialdehyde to SUCCINATE using NAD+ as a coenzyme. Deficiency of this enzyme, causes 4-hydroxybutyricaciduria, a rare inborn error in the metabolism of the neurotransmitter 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA).
Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID that include a double bond between carbon 2 and 3 of the aliphatic structure. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the aminobutryrate structure.
An enzyme that plays a role in the VALINE; LEUCINE; and ISOLEUCINE catabolic pathways by catalyzing the oxidation of 2-methyl-3-oxopropanate to propanoyl-CoA using NAD+ as a coenzyme. Methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency is characterized by elevated BETA-ALANINE and 3-hydropropionic acid.
An NAD+ dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 2-aminomuconate 6-semialdehyde to 2-aminomuconate.
Oxidoreductases that are specific for ALDEHYDES.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-aspartate 4-semialdehyde, orthophosphate, and NADP+ to yield L-4-aspartyl phosphate and NADPH. EC 1.2.1.11.
Phenols substituted in any position by an amino group.
Aminohydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of various nitrogenous compounds, including proteins, nucleotides, and amines, playing a crucial role in numerous biological processes such as metabolism and signaling.
Brain disorders resulting from inborn metabolic errors, primarily from enzymatic defects which lead to substrate accumulation, product reduction, or increase in toxic metabolites through alternate pathways. The majority of these conditions are familial, however spontaneous mutation may also occur in utero.
An enzyme that converts brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID) into succinate semialdehyde, which can be converted to succinic acid and enter the citric acid cycle. It also acts on beta-alanine. EC 2.6.1.19.
'Nitrobenzenes' are organic compounds characterized by the presence of a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring, with the molecular formula C6H5NO2, which can be hazardous and toxic, and have various applications in industry, such as solvents, dyes, and explosives.
Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of certain acids, specifically catalyzing the reversible conversion of D-3-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate.
The sodium salt of 4-hydroxybutyric acid. It is used for both induction and maintenance of ANESTHESIA.
Disorders affecting amino acid metabolism. The majority of these disorders are inherited and present in the neonatal period with metabolic disturbances (e.g., ACIDOSIS) and neurologic manifestations. They are present at birth, although they may not become symptomatic until later in life.
An enzyme that oxidizes an aldehyde in the presence of NAD+ and water to an acid and NADH. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.1.1.70.
An NADP+ dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-glutamate 5-semialdehyde to L-glutamyl 5-phosphate. It plays a role in the urea cycle and metabolism of amino groups.
Salts and esters of hydroxybutyric acid.
Derivatives of SUCCINIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a 1,4-carboxy terminated aliphatic structure.
Derivatives of adipic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a 1,6-carboxy terminated aliphatic structure.
Glutarates are organic compounds, specifically carboxylic acids, that contain a five-carbon chain with two terminal carboxyl groups and a central methyl group, playing a role in various metabolic processes, including the breakdown of certain amino acids. They can also refer to their salts or esters. Please note that this definition is concise and may not cover all aspects of glutarates in depth.
A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-diphosphate coupled to adenosine 5'-phosphate by pyrophosphate linkage. It is found widely in nature and is involved in numerous enzymatic reactions in which it serves as an electron carrier by being alternately oxidized (NAD+) and reduced (NADH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A tetrameric enzyme that, along with the coenzyme NAD+, catalyzes the interconversion of LACTATE and PYRUVATE. In vertebrates, genes for three different subunits (LDH-A, LDH-B and LDH-C) exist.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of beta-aspartyl phosphate from aspartic acid and ATP. Threonine serves as an allosteric regulator of this enzyme to control the biosynthetic pathway from aspartic acid to threonine. EC 2.7.2.4.
A species of motile, free-living, gram-negative bacteria that occur in the soil. They are aerobic or microaerophilic and are sometimes capable of nitrogen fixation.
The removal of a carboxyl group, usually in the form of carbon dioxide, from a chemical compound.
The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.
A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Organic compounds containing a carbonyl group in the form -CHO.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Enzymes that catalyze the breakage of a carbon-oxygen bond leading to unsaturated products via the removal of water. EC 4.2.1.
Enzymes of the isomerase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl-, phospho-, amino- or other groups from one position within a molecule to another. EC 5.4.
Enzymes that catalyze the dehydrogenation of GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE. Several types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase exist including phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating varieties and ones that transfer hydrogen to NADP and ones that transfer hydrogen to NAD.
A subclass of enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of an amino group from a donor (generally an amino acid) to an acceptor (generally a 2-keto acid). Most of these enzymes are pyridoxyl phosphate proteins. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 2.6.1.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
S-Acyl coenzyme A. Fatty acid coenzyme A derivatives that are involved in the biosynthesis and oxidation of fatty acids as well as in ceramide formation.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-glutamate and water to 2-oxoglutarate and NH3 in the presence of NAD+. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.4.1.2.
Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme that plays a critical role in the pentose phosphate pathway, catalyzing the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphoglucono-δ-lactone while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH), thereby protecting cells from oxidative damage and maintaining redox balance.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of (S)-malate and NAD+ to oxaloacetate and NADH. EC 1.1.1.37.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate and NAD+ to yield 2-ketoglutarate, carbon dioxide, and NADH. It occurs in cell mitochondria. The enzyme requires Mg2+, Mn2+; it is activated by ADP, citrate, and Ca2+, and inhibited by NADH, NADPH, and ATP. The reaction is the key rate-limiting step of the citric acid (tricarboxylic) cycle. (From Dorland, 27th ed) (The NADP+ enzyme is EC 1.1.1.42.) EC 1.1.1.41.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
An essential amino acid. It is often added to animal feed.
A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reduction of lipoamide by NADH to yield dihydrolipoamide and NAD+. The enzyme is a component of several MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES.
Reversibly catalyze the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of carbohydrates to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2.; and 1.1.99.
A metabolite in the principal biochemical pathway of lysine. It antagonizes neuroexcitatory activity modulated by the glutamate receptor, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE; (NMDA).
A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of SUCCINATE to fumarate. In most eukaryotic organisms this enzyme is a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex II.
An alcohol oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of L-iditol to L-sorbose in the presence of NAD. It also acts on D-glucitol to form D-fructose. It also acts on other closely related sugar alcohols to form the corresponding sugar. EC 1.1.1.14
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Glycerolphosphate Dehydrogenase is an enzyme (EC 1.1.1.8) that catalyzes the reversible conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to glycerol 3-phosphate, using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as an electron acceptor in the process.
A class of enzymes that catalyze geometric or structural changes within a molecule to form a single product. The reactions do not involve a net change in the concentrations of compounds other than the substrate and the product.(from Dorland, 28th ed) EC 5.
An enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of aspartic beta-semialdehyde to homoserine, which is the branch point in biosynthesis of methionine, lysine, threonine and leucine from aspartic acid. EC 1.1.1.3.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A glucose dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of beta-D-glucose to form D-glucono-1,5-lactone, using NAD as well as NADP as a coenzyme.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Enzymes of the oxidoreductase class that catalyze the dehydrogenation of hydroxysteroids. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.1.-.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex is a multi-enzyme complex involved in the citric acid cycle, catalyzing the oxidative decarboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinyl-CoA and CO2, thereby connecting the catabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, and fats to the generation of energy in the form of ATP.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)
Amine oxidoreductases that use either NAD+ (EC 1.5.1.7) or NADP+ (EC 1.5.1.8) as an acceptor to form L-LYSINE or NAD+ (EC 1.5.1.9) or NADP+ (EC 1.5.1.10) as an acceptor to form L-GLUTAMATE. Deficiency of this enzyme causes HYPERLYSINEMIAS.
D-Glucose:1-oxidoreductases. Catalyzes the oxidation of D-glucose to D-glucono-gamma-lactone and reduced acceptor. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.47; EC 1.1.1.118; EC 1.1.1.119 and EC 1.1.99.10.
Catalyze the oxidation of 3-hydroxysteroids to 3-ketosteroids.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction 6-phospho-D-gluconate and NADP+ to yield D-ribulose 5-phosphate, carbon dioxide, and NADPH. The reaction is a step in the pentose phosphate pathway of glucose metabolism. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 1.1.1.43.
Reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of sugar alcohols to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2. and EC 1.1.99.
Enzymes that catalyze the first step in the beta-oxidation of FATTY ACIDS.
A flavoprotein and iron sulfur-containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the oxidation of NADH to NAD. In eukaryotes the enzyme can be found as a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex I. Under experimental conditions the enzyme can use CYTOCHROME C GROUP as the reducing cofactor. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 1.6.2.1.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxopropanoate (malonate semialdehyde) to acetyl COENZYME A. It plays a role in the metabolism of BETA-ALANINE.
An enzyme that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of inosine 5'-phosphate to xanthosine 5'-phosphate in the presence of NAD. EC 1.1.1.205.
Alcohol oxidoreductases with substrate specificity for LACTIC ACID.
A group of 1,2-benzenediols that contain the general formula R-C6H5O2.
An NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase found in the cytosol of eucaryotes. It catalyses the dehydrogenation and phosphorylation of GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE to 3-phospho-D-glyceroyl phosphate, which is an important step in the GLYCOLYSIS pathway.
Flavoproteins that catalyze reversibly the reduction of carbon dioxide to formate. Many compounds can act as acceptors, but the only physiologically active acceptor is NAD. The enzymes are active in the fermentation of sugars and other compounds to carbon dioxide and are the key enzymes in obtaining energy when bacteria are grown on formate as the main carbon source. They have been purified from bovine blood. EC 1.2.1.2.
A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for medium-chain fatty acids. It forms a complex with ELECTRON TRANSFERRING FLAVOPROTEINS and conveys reducing equivalents to UBIQUINONE.
A class of enzymes that catalyzes the oxidation of 17-hydroxysteroids to 17-ketosteroids. EC 1.1.-.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of XANTHINE in the presence of NAD+ to form URIC ACID and NADH. It acts also on a variety of other purines and aldehydes.
Tartronates are salts or esters of tartaric acid, which is a crystalline organic acid found in various fruits and used in certain medications as a stabilizing agent or for treating antimony poisoning.
An order of CRENARCHAEOTA consisting of aerobic or facultatively aerobic, chemolithotrophic cocci which are extreme thermoacidophiles. They lack peptidoglycan in their cell walls.
A ketone oxidoreductase that catalyzes the overall conversion of alpha-keto acids to ACYL-CoA and CO2. The enzyme requires THIAMINE DIPHOSPHATE as a cofactor. Defects in genes that code for subunits of the enzyme are a cause of MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE. The enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.2.4.3.
A compound produced from succinyl-CoA and GLYCINE as an intermediate in heme synthesis. It is used as a PHOTOCHEMOTHERAPY for actinic KERATOSIS.
The E1 component of the multienzyme PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX. It is composed of 2 alpha subunits (pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha subunit) and 2 beta subunits (pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta subunit).
Enzymes that reversibly catalyze the oxidation of a 3-hydroxyacyl CoA to 3-ketoacyl CoA in the presence of NAD. They are key enzymes in the oxidation of fatty acids and in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis.
The 4-aminomethyl form of VITAMIN B 6. During transamination of amino acids, PYRIDOXAL PHOSPHATE is transiently converted into pyridoxamine phosphate.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that catalyzes the reversible conversion of CORTISOL to the inactive metabolite CORTISONE. Enzymes in this class can utilize either NAD or NADP as cofactors.
Oxidoreductases that are specific for KETONES.
An oxidoreductase involved in pyrimidine base degradation. It catalyzes the catabolism of THYMINE; URACIL and the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-FLUOROURACIL.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of UDPglucose to UDPglucuronate in the presence of NAD+. EC 1.1.1.22.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to L-GLUTAMATE in the presence of NAD. Defects in the enzyme are the cause of hyperprolinemia II.
A disease-producing enzyme deficiency subject to many variants, some of which cause a deficiency of GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE activity in erythrocytes, leading to hemolytic anemia.
Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.
A low-affinity 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase found in a variety of tissues, most notably in LIVER; LUNG; ADIPOSE TISSUE; vascular tissue; OVARY; and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The enzyme acts reversibly and can use either NAD or NADP as cofactors.
A colorless, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol. It has a general narcotic action and also causes irritation of mucous membranes. Large doses may cause death from respiratory paralysis.
An NAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible DEAMINATION of L-ALANINE to PYRUVATE and AMMONIA. The enzyme is needed for growth when ALANINE is the sole CARBON or NITROGEN source. It may also play a role in CELL WALL synthesis because L-ALANINE is an important constituent of the PEPTIDOGLYCAN layer.
A 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase which catalyzes the reversible reduction of the active androgen, DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE to 5 ALPHA-ANDROSTANE-3 ALPHA,17 BETA-DIOL. It also has activity towards other 3-alpha-hydroxysteroids and on 9-, 11- and 15- hydroxyprostaglandins. The enzyme is B-specific in reference to the orientation of reduced NAD or NADPH.
Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases that have specificity for MANNITOL. Enzymes in this category are generally classified according to their preference for a specific reducing cofactor.
Non-heme iron-containing enzymes that incorporate two atoms of OXYGEN into the substrate. They are important in biosynthesis of FLAVONOIDS; GIBBERELLINS; and HYOSCYAMINE; and for degradation of AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS.
Catalyzes the oxidation of catechol to 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde in the carbazole and BENZOATE degradation via HYDROXYLATION pathways. It also catalyzes the conversion of 3-methylcatechol to cis, cis-2-hydroxy-6-oxohept-2,4-dienoate in the TOLUENE and XYLENE degradation pathway. This enzyme was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.2.
Catalyzes reversibly the oxidation of hydroxyl groups of prostaglandins.
A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for short-chain fatty acids. It forms a complex with ELECTRON-TRANSFERRING FLAVOPROTEINS and conveys reducing equivalents to UBIQUINONE.
A metalloflavoprotein enzyme involved the metabolism of VITAMIN A, this enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of RETINAL to RETINOIC ACID, using both NAD+ and FAD coenzymes. It also acts on both the 11-trans- and 13-cis-forms of RETINAL.
Enzymes that catalyze the addition of a carboxyl group to a compound (carboxylases) or the removal of a carboxyl group from a compound (decarboxylases). EC 4.1.1.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 3-hydroxyanthranilate to 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde. It was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.6.
Derivatives of caproic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a carboxy terminated six carbon aliphatic structure.
A group of enzymes that catalyze the reversible reduction-oxidation reaction of 20-hydroxysteroids, such as from a 20-ketosteroid to a 20-alpha-hydroxysteroid (EC 1.1.1.149) or to a 20-beta-hydroxysteroid (EC 1.1.1.53).
A family of compounds containing an oxo group with the general structure of 1,5-pentanedioic acid. (From Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p442)
An high-affinity, NAD-dependent 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase that acts unidirectionally to catalyze the dehydrogenation of CORTISOL to CORTISONE. It is found predominantly in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as the KIDNEY; COLON; SWEAT GLANDS; and the PLACENTA. Absence of the enzyme leads to a fatal form of childhood hypertension termed, APPARENT MINERALOCORTICOID EXCESS SYNDROME.

Studies of the catabolic pathway of degradation of nitrobenzene by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45: removal of the amino group from 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde. (1/2)

Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 utilizes nitrobenzene as the sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. Previous studies have shown that degradation of nitrobenzene involves the reduction of nitrobenzene to nitrosobenzene and hydroxylaminobenzene, followed by rearrangement to 2-aminophenol, which then undergoes meta ring cleavage to 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde. In the present paper, we report the enzymatic reactions responsible for the release of ammonia after ring cleavage. 2-Aminomuconic semialdehyde was oxidized to 2-aminomuconate in the presence of NAD by enzymes in crude extracts. 2-Aminomuconate was subsequently deaminated stoichiometrically to 4-oxalocrotonic acid. No cofactors are required for the deamination. Two enzymes, 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and a novel 2-aminomuconate deaminase, distinguished by partial purification of the crude extracts, catalyzed the two reactions. 4-Oxalocrotonic acid was further degraded to pyruvate and acetaldehyde. The key enzyme, 2-aminomuconate deaminase, catalyzed the hydrolytic deamination that released ammonia, which served as the nitrogen source for growth of the organism.  (+info)

Purification, characterization, and sequence analysis of 2-aminomuconic 6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45. (2/2)

2-Aminonumconic 6-semialdehyde is an unstable intermediate in the biodegradation of nitrobenzene and 2-aminophenol by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45. Previous work has shown that enzymes in cell extracts convert 2-aminophenol to 2-aminomuconate in the presence of NAD+. In the present work, 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase was purified and characterized. The purified enzyme migrates as a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular mass of 57 kDa. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was estimated to be 160 kDa by gel filtration chromatography. The optimal pH for the enzyme activity was 7.3. The enzyme is able to oxidize several aldehyde analogs, including 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, hexaldehyde, and benzaldehyde. The gene encoding 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase was identified by matching the deduced N-terminal amino acid sequence of the gene with the first 21 amino acids of the purified protein. Multiple sequence alignment of various semialdehyde dehydrogenase protein sequences indicates that 2-aminomuconic 6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase has a high degree of identity with 2-hydroxymuconic 6-semialdehyde dehydrogenases.  (+info)

Succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSDH) is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Specifically, SSDH catalyzes the conversion of succinic semialdehyde to succinate in the final step of the GABA degradation pathway. This enzyme plays a critical role in maintaining the balance of GABA levels in the brain and is therefore essential for normal neurological function. Deficiencies or mutations in SSDH can lead to neurological disorders, including developmental delays, intellectual disability, and seizures.

Crotonates are a group of organic compounds that contain a carboxylic acid functional group (-COOH) attached to a crotyl group, which is a type of alkyl group with the structure -CH=CH-CH\_{2}-. Crotyl groups are derived from crotonic acid or its derivatives.

Crotonates can be found in various natural and synthetic compounds, including some pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and other industrial chemicals. They can exist as salts, esters, or other derivatives of crotonic acid.

In medical contexts, crotonates may refer to certain medications or chemical compounds used for research purposes. For example, sodium crotylate is a salt of crotonic acid that has been studied for its potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, it is not widely used in clinical practice.

It's worth noting that the term "crotonates" may not have a specific medical definition on its own, as it refers to a broad class of compounds with varying properties and uses.

Aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase is an enzyme that plays a role in the metabolism of certain aromatic amino acids, such as tryptophan and phenylalanine. This enzyme helps to catalyze the conversion of 5-aminomuconate semialdehyde to 5-aminosalicylate semialdehyde in the tryptophan degradation pathway known as the kynurenine pathway. Deficiencies in this enzyme can lead to the accumulation of toxic metabolites and have been associated with neurological disorders.

Aldehyde oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids using NAD+ or FAD as cofactors. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of aldehydes generated from various metabolic processes, such as lipid peroxidation and alcohol metabolism. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have been identified in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals.

The oxidation reaction catalyzed by aldehyde oxidoreductases involves the transfer of electrons from the aldehyde substrate to the cofactor, resulting in the formation of a carboxylic acid and reduced NAD+ or FAD. The enzymes are classified into several families based on their sequence similarity and cofactor specificity.

One of the most well-known members of this family is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which catalyzes the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones as part of the alcohol metabolism pathway. Another important member is aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which further oxidizes the aldehydes generated by ADH to carboxylic acids, thereby preventing the accumulation of toxic aldehydes in the body.

Deficiencies in ALDH enzymes have been linked to several human diseases, including alcoholism and certain types of cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of aldehyde oxidoreductases is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASAD) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction converting aspartate semialdehyde to beta-aspartyl-beta-AMP and then to beta-aspartate. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of several amino acids, including lysine, threonine, and methionine. Defects in this enzyme can lead to serious genetic disorders, such as 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency and Dwarfishism-deafness syndrome. The gene that encodes for ASAD is located on human chromosome 1 (1q21).

Aminophenols are organic compounds that consist of an amino group (-NH2) attached to a phenol group (aromatic ring with a hydroxyl group, -OH). There are two primary aminophenols: para-aminophenol (PAP) and ortho-aminophenol (OAP), which differ in the position of the amino group on the aromatic ring.

Para-aminophenol (PAP):
Chemical formula: C6H5NOH
IUPAC name: 4-Aminophenol

Ortho-aminophenol (OAP):
Chemical formula: C6H5NOH
IUPAC name: 2-Aminophenol

These compounds have various applications, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, and chemical intermediates. However, they can also be toxic and pose health risks if not handled properly. For instance, PAP is a metabolite of the analgesic drug paracetamol (acetaminophen), and overexposure to it can lead to liver damage.

Aminohydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of amide bonds and the breakdown of urea, converting it into ammonia and carbon dioxide. They are also known as amidases or urease. These enzymes play an essential role in various biological processes, including nitrogen metabolism and the detoxification of xenobiotics.

Aminohydrolases can be further classified into several subclasses based on their specificity for different types of amide bonds. For example, peptidases are a type of aminohydrolase that specifically hydrolyze peptide bonds in proteins and peptides. Other examples include ureases, which hydrolyze urea, and acylamidases, which hydrolyze acylamides.

Aminohydrolases are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They have important applications in biotechnology and medicine, such as in the production of pharmaceuticals, the treatment of wastewater, and the diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Metabolic brain diseases are a group of disorders caused by genetic defects that affect the body's metabolism and result in abnormal accumulation of harmful substances in the brain. These conditions are present at birth (inborn) or develop during infancy or early childhood. Examples of metabolic brain diseases that are present at birth include:

1. Phenylketonuria (PKU): A disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase, which leads to an accumulation of phenylalanine in the brain and can cause intellectual disability, seizures, and behavioral problems if left untreated.
2. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD): A disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase, which leads to an accumulation of branched-chain amino acids in the body and can cause intellectual disability, seizures, and metabolic crisis if left untreated.
3. Urea cycle disorders: A group of disorders caused by defects in enzymes that help remove ammonia from the body. Accumulation of ammonia in the blood can lead to brain damage, coma, or death if not treated promptly.
4. Organic acidemias: A group of disorders caused by defects in enzymes that help break down certain amino acids and other organic compounds. These conditions can cause metabolic acidosis, seizures, and developmental delays if left untreated.

Early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions are crucial to prevent irreversible brain damage and other complications. Treatment typically involves dietary restrictions, supplements, and medications to manage the underlying metabolic imbalance. In some cases, enzyme replacement therapy or liver transplantation may be necessary.

4-Aminobutyrate transaminase (GABA transaminase or GABA-T) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) to 2-oxoglutarate, forming succinic semialdehyde and glutamate. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the metabolism of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system. Inhibition of GABA transaminase is a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and anxiety, due to its ability to increase GABA levels in the brain.

Nitrobenzenes are organic compounds that contain a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring. The chemical formula for nitrobenzene is C6H5NO2. It is a pale yellow, oily liquid with a characteristic sweet and unpleasant odor. Nitrobenzene is not produced or used in large quantities in the United States, but it is still used as an intermediate in the production of certain chemicals.

Nitrobenzenes are classified as toxic and harmful if swallowed, inhaled, or if they come into contact with the skin. They can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects such as damage to the nervous system and liver. Nitrobenzenes are also considered to be potential carcinogens, meaning that they may increase the risk of cancer with long-term exposure.

In a medical setting, nitrobenzene poisoning is rare but can occur if someone is exposed to large amounts of this chemical. Symptoms of nitrobenzene poisoning may include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, it can cause convulsions, unconsciousness, and even death. If you suspect that you or someone else has been exposed to nitrobenzenes, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, also known as hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.16), is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of succinic semialdehyde to succinate, which is a key step in the GABA degradation pathway.

Deficiency in this enzyme can lead to an accumulation of succinic semialdehyde and its downstream metabolite, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), resulting in neurological symptoms such as developmental delay, hypotonia, seizures, and movement disorders. GHB is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter and also a recreational drug known as "Grievous Bodily Harm" or "Liquid Ecstasy."

The gene that encodes for succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is located on chromosome 6 (6p22.3) and has been identified as ALDH5A1. Mutations in this gene can lead to succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, which is an autosomal recessive disorder.

Sodium oxybate is a central nervous system depressant, which is a sodium salt of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). It is also known as gamma-hydroxybutyrate monosodium salt or sodium GHB. Sodium oxybate is used in the medical field for the treatment of narcolepsy, a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone). It is sold under the brand name Xyrem.

Sodium oxybate works by affecting the neurotransmitters in the brain, specifically increasing the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps regulate sleep and wakefulness. The medication is available only through a restricted distribution program due to its potential for abuse and dependence. It is usually taken at night in two doses, one at bedtime and the other about 2.5 to 4 hours later.

It's important to note that sodium oxybate has a high potential for misuse and addiction, and it should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Inborn errors of amino acid metabolism refer to genetic disorders that affect the body's ability to properly break down and process individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. These disorders can result in an accumulation of toxic levels of certain amino acids or their byproducts in the body, leading to a variety of symptoms and health complications.

There are many different types of inborn errors of amino acid metabolism, each affecting a specific amino acid or group of amino acids. Some examples include:

* Phenylketonuria (PKU): This disorder affects the breakdown of the amino acid phenylalanine, leading to its accumulation in the body and causing brain damage if left untreated.
* Maple syrup urine disease: This disorder affects the breakdown of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine, leading to their accumulation in the body and causing neurological problems.
* Homocystinuria: This disorder affects the breakdown of the amino acid methionine, leading to its accumulation in the body and causing a range of symptoms including developmental delay, intellectual disability, and cardiovascular problems.

Treatment for inborn errors of amino acid metabolism typically involves dietary restrictions or supplementation to manage the levels of affected amino acids in the body. In some cases, medication or other therapies may also be necessary. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent or minimize the severity of symptoms and health complications associated with these disorders.

Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a class of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of alcohol and other aldehydes in the body. These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids, using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor.

There are several isoforms of ALDH found in different tissues throughout the body, with varying substrate specificities and kinetic properties. The most well-known function of ALDH is its role in alcohol metabolism, where it converts the toxic aldehyde intermediate acetaldehyde to acetate, which can then be further metabolized or excreted.

Deficiencies in ALDH activity have been linked to a number of clinical conditions, including alcohol flush reaction, alcohol-induced liver disease, and certain types of cancer. Additionally, increased ALDH activity has been associated with chemotherapy resistance in some cancer cells.

Glutamate-5-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (G5SDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, specifically in the catabolic pathway of the amino acid tryptophan. G5SDH catalyzes the conversion of glutamate-5-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, which is a precursor for the synthesis of porphyrins, including heme, a component of hemoglobin.

The reaction catalyzed by G5SDH involves the oxidation of glutamate-5-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, with the concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Deficiencies in G5SDH activity can lead to neurological disorders and impaired heme synthesis, as observed in certain genetic diseases such as 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase deficiency and pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

Hydroxybutyrates are compounds that contain a hydroxyl group (-OH) and a butyric acid group. More specifically, in the context of clinical medicine and biochemistry, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is often referred to as a "ketone body."

Ketone bodies are produced by the liver during periods of low carbohydrate availability, such as during fasting, starvation, or a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. BHB is one of three major ketone bodies, along with acetoacetate and acetone. These molecules serve as alternative energy sources for the brain and other tissues when glucose levels are low.

In some pathological states, such as diabetic ketoacidosis, the body produces excessive amounts of ketone bodies, leading to a life-threatening metabolic acidosis. Elevated levels of BHB can also be found in other conditions like alcoholism, severe illnesses, and high-fat diets.

It is important to note that while BHB is a hydroxybutyrate, not all hydroxybutyrates are ketone bodies. The term "hydroxybutyrates" can refer to any compound containing both a hydroxyl group (-OH) and a butyric acid group.

Succinates, in a medical context, most commonly refer to the salts or esters of succinic acid. Succinic acid is a dicarboxylic acid that is involved in the Krebs cycle, which is a key metabolic pathway in cells that generates energy through the oxidation of acetyl-CoA derived from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

Succinates can also be used as a buffer in medical solutions and as a pharmaceutical intermediate in the synthesis of various drugs. In some cases, succinate may be used as a nutritional supplement or as a component of parenteral nutrition formulations to provide energy and help maintain acid-base balance in patients who are unable to eat normally.

It's worth noting that there is also a condition called "succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency" which is a genetic disorder that affects the metabolism of the amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This condition can lead to an accumulation of succinic semialdehyde and other metabolic byproducts, which can cause neurological symptoms such as developmental delay, hypotonia, and seizures.

Adipates are a group of chemical compounds that are esters of adipic acid. Adipic acid is a dicarboxylic acid with the formula (CH₂)₄(COOH)₂. Adipates are commonly used as plasticizers in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products, such as pipes, cables, and flooring. They can also be found in cosmetics, personal care products, and some food additives.

Adipates are generally considered to be safe for use in consumer products, but like all chemicals, they should be used with caution and in accordance with recommended guidelines. Some adipates have been shown to have potential health effects, such as endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity, at high levels of exposure. Therefore, it is important to follow proper handling and disposal procedures to minimize exposure.

Glutarates are compounds that contain a glutaric acid group. Glutaric acid is a carboxylic acid with a five-carbon chain and two carboxyl groups at the 1st and 5th carbon positions. Glutarates can be found in various substances, including certain foods and medications.

In a medical context, glutarates are sometimes used as ingredients in pharmaceutical products. For example, sodium phenylbutyrate, which is a salt of phenylbutyric acid and butyric acid, contains a glutaric acid group and is used as a medication to treat urea cycle disorders.

Glutarates can also be found in some metabolic pathways in the body, where they play a role in energy production and other biochemical processes. However, abnormal accumulation of glutaric acid or its derivatives can lead to certain medical conditions, such as glutaric acidemia type I, which is an inherited disorder of metabolism that can cause neurological symptoms and other health problems.

NAD (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It plays an essential role in cellular metabolism, particularly in redox reactions, where it acts as an electron carrier. NAD exists in two forms: NAD+, which accepts electrons and becomes reduced to NADH. This pairing of NAD+/NADH is involved in many fundamental biological processes such as generating energy in the form of ATP during cellular respiration, and serving as a critical cofactor for various enzymes that regulate cellular functions like DNA repair, gene expression, and cell death.

Maintaining optimal levels of NAD+/NADH is crucial for overall health and longevity, as it declines with age and in certain disease states. Therefore, strategies to boost NAD+ levels are being actively researched for their potential therapeutic benefits in various conditions such as aging, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic diseases.

L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme found in various tissues within the body, including the heart, liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. It plays a crucial role in the process of energy production, particularly during anaerobic conditions when oxygen levels are low.

In the presence of the coenzyme NADH, LDH catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, generating NAD+ as a byproduct. Conversely, in the presence of NAD+, LDH can convert lactate back to pyruvate using NADH. This reversible reaction is essential for maintaining the balance between lactate and pyruvate levels within cells.

Elevated blood levels of LDH may indicate tissue damage or injury, as this enzyme can be released into the circulation following cellular breakdown. As a result, LDH is often used as a nonspecific biomarker for various medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), liver disease, muscle damage, and certain types of cancer. However, it's important to note that an isolated increase in LDH does not necessarily pinpoint the exact location or cause of tissue damage, and further diagnostic tests are usually required for confirmation.

"Pseudomonas" is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely found in soil, water, and plants. Some species of Pseudomonas can cause disease in animals and humans, with P. aeruginosa being the most clinically relevant as it's an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

P. aeruginosa is known for its remarkable ability to resist many antibiotics and disinfectants, making infections caused by this bacterium difficult to treat. It can cause a range of healthcare-associated infections, such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections. In addition, it can also cause external ear infections and eye infections.

Prompt identification and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are crucial for managing Pseudomonas infections, although the increasing antibiotic resistance poses a significant challenge in treatment.

Aspartate kinase is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of several amino acids, including aspartate, methionine, and threonine. This enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of aspartic acid to form phosphoaspartate, which is the first step in the synthesis of these essential amino acids.

Aspartate kinase exists in different forms or isozymes in various organisms, and it can be regulated by feedback inhibition. This means that the enzyme's activity can be suppressed when the concentration of one or more of the amino acids it helps to synthesize becomes too high, preventing further production and maintaining a balanced level of these essential nutrients in the body.

In humans, aspartate kinase is involved in several metabolic pathways and is an essential enzyme for normal growth and development. Defects or mutations in the genes encoding aspartate kinase can lead to various genetic disorders and metabolic imbalances.

'Azospirillum brasilense' is a species of free-living, nitrogen-fixing bacteria that is commonly found in the soil and in the roots of various plants. It belongs to the genus Azospirillum and is known for its ability to promote plant growth through a process called bacterial colonization. The bacteria colonize the root system of the plant and enhance nutrient uptake, leading to improved growth and yield. Additionally, 'Azospirillum brasilense' can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, making it available to the plants as a natural fertilizer. It is widely used in agricultural practices as a bioinoculant to improve crop productivity and sustainability.

Decarboxylation is a chemical reaction that removes a carboxyl group from a molecule and releases carbon dioxide (CO2) as a result. In the context of medical chemistry, decarboxylation is a crucial process in the activation of certain acidic precursor compounds into their biologically active forms.

For instance, when discussing phytocannabinoids found in cannabis plants, decarboxylation converts non-psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into psychoactive delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) through the removal of a carboxyl group. This reaction typically occurs when the plant material is exposed to heat, such as during smoking or vaporization, or when it undergoes aging.

In summary, decarboxylation refers to the chemical process that removes a carboxyl group from a molecule and releases CO2, which can activate certain acidic precursor compounds into their biologically active forms in medical chemistry.

Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. It plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal excitability and preventing excessive neuronal firing, which helps to maintain neural homeostasis and reduce the risk of seizures. GABA functions by binding to specific receptors (GABA-A, GABA-B, and GABA-C) on the postsynaptic membrane, leading to hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane and reduced neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals.

In addition to its role in the central nervous system, GABA has also been identified as a neurotransmitter in the peripheral nervous system, where it is involved in regulating various physiological processes such as muscle relaxation, hormone secretion, and immune function.

GABA can be synthesized in neurons from glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, through the action of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Once synthesized, GABA is stored in synaptic vesicles and released into the synapse upon neuronal activation. After release, GABA can be taken up by surrounding glial cells or degraded by the enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T) into succinic semialdehyde, which is further metabolized to form succinate and enter the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances. Therefore, modulating GABAergic signaling through pharmacological interventions or other therapeutic approaches may offer potential benefits for the treatment of these conditions.

Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is a group of enzymes responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, and reducing equivalents such as NAD+ to NADH. In humans, ADH plays a crucial role in the metabolism of ethanol, converting it into acetaldehyde, which is then further metabolized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) into acetate. This process helps to detoxify and eliminate ethanol from the body. Additionally, ADH enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of other alcohols, such as methanol and ethylene glycol, which can be toxic if allowed to accumulate in the body.

NADP (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate) is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role as an electron carrier in various redox reactions in the human body. It exists in two forms: NADP+, which functions as an oxidizing agent and accepts electrons, and NADPH, which serves as a reducing agent and donates electrons.

NADPH is particularly important in anabolic processes, such as lipid and nucleotide synthesis, where it provides the necessary reducing equivalents to drive these reactions forward. It also plays a critical role in maintaining the cellular redox balance by participating in antioxidant defense mechanisms that neutralize harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS).

In addition, NADP is involved in various metabolic pathways, including the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle in photosynthesis. Overall, NADP and its reduced form, NADPH, are essential molecules for maintaining proper cellular function and energy homeostasis.

Aldehydes are a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of a functional group consisting of a carbon atom bonded to a hydrogen atom and a double bonded oxygen atom, also known as a formyl or aldehyde group. The general chemical structure of an aldehyde is R-CHO, where R represents a hydrocarbon chain.

Aldehydes are important in biochemistry and medicine as they are involved in various metabolic processes and are found in many biological molecules. For example, glucose is converted to pyruvate through a series of reactions that involve aldehyde intermediates. Additionally, some aldehydes have been identified as toxicants or environmental pollutants, such as formaldehyde, which is a known carcinogen and respiratory irritant.

Formaldehyde is also commonly used in medical and laboratory settings for its disinfectant properties and as a fixative for tissue samples. However, exposure to high levels of formaldehyde can be harmful to human health, causing symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. Therefore, appropriate safety measures must be taken when handling aldehydes in medical and laboratory settings.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hydro-Lyases" is not a recognized medical term or category in biochemistry. It seems like there might be a misunderstanding or a typo in the term.

In biochemistry, "lyases" are enzymes that catalyze the removal of groups from substrates by means other than hydrolysis or oxidation, often forming a double bond or a ring-forming reaction. They are classified and named based on the type of bond they break.

If you meant to ask about a specific enzyme or reaction, could you please provide more context or clarify the term? I'd be happy to help further with accurate information.

Intramolecular transferases are a specific class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a functional group from one part of a molecule to another within the same molecule. These enzymes play a crucial role in various biochemical reactions, including the modification of complex carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. By facilitating intramolecular transfers, these enzymes help regulate cellular processes, signaling pathways, and metabolic functions.

The systematic name for this class of enzymes is: [donor group]-transferring intramolecular transferases. The classification system developed by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (NC-IUBMB) categorizes them under EC 2.5. This category includes enzymes that transfer alkyl or aryl groups, other than methyl groups; methyl groups; hydroxylyl groups, including glycosyl groups; and various other specific functional groups.

Examples of intramolecular transferases include:

1. Protein kinases (EC 2.7.11): Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to a specific amino acid residue within a protein, thereby regulating protein function and cellular signaling pathways.
2. Glycosyltransferases (EC 2.4): Enzymes that facilitate the transfer of glycosyl groups between donor and acceptor molecules; some of these enzymes can catalyze intramolecular transfers, playing a role in the biosynthesis and modification of complex carbohydrates.
3. Methyltransferases (EC 2.1): Enzymes that transfer methyl groups between donor and acceptor molecules; some of these enzymes can catalyze intramolecular transfers, contributing to the regulation of gene expression and other cellular processes.

Understanding the function and regulation of intramolecular transferases is essential for elucidating their roles in various biological processes and developing targeted therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with dysregulation of these enzymes.

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolic pathway of glycolysis. Its primary function is to convert glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (a triose sugar phosphate) into D-glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate, while also converting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) into its reduced form NADH. This reaction is essential for the production of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during cellular respiration. GAPDH has also been implicated in various non-metabolic processes, including DNA replication, repair, and transcription regulation, due to its ability to interact with different proteins and nucleic acids.

Transaminases, also known as aminotransferases, are a group of enzymes found in various tissues of the body, particularly in the liver, heart, muscle, and kidneys. They play a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins.

There are two major types of transaminases: aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Both enzymes are normally present in low concentrations in the bloodstream. However, when tissues that contain these enzymes are damaged or injured, such as during liver disease or muscle damage, the levels of AST and ALT in the blood may significantly increase.

Measurement of serum transaminase levels is a common laboratory test used to assess liver function and detect liver injury or damage. Increased levels of these enzymes in the blood can indicate conditions such as hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, drug-induced liver injury, heart attack, and muscle disorders. It's important to note that while elevated transaminase levels may suggest liver disease, they do not specify the type or cause of the condition, and further diagnostic tests are often required for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Alcohol oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to NADH. These enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of alcohols and other organic compounds in living organisms.

The most well-known example of an alcohol oxidoreductase is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is responsible for the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the liver during the metabolism of alcoholic beverages. Other examples include aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH).

These enzymes are important targets for the development of drugs used to treat alcohol use disorder, as inhibiting their activity can help to reduce the rate of ethanol metabolism and the severity of its effects on the body.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Acyl Coenzyme A (often abbreviated as Acetyl-CoA or Acyl-CoA) is a crucial molecule in metabolism, particularly in the breakdown and oxidation of fats and carbohydrates to produce energy. It is a thioester compound that consists of a fatty acid or an acetate group linked to coenzyme A through a sulfur atom.

Acyl CoA plays a central role in several metabolic pathways, including:

1. The citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle): In the mitochondria, Acyl-CoA is formed from the oxidation of fatty acids or the breakdown of certain amino acids. This Acyl-CoA then enters the citric acid cycle to produce high-energy electrons, which are used in the electron transport chain to generate ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the main energy currency of the cell.
2. Beta-oxidation: The breakdown of fatty acids occurs in the mitochondria through a process called beta-oxidation, where Acyl-CoA is sequentially broken down into smaller units, releasing acetyl-CoA, which then enters the citric acid cycle.
3. Ketogenesis: In times of low carbohydrate availability or during prolonged fasting, the liver can produce ketone bodies from acetyl-CoA to supply energy to other organs, such as the brain and heart.
4. Protein synthesis: Acyl-CoA is also involved in the modification of proteins by attaching fatty acid chains to them (a process called acetylation), which can influence protein function and stability.

In summary, Acyl Coenzyme A is a vital molecule in metabolism that connects various pathways related to energy production, fatty acid breakdown, and protein modification.

Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GLDH or GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly within liver and kidney tissues. It catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate, which links amino acid metabolism with the citric acid cycle and energy production. This enzyme is significant in clinical settings as its levels in blood serum can be used as a diagnostic marker for diseases that damage liver or kidney cells, since these cells release GLDH into the bloodstream upon damage.

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), also known as Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase, is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in cellular metabolism, particularly in the glycolytic pathway. It catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG), while also converting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to its reduced form NADH. This reaction is essential for the production of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during cellular respiration. GAPDH has been widely used as a housekeeping gene in molecular biology research due to its consistent expression across various tissues and cells, although recent studies have shown that its expression can vary under certain conditions.

Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. It catalyzes the reversible oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate, while simultaneously reducing NAD+ to NADH. This reaction is essential for energy production in the form of ATP and NADH within the cell.

There are two main types of Malate Dehydrogenase:

1. NAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH1): Found primarily in the cytoplasm, this isoform plays a role in the malate-aspartate shuttle, which helps transfer reducing equivalents between the cytoplasm and mitochondria.
2. FAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH2): Located within the mitochondrial matrix, this isoform is involved in the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Abnormal levels of Malate Dehydrogenase enzyme can be indicative of certain medical conditions or diseases, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), muscle damage, or various types of cancer. Therefore, MDH enzyme activity is often assessed in diagnostic tests to help identify and monitor these health issues.

Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the presence of NAD+ or NADP+, producing NADH or NADPH respectively. This reaction occurs in the citric acid cycle, also known as the Krebs cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is a crucial metabolic pathway in the cell's energy production and biosynthesis of various molecules. There are three isoforms of IDH found in humans: IDH1 located in the cytosol, IDH2 in the mitochondrial matrix, and IDH3 within the mitochondria. Mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 have been associated with several types of cancer, such as gliomas and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), leading to abnormal accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which can contribute to tumorigenesis.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Lysine is an essential amino acid, which means that it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Its chemical formula is (2S)-2,6-diaminohexanoic acid. Lysine is necessary for the growth and maintenance of tissues in the body, and it plays a crucial role in the production of enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. It is also essential for the absorption of calcium and the formation of collagen, which is an important component of bones and connective tissue. Foods that are good sources of lysine include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products.

Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DHLD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in several important metabolic pathways in the human body, including the citric acid cycle and the catabolism of certain amino acids. DHLD is a component of multi-enzyme complexes, such as the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) and the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDC).

The primary function of DHLD is to catalyze the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide, a reduced form of lipoamide, back to its oxidized state (lipoamide) while simultaneously reducing NAD+ to NADH. This reaction is essential for the continued functioning of the PDC and KGDC, as dihydrolipoamide is a cofactor for these enzyme complexes.

Deficiencies in DHLD can lead to serious metabolic disorders, such as maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (RR-MADD). These conditions can result in neurological symptoms, developmental delays, and metabolic acidosis, among other complications. Treatment typically involves dietary modifications, supplementation with specific nutrients, and, in some cases, enzyme replacement therapy.

Carbohydrate dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of carbohydrates, including sugars and sugar alcohols. These enzymes play a crucial role in cellular metabolism by helping to convert these molecules into forms that can be used for energy or as building blocks for other biological compounds.

During the oxidation process, carbohydrate dehydrogenases remove hydrogen atoms from the carbohydrate substrate and transfer them to an electron acceptor, such as NAD+ or FAD. This results in the formation of a ketone or aldehyde group on the carbohydrate molecule and the reduction of the electron acceptor to NADH or FADH2.

Carbohydrate dehydrogenases are classified into several subgroups based on their substrate specificity, cofactor requirements, and other factors. Some examples include glucose dehydrogenase, galactose dehydrogenase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase.

These enzymes have important applications in various fields, including biotechnology, medicine, and industry. For example, they can be used to detect or quantify specific carbohydrates in biological samples, or to produce valuable chemical compounds through the oxidation of renewable resources such as plant-derived sugars.

2-Aminoadipic acid (2-AAA) is a type of amino acid that is formed as a byproduct of the metabolism of lysine, which is an essential amino acid. It is not commonly considered a building block of proteins, but it does play a role in various biochemical pathways in the body.

Abnormally high levels of 2-AAA have been found in certain medical conditions, such as genetic disorders of lysine metabolism and in some neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is not currently clear whether elevated levels of 2-AAA are a cause or a consequence of these conditions.

Research is ongoing to better understand the role of 2-AAA in human health and disease.

Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the process of cellular respiration, specifically in the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle) and the electron transport chain. It is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells.

SDH catalyzes the oxidation of succinate to fumarate, converting it into a molecule of fadaquate in the process. During this reaction, two electrons are transferred from succinate to the FAD cofactor within the SDH enzyme complex, reducing it to FADH2. These electrons are then passed on to ubiquinone (CoQ), which is a mobile electron carrier in the electron transport chain, leading to the generation of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

SDH is also known as mitochondrial complex II because it is the second complex in the electron transport chain. Mutations in the genes encoding SDH subunits or associated proteins have been linked to various human diseases, including hereditary paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and some forms of neurodegenerative disorders.

L-Iditol 2-Dehydrogenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction between L-iditol and NAD+ to produce L-sorbose and NADH + H+. This enzyme plays a role in the metabolism of sugars, specifically in the conversion of L-iditol to L-sorbose in various organisms, including bacteria and fungi. The reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is part of the polyol pathway, which is involved in the regulation of osmotic pressure and other cellular processes.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of glucose and lipids. It catalyzes the conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), which is a key intermediate in the synthesis of triglycerides, phospholipids, and other glycerophospholipids.

There are two main forms of GPD: a cytoplasmic form (GPD1) and a mitochondrial form (GPD2). The cytoplasmic form is involved in the production of NADH, which is used in various metabolic processes, while the mitochondrial form is involved in the production of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

Deficiencies or mutations in GPD can lead to a variety of metabolic disorders, including glycerol kinase deficiency and congenital muscular dystrophy. Elevated levels of GPD have been observed in certain types of cancer, suggesting that it may play a role in tumor growth and progression.

Isomerases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of isomers of a single molecule. They do this by rearranging atoms within a molecule to form a new structural arrangement or isomer. Isomerases can act on various types of chemical bonds, including carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bonds.

There are several subclasses of isomerases, including:

1. Racemases and epimerases: These enzymes interconvert stereoisomers, which are molecules that have the same molecular formula but different spatial arrangements of their atoms in three-dimensional space.
2. Cis-trans isomerases: These enzymes interconvert cis and trans isomers, which differ in the arrangement of groups on opposite sides of a double bond.
3. Intramolecular oxidoreductases: These enzymes catalyze the transfer of electrons within a single molecule, resulting in the formation of different isomers.
4. Mutases: These enzymes catalyze the transfer of functional groups within a molecule, resulting in the formation of different isomers.
5. Tautomeres: These enzymes catalyze the interconversion of tautomers, which are isomeric forms of a molecule that differ in the location of a movable hydrogen atom and a double bond.

Isomerases play important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, signaling, and regulation.

Homoserine dehydrogenase is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of certain amino acids. Specifically, it catalyzes the conversion of homoserine to aspartate semialdehyde, which is a key step in the biosynthesis of several essential amino acids, including threonine, methionine, and isoleucine. The reaction catalyzed by homoserine dehydrogenase involves the oxidation of homoserine to form aspartate semialdehyde, using NAD or NADP as a cofactor. There are several isoforms of this enzyme found in different organisms, and it has been studied extensively due to its importance in amino acid metabolism and potential as a target for antibiotic development.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Glucose 1-Dehydrogenase (G1DH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of β-D-glucose into D-glucono-1,5-lactone and reduces the cofactor NAD+ into NADH. This reaction plays a role in various biological processes, including glucose sensing and detoxification of reactive carbonyl species. G1DH is found in many organisms, including humans, and has several isoforms with different properties and functions.

An operon is a genetic unit in prokaryotic organisms (like bacteria) consisting of a cluster of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule, which then undergoes translation to produce multiple proteins. This genetic organization allows for the coordinated regulation of genes that are involved in the same metabolic pathway or functional process. The unit typically includes promoter and operator regions that control the transcription of the operon, as well as structural genes encoding the proteins. Operons were first discovered in bacteria, but similar genetic organizations have been found in some eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast.

Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone metabolism. They catalyze the oxidation and reduction reactions of hydroxyl groups on the steroid molecule, which can lead to the activation or inactivation of steroid hormones. HSDs are involved in the conversion of various steroids, including sex steroids (e.g., androgens, estrogens) and corticosteroids (e.g., cortisol, cortisone). These enzymes can be found in different tissues throughout the body, and their activity is regulated by various factors, such as hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. Dysregulation of HSDs has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

The Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex (KGDC or α-KGDH) is a multi-enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle. It is located within the mitochondrial matrix of eukaryotic cells and functions to catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate into succinyl-CoA, thereby connecting the Krebs cycle to the electron transport chain for energy production.

The KGDC is composed of three distinct enzymes:

1. α-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1): This enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation and oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to form a thioester intermediate with lipoamide, which is bound to the E2 component.
2. Dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2): This enzyme facilitates the transfer of the acetyl group from the lipoamide cofactor to CoA, forming succinyl-CoA and regenerating oxidized lipoamide.
3. Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3): The final enzyme in the complex catalyzes the reoxidation of reduced lipoamide back to its disulfide form, using FAD as a cofactor and transferring electrons to NAD+, forming NADH.

The KGDC is subject to regulation by several mechanisms, including phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions that can inhibit or activate the complex, respectively. Dysfunction of this enzyme complex has been implicated in various diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which involve the transfer of electrons from one molecule (the reductant) to another (the oxidant). These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy production, metabolism, and detoxification.

The oxidoreductase-catalyzed reaction typically involves the donation of electrons from a reducing agent (donor) to an oxidizing agent (acceptor), often through the transfer of hydrogen atoms or hydride ions. The enzyme itself does not undergo any permanent chemical change during this process, but rather acts as a catalyst to lower the activation energy required for the reaction to occur.

Oxidoreductases are classified and named based on the type of electron donor or acceptor involved in the reaction. For example, oxidoreductases that act on the CH-OH group of donors are called dehydrogenases, while those that act on the aldehyde or ketone groups are called oxidases. Other examples include reductases, peroxidases, and catalases.

Understanding the function and regulation of oxidoreductases is important for understanding various physiological processes and developing therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with impaired redox homeostasis, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Saccharopine dehydrogenases are enzymes involved in the metabolism of the amino acid lysine. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of saccharopine, an intermediate compound in the lysine degradation pathway, into α-aminoadipic semialdehyde and glutamate. Saccharopine dehydrogenases play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of amino acids in the body and are found in various organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding one form of saccharopine dehydrogenase (Lysine Ketoglutarate Reductase/Saccharopine Dehydrogenase) have been associated with a rare genetic disorder called saccharopinuria, which is characterized by elevated levels of saccharopine in the urine and neurological symptoms.

Glucose dehydrogenases (GDHs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of glucose to generate gluconic acid or glucuronic acid. This reaction involves the transfer of electrons from glucose to an electron acceptor, most commonly nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) or phenazine methosulfate (PMS).

GDHs are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They play important roles in different biological processes, such as glucose metabolism, energy production, and detoxification of harmful substances. Based on their cofactor specificity, GDHs can be classified into two main types: NAD(P)-dependent GDHs and PQQ-dependent GDHs.

NAD(P)-dependent GDHs use NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor to oxidize glucose to glucono-1,5-lactone, which is then hydrolyzed to gluconic acid by an accompanying enzyme. These GDHs are involved in various metabolic pathways, such as the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway.

PQQ-dependent GDHs, on the other hand, use pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a cofactor to catalyze the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid directly. These GDHs are typically found in bacteria and play a role in energy production and detoxification.

Overall, glucose dehydrogenases are essential enzymes that contribute to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and energy balance in living organisms.

3-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone biosynthesis. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of 3-beta-hydroxy steroids to 3-keto steroids, which is an essential step in the production of various steroid hormones, including progesterone, cortisol, aldosterone, and sex hormones such as testosterone and estradiol.

There are several isoforms of 3-HSDs that are expressed in different tissues and have distinct substrate specificities. For instance, 3-HSD type I is primarily found in the ovary and adrenal gland, where it catalyzes the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 17-hydroxycortisol. On the other hand, 3-HSD type II is mainly expressed in the testes, adrenal gland, and placenta, where it catalyzes the conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione and androstenedione to testosterone.

Defects in 3-HSDs can lead to various genetic disorders that affect steroid hormone production and metabolism, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as adrenal insufficiency, ambiguous genitalia, and sexual development disorders.

Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is a metabolic pathway that supplies reducing energy to cells by converting glucose into ribose-5-phosphate and NADPH.

PGD catalyzes the third step of this pathway, in which 6-phosphogluconate is converted into ribulose-5-phosphate, with the concurrent reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. This reaction is essential for the generation of NADPH, which serves as a reducing agent in various cellular processes, including fatty acid synthesis and antioxidant defense.

Deficiencies in PGD can lead to several metabolic disorders, such as congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, which is characterized by the premature destruction of red blood cells due to a defect in the pentose phosphate pathway.

Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases (SADHs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the interconversion between sugar alcohols and sugars, which involves the gain or loss of a pair of electrons, typically in the form of NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of sugar alcohols, which are commonly found in various plants and some microorganisms.

Sugar alcohols, also known as polyols, are reduced forms of sugars that contain one or more hydroxyl groups instead of aldehyde or ketone groups. Examples of sugar alcohols include sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, and erythritol. SADHs can interconvert these sugar alcohols to their corresponding sugars through a redox reaction that involves the transfer of hydrogen atoms.

The reaction catalyzed by SADHs is typically represented as follows:

R-CH(OH)-CH2OH + NAD(P)+ ↔ R-CO-CH2OH + NAD(P)H + H+

where R represents a carbon chain, and CH(OH)-CH2OH and CO-CH2OH represent the sugar alcohol and sugar forms, respectively.

SADHs are widely distributed in nature and have been found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. These enzymes have attracted significant interest in biotechnology due to their potential applications in the production of sugar alcohols and other value-added products. Additionally, SADHs have been studied as targets for developing novel antimicrobial agents, as inhibiting these enzymes can disrupt the metabolism of certain pathogens that rely on sugar alcohols for growth and survival.

Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the body's energy production process. They are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of various fatty acids, which are broken down into smaller molecules called acyl-CoAs in the body.

More specifically, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases facilitate the removal of electrons from the acyl-CoA molecules, which are then transferred to coenzyme Q10 and eventually to the electron transport chain. This process generates energy in the form of ATP, which is used by cells throughout the body for various functions.

There are several different types of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, each responsible for oxidizing a specific type of acyl-CoA molecule. These include:

* Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 12 to 20 carbon atoms
* Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 14 to 20 carbon atoms
* Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 6 to 12 carbon atoms
* Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 4 to 8 carbon atoms
* Isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which oxidizes isovaleryl-CoA, a specific type of branched-chain acyl-CoA molecule

Deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) or long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCADD), which can cause symptoms such as hypoglycemia, muscle weakness, and developmental delays.

NADH dehydrogenase, also known as Complex I, is an enzyme complex in the electron transport chain located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It catalyzes the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ and the reduction of coenzyme Q to ubiquinol, playing a crucial role in cellular respiration and energy production. The reaction involves the transfer of electrons from NADH to coenzyme Q, which contributes to the generation of a proton gradient across the membrane, ultimately leading to ATP synthesis. Defects in NADH dehydrogenase can result in various mitochondrial diseases and disorders.

Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMDH or IMPDH) is an enzyme that is involved in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. It catalyzes the conversion of inosine monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine monophosphate (XMP), which is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP).

There are two isoforms of IMPDH, type I and type II, which are encoded by separate genes. Type I IMPDH is expressed in most tissues, while type II IMPDH is primarily expressed in lymphocytes and other cells involved in the immune response. Inhibitors of IMPDH have been developed as immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of transplanted organs. Defects in the gene encoding IMPDH type II have been associated with retinal degeneration and hearing loss.

Lactate dehydrogenases (LDH) are a group of intracellular enzymes found in nearly all human cells, particularly in the heart, liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. They play a crucial role in energy production during anaerobic metabolism, converting pyruvate to lactate while regenerating NAD+ from NADH. LDH exists as multiple isoenzymes (LDH-1 to LDH-5) in the body, each with distinct distributions and functions.

An elevated level of LDH in the blood may indicate tissue damage or injury, as these enzymes are released into the circulation following cellular destruction. Therefore, measuring LDH levels is a common diagnostic tool to assess various medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), liver disease, muscle damage, and some types of cancer. However, an isolated increase in LDH may not be specific enough for a definitive diagnosis, and additional tests are usually required for confirmation.

Catechols are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzene ring with two hydroxyl groups (-OH) attached to it in the ortho position. The term "catechol" is often used interchangeably with "ortho-dihydroxybenzene." Catechols are important in biology because they are produced through the metabolism of certain amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, and are involved in the synthesis of various neurotransmitters and hormones. They also have antioxidant properties and can act as reducing agents. In chemistry, catechols can undergo various reactions, such as oxidation and polymerization, to form other classes of compounds.

Formate dehydrogenases (FDH) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of formic acid (formate) to carbon dioxide and hydrogen or to carbon dioxide and water, depending on the type of FDH. The reaction is as follows:

Formic acid + Coenzyme Q (or NAD+) -> Carbon dioxide + H2 (or H2O) + Reduced coenzyme Q (or NADH)

FDHs are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. They play a crucial role in the metabolism of many microorganisms that use formate as an electron donor for energy conservation or as a carbon source for growth. In addition to their biological significance, FDHs have attracted much interest as biocatalysts for various industrial applications, such as the production of hydrogen, reduction of CO2, and detoxification of formic acid in animal feed.

FDHs can be classified into two main types based on their cofactor specificity: NAD-dependent FDHs and quinone-dependent FDHs. NAD-dependent FDHs use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor, while quinone-dependent FDHs use menaquinone or ubiquinone as a cofactor. Both types of FDHs have a similar reaction mechanism that involves the transfer of a hydride ion from formate to the cofactor and the release of carbon dioxide.

FDHs are composed of two subunits: a small subunit containing one or two [4Fe-4S] clusters and a large subunit containing a molybdenum cofactor (Moco) and one or two [2Fe-2S] clusters. Moco is a complex prosthetic group that consists of a pterin ring, a dithiolene group, and a molybdenum atom coordinated to three ligands: a sulfur atom from the dithiolene group, a terminal oxygen atom from a mononucleotide, and a serine residue. The molybdenum center can adopt different oxidation states (+4, +5, or +6) during the catalytic cycle, allowing for the transfer of electrons and the activation of formate.

FDHs have various applications in biotechnology and industry, such as the production of hydrogen gas, the removal of nitrate from wastewater, and the synthesis of fine chemicals. The high selectivity and efficiency of FDHs make them attractive catalysts for these processes, which require mild reaction conditions and low energy inputs. However, the stability and activity of FDHs are often limited by their sensitivity to oxygen and other inhibitors, which can affect their performance in industrial settings. Therefore, efforts have been made to improve the properties of FDHs through protein engineering, genetic modification, and immobilization techniques.

Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase is a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the body's energy production process. Specifically, they are involved in the breakdown of fatty acids within the cells.

More technically, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases catalyze the removal of electrons from the thiol group of acyl-CoAs, forming a trans-double bond and generating FADH2. This reaction is the first step in each cycle of fatty acid beta-oxidation, which occurs in the mitochondria of cells.

There are several different types of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, each specific to breaking down different lengths of fatty acids. For example, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is responsible for breaking down longer chain fatty acids, while medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) breaks down medium-length chains.

Deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as MCAD deficiency or LC-FAOD (long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders), which can cause symptoms like vomiting, lethargy, and muscle weakness, especially during periods of fasting or illness.

17-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone biosynthesis. They are involved in the conversion of 17-ketosteroids to 17-hydroxy steroids or vice versa, by adding or removing a hydroxyl group (–OH) at the 17th carbon atom of the steroid molecule. This conversion is essential for the production of various steroid hormones, including cortisol, aldosterone, and sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone.

There are several isoforms of 17-HSDs, each with distinct substrate specificities, tissue distributions, and functions:

1. 17-HSD type 1 (17-HSD1): This isoform primarily catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), an active form of estrogen. It is mainly expressed in the ovary, breast, and adipose tissue.
2. 17-HSD type 2 (17-HSD2): This isoform catalyzes the reverse reaction, converting estradiol (E2) to estrone (E1). It is primarily expressed in the placenta, prostate, and breast tissue.
3. 17-HSD type 3 (17-HSD3): This isoform is responsible for the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone, an essential step in male sex hormone biosynthesis. It is predominantly expressed in the testis and adrenal gland.
4. 17-HSD type 4 (17-HSD4): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione, an intermediate step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. It is primarily expressed in the placenta.
5. 17-HSD type 5 (17-HSD5): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of cortisone to cortisol, a critical step in glucocorticoid biosynthesis. It is predominantly expressed in the adrenal gland and liver.
6. 17-HSD type 6 (17-HSD6): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone, similar to 17-HSD3. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the ovary.
7. 17-HSD type 7 (17-HSD7): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the ovary.
8. 17-HSD type 8 (17-HSD8): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
9. 17-HSD type 9 (17-HSD9): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
10. 17-HSD type 10 (17-HSD10): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
11. 17-HSD type 11 (17-HSD11): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
12. 17-HSD type 12 (17-HSD12): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
13. 17-HSD type 13 (17-HSD13): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
14. 17-HSD type 14 (17-HSD14): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
15. 17-HSD type 15 (17-HSD15): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
16. 17-HSD type 16 (17-HSD16): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
17. 17-HSD type 17 (17-HSD17): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
18. 17-HSD type 18 (17-HSD18): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
19. 17-HSD type 19 (17-HSD19): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
20. 17-HSD type 20 (17-HSD20): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
21. 17-HSD type 21 (17-HSD21): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
22. 17-HSD type 22 (17-HSD22): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
23. 17-HSD type 23 (17-HSD23): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
24. 17-HSD type 24 (17-HSD24): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
25. 17-HSD type 25 (17-HSD25): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
26. 17-HSD type 26 (17-HSD26): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However

Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of purines, which are nitrogen-containing compounds that form part of DNA and RNA. Specifically, XDH helps to break down xanthine and hypoxanthine into uric acid, a waste product that is excreted in the urine.

XDH can exist in two interconvertible forms: a dehydrogenase form (XDH) and an oxidase form (XO). In its dehydrogenase form, XDH uses NAD+ as an electron acceptor to convert xanthine into uric acid. However, when XDH is converted to its oxidase form (XO), it can use molecular oxygen as an electron acceptor instead, producing superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as byproducts. These reactive oxygen species can contribute to oxidative stress and tissue damage in the body.

Abnormal levels or activity of XDH have been implicated in various diseases, including gout, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Tartronates are salts or esters of tartaric acid, which is a crystalline organic acid found in many fruits and used as an antioxidant and preservative. In the context of medicine, tartronate salts such as potassium tartrate have been used in the treatment of certain metabolic disorders, such as hyperlactacidemia and lactic acidosis, due to their ability to act as a buffering agent and help regulate acid-base balance. However, the use of tartronates in medical therapy is not widely established and has largely been replaced by other more effective treatments.

Sulfolobales is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in the field of microbiology. It refers to an order of extremophilic archaea, which are single-celled organisms that lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Members of Sulfolobales are characterized by their ability to thrive in harsh environments with high temperatures (often above 80°C) and acidic pH levels (typically below 4). They are commonly found in volcanic hot springs, sulfur-rich mudpots, and other geothermal areas.

The order Sulfolobales includes several genera of archaea, such as Sulfolobus, Acidianus, and Metallosphaera, among others. These organisms have attracted scientific interest due to their unique metabolic pathways and potential applications in biotechnology.

Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring compound in the human body and is a key precursor in the biosynthesis of heme, which is a component of hemoglobin in red blood cells. It is also used as a photosensitizer in dermatology for the treatment of certain types of skin conditions such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

In medical terms, ALA is classified as an α-keto acid and a porphyrin precursor. It is synthesized in the mitochondria from glycine and succinyl-CoA in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aminolevulinic acid synthase. After its synthesis, ALA is transported to the cytosol where it undergoes further metabolism to form porphyrins, which are then used for heme biosynthesis in the mitochondria.

In dermatology, topical application of ALA followed by exposure to a specific wavelength of light can lead to the production of reactive oxygen species that destroy abnormal cells in the skin while leaving healthy cells unharmed. This makes it an effective treatment for precancerous and cancerous lesions on the skin.

It is important to note that ALA can cause photosensitivity, which means that patients who have undergone ALA-based treatments should avoid exposure to sunlight or other sources of bright light for a period of time after the treatment to prevent adverse reactions.

3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases (3-HADs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. These enzymes catalyze the third step of the beta-oxidation process, which involves the oxidation of 3-hydroxyacyl CoA to 3-ketoacyl CoA. This reaction is an essential part of the energy-generating process that occurs in the mitochondria of cells and allows for the breakdown of fatty acids into smaller molecules, which can then be used to produce ATP, the primary source of cellular energy.

There are several different isoforms of 3-HADs, each with specific substrate preferences and tissue distributions. The most well-known isoform is the mitochondrial 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (M3HD), which is involved in the oxidation of medium and long-chain fatty acids. Other isoforms include the short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD) and the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), which are involved in the oxidation of shorter and longer chain fatty acids, respectively.

Deficiencies in 3-HADs can lead to serious metabolic disorders, such as 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (3-HAD deficiency), which is characterized by the accumulation of toxic levels of 3-hydroxyacyl CoAs in the body. Symptoms of this disorder can include hypoglycemia, muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and developmental delays. Early diagnosis and treatment of 3-HAD deficiency are essential to prevent serious complications and improve outcomes for affected individuals.

Pyridoxamine is a form of vitamin B6, which is a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in the body's protein metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and hemoglobin production. Pyridoxamine is a specific chemical compound that is a derivative of pyridoxine, another form of vitamin B6.

Pyridoxamine functions as a cofactor for various enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. It helps to convert harmful homocysteine into the essential amino acid methionine, which is important for maintaining normal levels of homocysteine and supporting cardiovascular health.

Pyridoxamine has been studied for its potential role in treating or preventing certain medical conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy and neurodegenerative diseases, due to its antioxidant properties and ability to protect against protein glycation, a process that can damage tissues and contribute to aging and disease. However, more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy for these uses.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11-β-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol and cortisone, which belong to the class of glucocorticoids. These enzymes exist in two isoforms: 11-β-HSD1 and 11-β-HSD2.

1. 11-β-HSD1: This isoform is primarily located within the liver, adipose tissue, and various other peripheral tissues. It functions as a NADPH-dependent reductase, converting inactive cortisone to its active form, cortisol. This enzyme helps regulate glucocorticoid action in peripheral tissues, influencing glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation.
2. 11-β-HSD2: This isoform is predominantly found in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as the kidneys, colon, and salivary glands. It functions as a NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase, converting active cortisol to its inactive form, cortisone. By doing so, it protects the mineralocorticoid receptor from being overstimulated by cortisol, ensuring aldosterone specifically binds and activates this receptor to maintain proper electrolyte and fluid balance.

Dysregulation of 11-β-HSDs has been implicated in several disease states, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and psychiatric disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat related conditions.

Ketone oxidoreductases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ketones to corresponding alcohols or vice versa, through the process of reduction or oxidation. These enzymes play an essential role in various metabolic pathways and biochemical reactions within living organisms.

In the context of medical research and diagnostics, ketone oxidoreductases have gained attention for their potential applications in the development of biosensors to detect and monitor blood ketone levels, particularly in patients with diabetes. Elevated levels of ketones in the blood (known as ketonemia) can indicate a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis, which requires prompt medical attention.

One example of a ketone oxidoreductase is the enzyme known as d-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (d-BDH), which catalyzes the conversion of d-beta-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate. This reaction is part of the metabolic pathway that breaks down fatty acids for energy production, and it becomes particularly important during periods of low carbohydrate availability or insulin deficiency, as seen in diabetes.

Understanding the function and regulation of ketone oxidoreductases can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders like diabetes and contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for their management.

Uridine Diphosphate (UDP) Glucose Dehydrogenase is an enzyme that plays a role in carbohydrate metabolism. Its systematic name is UDP-glucose:NAD+ oxidoreductase, and it catalyzes the following chemical reaction:

UDP-glucose + NAD+ -> UDP-glucuronate + NADH + H+

This enzyme helps convert UDP-glucose into UDP-glucuronate, which is a crucial component in the biosynthesis of various substances in the body, such as glycosaminoglycans and other glyconjugates. The reaction also results in the reduction of NAD+ to NADH, which is an essential coenzyme in numerous metabolic processes.

UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is widely distributed in various tissues, including the liver, kidney, and intestine. Deficiencies or mutations in this enzyme can lead to several metabolic disorders, such as glucosuria and hypermethioninemia.

1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Dehydrogenase (PCD) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction involved in the metabolism of proline, an amino acid. The enzyme converts 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate semialdehyde, which is then further metabolized to glutamate. This reaction is important in the regulation of proline levels in cells and is also a part of the cell's stress response. A deficiency in PCD can lead to an accumulation of 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, which can cause neurological symptoms and other health problems.

Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the normal functioning of an enzyme called G6PD. This enzyme is found in red blood cells and plays a crucial role in protecting them from damage.

In people with G6PD deficiency, the enzyme's activity is reduced or absent, making their red blood cells more susceptible to damage and destruction, particularly when they are exposed to certain triggers such as certain medications, infections, or foods. This can lead to a condition called hemolysis, where the red blood cells break down prematurely, leading to anemia, jaundice, and in severe cases, kidney failure.

G6PD deficiency is typically inherited from one's parents in an X-linked recessive pattern, meaning that males are more likely to be affected than females. While there is no cure for G6PD deficiency, avoiding triggers and managing symptoms can help prevent complications.

Oxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of many natural products, as well as the detoxification and degradation of xenobiotics (foreign substances).

There are two main types of oxygenases: monooxygenases and dioxygenases. Monooxygenases introduce one atom of molecular oxygen into a substrate while reducing the other to water. An example of this type of enzyme is cytochrome P450, which is involved in drug metabolism and steroid hormone synthesis. Dioxygenases, on the other hand, incorporate both atoms of molecular oxygen into their substrates, often leading to the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds or the cleavage of existing ones.

It's important to note that while oxygenases are essential for many life-sustaining processes, they can also contribute to the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) during normal cellular metabolism. An imbalance in ROS levels can lead to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, which has been linked to various diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 (11β-HSD1) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol, in the body. Cortisol is a glucocorticoid hormone produced by the adrenal glands that helps regulate various physiological processes such as metabolism, immune response, and stress response.

11β-HSD1 is primarily expressed in liver, fat, and muscle tissues, where it catalyzes the conversion of cortisone to cortisol. Cortisone is a biologically inactive form of cortisol that is produced when cortisol levels are high, and it needs to be converted back to cortisol for the hormone to exert its effects.

By increasing the availability of active cortisol in these tissues, 11β-HSD1 has been implicated in several metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Inhibitors of 11β-HSD1 are currently being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Acetaldehyde is a colorless, volatile, and flammable liquid with a pungent odor. It is the simplest aldehyde, with the formula CH3CHO. Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol and is produced by the oxidation of ethanol by alcohol dehydrogenase. It is also a naturally occurring compound that is found in small amounts in various foods and beverages, such as fruits, vegetables, and coffee.

Acetaldehyde is a toxic substance that can cause a range of adverse health effects, including irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, nausea, vomiting, and headaches. It has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Long-term exposure to acetaldehyde has been linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, including cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus, and liver.

Alanine Dehydrogenase (ADH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion between alanine and pyruvate with the reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH). This reaction plays a role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly in the catabolism of alanine.

In humans, there are multiple isoforms of ADH that are expressed in different tissues and have different functions. The isoform known as ALDH4A1 is primarily responsible for the conversion of alanine to pyruvate in the liver. Deficiencies or mutations in this enzyme can lead to a rare genetic disorder called 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria, which is characterized by elevated levels of 4-hydroxybutyric acid in the urine and neurological symptoms.

Mannitol dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of mannitol to mannose or the reverse reduction reaction, depending on the cofactor used. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of mannitol, a sugar alcohol found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, and plants.

There are two main types of mannitol dehydrogenases:

1. Mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (MT-2DH; EC 1.1.1.67): This enzyme oxidizes mannitol to fructose, using NAD+ as a cofactor. It is widely distributed in bacteria and fungi, contributing to their metabolic versatility.
2. Mannitol-1-dehydrogenase (MT-1DH; EC 1.1.1.17): This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of mannitol to mannose, using NADP+ as a cofactor. It is primarily found in plants and some bacteria, where it plays a role in osmoregulation and stress response.

In summary, mannitol dehydrogenases are enzymes that facilitate the interconversion of mannitol and its corresponding sugars (mannose or fructose) through oxidation-reduction reactions.

Dioxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They are classified based on the type of reaction they catalyze and the number of iron atoms in their active site. The two main types of dioxygenases are:

1. Intradiol dioxygenases: These enzymes cleave an aromatic ring by inserting both atoms of O2 into a single bond between two carbon atoms, leading to the formation of an unsaturated diol (catechol) intermediate and the release of CO2. They contain a non-heme iron(III) center in their active site.

An example of intradiol dioxygenase is catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of catechol to muconic acid.

2. Extradiol dioxygenases: These enzymes cleave an aromatic ring by inserting one atom of O2 at a position adjacent to the hydroxyl group and the other atom at a more distant position, leading to the formation of an unsaturated lactone or cyclic ether intermediate. They contain a non-heme iron(II) center in their active site.

An example of extradiol dioxygenase is homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of homogentisate to maleylacetoacetate in the tyrosine degradation pathway.

Dioxygenases play important roles in various biological processes, including the metabolism of aromatic compounds, the biosynthesis of hormones and signaling molecules, and the detoxification of xenobiotics.

Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of catechols to muconic acids as part of the meta-cleavage pathway in the breakdown of aromatic compounds. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the degradation of various aromatic hydrocarbons, including lignin and environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase requires Fe(II) as a cofactor for its activity. The gene that encodes this enzyme is often used as a bioremediation marker to monitor the degradation of aromatic pollutants in the environment.

Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenases (HPGDs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like lipid compounds with various physiological effects in the body. The oxidation reaction catalyzed by HPGDs involves the removal of hydrogen atoms from the prostaglandin molecule and the addition of a ketone group in its place.

The HPGD family includes several isoforms, each with distinct tissue distributions and substrate specificities. The most well-known isoform is 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), which preferentially oxidizes PGE2 and PGF2α at the 15-hydroxyl position, thereby inactivating these prostaglandins.

The regulation of HPGD activity is critical for maintaining prostaglandin homeostasis, as imbalances in prostaglandin levels have been linked to various pathological conditions, including inflammation, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. For example, decreased 15-PGDH expression has been observed in several types of cancer, leading to increased PGE2 levels and promoting tumor growth and progression.

Overall, Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenases play a crucial role in regulating prostaglandin signaling and have important implications for human health and disease.

Butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (BD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the breakdown and metabolism of fatty acids, specifically those with medium chain length. It catalyzes the oxidation of butyryl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA, which is an important step in the beta-oxidation pathway.

The reaction catalyzed by BD can be summarized as follows:

butyryl-CoA + FAD → crotonyl-CoA + FADH2 + CO2

In this reaction, butyryl-CoA is oxidized to crotonyl-CoA, and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) is reduced to FADH2. The release of CO2 is a byproduct of the reaction.

BD is an important enzyme in energy metabolism, as it helps to generate reducing equivalents that can be used in the electron transport chain to produce ATP, the primary source of cellular energy. Deficiencies in BD have been linked to various metabolic disorders, including a rare genetic disorder known as multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), which is characterized by impaired fatty acid and amino acid metabolism.

Retinal dehydrogenase, also known as Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of alcohol and other aldehydes in the body. In the eye, retinal dehydrogenase plays a specific role in the conversion of retinaldehyde to retinoic acid, which is an important molecule for the maintenance and regulation of the visual cycle and overall eye health.

Retinoic acid is involved in various physiological processes such as cell differentiation, growth, and survival, and has been shown to have a protective effect against oxidative stress in the retina. Therefore, retinal dehydrogenase deficiency or dysfunction may lead to impaired visual function and increased susceptibility to eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

Carboxy-lyases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the removal of a carboxyl group from a substrate, often releasing carbon dioxide in the process. These enzymes play important roles in various metabolic pathways, such as the biosynthesis and degradation of amino acids, sugars, and other organic compounds.

Carboxy-lyases are classified under EC number 4.2 in the Enzyme Commission (EC) system. They can be further divided into several subclasses based on their specific mechanisms and substrates. For example, some carboxy-lyases require a cofactor such as biotin or thiamine pyrophosphate to facilitate the decarboxylation reaction, while others do not.

Examples of carboxy-lyases include:

1. Pyruvate decarboxylase: This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide during fermentation in yeast and other organisms.
2. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO): This enzyme is essential for photosynthesis in plants and some bacteria, as it catalyzes the fixation of carbon dioxide into an organic molecule during the Calvin cycle.
3. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: Found in plants, algae, and some bacteria, this enzyme plays a role in anaplerotic reactions that replenish intermediates in the citric acid cycle. It catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate and inorganic phosphate.
4. Aspartate transcarbamylase: This enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of pyrimidines, a class of nucleotides. It catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from carbamoyl aspartate to carbamoyl phosphate, forming cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and fumarate.
5. Urocanase: Found in animals, this enzyme is involved in histidine catabolism. It catalyzes the conversion of urocanate to formiminoglutamate and ammonia.

3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-Dioxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction:

3-hydroxyanthranilate + O2 -> 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde

This enzyme is involved in the catabolism of tryptophan, an essential amino acid, through the kynurenine pathway. The reaction catalyzed by this enzyme involves the cleavage of the aromatic ring of 3-hydroxyanthranilate and the formation of 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde, which is further metabolized to produce NAD+ and other products. Defects in this enzyme have been associated with certain neurological disorders.

"Caproates" is not a term commonly used in medical terminology. It appears to be a derivative of "caproic acid," which is an organic compound with the formula CH3CH2CH2CH2CO2H. Caproic acid is one of several saturated fatty acids that are abundant in animal fats and have a distinctive rancid odor when they spoil or break down.

However, I was unable to find any specific medical definition or use of the term "caproates" in the context of medicine or healthcare. It is possible that this term may be used in a different field or context, such as chemistry or biochemistry. If you have more information about the context in which you encountered this term, I may be able to provide a more accurate answer.

20-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases (20-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of steroid hormone precursors to their active forms by adding or removing a hydroxyl group at the 20th carbon position of the steroid molecule.

There are several isoforms of 20-HSDs, each with distinct tissue distribution and substrate specificity. The most well-known isoforms include 20-HSD type I and II, which have opposing functions in regulating the activity of cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone produced by the adrenal gland.

Type I 20-HSD, primarily found in the liver and adipose tissue, converts inactive cortisone to its active form, cortisol. In contrast, type II 20-HSD, expressed mainly in the kidney, brain, and immune cells, catalyzes the reverse reaction, converting cortisol back to cortisone.

Dysregulation of 20-HSDs has been implicated in various medical conditions, such as metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, and cancers. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing targeted therapies for these conditions.

Alpha-ketoglutaric acid, also known as 2-oxoglutarate, is not an acid in the traditional sense but is instead a key molecule in the Krebs cycle (citric acid cycle), which is a central metabolic pathway involved in cellular respiration. Alpha-ketoglutaric acid is a crucial intermediate in the process of converting carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy through oxidation. It plays a vital role in amino acid synthesis and the breakdown of certain amino acids. Additionally, it serves as an essential cofactor for various enzymes involved in numerous biochemical reactions within the body. Any medical conditions or disorders related to alpha-ketoglutaric acid would typically be linked to metabolic dysfunctions or genetic defects affecting the Krebs cycle.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 (11β-HSD2) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol and aldosterone. It is primarily found in tissues such as the kidneys, colon, and salivary glands.

The main function of 11β-HSD2 is to convert active cortisol into inactive cortisone, which helps to prevent excessive mineralocorticoid receptor activation by cortisol. This is important because cortisol can bind to and activate mineralocorticoid receptors, leading to increased sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys, as well as other effects on blood pressure and electrolyte balance.

By converting cortisol to cortisone, 11β-HSD2 helps to protect mineralocorticoid receptors from being overstimulated by cortisol, allowing aldosterone to bind and activate these receptors instead. This is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and electrolyte balance.

Deficiencies or mutations in the 11β-HSD2 enzyme can lead to a condition called apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME), which is characterized by high blood pressure, low potassium levels, and increased sodium reabsorption in the kidneys. This occurs because cortisol is able to bind to and activate mineralocorticoid receptors in the absence of 11β-HSD2 activity.

Other names in common use include 2-aminomuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, 2-hydroxymuconic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase ... an aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction 2-aminomuconate 6- ... alpha-hydroxymuconic epsilon-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Ichiyama A, Nakamura ... 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, alpha-aminomuconic epsilon-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ...
... oxidizing 2-aminomuconate semialdehyde to 2-aminomuconic acid. Two transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms have been ... Aldehyde dehydrogenase 8 family, member A1 also known as ALDH8A1 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ALDH8A1 gene. ... This protein belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenase family of enzymes. It was originally thought to play a role in a pathway of ... Davis I, Yang Y, Wherritt D, Liu A (June 2018). "Reassignment of the human aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH8A1 (ALDH12) to the ...
... aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase MeSH D08.811.682.657.163.374 - aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase MeSH D08.811. ... succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase MeSH D08.811.682.657.163.875 - succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (NAD(P)+) MeSH D08.811 ... l-aminoadipate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase MeSH D08.811.682.657.163.812 - malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (acetylating) MeSH ... betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase MeSH D08.811.682.657.163.562 - glutamate-5-semialdehyde dehydrogenase MeSH D08.811.682.657. ...
L-aminoadipate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase EC 1.2.1.32: aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase EC 1.2.1.33: (R)- ... IMP dehydrogenase EC 1.2.1.15: malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase EC 1.2.1.16: succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase [NAD(P)+] ... glutarate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase EC 1.2.1.21: glycolaldehyde dehydrogenase EC 1.2.1.22: lactaldehyde dehydrogenase EC 1.2. ... succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (acylating) EC 1.2.1.77: 3,4-dehydroadipyl-CoA semialdehyde dehydrogenase (NADP+) EC 1.2. ...
2-hydroxymuconate-semialdehyde hydrolase EC 3.7.1.10: cyclohexane-1,3-dione hydrolase EC 3.7.1.11: cyclohexane-1,2-dione ... 2-aminomuconate deaminase (2-hydroxymuconate-forming) * *No Wikipedia article EC 3.6.1.1: inorganic diphosphatase EC 3.6.1.2: ... pyruvate dehydrogenase (acetyl-transferring)]-phosphatase EC 3.1.3.44: [acetyl-CoA carboxylase]-phosphatase EC 3.1.3.45: 3- ... 2-aminomuconate deaminase (2-hydroxymuconate-forming) EC 3.5.1.121: protein N-terminal asparagine amidohydrolase * EC 3.5.1.122 ...
Other names in common use include 2-aminomuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, 2-hydroxymuconic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase ... an aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction 2-aminomuconate 6- ... alpha-hydroxymuconic epsilon-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Ichiyama A, Nakamura ... 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, alpha-aminomuconic epsilon-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ...
succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (RefSeq). 2-aminomuconate 6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) (characterized). 35%. ... aldehyde dehydrogenase (RefSeq). 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase; Aldehyde dehydrogenase 12; Aldehyde dehydrogenase ... 2-aminomuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) (characterized). 39%. 99%. 357.1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) ... 3 candidates for nbaE: 2-aminomuconate 6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Score. Gene. Description. Similar to. Id.. Cov.. Bits. ...
2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 3 Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase use 3-Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase 3 Keto 5 alpha Steroid delta 4 Dehydrogenase use 3-Oxo-5- ... 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases use 3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenase use 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA ...
2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 3 Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase use 3-Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase 3 Keto 5 alpha Steroid delta 4 Dehydrogenase use 3-Oxo-5- ... 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases use 3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenase use 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA ...
2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 3 Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase use 3-Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase 3 Keto 5 alpha Steroid delta 4 Dehydrogenase use 3-Oxo-5- ... 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases use 3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenase use 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA ...
2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 3 Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase use 3-Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase 3 Keto 5 alpha Steroid delta 4 Dehydrogenase use 3-Oxo-5- ... 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases use 3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases 3 Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenase use 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA ...
Align aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) (characterized) to candidate Ac3H11_1496 Aldehyde dehydrogenase ( ...
Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase. *Aspartate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase. *Benzaldehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+). *Betaine- ... "Benzaldehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+)" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Benzaldehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+)" by people in this website ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Benzaldehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+)" by people in Profiles. ...
Alcohol dehydrogenase (ethanol). ALDD19xr. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (phenylacetaldehyde, NAD). AM6SAD. Aminomuconate-semialdehyde ...
2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2 Oxoisocaproate Dehydrogenase use 3-Methyl-2-Oxobutanoate Dehydrogenase (Lipoamide) 2 Oxoisovalerate Dehydrogenase use 2- ... 2 Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex use Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex 2 Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase use Ketoglutarate ...
2-hydroxymuconate-semialdehyde hydrolase. *2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA lyase. *2-Isopropyl-5-methyl-1-(2,6-dihydroxy-4-nonylphenyl) ... 2-Methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. *2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency. *2-Methylhexane ... 2-aminomuconate deaminase. *2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase. *2-C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate ...
Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657.163.342] * Aspartate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657. ... Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657.163.843] * Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+) [D08.811.682.657. ... L-Aminoadipate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657.163.796] * Malonate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (Acetylating) [ ... 2-AMS Dehydrogenase Term UI T315720. LexicalTag ABX. ThesaurusID NLM (2006). 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Term ...
Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657.163.342] * Aspartate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657. ... Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657.163.843] * Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+) [D08.811.682.657. ... L-Aminoadipate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase [D08.811.682.657.163.796] * Malonate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (Acetylating) [ ... 2-AMS Dehydrogenase Term UI T315720. LexicalTag ABX. ThesaurusID NLM (2006). 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Term ...
6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase, 2-Aminomuconic Aminomuconate Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Dehydrogenase, 2-AMS Dehydrogenase, 2- ... 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase, 2-Aminomuconic. Aminomuconate Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase. Dehydrogenase, 2-AMS. Dehydrogenase, 2- ... Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Entry term(s). 2 AMS Dehydrogenase 2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-AMS ... Aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase Entry term(s):. 2 AMS Dehydrogenase. 2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase. 2- ...
aminomuconate-semialdehyde/2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase. malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (acetylating) ( ... succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase / glutarate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase. malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (acetylating ... malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.15); malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (acetylating) (EC 1.2.1.18); ... succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.2.1.79). 45%. 398.3. lo. N515DRAFT_0465. aldehyde dehydrogenase (NAD+). ...
Acids N0000170216 Aminolevulinic Acid N0000168171 Aminomethyltransferase N0000167901 Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase ... Succinate-CoA Ligases N0000167903 Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase N0000167905 Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (NADP+ ... N0000167894 L-Aminoadipate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase N0000167967 L-Gulonolactone Oxidase N0000167971 L-Iditol 2-Dehydrogenase ... N0000167898 Glutamate-5-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase N0000167771 Glutamate-Ammonia Ligase N0000167769 Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase ...
to candidate N515DRAFT_3729 N515DRAFT_3729 aminomuconate-semialdehyde/2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase ... Align 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase; Aldehyde dehydrogenase 12; Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 8 member A1; EC 1.2. ...
HN - 2006(1975) MH - Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase UI - D050648 MN - D8.811.682.657.163.342 MS - An NAD+ dependent ... Methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency is characterized by elevated BETA-ALANINE and 3-HYDROXYPROPIONIC ACID. HN ... HN - 2006 MH - Succinate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase UI - D050644 MN - D8.811.682.657.163.843 MS - An enzyme that plays a role ... HN - 2006(1974) MH - L-Aminoadipate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase UI - D050647 MN - D8.811.682.657.163.796 MS - An enzyme that ...
Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase. *Aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase. PHENYLALANINE→tyrosine→. *(see ...
Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Aminooxyacetic Acid Aminopeptidases Aminophenols Aminophylline Aminopropionitrile ... Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase, Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenases Acyl-CoA Oxidase Acylation Acyltransferases ... 11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases ... Aspartate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Aspartate-tRNA Ligase Aspartic Acid Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases Aspartic Acid Proteases ...
2 Aminomuconic 6 Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2-Aminomuconic 6-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase use Aminomuconate-Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Aminonaphthalene use 2-Naphthylamine ... 2 Oxoisocaproate Dehydrogenase use 3-Methyl-2-Oxobutanoate Dehydrogenase (Lipoamide) 2 Oxoisovalerate Dehydrogenase use 2- ... 2 Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex use Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex 2 Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase use Ketoglutarate ...
Aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (substance) {42242004 , SNOMED-CT } Aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (substance) {26753001 ... Glutamate-5-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (substance) {60943003 , SNOMED-CT } Glutarate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (substance) { ... L-amino-acid dehydrogenase (substance) {3463001 , SNOMED-CT } L-Aminoadipate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (substance) {32826004 ... Dehydrogenase Current Synonym true false 3520895011 Substance with dehydrogenase mechanism of action Current Synonym true false ...
Converts alpha-amino-beta-carboxymuconate-epsilon-semialdehyde (ACMS) to alpha-aminomuconate semialdehyde (AMS). ACMS can be ... "pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 2 precursor" Pdk2 Rattus norvegicus " Inhibits the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase ... Has dehydrogenase activity. Functions in brown adipose tissue (BAT) differentiation. Q9Z2F5.3 ... the conversion of gamma-aminobutyrate and L-beta-aminoisobutyrate to succinate semialdehyde and methylmalonate semialdehyde, ...
  • In enzymology, an aminomuconate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.32) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction 2-aminomuconate 6-semialdehyde + NAD+ + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } 2-aminomuconate + NADH + 2 H+ The 3 substrates of this enzyme are 2-aminomuconate 6-semialdehyde, NAD+, and H2O, whereas its 3 products are 2-aminomuconate, NADH, and H+. (wikipedia.org)
  • An NAD + dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 2-aminomuconate 6-semialdehyde to 2-aminomuconate. (nih.gov)
  • use ACYLTRANSFERASES 1973-1979, use COENZYME A & PHOSPHOLIPIDS 1973-1978 MH - 1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Dehydrogenase UI - D050842 MN - D8.811.682.662.693 MS - An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to L-GLUTAMATE in the presence of NAD. (nih.gov)
  • HN - 2006(1983) MH - 2-Oxoisovalerate Dehydrogenase (Acylating) UI - D050645 MN - D8.811.682.657.350.825 MS - An NAD+ dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation 3-methyl-2-oxobutanoate to 2-methylpropanoyl-CoA. (nih.gov)
  • use AMINO ACIDS, BRANCHED-CHAIN 1979, & KETO ACIDS & VALERATES 1973-1979 MH - 3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-Dioxygenase UI - D050561 MN - D8.811.682.690.416.328 MS - An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 3-hydroxyanthranilate to 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde. (nih.gov)
  • use ANTHRANILIC ACID 1974-1979 MH - 3-Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase UI - D050539 MN - D8.811.682.47.500 MS - An NAD+ dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 3-carboxy-2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoate to 3-carboxy-4-methyl-2-oxopentanoate. (nih.gov)