A subclass of enzymes that aminoacylate AMINO ACID-SPECIFIC TRANSFER RNA with their corresponding AMINO ACIDS.
Intermediates in protein biosynthesis. The compounds are formed from amino acids, ATP and transfer RNA, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. They are key compounds in the genetic translation process.
The conversion of uncharged TRANSFER RNA to AMINO ACYL TRNA.
An enzyme that activates isoleucine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.5.
An enzyme that activates glycine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.14.
An enzyme that activates alanine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.7.
An enzyme that activates methionine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.10.
An enzyme that activates tyrosine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.1.
The small RNA molecules, 73-80 nucleotides long, that function during translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) to align AMINO ACIDS at the RIBOSOMES in a sequence determined by the mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). There are about 30 different transfer RNAs. Each recognizes a specific CODON set on the mRNA through its own ANTICODON and as aminoacyl tRNAs (RNA, TRANSFER, AMINO ACYL), each carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome to add to the elongating peptide chains.
A reaction that introduces an aminoacyl group to a molecule. TRANSFER RNA AMINOACYLATION is the first step in GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The sequential set of three nucleotides in TRANSFER RNA that interacts with its complement in MESSENGER RNA, the CODON, during translation in the ribosome.
The meaning ascribed to the BASE SEQUENCE with respect to how it is translated into AMINO ACID SEQUENCE. The start, stop, and order of amino acids of a protein is specified by consecutive triplets of nucleotides called codons (CODON).
An enzyme that activates tryptophan with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.2.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Ligases that catalyze the joining of adjacent AMINO ACIDS by the formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds between their carboxylic acid groups and amine groups.
Enzymes that catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methylation of ribonucleotide bases within a transfer RNA molecule. EC 2.1.1.
An enzyme that activates lysine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.6.
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
An enzyme that activates leucine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.4.
An enzyme that activates glutamic acid with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.17.
An enzyme that activates serine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.11.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
An enzyme that activates valine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.9
An enzyme that activates phenylalanine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.20.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
An enzyme that activates aspartic acid with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.12.
An enzyme that activates arginine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.19.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
An enzyme that activates histidine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.21.
The addition of an organic acid radical into a molecule.
Enzymes that catalyze the formation of acyl-CoA derivatives. EC 6.2.1.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying glutamine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A group of transfer RNAs which are specific for carrying each one of the 20 amino acids to the ribosome in preparation for protein synthesis.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying serine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
An enzyme that activates threonine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.3.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying glutamic acid to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
S-Acyl coenzyme A. Fatty acid coenzyme A derivatives that are involved in the biosynthesis and oxidation of fatty acids as well as in ceramide formation.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying glycine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying proline to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying isoleucine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying tryptophan to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying methionine to sites on the ribosomes. During initiation of protein synthesis, tRNA(f)Met in prokaryotic cells and tRNA(i)Met in eukaryotic cells binds to the start codon (CODON, INITIATOR).
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying aspartic acid to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying alanine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying phenylalanine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
The enzymatic synthesis of PEPTIDES without an RNA template by processes that do not use the ribosomal apparatus (RIBOSOMES).
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying cysteine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying arginine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying histidine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
An essential branched-chain aliphatic amino acid found in many proteins. It is an isomer of LEUCINE. It is important in hemoglobin synthesis and regulation of blood sugar and energy levels.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying valine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in hot springs of neutral to alkaline pH, as well as in hot-water heaters.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
A class of enzymes that catalyze the formation of a bond between two substrate molecules, coupled with the hydrolysis of a pyrophosphate bond in ATP or a similar energy donor. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 6.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
Enzymes from the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from donor to acceptor, forming either esters or amides. (From Enzyme Nomenclature 1992) EC 2.3.
An antibiotic mixture produced by Bacillus brevis which may be separated into three components, tyrocidines A, B, and C. It is the major constituent (40-60 per cent) of tyrothricin, gramicidin accounting for the remaining 10-20 per cent active material. It is a topical antimicrobial agent, that is very toxic parenterally.
An intermediate in the pathway of coenzyme A formation in mammalian liver and some microorganisms.
Adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety in the 2'-, 3'-, or 5'-position.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
An essential branched-chain amino acid important for hemoglobin formation.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of CoA derivatives from ATP, acetate, and CoA to form AMP, pyrophosphate, and acetyl CoA. It acts also on propionates and acrylates. EC 6.2.1.1.
The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.
A branched-chain essential amino acid that has stimulant activity. It promotes muscle growth and tissue repair. It is a precursor in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
A family of anaerobic, coccoid to rod-shaped METHANOBACTERIALES. Cell membranes are composed mainly of polyisoprenoid hydrocarbons ether-linked to glycerol. Its organisms are found in anaerobic habitats throughout nature.
Thiolester hydrolases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of thioester bonds, commonly found in acetyl-CoA and other coenzyme A derivatives, to produce free carboxylic acids and CoASH.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying asparagine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
Systems of enzymes which function sequentially by catalyzing consecutive reactions linked by common metabolic intermediates. They may involve simply a transfer of water molecules or hydrogen atoms and may be associated with large supramolecular structures such as MITOCHONDRIA or RIBOSOMES.
Ribonucleic acid in fungi having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
A process that changes the nucleotide sequence of mRNA from that of the DNA template encoding it. Some major classes of RNA editing are as follows: 1, the conversion of cytosine to uracil in mRNA; 2, the addition of variable number of guanines at pre-determined sites; and 3, the addition and deletion of uracils, templated by guide-RNAs (RNA, GUIDE).
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Enzymes that catalyze the joining of either ammonia or an amide with another molecule, in which the linkage is in the form of a carbon-nitrogen bond. EC 6.3.1.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
An essential aromatic amino acid that is a precursor of MELANIN; DOPAMINE; noradrenalin (NOREPINEPHRINE), and THYROXINE.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying threonine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
An essential amino acid. It is often added to animal feed.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).
A species of GRAM-POSITIVE ENDOSPORE-FORMING BACTERIA in the family BACILLACEAE, found in soil, hot springs, Arctic waters, ocean sediments, and spoiled food products.
A genus of anaerobic coccoid METHANOCOCCACEAE whose organisms are motile by means of polar tufts of flagella. These methanogens are found in salt marshes, marine and estuarine sediments, and the intestinal tract of animals.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP into a series of (2'-5') linked oligoadenylates and pyrophosphate in the presence of double-stranded RNA. These oligonucleotides activate an endoribonuclease (RNase L) which cleaves single-stranded RNA. Interferons can act as inducers of these reactions. EC 2.7.7.-.
Amino acids that are not synthesized by the human body in amounts sufficient to carry out physiological functions. They are obtained from dietary foodstuffs.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP, L-glutamate, and NH3 to ADP, orthophosphate, and L-glutamine. It also acts more slowly on 4-methylene-L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 6.3.1.2.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying leucine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
Ribonucleic acid in archaea having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
Coenzyme A is an essential coenzyme that plays a crucial role in various metabolic processes, particularly in the transfer and activation of acetyl groups in important biochemical reactions such as fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, and the citric acid cycle.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
A photoactivable URIDINE analog that is used as an affinity label.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
An enzyme that forms CMP-acylneuraminic acids, which donate the N-acylneuraminic acid residues to the terminal sugar residue of a ganglioside or glycoprotein. EC 2.7.7.43.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.
One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.
Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying tyrosine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
A non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and is involved in many metabolic processes. It is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID and AMMONIA. It is the principal carrier of NITROGEN in the body and is an important energy source for many cells.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.
Cellular proteins and protein complexes that transport amino acids across biological membranes.
A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
A protein found in bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria which delivers aminoacyl-tRNA's to the A site of the ribosome. The aminoacyl-tRNA is first bound to a complex of elongation factor Tu containing a molecule of bound GTP. The resulting complex is then bound to the 70S initiation complex. Simultaneously the GTP is hydrolyzed and a Tu-GDP complex is released from the 70S ribosome. The Tu-GTP complex is regenerated from the Tu-GDP complex by the Ts elongation factor and GTP.
Large enzyme complexes composed of a number of component enzymes that are found in STREPTOMYCES which biosynthesize MACROLIDES and other polyketides.
A genus of EUKARYOTES, in the phylum EUGLENIDA, found mostly in stagnant water. Characteristics include a pellicle usually marked by spiral or longitudinal striations.
Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
A species of STIGMATELLA usually isolated from rotting wood. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
A sulfur-containing essential L-amino acid that is important in many body functions.
Genes that have a suppressor allele or suppressor mutation (SUPPRESSION, GENETIC) which cancels the effect of a previous mutation, enabling the wild-type phenotype to be maintained or partially restored. For example, amber suppressors cancel the effect of an AMBER NONSENSE MUTATION.
A process of GENETIC TRANSLATION, when an amino acid is transferred from its cognate TRANSFER RNA to the lengthening chain of PEPTIDES.
An essential amino acid that is necessary for normal growth in infants and for NITROGEN balance in adults. It is a precursor of INDOLE ALKALOIDS in plants. It is a precursor of SEROTONIN (hence its use as an antidepressant and sleep aid). It can be a precursor to NIACIN, albeit inefficiently, in mammals.
Post-transcriptional biological modification of messenger, transfer, or ribosomal RNAs or their precursors. It includes cleavage, methylation, thiolation, isopentenylation, pseudouridine formation, conformational changes, and association with ribosomal protein.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nitrogenous groups, primarily amino groups, from a donor, generally an amino acid, to an acceptor, usually a 2-oxoacid. EC 2.6.
Proteins found in any species of archaeon.
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
The ginseng plant family of the order Apiales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Leaves are generally alternate, large, and compound. Flowers are five-parted and arranged in compound flat-topped umbels. The fruit is a berry or (rarely) a drupe (a one-seeded fruit). It is well known for plant preparations used as adaptogens (immune support and anti-fatigue).
Cells of the higher organisms, containing a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
A family of enzymes that catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA. It includes EC 3.1.26.-, EC 3.1.27.-, EC 3.1.30.-, and EC 3.1.31.-.
A non-essential amino acid. It is found primarily in gelatin and silk fibroin and used therapeutically as a nutrient. It is also a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.
The production of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS by the constituents of a living organism. The biosynthesis of proteins on RIBOSOMES following an RNA template is termed translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC). There are other, non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NUCLEIC ACID-INDEPENDENT) mechanisms carried out by PEPTIDE SYNTHASES and PEPTIDYLTRANSFERASES. Further modifications of peptide chains yield functional peptide and protein molecules.
Techniques used to separate mixtures of substances based on differences in the relative affinities of the substances for mobile and stationary phases. A mobile phase (fluid or gas) passes through a column containing a stationary phase of porous solid or liquid coated on a solid support. Usage is both analytical for small amounts and preparative for bulk amounts.
A multistage process that includes the determination of a sequence (protein, carbohydrate, etc.), its fragmentation and analysis, and the interpretation of the resulting sequence information.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
The facilitation of biochemical reactions with the aid of naturally occurring catalysts such as ENZYMES.
A modified nucleoside which is present in the first position of the anticodon of tRNA-tyrosine, tRNA-histidine, tRNA-asparagine and tRNA-aspartic acid of many organisms. It is believed to play a role in the regulatory function of tRNA. Nucleoside Q can be further modified to nucleoside Q*, which has a mannose or galactose moiety linked to position 4 of its cyclopentenediol moiety.
A genus of BACILLACEAE that are spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Most species are saprophytic soil forms with only a few species being pathogenic.
The functional genetic units of ARCHAEA.
Adenine nucleotides are molecules that consist of an adenine base attached to a ribose sugar and one, two, or three phosphate groups, including adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which play crucial roles in energy transfer and signaling processes within cells.
A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.
A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.
Enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of FATTY ACIDS from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA derivatives.
The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.
A fractionated cell extract that maintains a biological function. A subcellular fraction isolated by ultracentrifugation or other separation techniques must first be isolated so that a process can be studied free from all of the complex side reactions that occur in a cell. The cell-free system is therefore widely used in cell biology. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p166)
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
Cells lacking a nuclear membrane so that the nuclear material is either scattered in the cytoplasm or collected in a nucleoid region.
"Esters are organic compounds that result from the reaction between an alcohol and a carboxylic acid, playing significant roles in various biological processes and often used in pharmaceutical synthesis."
Peptides whose amino and carboxy ends are linked together with a peptide bond forming a circular chain. Some of them are ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS. Some of them are biosynthesized non-ribosomally (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NON-RIBOSOMAL).
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of carbamoyl phosphate from ATP, carbon dioxide, and glutamine. This enzyme is important in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidines. EC 6.3.5.5.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
An essential amino acid occurring naturally in the L-form, which is the active form. It is found in eggs, milk, gelatin, and other proteins.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A group of ribonucleotides (up to 12) in which the phosphate residues of each ribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the ribose moieties.
Transferases are enzymes transferring a group, for example, the methyl group or a glycosyl group, from one compound (generally regarded as donor) to another compound (generally regarded as acceptor). The classification is based on the scheme "donor:acceptor group transferase". (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.

In vivo and in vitro processing of the Bacillus subtilis transcript coding for glutamyl-tRNA synthetase, serine acetyltransferase, and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase. (1/1309)

In Bacillus subtilis, the adjacent genes gltX, cysE, and cysS encoding respectively glutamyl-tRNA synthetase, serine acetyl-transferase, and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, are transcribed as an operon but a gltX probe reveals only the presence of a monocistronic gltX mRNA (Gagnon et al., 1994, J Biol Chem 269:7473-7482). The transcript of the gltX-cysE intergenic region contains putative alternative secondary structures forming a p-independent terminator or an antiterminator, and a conserved sequence (T-box) found in the leader of most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and many amino acid biosynthesis genes in B. subtilis and in other Gram-positive eubacteria. The transcription of these genes is initiated 45 nt upstream from the first codon of gltX and is under the control of a sigmaA-type promoter. Analysis of the in vivo transcript of this operon revealed a cleavage site immediately downstream from the p-independent terminator structure. In vitro transcription analysis, using RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli, B. subtilis, and that encoded by the T7 phage, in the presence of various RNase inhibitors, shows the same cleavage. This processing generates mRNAs whose 5'-end half-lives differ by a factor of 2 in rich medium, and leaves putative secondary structures at the 3' end of the gltX transcript and at the 5' end of the cysE/S mRNA, which may be involved in the stabilization of these mRNAs. By its mechanism and its position, this cleavage differs from that of the other known transcripts encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in B. subtilis.  (+info)

The peculiar architectural framework of tRNASec is fully recognized by yeast AspRS. (2/1309)

The wild-type transcript of Escherichia coli tRNASec, characterized by a peculiar core architecture and a large variable region, was shown to be aspartylatable by yeast AspRS. Similar activities were found for tRNASec mutants with methionine, leucine, and tryptophan anticodons. The charging efficiency of these molecules was found comparable to that of a minihelix derived from tRNAAsp and is accounted for by the presence of the discriminator residue G73, which is a major aspartate identity determinant. Introducing the aspartate identity elements from the anticodon loop (G34, U35, C36, C38) into tRNASec transforms this molecule into an aspartate acceptor with kinetic properties identical to tRNAAsp. Expression of the aspartate identity set in tRNASec is independent of the size of its variable region. The functional study was completed by footprinting experiments with four different nucleases as structural probes. Protection patterns by AspRS of transplanted tRNASec and tRNAAsp were found similar. They are modified, particularly in the anticodon loop, upon changing the aspartate anticodon into that of methionine. Altogether, it appears that recognition of a tRNA by AspRS is more governed by the presence of the aspartate identity set than by the structural framework that carries this set.  (+info)

Genetic dissection of protein-protein interactions in multi-tRNA synthetase complex. (3/1309)

Cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of higher eukaryotes acquired extra peptides in the course of their evolution. It has been thought that these appendices are related to the occurrence of the multiprotein complex consisting of at least eight different tRNA synthetase polypeptides. This complex is believed to be a signature feature of metazoans. In this study, we used multiple sequence alignments to infer the locations of the peptide appendices from human cytoplasmic tRNA synthetases found in the multisynthetase complex. The selected peptide appendices ranged from 22 aa of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase to 267 aa of methionyl-tRNA synthetase. We then made genetic constructions to investigate interactions between all 64 combinations of these peptides that were individually fused to nonsynthetase test proteins. The analyses identified 11 (10 heterologous and 1 homologous) interactions. The six peptide-dependent interactions paralleled what had been detected by crosslinking methods applied to the isolated multisynthetase complex. Thus, small peptide appendices seem to link together different synthetases into a complex. In addition, five interacting pairs that had not been detected previously were suggested from the observed peptide-dependent complexes.  (+info)

Immunoelectron microscopic localization of glutamyl-/ prolyl-tRNA synthetase within the eukaryotic multisynthetase complex. (4/1309)

A high molecular mass complex of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is readily isolated from a variety of eukaryotes. Although its composition is well characterized, knowledge of its structure and organization is still quite limited. This study uses antibodies directed against prolyl-tRNA synthetase for immunoelectron microscopic localization of the bifunctional glutamyl-/prolyl-tRNA synthetase. This is the first visualization of a specific site within the multisynthetase complex. Images of immunocomplexes are presented in the characteristic views of negatively stained multisynthetase complex from rabbit reticulocytes. As described in terms of a three domain working model of the structure, in "front" views of the particle and "intermediate" views, the primary antibody binding site is near the intersection between the "base" and one "arm." In "side" views, where the particle is rotated about its long axis, the binding site is near the midpoint. "Top" and "bottom" views, which appear as square projections, are also consistent with the central location of the binding site. These data place the glutamyl-/prolyl-tRNA synthetase polypeptide in a defined area of the particle, which encompasses portions of two domains, yet is consistent with the previous structural model.  (+info)

Ultrastructure of the eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex derived from two dimensional averaging and classification of negatively stained electron microscopic images. (5/1309)

Several aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in higher eukaryotes are consistently isolated as a multi-enzyme complex for which little structural information is yet known. This study uses computational methods for analysis of electron microscopic images of the particle. A data set of almost 2000 negatively stained images was processed through reference-free alignment and multivariate statistical analysis. Interpretable structural information was evident in five eigenvectors. Hierarchical ascendant classification extracted clusters corresponding to distinct image orientations. The class averages are consistent with rotations around and orthogonal to a central particle axis and provide particle measurements: approximately 25 nm in height, 30 nm at the widest point and 23 nm thick. The results also provide objective evidence in support of the working structural model and demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining the three dimensional structure of the multisynthetase complex by single particle reconstruction methods.  (+info)

The identity determinants required for the discrimination between tRNAGlu and tRNAAsp by glutamyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli. (6/1309)

We previously elucidated the major determinant set for Escherichia coli tRNAGlu identity (U34, U35, C36, A37, G1*C72, U2*A71, U11*A24, U13*G22**Alpha46, and Delta47) and showed that the set is sufficient to switch the identity of tRNAGln to Glu [Sekine, S., Nureki, O., Sakamoto, K., Niimi, T., Tateno, M., Go, M., Kohno, T., Brisson, A., Lapointe, J. & Yokoyama, S. (1996) J. Mol. Biol. 256, 685-700]. In the present study, we attempted to switch the identity of tRNAAsp, which has a sequence similar to that of tRNAGlu, and consequently possesses many nucleotide residues corresponding to the Glu identity determinants (U35, C36, A37, G1*C72, and U11*A24). A simple transplantation of the rest of the major determinants (U34, U2*A71, U13*G22**Alpha46, and Delta47) to the framework of tRNAAsp did not result in a sufficient switch of the tRNAAsp identity to Glu. To confer an optimal glutamate accepting activity to tRNAAsp, two other elements, C4*G69 in the middle of the acceptor stem and C12*G23**C9 in the augmented D helix, were required. Consistently, the two base pairs, C4*G69 and C12*G23, in tRNAGlu had been shown to exist in the interface with glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) by phosphate-group footprinting. We also found the two elements in the framework of tRNAGln, and determined that their contributions successfully changed the identity of tRNAGln to Glu in the previous study. By the identity-determinant set (C4*G69 and C12*G23**C9 in addition to U34, U35, C36, A37, G1*C72, U2*A71, U11*A24, U13*G22**Alpha46, and Delta47) the activity of GluRS was optimized and efficient discrimination from the noncognate tRNAs was achieved.  (+info)

tRNA synthetase mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 are resistant to the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin. (7/1309)

In previous studies we demonstrated that mutations in the genes cysB, cysE, and cls (nov) affect resistance of Escherichia coli to novobiocin (J. Rakonjac, M. Milic, and D. J. Savic, Mol. Gen. Genet. 228:307-311, 1991; R. Ivanisevic, M. Milic, D. Ajdic, J. Rakonjac, and D. J. Savic, J. Bacteriol. 177:1766-1771, 1995). In this work we expand this list with mutations in rpoN (the gene for RNA polymerase subunit sigma54) and the tRNA synthetase genes alaS, argS, ileS, and leuS. Similarly to resistance to the penicillin antibiotic mecillinam, resistance to novobiocin of tRNA synthetase mutants appears to depend upon the RelA-mediated stringent response. However, at this point the overlapping pathways of mecillinam and novobiocin resistance diverge. Under conditions of stringent response induction, either by the presence of tRNA synthetase mutations or by constitutive production of RelA protein, inactivation of the cls gene diminishes resistance to novobiocin but not to mecillinam.  (+info)

Progress toward the evolution of an organism with an expanded genetic code. (8/1309)

Several significant steps have been completed toward a general method for the site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo. An "orthogonal" suppressor tRNA was derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae tRNA2Gln. This yeast orthogonal tRNA is not a substrate in vitro or in vivo for any Escherichia coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, including E. coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS), yet functions with the E. coli translational machinery. Importantly, S. cerevisiae GlnRS aminoacylates the yeast orthogonal tRNA in vitro and in E. coli, but does not charge E. coli tRNAGln. This yeast-derived suppressor tRNA together with yeast GlnRS thus represents a completely orthogonal tRNA/synthetase pair in E. coli suitable for the delivery of unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo. A general method was developed to select for mutant aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases capable of charging any ribosomally accepted molecule onto an orthogonal suppressor tRNA. Finally, a rapid nonradioactive screen for unnatural amino acid uptake was developed and applied to a collection of 138 amino acids. The majority of glutamine and glutamic acid analogs under examination were found to be uptaken by E. coli. Implications of these results are discussed.  (+info)

Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (also known as aminoacyl-tRNA ligases) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in protein synthesis. They are responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their corresponding transfer RNAs (tRNAs), creating aminoacyl-tRNA complexes. These complexes are then used in the translation process to construct proteins according to the genetic code.

Each aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase is specific to a particular amino acid, and there are 20 different synthetases in total, one for each of the standard amino acids. The enzymes catalyze the reaction between an amino acid and ATP to form an aminoacyl-AMP intermediate, which then reacts with the appropriate tRNA to create the aminoacyl-tRNA complex. This two-step process ensures the fidelity of the translation process by preventing mismatching of amino acids with their corresponding tRNAs.

Defects in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can lead to various genetic disorders and diseases, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D, distal spinal muscular atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and lactate acidosis (LBSL).

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. It serves as the adaptor molecule that translates the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acids, which are then linked together to form a polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Aminoacyl tRNA is a specific type of tRNA molecule that has been charged or activated with an amino acid. This process is called aminoacylation and is carried out by enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Each synthetase specifically recognizes and attaches a particular amino acid to its corresponding tRNA, ensuring the fidelity of protein synthesis. Once an amino acid is attached to a tRNA, it forms an aminoacyl-tRNA complex, which can then participate in translation and contribute to the formation of a new protein.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation is the process by which an amino acid is chemically linked to a specific tRNA molecule through an ester bond. This reaction is catalyzed by an enzyme called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, which plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Each type of tRNA corresponds to a particular amino acid, and the correct pairing between them ensures that the genetic code carried by messenger RNA (mRNA) is accurately translated into the corresponding amino acid sequence during protein synthesis. This precise matching of tRNAs with their respective amino acids is essential for maintaining the fidelity of the translation process and ultimately, for the proper functioning of proteins in living organisms.

Isoleucine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme involved in the process of protein synthesis in cells. Its specific role is to catalyze the attachment of the amino acid isoleucine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule, which then participates in the translation of genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) into a polypeptide chain during protein synthesis. This enzyme helps ensure that the correct amino acids are incorporated into proteins according to the genetic code.

Glycine-tRNA ligase, also known as glycyl-tRNA synthetase, is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Its primary function is to catalyze the reaction between the amino acid glycine and its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This reaction forms a covalent bond between glycine and tRNA, creating a charged tRNA molecule that can then participate in protein synthesis on the ribosome.

The systematic name for this enzyme is "glycyl-tRNA ligase (AMP-forming)" and it belongs to the class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. It requires ATP as a cofactor to activate the glycine molecule before forming the ester bond with tRNA. Defects in this enzyme have been associated with certain neurological disorders, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D and distal spinal muscular atrophy type V.

Alanine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Its primary function is to join alanine, one of the 20 standard amino acids, with its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA). This enzyme catalyzes the formation of an alanine-tRNA complex, which is essential for translating genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) into a specific sequence of amino acids during protein synthesis.

In humans, there are two types of alanine-tRNA ligases: cytoplasmic and mitochondrial. The cytoplasmic enzyme is responsible for attaching alanine to cytosolic tRNAs, while the mitochondrial enzyme performs this function for mitochondrial tRNAs. Both forms of the enzyme are necessary for maintaining proper cellular functions and overall health.

Deficiencies or mutations in alanine-tRNA ligase can lead to various genetic disorders, such as mitochondrial disorders, that may result in neurological symptoms, muscle weakness, and other health issues.

Methionine-tRNA Ligase is an enzyme involved in the process of protein synthesis. Its specific role is to catalyze the attachment of methionine, which is the first amino acid in a newly forming polypeptide chain, to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This enzyme binds methionine with a tRNAMet, creating a secure bond that allows for the accurate translation of genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) into a protein sequence during translation.

There are two types of Methionine-tRNA Ligases: one for cytoplasmic proteins and another for mitochondrial proteins. These enzymes play crucial roles in initiating protein synthesis within their respective cellular compartments, ensuring proper protein production and maintenance of cellular function.

Tyrosine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, specifically in the process of translating the genetic code from messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. More formally known as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, this enzyme is responsible for charging tRNA molecules with their specific amino acids. In this case, it catalyzes the attachment of the amino acid tyrosine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This enzymatic reaction involves the activation of tyrosine with ATP to form an aminoacyl-AMP intermediate, followed by the transfer of the tyrosyl group from the intermediate to the 3' end of its appropriate tRNA. The resulting tyrosine-tRNA complex is then used in the translation process to incorporate tyrosine into the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, the process by which cells create proteins. In protein synthesis, tRNAs serve as adaptors, translating the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acids required to build a protein.

Each tRNA molecule has a distinct structure, consisting of approximately 70-90 nucleotides arranged in a cloverleaf shape with several loops and stems. The most important feature of a tRNA is its anticodon, a sequence of three nucleotides located in one of the loops. This anticodon base-pairs with a complementary codon on the mRNA during translation, ensuring that the correct amino acid is added to the growing polypeptide chain.

Before tRNAs can participate in protein synthesis, they must be charged with their specific amino acids through an enzymatic process involving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes recognize and bind to both the tRNA and its corresponding amino acid, forming a covalent bond between them. Once charged, the aminoacyl-tRNA complex is ready to engage in translation and contribute to protein formation.

In summary, transfer RNA (tRNA) is a small RNA molecule that facilitates protein synthesis by translating genetic information from messenger RNA into specific amino acids, ultimately leading to the creation of functional proteins within cells.

Aminoacylation is a biochemical process in which an amino acid is linked to a transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule through the formation of an ester bond. This reaction is catalyzed by an enzyme called an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, which specifically recognizes and activates a particular amino acid and then attaches it to the appropriate tRNA molecule.

The resulting aminoacyl-tRNA complexes are essential for protein synthesis in all living organisms. During translation, the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) is used to direct the sequential addition of amino acids to a growing polypeptide chain. Each aminoacyl-tRNA molecule carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to a particular codon in the mRNA, ensuring that the correct amino acids are added to the protein in the proper order.

Therefore, the process of aminoacylation plays a crucial role in maintaining the fidelity and accuracy of protein synthesis, as well as contributing to the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

An anticodon is a sequence of three ribonucleotides (RNA bases) in a transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that pair with a complementary codon in a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule during protein synthesis. This interaction occurs within the ribosome during translation, where the genetic code in the mRNA is translated into an amino acid sequence in a polypeptide. Specifically, each tRNA carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to its anticodon sequence, allowing for the accurate and systematic addition of amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain.

In summary, an anticodon is a crucial component of the translation machinery, facilitating the precise decoding of genetic information and enabling the synthesis of proteins according to the instructions encoded in mRNA molecules.

The genetic code is the set of rules that dictates how DNA and RNA sequences are translated into proteins. It consists of a 64-unit "alphabet" formed by all possible combinations of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) in DNA or uracil (U) in RNA. These triplets, also known as codons, specify the addition of specific amino acids during protein synthesis or signal the start or stop of translation. This code is universal across all known organisms, with only a few exceptions.

Tryptophan-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Its primary function is to join tryptophan, one of the twenty standard amino acids, to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This enzyme catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between tryptophan and the tRNA during the translation process, where genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a specific protein sequence. The correct pairing of amino acids with their respective tRNAs is essential for maintaining the fidelity of protein synthesis and ensuring the production of functional proteins.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Peptide synthases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between specific amino acids to produce peptides or proteins. They are responsible for the biosynthesis of many natural products, including antibiotics, bacterial toxins, and immunomodulatory peptides.

Peptide synthases are large, complex enzymes that consist of multiple domains and modules, each of which is responsible for activating and condensing specific amino acids. The activation of amino acids involves the formation of an aminoacyl-adenylate intermediate, followed by transfer of the activated amino acid to a thiol group on the enzyme. The condensation of two activated amino acids results in the formation of a peptide bond and release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and pyrophosphate.

Peptide synthases are found in all three domains of life, but are most commonly associated with bacteria and fungi. They play important roles in the biosynthesis of many natural products that have therapeutic potential, making them targets for drug discovery and development.

tRNA (transfer RNA) methyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group (-CH3) to specific positions on the tRNA molecule. These enzymes play a crucial role in modifying and regulating tRNA function, stability, and interaction with other components of the translation machinery during protein synthesis.

The addition of methyl groups to tRNAs can occur at various sites, including the base moieties of nucleotides within the anticodon loop, the TψC loop, and the variable region. These modifications help maintain the structural integrity of tRNA molecules, enhance their ability to recognize specific codons during translation, and protect them from degradation by cellular nucleases.

tRNA methyltransferases are classified based on the type of methylation they catalyze:

1. N1-methyladenosine (m1A) methyltransferases: These enzymes add a methyl group to the N1 position of adenosine residues in tRNAs. An example is TRMT6/TRMT61A, which methylates adenosines at position 58 in human tRNAs.
2. N3-methylcytosine (m3C) methyltransferases: These enzymes add a methyl group to the N3 position of cytosine residues in tRNAs. An example is Dnmt2, which methylates cytosines at position 38 in various organisms.
3. N7-methylguanosine (m7G) methyltransferases: These enzymes add a methyl group to the N7 position of guanosine residues in tRNAs, primarily at position 46 within the TψC loop. An example is Trm8/Trm82, which catalyzes this modification in yeast and humans.
4. 2'-O-methylated nucleotides (Nm) methyltransferases: These enzymes add a methyl group to the 2'-hydroxyl group of ribose sugars in tRNAs, which can occur at various positions throughout the molecule. An example is FTSJ1, which methylates uridines at position 8 in human tRNAs.
5. Pseudouridine (Ψ) synthases: Although not technically methyltransferases, pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine, which can enhance tRNA stability and function. An example is Dyskerin (DKC1), which introduces Ψ at various positions in human tRNAs.

These enzymes play crucial roles in modifying tRNAs, ensuring proper folding, stability, and function during translation. Defects in these enzymes can lead to various diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, and premature aging.

Lysine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme involved in the process of protein synthesis, specifically during the step of translation. Its primary function is to catalyze the attachment of the amino acid lysine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This reaction forms a covalent bond between the carboxyl group of the lysine and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the tRNA, creating a charged lysine-tRNA complex.

The resulting complex is then transported to the ribosome, where it participates in the elongation phase of translation. Here, the lysine-tRNA complex binds to the appropriate codon on the mRNA and contributes to the formation of a polypeptide chain. The proper matching of amino acids to their corresponding tRNAs is crucial for maintaining the fidelity of protein synthesis and ensuring that the correct proteins are produced in the cell.

There are two main types of lysine-tRNA ligases: Lys-tRNA^Lys ligase (also known as lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and Lys-tRNA^UUG ligase (also known as bifunctional lysyl-tRNA synthetase). These enzymes differ in their substrate specificity, with the former recognizing tRNA^Lys molecules and the latter recognizing tRNA^UUG molecules. Both enzymes play essential roles in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis and ensuring proper cellular function.

Protein biosynthesis is the process by which cells generate new proteins. It involves two major steps: transcription and translation. Transcription is the process of creating a complementary RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. This RNA copy, or messenger RNA (mRNA), carries the genetic information to the site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. During translation, the mRNA is read by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which bring specific amino acids to the ribosome based on the sequence of nucleotides in the mRNA. The ribosome then links these amino acids together in the correct order to form a polypeptide chain, which may then fold into a functional protein. Protein biosynthesis is essential for the growth and maintenance of all living organisms.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

Leucine-tRNA Ligase, also known as Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase, is an enzyme (EC 6.1.1.4) that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. This enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the esterification of the amino acid leucine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. The resulting leucine-tRNA complex is then used in the translation process, where genetic information encoded in mRNA is translated into a specific protein sequence.

The reaction catalyzed by Leucine-tRNA Ligase can be represented as follows:

Leucine + tRNA(Leu) + ATP → Leucyl-tRNA(Leu) + AMP + PP\_i

In this reaction, leucine is activated by attachment to an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) molecule with the help of ATP. The activated leucine is then transferred to the appropriate tRNA molecule, releasing AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate (PP\_i). This enzyme's function is essential for maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis, as it ensures that only the correct amino acids are incorporated into proteins according to the genetic code.

Glutamate-tRNA ligase is an enzyme involved in the process of protein synthesis, specifically during the charging or aminoacylation of transfer RNA (tRNA). This enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the reaction between glutamic acid (Glu) and its corresponding tRNA molecule (tRNAGlu), forming a covalent bond between them. The resulting product, Glu-tRNAGlu, then participates in the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into a specific protein sequence at the ribosome.

The reaction catalyzed by glutamate-tRNA ligase is as follows:

Glutamic acid + ATP + tRNAGlu ↔ Glu-tRNAGlu + AMP + PP~i~ (pyrophosphate)

This enzyme plays a crucial role in maintaining the accuracy and efficiency of protein synthesis, ensuring that the correct amino acids are incorporated into proteins according to the genetic code. Defects or mutations in glutamate-tRNA ligase can lead to various genetic disorders and impairments in cellular function.

Serine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, specifically in the attachment of the amino acid serine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This enzyme catalyzes the formation of a ester bond between the carboxyl group of L-serine and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the tRNASerine, creating a charged tRNASerine molecule that can participate in protein synthesis on the ribosome.

The systematic name for this enzyme is L-serine:tRNA(Ser) ligase (AMP-forming), and it belongs to the family of ligases, specifically the transfer RNA ligases, which form aminoacyl-tRNA and related compounds. This enzyme is essential for maintaining the accuracy and fidelity of protein synthesis, as it ensures that the correct amino acid is attached to its corresponding tRNA molecule before being translated into a polypeptide chain on the ribosome.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

Valine-tRNA Ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis in the body. Its specific function is to catalyze the attachment of the amino acid valine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule during translation, the process by which genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) is used to synthesize proteins.

The reaction catalyzed by Valine-tRNA Ligase involves the activation of valine through the formation of an adenylate intermediate with ATP, followed by the transfer of valine to the appropriate tRNA molecule. This enzyme is essential for maintaining the fidelity and efficiency of protein synthesis, as it ensures that the correct amino acid is incorporated into the growing polypeptide chain during translation.

Valine-tRNA Ligase is a member of the class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and contains several functional domains, including an anticodon-binding domain that recognizes and binds to specific tRNA molecules, and a catalytic domain that carries out the reaction with valine. Mutations in the gene encoding Valine-tRNA Ligase have been associated with various genetic disorders, highlighting its importance in maintaining normal cellular function.

Phenylalanine-tRNA ligase, also known as Phe-tRNA synthetase, is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Its primary function is to catalyze the attachment of the amino acid phenylalanine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This reaction forms a phenylalanine-tRNA complex, which is then used in the translation process to create proteins according to the genetic code. The systematic name for this enzyme is phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.20). Any defects or mutations in the Phe-tRNA ligase can lead to various medical conditions, including neurological disorders and impaired growth.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Aspartate-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Its specific function is to join the amino acid aspartic acid to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule, forming an aspartyl-tRNA complex. This complex is essential for the accurate translation of genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) into a polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

The systematic name for this enzyme is L-aspartate:tRNA(Asn) ligase (AMP-forming), which reflects its role in catalyzing the reaction between aspartic acid and tRNA(Asn). The enzyme can also activate aspartic acid by forming an aspartyl-AMP intermediate before transferring the activated aspartate to the appropriate tRNA molecule.

Deficiencies or mutations in aspartate-tRNA ligase can lead to various genetic disorders and impairments in protein synthesis, which may have severe consequences for cellular function and overall health.

Arginine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Its primary function is to join arginine, an essential amino acid, to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This enzyme catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between the arginine and the tRNA during translation, the process by which genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) is converted into a protein sequence.

The reaction catalyzed by arginine-tRNA ligase involves two main steps:

1. Activation of arginine: The enzyme binds to and activates an arginine molecule by attaching adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to it, forming an arginine-AMP intermediate.
2. Transfer of arginine to tRNA: The activated arginine is then transferred from the arginine-AMP complex onto the appropriate tRNA molecule, releasing AMP and forming an ester bond between the carboxyl group of arginine and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety in the tRNA.

The resulting arginine-tRNA complex is now ready to participate in protein synthesis, where it will contribute to the formation of a polypeptide chain under the direction of mRNA. The enzyme's role in ensuring accurate amino acid attachment to their corresponding tRNAs is essential for maintaining proper protein folding and function.

There are two main types of arginine-tRNA ligases, based on their structure and mechanism:

1. Class I arginine-tRNA ligase (also known as ArgRS): This enzyme contains an alpha/beta Rossmann-fold domain that binds ATP and a catalytic domain with a characteristic HIGH motif. It follows the standard two-step reaction mechanism for class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.
2. Class II arginine-tRNA ligase (also known as ArgQ): This enzyme has an alpha/beta/alpha sandwich fold and a distinct catalytic mechanism compared to Class I enzymes. It follows the three-step reaction mechanism for class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which includes an intermediate step of adenylate formation before transferring arginine to tRNA.

Both types of arginine-tRNA ligases are found in various organisms, including bacteria and eukaryotes. In humans, the Class I enzyme is encoded by the RARS gene, while the Class II enzyme is encoded by the QARS gene. Dysfunction or mutations in these genes can lead to neurological disorders and other health issues due to impaired protein synthesis and folding.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Histidine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme involved in the process of protein synthesis, specifically during the step of translation. Its primary function is to catalyze the attachment of the amino acid histidine to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule. This enzyme does this by forming a ester bond between the carboxyl group of histidine and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the tRNA, creating a charged histidine-tRNA complex.

The histidine-tRNA ligase enzyme plays a crucial role in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis, as it ensures that only the correct amino acid is attached to its specific tRNA. This helps to prevent errors in the genetic code and contributes to the proper folding and functioning of proteins.

The systematic name for this enzyme is "histidine:tRNA(His) ligase (AMP-forming)" and it belongs to the family of ligases, specifically the aminoacyl-tRNA ligases. The gene that encodes this enzyme in humans is known as HARS1 (Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase 1). Defects or mutations in this gene can lead to various genetic disorders, such as histidinemia and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

Acylation is a medical and biological term that refers to the process of introducing an acyl group (-CO-) into a molecule. This process can occur naturally or it can be induced through chemical reactions. In the context of medicine and biology, acylation often occurs during post-translational modifications of proteins, where an acyl group is added to specific amino acid residues, altering the protein's function, stability, or localization.

An example of acylation in medicine is the administration of neuraminidase inhibitors, such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu), for the treatment and prevention of influenza. These drugs work by inhibiting the activity of the viral neuraminidase enzyme, which is essential for the release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Oseltamivir is administered orally as an ethyl ester prodrug, which is then hydrolyzed in the body to form the active acylated metabolite that inhibits the viral neuraminidase.

In summary, acylation is a vital process in medicine and biology, with implications for drug design, protein function, and post-translational modifications.

Coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, also known as CoA synthetases, are a class of enzymes that activate acyl groups, such as fatty acids and amino acids, by forming a thioester bond with coenzyme A. This activation is an essential step in various metabolic pathways, including fatty acid oxidation, amino acid catabolism, and the synthesis of several important compounds like steroids and acetylcholine.

CoA ligases catalyze the following reaction:

acyl group + ATP + CoA ↔ acyl-CoA + AMP + PP~i~

In this reaction, an acyl group (R-) from a carboxylic acid is linked to the thiol (-SH) group of coenzyme A through a high-energy thioester bond. The energy required for this activation is provided by the hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate (PP~i~).

CoA ligases are classified into three main types based on the nature of the acyl group they activate:

1. Acyl-CoA synthetases (or long-chain fatty acid CoA ligases) activate long-chain fatty acids, typically containing 12 or more carbon atoms.
2. Aminoacyl-CoA synthetases activate amino acids to form aminoacyl-CoAs, which are essential intermediates in the catabolism of certain amino acids.
3. Short-chain specific CoA ligases activate short-chain fatty acids (up to 6 carbon atoms) and other acyl groups like acetate or propionate.

These enzymes play a crucial role in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis, metabolism, and the synthesis of various essential biomolecules.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that carries glutamine (Gln) is a type of RNA molecule involved in protein synthesis. Glutamine is one of the twenty standard amino acids used by cells to construct proteins. During protein synthesis, tRNAs serve as adaptors between the mRNA code and the corresponding amino acids. Specifically, the tRNA with the anticodon complementary to the mRNA codon for glutamine (CAA or CAG) binds to glutamine and delivers it to the growing polypeptide chain during translation. This particular tRNA is referred to as 'tRNA Gln' or 'tRNA for Gln'.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) are small RNA molecules that play a crucial role in protein synthesis. They are responsible for translating the genetic code contained within messenger RNA (mRNA) into the specific sequence of amino acids during protein synthesis.

Amino acid-specific tRNAs are specialized tRNAs that recognize and bind to specific amino acids. Each tRNA has an anticodon region that can base-pair with a complementary codon on the mRNA, which determines the specific amino acid that will be added to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Therefore, a more detailed medical definition of "RNA, Transfer, Amino Acid-Specific" would be:

A type of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that is specific to a particular amino acid and plays a role in translating the genetic code contained within messenger RNA (mRNA) into the specific sequence of amino acids during protein synthesis. The anticodon region of an amino acid-specific tRNA base-pairs with a complementary codon on the mRNA, which determines the specific amino acid that will be added to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis in the cell. It carries and transfers specific amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain during translation, the process by which the genetic code in mRNA is translated into a protein sequence.

tRNAs have a characteristic cloverleaf-like secondary structure and a stem-loop tertiary structure, which allows them to bind both to specific amino acids and to complementary codon sequences on the messenger RNA (mRNA) through anticodons. This enables the precise matching of the correct amino acid to its corresponding codon in the mRNA during protein synthesis.

Ser, or serine, is one of the 20 standard amino acids that make up proteins. It is encoded by six different codons (UCU, UCC, UCA, UCG, AGU, and AGC) in the genetic code. The corresponding tRNA molecule that carries serine during protein synthesis is called tRNASer. There are multiple tRNASer isoacceptors, each with a different anticodon sequence but all carrying the same amino acid, serine.

Threonine-tRNA ligase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, specifically in the attachment of threonine (Thr) to its corresponding transfer RNA (tRNA). This enzyme catalyzes the formation of a ester bond between the carboxyl group of threonine and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the tRNAThr, creating a charged tRNA molecule that can participate in translation at the ribosome. Proper function of threonine-tRNA ligase is essential for maintaining the fidelity and efficiency of protein synthesis, as it ensures that the correct amino acids are incorporated into proteins according to the genetic code.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that is specific for the amino acid glutamic acid (Glu or E) is referred to as "tRNA-Glu" or "tRNAGlu." This tRNA carries the amino acid glutamic acid to the ribosome during protein synthesis, where it gets incorporated into a growing polypeptide chain according to the genetic code.

The transfer RNA molecules are small adaptor molecules that facilitate translation of the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acid sequence of proteins. Each tRNA has an anticodon region, which recognizes and binds to a specific codon on the mRNA through base-pairing interactions. The other end of the tRNA contains a binding site for the corresponding amino acid, ensuring that the correct amino acid is added during protein synthesis.

In summary, "tRNA-Glu" or "tRNAGlu" refers to the specific transfer RNA molecule responsible for transporting and incorporating glutamic acid into proteins during translation.

Acyl Coenzyme A (often abbreviated as Acetyl-CoA or Acyl-CoA) is a crucial molecule in metabolism, particularly in the breakdown and oxidation of fats and carbohydrates to produce energy. It is a thioester compound that consists of a fatty acid or an acetate group linked to coenzyme A through a sulfur atom.

Acyl CoA plays a central role in several metabolic pathways, including:

1. The citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle): In the mitochondria, Acyl-CoA is formed from the oxidation of fatty acids or the breakdown of certain amino acids. This Acyl-CoA then enters the citric acid cycle to produce high-energy electrons, which are used in the electron transport chain to generate ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the main energy currency of the cell.
2. Beta-oxidation: The breakdown of fatty acids occurs in the mitochondria through a process called beta-oxidation, where Acyl-CoA is sequentially broken down into smaller units, releasing acetyl-CoA, which then enters the citric acid cycle.
3. Ketogenesis: In times of low carbohydrate availability or during prolonged fasting, the liver can produce ketone bodies from acetyl-CoA to supply energy to other organs, such as the brain and heart.
4. Protein synthesis: Acyl-CoA is also involved in the modification of proteins by attaching fatty acid chains to them (a process called acetylation), which can influence protein function and stability.

In summary, Acyl Coenzyme A is a vital molecule in metabolism that connects various pathways related to energy production, fatty acid breakdown, and protein modification.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. During this process, tRNAs serve as adaptors between the mRNA (messenger RNA) molecules and the amino acids used to construct proteins. Each tRNA contains a specific anticodon sequence that can base-pair with a complementary codon on the mRNA. At the other end of the tRNA, there is a site where an amino acid can attach. This attachment is facilitated by enzymes called aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, which recognize specific tRNAs and catalyze the formation of the ester bond between the tRNA and its cognate amino acid.

Gly (glycine) is one of the 20 standard amino acids found in proteins. It has a simple structure, consisting of an amino group (-NH2), a carboxylic acid group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (-H), and a side chain made up of a single hydrogen atom (-CH2-). Glycine is the smallest and most flexible of all amino acids due to its lack of a bulky side chain, which allows it to fit into tight spaces within protein structures.

Therefore, 'RNA, Transfer, Gly' can be understood as a transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule specifically responsible for delivering the amino acid glycine (-Gly) during protein synthesis. This tRNA will have an anticodon sequence that base-pairs with the mRNA codons specifying glycine: GGU, GGC, GGA, or GGG.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, the process by which cells create proteins. In protein synthesis, tRNAs serve as adaptors, translating the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acids required to build a protein.

tRNAs have a distinct cloverleaf-like secondary structure and a compact L-shaped tertiary structure. Each tRNA molecule contains a specific anticodon triplet nucleotide sequence that can base-pair with a complementary codon in the mRNA during translation. At the other end of the tRNA, there is an amino acid attachment site where the corresponding amino acid is covalently attached through the action of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzymes.

Pro (also known as proline) is a specific amino acid that can be carried by certain tRNAs during protein synthesis. Therefore, in a medical definition context, 'RNA, Transfer, Pro' would refer to the transfer RNA molecule(s) specifically responsible for carrying and delivering proline during protein synthesis. This tRNA is typically denoted as tRNA^Pro^ or tRNA-Pro, with the superscript indicating the specific amino acid it carries.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that carries the amino acid isoleucine is referred to as 'tRNA-Ile' in medical and molecular biology terminology.

tRNAs are specialized RNA molecules that play a crucial role in protein synthesis, by transporting specific amino acids from the cytoplasm to the ribosomes, where proteins are assembled. Each tRNA has an anticodon region that recognizes and binds to a complementary codon sequence on messenger RNA (mRNA). When a tRNA with the correct anticodon pairs with an mRNA codon during translation, the attached amino acid is added to the growing polypeptide chain.

Ile, or isoleucine, is a genetically encoded, hydrophobic amino acid that is one of the 20 standard amino acids found in proteins. Isoleucine is transported by its specific tRNA-Ile molecule during protein synthesis.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) for tryptophan (Trp) is a specific type of tRNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. In the process of translation, genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a corresponding sequence of amino acids to form a protein.

Tryptophan is one of the twenty standard amino acids found in proteins. Each tRNA molecule carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to a particular codon (a sequence of three nucleotides) on the mRNA. The tRNA with tryptophan attached to it recognizes and binds to the mRNA codon UGG, which is the only codon that specifies tryptophan in the genetic code.

The tRNA molecule has a characteristic cloverleaf-like structure, composed of a stem region made up of base pairs and loop regions containing unpaired nucleotides. The anticodon loop contains the complementary sequence to the mRNA codon, allowing for specific recognition and binding. The other end of the tRNA molecule carries the amino acid, in this case tryptophan, which is attached via an ester linkage to a specific nucleotide called the 3'-end of the tRNA.

In summary, tRNA (Trp) is a key player in protein synthesis, responsible for delivering tryptophan to the ribosome during translation, where it can be incorporated into the growing polypeptide chain according to the genetic information encoded in mRNA.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, the process by which cells create proteins. During protein synthesis, tRNAs serve as adaptors, translating the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acids required to build a protein.

Each tRNA molecule has an anticodon region that can base-pair with specific codons (three-nucleotide sequences) on the mRNA. At the other end of the tRNA is the acceptor stem, which contains a binding site for the corresponding amino acid. When an amino acid attaches to the tRNA, it forms an ester bond between the carboxyl group of the amino acid and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the ribose in the tRNA. This aminoacylated tRNA then participates in the translation process, delivering the amino acid to the growing polypeptide chain at the ribosome.

In summary, transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that facilitates protein synthesis by transporting and delivering specific amino acids to the ribosome for incorporation into a polypeptide chain, based on the codon-anticodon pairing between tRNAs and messenger RNA (mRNA).

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

I believe there may be a slight error in the term you're asking about. "Asp" doesn't specifically relate to RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) or its types. However, I can provide a definition for "Transfer RNA" (tRNA).

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. It carries and transfers specific amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain during translation, according to the genetic code provided by messenger RNA (mRNA). Each tRNA molecule has an anticodon region which can base-pair with a complementary codon in the mRNA, and a corresponding amino acid attached to its other end. This enables the correct matching of amino acids to form proteins according to the genetic information encoded in mRNA.

'RNA, Transfer, Ala' refers to a specific type of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that is involved in protein synthesis. In molecular biology, the term 'RNA' stands for ribonucleic acid, which is a nucleic acid present in the cells of all living organisms. Transfer RNAs are a type of RNA that help translate genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins during the process of protein synthesis or translation.

'Transfer, Ala' more specifically refers to a transfer RNA molecule that carries the amino acid alanine (Ala) to the ribosome during protein synthesis. Each tRNA has a specific anticodon sequence that can base-pair with a complementary codon sequence in the mRNA, and it also carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to that codon. In this case, the anticodon on the 'Transfer, Ala' tRNA molecule is capable of base-pairing with any one of the three codons (GCU, GCC, GCA, or GCG) that specify alanine in the genetic code.

Therefore, 'RNA, Transfer, Ala' can be defined as a type of transfer RNA molecule that carries and delivers the amino acid alanine to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that helps translate genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. Each tRNA carries a specific amino acid to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis, based on the anticodon sequence in its variable loop region that recognizes and binds to a complementary codon sequence in the mRNA.

Phenylalanine (Phe) is one of the twenty standard amino acids found in proteins. It has a hydrophobic side chain, which means it tends to repel water and interact with other non-polar molecules. In tRNA, phenylalanine is attached to a specific tRNA molecule known as tRNAPhe. This tRNA recognizes the mRNA codons UUC and UUU, which specify phenylalanine during protein synthesis.

Nucleic acid-independent peptide biosynthesis refers to the process of producing peptides without the involvement of nucleic acids such as DNA or RNA. This is in contrast to the more common and well-known nucleic acid-dependent pathway, where genetic information encoded in DNA or RNA is transcribed and translated into a specific protein sequence.

In nucleic acid-independent peptide biosynthesis, peptides are generated through non-ribosomal mechanisms that involve large enzyme complexes called non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). These enzymes directly assemble and modify amino acids into peptide bonds, creating a wide variety of structurally diverse peptides. This pathway is often observed in the biosynthesis of complex natural products, such as antibiotics, toxins, and siderophores, produced by various microorganisms like bacteria and fungi.

The NRPS-mediated process allows for the incorporation of non-proteinogenic amino acids and other building blocks into the peptide structure, expanding the chemical diversity beyond what can be achieved through ribosomal protein synthesis alone. This unique feature makes nucleic acid-independent peptide biosynthesis an essential area of study in natural product discovery, drug development, and synthetic biology.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that carries the amino acid cysteine (Cys) is a type of adaptor molecule in the process of translation during protein synthesis. The genetic code for cysteine is UGU and UGC, which are the anticodon sequences on specific tRNAs. These tRNA molecules recognize and bind to the corresponding mRNA codons through base-pairing, allowing for the addition of cysteine to the growing polypeptide chain in a ribosome. The tRNA^Cys plays a crucial role in maintaining the fidelity and efficiency of protein synthesis.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems like the term you're looking for is "Transfer RNA arginine," not "Arg." Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Specifically, tRNAs are responsible for delivering amino acids to the ribosome, where they are joined together to form proteins.

Each tRNA molecule contains a specific anticodon sequence that can base-pair with a complementary codon sequence on messenger RNA (mRNA). When a tRNA molecule encounters an mRNA codon that matches its anticodon, it binds to the mRNA and delivers the amino acid associated with that tRNA.

In the case of tRNA arginine, this type of tRNA is responsible for delivering the amino acid arginine to the ribosome during protein synthesis. Arginine is a positively charged amino acid that plays important roles in various cellular processes, including protein structure and function, signal transduction, and gene regulation.

Therefore, Transfer RNA arginine refers to the specific tRNA molecule that delivers the amino acid arginine during protein synthesis.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

A codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies the insertion of a particular amino acid during protein synthesis, or signals the beginning or end of translation. In DNA, these triplets are read during transcription to produce a complementary mRNA molecule, which is then translated into a polypeptide chain during translation. There are 64 possible codons in the standard genetic code, with 61 encoding for specific amino acids and three serving as stop codons that signal the termination of protein synthesis.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. It carries amino acids to the ribosome, where they are incorporated into growing polypeptide chains during translation, the process by which the genetic code in mRNA is translated into a protein sequence.

tRNAs have a characteristic cloverleaf-like secondary structure and a stem-loop tertiary structure, which allows them to recognize specific codons on the mRNA through base-pairing between their anticodon loops and the complementary codons. Each tRNA is specific for one amino acid, and there are multiple tRNAs for each amino acid that differ in their anticodon sequences, allowing them to recognize different codons that specify the same amino acid.

"His" refers to the amino acid Histidine, which is encoded by the codons CAU and CAC on mRNA. Therefore, tRNA-His is a type of tRNA molecule that carries the amino acid Histidine to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

An amino acid substitution is a type of mutation in which one amino acid in a protein is replaced by another. This occurs when there is a change in the DNA sequence that codes for a particular amino acid in a protein. The genetic code is redundant, meaning that most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon (a sequence of three nucleotides). As a result, a single base pair change in the DNA sequence may not necessarily lead to an amino acid substitution. However, if a change does occur, it can have a variety of effects on the protein's structure and function, depending on the nature of the substituted amino acids. Some substitutions may be harmless, while others may alter the protein's activity or stability, leading to disease.

Isoleucine is an essential branched-chain amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources. Its chemical formula is C6H13NO2. Isoleucine is crucial for muscle protein synthesis, hemoglobin formation, and energy regulation during exercise or fasting. It is found in various foods such as meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, legumes, and nuts. Deficiency of isoleucine may lead to various health issues like muscle wasting, fatigue, and mental confusion.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis in the cell. It carries amino acids to the ribosome, where they are joined together in a specific sequence to form a polypeptide chain, which eventually becomes a protein.

Each tRNA molecule has a unique structure and is responsible for carrying a specific amino acid to the ribosome during protein synthesis. The amino acids are attached to the tRNA at a site called the acceptor stem, which contains a three-base sequence known as the anticodon.

Val (or V) is one of the twenty standard amino acids found in proteins. It stands for Valine, and its codons are GUA, GUC, GUG, and GUU. Therefore, tRNA Val refers to a specific type of transfer RNA molecule that carries valine to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

'Thermus thermophilus' is not a medical term, but a scientific name for a species of bacteria. It is commonly used in molecular biology and genetics research. Here is the biological definition:

'Thermus thermophilus' is a gram-negative, rod-shaped, thermophilic bacterium found in hot springs and other high-temperature environments. Its optimum growth temperature ranges from 65 to 70°C (149-158°F), with some strains able to grow at temperatures as high as 85°C (185°F). The bacterium's DNA polymerase enzyme, Taq polymerase, is widely used in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique for amplifying and analyzing DNA. 'Thermus thermophilus' has a single circular chromosome and can also have one or more plasmids. Its genome has been fully sequenced, making it an important model organism for studying extremophiles and their adaptations to harsh environments.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Ligases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the formation of a covalent bond between two molecules, usually involving the joining of two nucleotides in a DNA or RNA strand. They play a crucial role in various biological processes such as DNA replication, repair, and recombination. In DNA ligases, the enzyme seals nicks or breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of the DNA molecule by catalyzing the formation of an ester bond between the 3'-hydroxyl group and the 5'-phosphate group of adjacent nucleotides. This process is essential for maintaining genomic integrity and stability.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

Acyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an acyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to a hydrogen atom) from one molecule to another. This transfer involves the formation of an ester bond between the acyl group donor and the acyl group acceptor.

Acyltransferases play important roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of lipids, fatty acids, and other metabolites. They are also involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) by catalyzing the addition of an acyl group to these compounds, making them more water-soluble and easier to excrete from the body.

Examples of acyltransferases include serine palmitoyltransferase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of sphingolipids, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters between lipoproteins.

Acyltransferases are classified based on the type of acyl group they transfer and the nature of the acyl group donor and acceptor molecules. They can be further categorized into subclasses based on their sequence similarities, three-dimensional structures, and evolutionary relationships.

Tyrocidine is not typically defined in the context of human medicine. It is a type of antibiotic that is produced by certain strains of bacteria, specifically Bacillus brevis and Bacillus stratosphericus. Tyrocidines are cyclic peptides, which means they consist of a ring-shaped structure formed by amino acid chains. They have been studied for their potential antimicrobial properties against various bacterial species, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. However, tyrocidines are not used as therapeutic agents in human medicine due to their toxicity and limited clinical applications.

Pantetheine is not a medical term per se, but it is a biochemical compound with relevance to medicine. Pantetheine is the alcohol form of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), and it plays a crucial role in the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. It is a component of coenzyme A, which is involved in numerous biochemical reactions within the body.

Coenzyme A, containing pantetheine, participates in oxidation-reduction reactions, energy production, and the synthesis of various compounds, such as fatty acids, cholesterol, steroid hormones, and neurotransmitters. Therefore, pantetheine is essential for maintaining proper cellular function and overall health.

While there isn't a specific medical condition associated with pantetheine deficiency, ensuring adequate intake of vitamin B5 (through diet or supplementation) is vital for optimal health and well-being.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a nucleotide that is the monophosphate ester of adenosine, consisting of the nitrogenous base adenine attached to the 1' carbon atom of ribose via a β-N9-glycosidic bond, which in turn is esterified to a phosphate group. It is an important molecule in biological systems as it plays a key role in cellular energy transfer and storage, serving as a precursor to other nucleotides such as ADP and ATP. AMP is also involved in various signaling pathways and can act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a molecular biology technique used to introduce specific and targeted changes to a specific DNA sequence. This process involves creating a new variant of a gene or a specific region of interest within a DNA molecule by introducing a planned, deliberate change, or mutation, at a predetermined site within the DNA sequence.

The methodology typically involves the use of molecular tools such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, and/or ligases to introduce the desired mutation(s) into a plasmid or other vector containing the target DNA sequence. The resulting modified DNA molecule can then be used to transform host cells, allowing for the production of large quantities of the mutated gene or protein for further study.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a valuable tool in basic research, drug discovery, and biotechnology applications where specific changes to a DNA sequence are required to understand gene function, investigate protein structure/function relationships, or engineer novel biological properties into existing genes or proteins.

Leucine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. It is one of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), along with isoleucine and valine. Leucine is critical for protein synthesis and muscle growth, and it helps to regulate blood sugar levels, promote wound healing, and produce growth hormones.

Leucine is found in various food sources such as meat, dairy products, eggs, and certain plant-based proteins like soy and beans. It is also available as a dietary supplement for those looking to increase their intake for athletic performance or muscle recovery purposes. However, it's important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Acetate-CoA ligase is an enzyme that plays a role in the metabolism of acetate in cells. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of acetate and coenzyme A (CoA) to acetyl-CoA, which is a key molecule in various metabolic pathways, including the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle).

The reaction catalyzed by Acetate-CoA ligase can be summarized as follows:

acetate + ATP + CoA → acetyl-CoA + AMP + PPi

In this reaction, acetate is activated by combining it with ATP to form acetyl-AMP, which then reacts with CoA to produce acetyl-CoA. The reaction also produces AMP and pyrophosphate (PPi) as byproducts.

There are two main types of Acetate-CoA ligases: the short-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase, which is responsible for activating acetate and other short-chain fatty acids, and the acyl-CoA synthetase, which activates long-chain fatty acids. Both types of enzymes play important roles in energy metabolism and the synthesis of various biological molecules.

A catalytic domain is a portion or region within a protein that contains the active site, where the chemical reactions necessary for the protein's function are carried out. This domain is responsible for the catalysis of biological reactions, hence the name "catalytic domain." The catalytic domain is often composed of specific amino acid residues that come together to form the active site, creating a unique three-dimensional structure that enables the protein to perform its specific function.

In enzymes, for example, the catalytic domain contains the residues that bind and convert substrates into products through chemical reactions. In receptors, the catalytic domain may be involved in signal transduction or other regulatory functions. Understanding the structure and function of catalytic domains is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of protein function and can provide valuable insights for drug design and therapeutic interventions.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Catalysis is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst, which remains unchanged at the end of the reaction. A catalyst lowers the activation energy required for the reaction to occur, thereby allowing the reaction to proceed more quickly and efficiently. This can be particularly important in biological systems, where enzymes act as catalysts to speed up metabolic reactions that are essential for life.

Valine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through diet. It is a hydrophobic amino acid, with a branched side chain, and is necessary for the growth, repair, and maintenance of tissues in the body. Valine is also important for muscle metabolism, and is often used by athletes as a supplement to enhance physical performance. Like other essential amino acids, valine must be obtained through foods such as meat, fish, dairy products, and legumes.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Ribosomes are complex macromolecular structures composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins that play a crucial role in protein synthesis within cells. They serve as the site for translation, where messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a specific sequence of amino acids to create a polypeptide chain, which eventually folds into a functional protein.

Ribosomes consist of two subunits: a smaller subunit and a larger subunit. These subunits are composed of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) molecules and proteins. In eukaryotic cells, the smaller subunit is denoted as the 40S subunit, while the larger subunit is referred to as the 60S subunit. In prokaryotic cells, these subunits are named the 30S and 50S subunits, respectively. The ribosome's overall structure resembles a "doughnut" or a "cotton reel," with grooves and binding sites for various factors involved in protein synthesis.

Ribosomes can be found floating freely within the cytoplasm of cells or attached to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, forming part of the rough ER. Membrane-bound ribosomes are responsible for synthesizing proteins that will be transported across the ER and ultimately secreted from the cell or inserted into the membrane. In contrast, cytoplasmic ribosomes synthesize proteins destined for use within the cytoplasm or organelles.

In summary, ribosomes are essential components of cells that facilitate protein synthesis by translating mRNA into functional polypeptide chains. They can be found in various cellular locations and exist as either free-floating entities or membrane-bound structures.

Amino acid motifs are recurring patterns or sequences of amino acids in a protein molecule. These motifs can be identified through various sequence analysis techniques and often have functional or structural significance. They can be as short as two amino acids in length, but typically contain at least three to five residues.

Some common examples of amino acid motifs include:

1. Active site motifs: These are specific sequences of amino acids that form the active site of an enzyme and participate in catalyzing chemical reactions. For example, the catalytic triad in serine proteases consists of three residues (serine, histidine, and aspartate) that work together to hydrolyze peptide bonds.
2. Signal peptide motifs: These are sequences of amino acids that target proteins for secretion or localization to specific organelles within the cell. For example, a typical signal peptide consists of a positively charged n-region, a hydrophobic h-region, and a polar c-region that directs the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for translocation.
3. Zinc finger motifs: These are structural domains that contain conserved sequences of amino acids that bind zinc ions and play important roles in DNA recognition and regulation of gene expression.
4. Transmembrane motifs: These are sequences of hydrophobic amino acids that span the lipid bilayer of cell membranes and anchor transmembrane proteins in place.
5. Phosphorylation sites: These are specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by protein kinases to regulate protein function.

Understanding amino acid motifs is important for predicting protein structure and function, as well as for identifying potential drug targets in disease-associated proteins.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

Methanobacteriaceae is a family of archaea within the order Methanobacteriales. These are obligate anaerobes that obtain energy for growth by reducing carbon dioxide to methane, a process called methanogenesis. They are commonly found in anaerobic environments such as wetlands, digestive tracts of animals, and sewage sludge. Some species are thermophilic, meaning they prefer higher temperatures, while others are mesophilic, growing best at moderate temperatures. Methanobacteriaceae are important contributors to the global carbon cycle and have potential applications in bioremediation and bioenergy production.

Thiol esters are chemical compounds that contain a sulfur atom (from a mercapto group, -SH) linked to a carbonyl group (a carbon double-bonded to an oxygen atom, -CO-) through an ester bond. Thiolester hydrolases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of thiol esters, breaking down these compounds into a carboxylic acid and a thiol (a compound containing a mercapto group).

In biological systems, thiolester bonds play important roles in various metabolic pathways. For example, acetyl-CoA, a crucial molecule in energy metabolism, is a thiol ester that forms between coenzyme A and an acetyl group. Thiolester hydrolases help regulate the formation and breakdown of these thiol esters, allowing cells to control various biochemical reactions.

Examples of thiolester hydrolases include:

1. CoA thioesterases (CoATEs): These enzymes hydrolyze thiol esters between coenzyme A and fatty acids, releasing free coenzyme A and a fatty acid. This process is essential for fatty acid metabolism.
2. Acetyl-CoA hydrolase: This enzyme specifically breaks down the thiol ester bond in acetyl-CoA, releasing acetic acid and coenzyme A.
3. Thioesterases involved in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS): These enzymes hydrolyze thiol esters during the biosynthesis of complex peptides, allowing for the formation of unique amino acid sequences and structures.

Understanding the function and regulation of thiolester hydrolases can provide valuable insights into various metabolic processes and potential therapeutic targets in disease treatment.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that carries asparagine (Asn) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Specifically, tRNAs are responsible for delivering the appropriate amino acids to the ribosome during translation, the process by which genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into proteins.

In the case of tRNA-Asn, this RNA molecule carries the amino acid asparagine, which is one of the 20 standard amino acids used to build proteins. The tRNA-Asn molecule recognizes a specific codon (a sequence of three nucleotides) in the mRNA that corresponds to asparagine, and then brings the appropriate amino acid to the ribosome to be incorporated into the growing polypeptide chain.

The correct pairing of tRNAs with their corresponding codons is facilitated by anticodon loops present on the tRNA molecules, which contain complementary sequences to the codons in the mRNA. In the case of tRNA-Asn, the anticodon loop contains the sequence UGU, which is complementary to the asparagine codons AAU and AAC in the mRNA.

Overall, tRNAs like tRNA-Asn are essential for the accurate and efficient synthesis of proteins in all living organisms.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Multienzyme complexes are specialized protein structures that consist of multiple enzymes closely associated or bound together, often with other cofactors and regulatory subunits. These complexes facilitate the sequential transfer of substrates along a series of enzymatic reactions, also known as a metabolic pathway. By keeping the enzymes in close proximity, multienzyme complexes enhance reaction efficiency, improve substrate specificity, and maintain proper stoichiometry between different enzymes involved in the pathway. Examples of multienzyme complexes include the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the citrate synthase complex, and the fatty acid synthetase complex.

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a type of nucleic acid that plays a crucial role in the process of gene expression. There are several types of RNA molecules, including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). These RNA molecules help to transcribe DNA into mRNA, which is then translated into proteins by the ribosomes.

Fungi are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. Like other eukaryotes, fungi contain DNA and RNA as part of their genetic material. The RNA in fungi is similar to the RNA found in other organisms, including humans, and plays a role in gene expression and protein synthesis.

A specific medical definition of "RNA, fungal" does not exist, as RNA is a fundamental component of all living organisms, including fungi. However, RNA can be used as a target for antifungal drugs, as certain enzymes involved in RNA synthesis and processing are unique to fungi and can be inhibited by these drugs. For example, the antifungal drug flucytosine is converted into a toxic metabolite that inhibits fungal RNA and DNA synthesis.

A multigene family is a group of genetically related genes that share a common ancestry and have similar sequences or structures. These genes are arranged in clusters on a chromosome and often encode proteins with similar functions. They can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication, recombination, and transposition. Multigene families play crucial roles in many biological processes, such as development, immunity, and metabolism. Examples of multigene families include the globin genes involved in oxygen transport, the immune system's major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, and the cytochrome P450 genes associated with drug metabolism.

RNA editing is a process that alters the sequence of a transcribed RNA molecule after it has been synthesized from DNA, but before it is translated into protein. This can result in changes to the amino acid sequence of the resulting protein or to the regulation of gene expression. The most common type of RNA editing in mammals is the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I), catalyzed by a family of enzymes called adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). Inosine is recognized as guanosine (G) by the translation machinery, leading to A-to-G changes in the RNA sequence. Other types of RNA editing include cytidine (C) to uridine (U) deamination and insertion/deletion of nucleotides. RNA editing is a crucial mechanism for generating diversity in gene expression and has been implicated in various biological processes, including development, differentiation, and disease.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Amide synthases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the formation of amide bonds between two molecules. Specifically, they facilitate the reaction between a carboxylic acid and an amine to produce an amide. This process is also known as amide bond formation or amide synthesis.

In the context of medical research and therapeutic development, amide synthases are important for understanding the biosynthesis of various endogenous compounds, such as peptides and proteins, as well as for developing methods to synthesize novel drugs and pharmaceutical agents.

There are several types of amide synthases, including:

1. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS): These enzymes catalyze the formation of complex peptides without the involvement of ribosomes. They typically consist of multiple modules, each of which is responsible for adding a single amino acid to the growing peptide chain.
2. Amidotransferases: These enzymes transfer an amino group from a donor molecule (usually glutamine) to a carboxylic acid, resulting in the formation of an amide bond. They are involved in various metabolic pathways, including the biosynthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, and other biomolecules.
3. Amide synthetases involved in lipid metabolism: These enzymes catalyze the formation of amide bonds between fatty acids and various amine-containing molecules, such as sphingosine or serine, during the biosynthesis of complex lipids like sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids.

Understanding the function and regulation of amide synthases is crucial for developing strategies to modulate their activity in various disease contexts, including infectious diseases, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through diet or supplementation. It's one of the building blocks of proteins and is necessary for the production of various molecules in the body, such as neurotransmitters (chemical messengers in the brain).

Phenylalanine has two forms: L-phenylalanine and D-phenylalanine. L-phenylalanine is the form found in proteins and is used by the body for protein synthesis, while D-phenylalanine has limited use in humans and is not involved in protein synthesis.

Individuals with a rare genetic disorder called phenylketonuria (PKU) must follow a low-phenylalanine diet or take special medical foods because they are unable to metabolize phenylalanine properly, leading to its buildup in the body and potential neurological damage.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis in the cell. It carries amino acids to the ribosome, where they are joined together in a specific sequence to form a polypeptide chain, which ultimately becomes a protein.

Each tRNA molecule has a unique structure and is responsible for carrying a specific amino acid. The genetic information that specifies which amino acid a particular tRNA carries is encoded in the form of a three-nucleotide sequence called an anticodon, which is located on one end of the tRNA molecule.

Threonine (Thr) is one of the twenty standard amino acids found in proteins. It is encoded by the codons ACU, ACA, ACC, and ACG in the genetic code. Therefore, a tRNA molecule with an anticodon complementary to any of these codons will carry threonine during protein synthesis.

So, to provide a medical definition of 'RNA, Transfer, Thr', it would be: A type of transfer RNA (tRNA) that carries the amino acid threonine (Thr) to the ribosome during protein synthesis and has an anticodon sequence complementary to one or more of the codons ACU, ACA, ACC, or ACG.

Lysine is an essential amino acid, which means that it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Its chemical formula is (2S)-2,6-diaminohexanoic acid. Lysine is necessary for the growth and maintenance of tissues in the body, and it plays a crucial role in the production of enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. It is also essential for the absorption of calcium and the formation of collagen, which is an important component of bones and connective tissue. Foods that are good sources of lysine include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products.

Restriction mapping is a technique used in molecular biology to identify the location and arrangement of specific restriction endonuclease recognition sites within a DNA molecule. Restriction endonucleases are enzymes that cut double-stranded DNA at specific sequences, producing fragments of various lengths. By digesting the DNA with different combinations of these enzymes and analyzing the resulting fragment sizes through techniques such as agarose gel electrophoresis, researchers can generate a restriction map - a visual representation of the locations and distances between recognition sites on the DNA molecule. This information is crucial for various applications, including cloning, genome analysis, and genetic engineering.

Genetic suppression is a concept in genetics that refers to the phenomenon where the expression or function of one gene is reduced or silenced by another gene. This can occur through various mechanisms such as:

* Allelic exclusion: When only one allele (version) of a gene is expressed, while the other is suppressed.
* Epigenetic modifications: Chemical changes to the DNA or histone proteins that package DNA can result in the suppression of gene expression.
* RNA interference: Small RNAs can bind to and degrade specific mRNAs (messenger RNAs), preventing their translation into proteins.
* Transcriptional repression: Proteins called transcription factors can bind to DNA and prevent the recruitment of RNA polymerase, which is necessary for gene transcription.

Genetic suppression plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and maintaining proper cellular function. It can also contribute to diseases such as cancer when genes that suppress tumor growth are suppressed themselves.

"Geobacillus stearothermophilus" is a species of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that is thermophilic, meaning it thrives at relatively high temperatures. It is commonly found in soil and hot springs, and can also be found in other environments such as compost piles, oil fields, and even in some food products.

The bacterium is known for its ability to form endospores that are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals, making it a useful organism for sterility testing and bioprotection applications. It has an optimum growth temperature of around 60-70°C (140-158°F) and can survive at temperatures up to 80°C (176°F).

In the medical field, "Geobacillus stearothermophilus" is not typically associated with human disease or infection. However, there have been rare cases of infections reported in immunocompromised individuals who have come into contact with contaminated medical devices or materials.

"Methanococcus" is a genus of archaea, which are single-celled microorganisms that share some characteristics with bacteria but are actually more closely related to eukaryotes. "Methanococcus" species are obligate anaerobes, meaning they can only survive in environments without oxygen. They are also methanogens, which means they produce methane as a byproduct of their metabolism. These microorganisms are commonly found in aquatic environments such as marine sediments and freshwater swamps, where they play an important role in the carbon cycle by breaking down organic matter and producing methane. Some "Methanococcus" species can also be found in the digestive tracts of animals, including humans, where they help to break down food waste and produce methane as a byproduct.

A conserved sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to a pattern of nucleotides (in DNA or RNA) or amino acids (in proteins) that has remained relatively unchanged over evolutionary time. These sequences are often functionally important and are highly conserved across different species, indicating strong selection pressure against changes in these regions.

In the case of protein-coding genes, the corresponding amino acid sequence is deduced from the DNA sequence through the genetic code. Conserved sequences in proteins may indicate structurally or functionally important regions, such as active sites or binding sites, that are critical for the protein's activity. Similarly, conserved non-coding sequences in DNA may represent regulatory elements that control gene expression.

Identifying conserved sequences can be useful for inferring evolutionary relationships between species and for predicting the function of unknown genes or proteins.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase (2'-5' OAS) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the innate immune response to viral infections. It is activated by double-stranded RNA, a molecular pattern often associated with viral replication. Once activated, 2'-5' OAS catalyzes the synthesis of 2'-5'-linked oligoadenylates, which then activate another enzyme called RNase L. RNase L degrades single-stranded RNA, thereby inhibiting viral replication and translation. This defense mechanism helps to limit the spread of viruses within the body. Additionally, 2'-5' OAS has been implicated in regulating cell death pathways and inflammatory responses.

Essential amino acids are a group of 9 out of the 20 standard amino acids that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through diet. They include: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine. These amino acids are essential for various biological processes such as protein synthesis, growth, and repair of body tissues. A deficiency in any of these essential amino acids can lead to impaired physical development and compromised immune function. Foods that provide all nine essential amino acids are considered complete proteins and include animal-derived products like meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy, as well as soy and quinoa.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Glutamate-ammonia ligase, also known as glutamine synthetase, is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in nitrogen metabolism. It catalyzes the formation of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia in the presence of ATP, resulting in the conversion of ammonia to a less toxic form. This reaction is essential for maintaining nitrogen balance in the body and for the synthesis of various amino acids, nucleotides, and other biomolecules. The enzyme is widely distributed in various tissues, including the brain, liver, and muscle, and its activity is tightly regulated through feedback inhibition by glutamine and other metabolites.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

A transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that carries the amino acid leucine is referred to as "tRNA-Leu." This specific tRNA molecule recognizes and binds to a codon (a sequence of three nucleotides in mRNA) during protein synthesis or translation. In this case, tRNA-Leu can recognize and pair with any of the following codons: UUA, UUG, CUU, CUC, CUA, and CUG. Once bound to the mRNA at the ribosome, leucine is added to the growing polypeptide chain through the action of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzymes that catalyze the attachment of specific amino acids to their corresponding tRNAs. This ensures the accurate and efficient production of proteins based on genetic information encoded in mRNA.

A gene is a specific sequence of nucleotides in DNA that carries genetic information. Genes are the fundamental units of heredity and are responsible for the development and function of all living organisms. They code for proteins or RNA molecules, which carry out various functions within cells and are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

Each gene has a specific location on a chromosome, and each person inherits two copies of every gene, one from each parent. Variations in the sequence of nucleotides in a gene can lead to differences in traits between individuals, including physical characteristics, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental factors.

Medical genetics is the study of genes and their role in health and disease. It involves understanding how genes contribute to the development and progression of various medical conditions, as well as identifying genetic risk factors and developing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Archaeal RNA refers to the Ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules that are present in archaea, which are a domain of single-celled microorganisms. RNA is a nucleic acid that plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as protein synthesis, gene expression, and regulation of cellular activities.

Archaeal RNAs can be categorized into different types based on their functions, including:

1. Messenger RNA (mRNA): It carries genetic information from DNA to the ribosome, where it is translated into proteins.
2. Transfer RNA (tRNA): It helps in translating the genetic code present in mRNA into specific amino acids during protein synthesis.
3. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA): It is a structural and functional component of ribosomes, where protein synthesis occurs.
4. Non-coding RNA: These are RNAs that do not code for proteins but have regulatory functions in gene expression and other cellular processes.

Archaeal RNAs share similarities with both bacterial and eukaryotic RNAs, but they also possess unique features that distinguish them from the other two domains of life. For example, archaeal rRNAs contain unique sequence motifs and secondary structures that are not found in bacteria or eukaryotes. These differences suggest that archaeal RNAs have evolved to adapt to the extreme environments where many archaea live.

Overall, understanding the structure, function, and evolution of archaeal RNA is essential for gaining insights into the biology of these unique microorganisms and their roles in various cellular processes.

Coenzyme A, often abbreviated as CoA or sometimes holo-CoA, is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role in several important chemical reactions in the body, particularly in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, and amino acids. It is composed of a pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) derivative called pantothenate, an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) molecule, and a terminal phosphate group.

Coenzyme A functions as a carrier molecule for acetyl groups, which are formed during the breakdown of carbohydrates, fatty acids, and some amino acids. The acetyl group is attached to the sulfur atom in CoA, forming acetyl-CoA, which can then be used as a building block for various biochemical pathways, such as the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle) and fatty acid synthesis.

In summary, Coenzyme A is a vital coenzyme that helps facilitate essential metabolic processes by carrying and transferring acetyl groups in the body.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Thiouridine is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in biochemistry and genetics. Thiouridine is a modified nucleoside that contains a sulfur atom, and it is found in the RNA (ribonucleic acid) of certain organisms, including yeast and mammals.

Thiouridine can be formed through the modification of uridine, one of the four basic building blocks of RNA, by the addition of a sulfur atom from a donor molecule such as cysteine or a derivative thereof. This modification can affect the stability, structure, and function of RNA molecules, including transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs).

In medicine, thiouridine is not used as a therapeutic agent or diagnostic tool, but it may be studied in the context of genetic research or molecular biology.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

N-Acylneuraminate Cytidylyltransferase is not a commonly used medical term, but it is a biological term related to the production of sialic acids, which are important in various biological processes.

Medically, sialic acids are often mentioned in relation to diseases where these molecules play a role, such as certain types of cancer, inflammation, and bacterial/viral infections.

N-Acylneuraminate Cytidylyltransferase is an enzyme (EC 2.7.7.43) that catalyzes the following reaction: CTP + N-acylneuraminate = CDP-N-acylneuraminate + PP_i

In simpler terms, this enzyme helps to create a molecule called CDP-N-acetyllneuraminic acid, which is an essential building block for the biosynthesis of sialic acids. These sialic acids are critical components of cell membranes and are involved in many important biological functions, such as cell recognition, immune response, and bacterial/viral interactions.

Defects or alterations in N-Acylneuraminate Cytidylyltransferase activity might contribute to certain pathological conditions related to sialic acid metabolism.

Hydrolysis is a chemical process, not a medical one. However, it is relevant to medicine and biology.

Hydrolysis is the breakdown of a chemical compound due to its reaction with water, often resulting in the formation of two or more simpler compounds. In the context of physiology and medicine, hydrolysis is a crucial process in various biological reactions, such as the digestion of food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Enzymes called hydrolases catalyze these hydrolysis reactions to speed up the breakdown process in the body.

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

Alanine is an alpha-amino acid that is used in the biosynthesis of proteins. The molecular formula for alanine is C3H7NO2. It is a non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be produced by the human body through the conversion of other nutrients, such as pyruvate, and does not need to be obtained directly from the diet.

Alanine is classified as an aliphatic amino acid because it contains a simple carbon side chain. It is also a non-polar amino acid, which means that it is hydrophobic and tends to repel water. Alanine plays a role in the metabolism of glucose and helps to regulate blood sugar levels. It is also involved in the transfer of nitrogen between tissues and helps to maintain the balance of nitrogen in the body.

In addition to its role as a building block of proteins, alanine is also used as a neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to have a calming effect on the nervous system. It is found in many foods, including meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, and legumes.

RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) is a single-stranded, linear polymer of ribonucleotides. It is a nucleic acid present in the cells of all living organisms and some viruses. RNAs play crucial roles in various biological processes such as protein synthesis, gene regulation, and cellular signaling. There are several types of RNA including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), small nuclear RNA (snRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). These RNAs differ in their structure, function, and location within the cell.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Secondary protein structure refers to the local spatial arrangement of amino acid chains in a protein, typically described as regular repeating patterns held together by hydrogen bonds. The two most common types of secondary structures are the alpha-helix (α-helix) and the beta-pleated sheet (β-sheet). In an α-helix, the polypeptide chain twists around itself in a helical shape, with each backbone atom forming a hydrogen bond with the fourth amino acid residue along the chain. This forms a rigid rod-like structure that is resistant to bending or twisting forces. In β-sheets, adjacent segments of the polypeptide chain run parallel or antiparallel to each other and are connected by hydrogen bonds, forming a pleated sheet-like arrangement. These secondary structures provide the foundation for the formation of tertiary and quaternary protein structures, which determine the overall three-dimensional shape and function of the protein.

Archaea are a domain of single-celled microorganisms that lack membrane-bound nuclei and other organelles. They are characterized by the unique structure of their cell walls, membranes, and ribosomes. Archaea were originally classified as bacteria, but they differ from bacteria in several key ways, including their genetic material and metabolic processes.

Archaea can be found in a wide range of environments, including some of the most extreme habitats on Earth, such as hot springs, deep-sea vents, and highly saline lakes. Some species of Archaea are able to survive in the absence of oxygen, while others require oxygen to live.

Archaea play important roles in global nutrient cycles, including the nitrogen cycle and the carbon cycle. They are also being studied for their potential role in industrial processes, such as the production of biofuels and the treatment of wastewater.

Mitochondria are specialized structures located inside cells that convert the energy from food into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the primary form of energy used by cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of chemical energy. Mitochondria are also involved in various other cellular processes, such as signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Mitochondria have their own DNA, known as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is inherited maternally. This means that mtDNA is passed down from the mother to her offspring through the egg cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a variety of diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and aging.

Streptomyces is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic, saprophytic bacteria that are widely distributed in soil, water, and decaying organic matter. They are known for their complex morphology, forming branching filaments called hyphae that can differentiate into long chains of spores.

Streptomyces species are particularly notable for their ability to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, antifungals, and other therapeutic compounds. In fact, many important antibiotics such as streptomycin, neomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin are derived from Streptomyces species.

Because of their industrial importance in the production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds, Streptomyces have been extensively studied and are considered model organisms for the study of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, and ecology.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

'Bacillus subtilis' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in soil and vegetation. It is a facultative anaerobe, meaning it can grow with or without oxygen. This bacterium is known for its ability to form durable endospores during unfavorable conditions, which allows it to survive in harsh environments for long periods of time.

'Bacillus subtilis' has been widely studied as a model organism in microbiology and molecular biology due to its genetic tractability and rapid growth. It is also used in various industrial applications, such as the production of enzymes, antibiotics, and other bioproducts.

Although 'Bacillus subtilis' is generally considered non-pathogenic, there have been rare cases of infection in immunocompromised individuals. It is important to note that this bacterium should not be confused with other pathogenic species within the genus Bacillus, such as B. anthracis (causative agent of anthrax) or B. cereus (a foodborne pathogen).

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that specifically carries the amino acid tyrosine (Tyr) during protein synthesis. In genetic code, Tyr is coded by the codons UAC and UAU. The corresponding anticodon on the tRNA molecule is AUA, which pairs with the mRNA codons to bring tyrosine to the ribosome for incorporation into the growing polypeptide chain.

Glutamine is defined as a conditionally essential amino acid in humans, which means that it can be produced by the body under normal circumstances, but may become essential during certain conditions such as stress, illness, or injury. It is the most abundant free amino acid found in the blood and in the muscles of the body.

Glutamine plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including protein synthesis, energy production, and acid-base balance. It serves as an important fuel source for cells in the intestines, immune system, and skeletal muscles. Glutamine has also been shown to have potential benefits in wound healing, gut function, and immunity, particularly during times of physiological stress or illness.

In summary, glutamine is a vital amino acid that plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of various tissues and organs in the body.

An open reading frame (ORF) is a continuous stretch of DNA or RNA sequence that has the potential to be translated into a protein. It begins with a start codon (usually "ATG" in DNA, which corresponds to "AUG" in RNA) and ends with a stop codon ("TAA", "TAG", or "TGA" in DNA; "UAA", "UAG", or "UGA" in RNA). The sequence between these two points is called a coding sequence (CDS), which, when transcribed into mRNA and translated into amino acids, forms a polypeptide chain.

In eukaryotic cells, ORFs can be located in either protein-coding genes or non-coding regions of the genome. In prokaryotic cells, multiple ORFs may be present on a single strand of DNA, often organized into operons that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that not all ORFs necessarily represent functional proteins; some may be pseudogenes or result from errors in genome annotation. Therefore, additional experimental evidence is typically required to confirm the expression and functionality of a given ORF.

Fungal genes refer to the genetic material present in fungi, which are eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. The genetic material of fungi is composed of DNA, just like in other eukaryotes, and is organized into chromosomes located in the nucleus of the cell.

Fungal genes are segments of DNA that contain the information necessary to produce proteins and RNA molecules required for various cellular functions. These genes are transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, which are then translated into proteins by ribosomes in the cytoplasm.

Fungal genomes have been sequenced for many species, revealing a diverse range of genes that encode proteins involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and regulation. Comparative genomic analyses have also provided insights into the evolutionary relationships among different fungal lineages and have helped to identify unique genetic features that distinguish fungi from other eukaryotes.

Understanding fungal genes and their functions is essential for advancing our knowledge of fungal biology, as well as for developing new strategies to control fungal pathogens that can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Diphosphates, also known as pyrophosphates, are chemical compounds that contain two phosphate groups joined together by an oxygen atom. The general formula for a diphosphate is P~PO3~2-, where ~ represents a bond. Diphosphates play important roles in various biological processes, such as energy metabolism and cell signaling. In the context of nutrition, diphosphates can be found in some foods, including milk and certain vegetables.

Amino acid transport systems refer to the various membrane transport proteins that are responsible for the active or passive translocation of amino acids across cell membranes in the body. These transport systems play a crucial role in maintaining amino acid homeostasis within cells and regulating their availability for protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and other physiological processes.

There are several distinct amino acid transport systems, each with its own specificity for particular types of amino acids or related molecules. These systems can be classified based on their energy requirements, substrate specificity, and membrane localization. Some of the major amino acid transport systems include:

1. System A - This is a sodium-dependent transport system that primarily transports small, neutral amino acids such as alanine, serine, and proline. It has several subtypes (ASC, A, and AN) with different substrate affinities and kinetic properties.
2. System L - This is a sodium-independent transport system that transports large, neutral amino acids such as leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan. It has several subtypes (L1, L2, and y+L) with different substrate specificities and transport mechanisms.
3. System B0 - This is a sodium-dependent transport system that transports both neutral and basic amino acids such as arginine, lysine, and ornithine. It has several subtypes (B0,+, B0-, and b0,+) with different substrate affinities and kinetic properties.
4. System y+ - This is a sodium-independent transport system that transports primarily basic amino acids such as arginine, lysine, and ornithine. It has several subtypes (y+L, y+, b0,+) with different substrate specificities and transport mechanisms.
5. System X-AG - This is a sodium-independent antiporter system that exchanges glutamate and aspartate for neutral amino acids such as cystine, serine, and threonine. It plays an essential role in maintaining redox homeostasis by regulating the intracellular levels of cysteine, a precursor of glutathione.

These transport systems are critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis and regulating various physiological processes such as protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and immune function. Dysregulation of these transport systems has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these transport systems is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Yeasts are single-celled microorganisms that belong to the fungus kingdom. They are characterized by their ability to reproduce asexually through budding or fission, and they obtain nutrients by fermenting sugars and other organic compounds. Some species of yeast can cause infections in humans, known as candidiasis or "yeast infections." These infections can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, mouth, genitals, and internal organs. Common symptoms of a yeast infection may include itching, redness, irritation, and discharge. Yeast infections are typically treated with antifungal medications.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

'Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins' refer to the various types of proteins that are produced and expressed by the bacterium Escherichia coli. These proteins play a critical role in the growth, development, and survival of the organism. They are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, translation, repair, and regulation.

E. coli is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that is commonly found in the intestines of warm-blooded organisms. It is widely used as a model organism in scientific research due to its well-studied genetics, rapid growth, and ability to be easily manipulated in the laboratory. As a result, many E. coli proteins have been identified, characterized, and studied in great detail.

Some examples of E. coli proteins include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as lactase, sucrase, and maltose; proteins involved in DNA replication such as the polymerases, single-stranded binding proteins, and helicases; proteins involved in transcription such as RNA polymerase and sigma factors; proteins involved in translation such as ribosomal proteins, tRNAs, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases; and regulatory proteins such as global regulators, two-component systems, and transcription factors.

Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of E. coli proteins is essential for understanding the basic biology of this important organism, as well as for developing new strategies for combating bacterial infections and improving industrial processes involving bacteria.

Peptide Elongation Factor Tu, also known as EF-Tu or Tuf, is a protein involved in the process of protein synthesis in prokaryotic cells. It plays a crucial role in the elongation phase of translation, where it facilitates the addition of amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

EF-Tu functions as a binding protein for aminoacyl-tRNA (transfer RNA) complexes. In this role, EF-Tu forms a ternary complex with GTP (guanosine triphosphate) and an aminoacyl-tRNA, which then binds to the A (acceptor) site of the small ribosomal subunit. Once aligned, the GTP in the EF-Tu-tRNA complex is hydrolyzed to GDP (guanosine diphosphate), causing a conformational change that releases the aminoacyl-tRNA into the A site for peptide bond formation.

After releasing the tRNA, EF-Tu recharges with another GTP molecule and is ready to form another ternary complex, thus continuing its role in the elongation of protein synthesis. The recycling of EF-Tu between GDP and GTP forms is facilitated by another elongation factor, EF-Ts (or Tsf).

In summary, Peptide Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu) is a vital protein in prokaryotic cells that binds to aminoacyl-tRNA and GTP, forming a ternary complex. This complex delivers the aminoacyl-tRNA to the ribosome for peptide bond formation during protein synthesis elongation.

Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are a type of large, multifunctional enzymes found in bacteria, fungi, and other organisms. They play a crucial role in the biosynthesis of polyketides, which are a diverse group of natural products with various biological activities, including antibiotic, antifungal, anticancer, and immunosuppressant properties.

PKSs are responsible for the assembly of polyketide chains by repetitively adding two-carbon units derived from acetyl-CoA or other extender units to a growing chain. The PKS enzymes can be classified into three types based on their domain organization and mechanism of action: type I, type II, and type III PKSs.

Type I PKSs are large, modular enzymes that contain multiple domains responsible for different steps in the polyketide biosynthesis process. These include acyltransferase (AT) domains that load extender units onto the PKS, acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that tether the growing chain to the PKS, and ketosynthase (KS) domains that catalyze the condensation of the extender unit with the growing chain.

Type II PKSs are simpler enzymes that consist of several separate proteins that work together in a complex to synthesize polyketides. These include ketosynthase, acyltransferase, and acyl carrier protein domains, as well as other domains responsible for reducing or modifying the polyketide chain.

Type III PKSs are the simplest of the three types and consist of a single catalytic domain that is responsible for both loading extender units and catalyzing their condensation with the growing chain. These enzymes typically synthesize shorter polyketide chains, such as those found in certain plant hormones and pigments.

Overall, PKSs are important enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a wide range of natural products with significant medical and industrial applications.

'Euglena' is a genus of unicellular flagellate protists that are typically characterized by their oval-shaped bodies, long whip-like tail (flagellum), and eyespot (stigma) which helps them to move towards light. They are commonly found in freshwater environments and can also be found in soil and brackish water. Some species of Euglena have the ability to photosynthesize, while others obtain their nutrition through heterotrophy (consuming other organisms or organic matter). The term 'Euglena' is derived from the Greek word 'euglenes', which means "well-shaped" or "true-eyed". Medical professionals and researchers may study Euglena as part of broader research into protists, microbiology, or ecology.

Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a type of chromatography used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture. In TLC, the sample is applied as a small spot onto a thin layer of adsorbent material, such as silica gel or alumina, which is coated on a flat, rigid support like a glass plate. The plate is then placed in a developing chamber containing a mobile phase, typically a mixture of solvents.

As the mobile phase moves up the plate by capillary action, it interacts with the stationary phase and the components of the sample. Different components of the mixture travel at different rates due to their varying interactions with the stationary and mobile phases, resulting in distinct spots on the plate. The distance each component travels can be measured and compared to known standards to identify and quantify the components of the mixture.

TLC is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective technique that is widely used in various fields, including forensics, pharmaceuticals, and research laboratories. It allows for the separation and analysis of complex mixtures with high resolution and sensitivity, making it an essential tool in many analytical applications.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Macromolecular substances, also known as macromolecules, are large, complex molecules made up of repeating subunits called monomers. These substances are formed through polymerization, a process in which many small molecules combine to form a larger one. Macromolecular substances can be naturally occurring, such as proteins, DNA, and carbohydrates, or synthetic, such as plastics and synthetic fibers.

In the context of medicine, macromolecular substances are often used in the development of drugs and medical devices. For example, some drugs are designed to bind to specific macromolecules in the body, such as proteins or DNA, in order to alter their function and produce a therapeutic effect. Additionally, macromolecular substances may be used in the creation of medical implants, such as artificial joints and heart valves, due to their strength and durability.

It is important for healthcare professionals to have an understanding of macromolecular substances and how they function in the body, as this knowledge can inform the development and use of medical treatments.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Stigmatella aurantiaca" is not a medical term. It is actually a type of soil-dwelling bacterium that is known for its fascinating fruiting bodies that resemble small mushrooms. These bacteria are often studied in the field of microbiology due to their unique developmental processes and bioluminescent properties.

If you have any questions related to medical terminologies or health-related topics, I would be happy to help you with those instead.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Methionine is an essential amino acid, which means that it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including:

1. Protein synthesis: Methionine is one of the building blocks of proteins, helping to create new proteins and maintain the structure and function of cells.
2. Methylation: Methionine serves as a methyl group donor in various biochemical reactions, which are essential for DNA synthesis, gene regulation, and neurotransmitter production.
3. Antioxidant defense: Methionine can be converted to cysteine, which is involved in the formation of glutathione, a potent antioxidant that helps protect cells from oxidative damage.
4. Homocysteine metabolism: Methionine is involved in the conversion of homocysteine back to methionine through a process called remethylation, which is essential for maintaining normal homocysteine levels and preventing cardiovascular disease.
5. Fat metabolism: Methionine helps facilitate the breakdown and metabolism of fats in the body.

Foods rich in methionine include meat, fish, dairy products, eggs, and some nuts and seeds.

A gene suppressor, also known as a tumor suppressor gene, is a type of gene that regulates cell growth and division by producing proteins to prevent uncontrolled cell proliferation. When these genes are mutated or deleted, they can lose their ability to regulate cell growth, leading to the development of cancer.

Tumor suppressor genes work to repair damaged DNA, regulate the cell cycle, and promote programmed cell death (apoptosis) when necessary. Some examples of tumor suppressor genes include TP53, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes have been linked to an increased risk of developing various types of cancer, such as breast, ovarian, and colon cancer.

In contrast to oncogenes, which promote cell growth and division when mutated, tumor suppressor genes typically act to inhibit or slow down cell growth and division. Both types of genes play crucial roles in maintaining the proper functioning of cells and preventing the development of cancer.

Translational peptide chain elongation is the process during protein synthesis where activated amino acids are added to the growing peptide chain in a sequence determined by the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA). This process involves several steps:

1. Recognition of the start codon on the mRNA by the small ribosomal subunit, which binds to the mRNA and brings an initiator tRNA with a methionine or formylmethionine amino acid attached into the P site (peptidyl site) of the ribosome.
2. The large ribosomal subunit then joins the small subunit, forming a complete ribosome complex.
3. An incoming charged tRNA with an appropriate amino acid, complementary to the next codon on the mRNA, binds to the A site (aminoacyl site) of the ribosome.
4. Peptidyl transferase, a catalytic domain within the large ribosomal subunit, facilitates the formation of a peptide bond between the amino acids attached to the tRNAs in the P and A sites. The methionine or formylmethionine initiator amino acid is now covalently linked to the second amino acid via this peptide bond.
5. Translocation occurs, moving the tRNA with the growing peptide chain from the P site to the E site (exit site) and shifting the mRNA by one codon relative to the ribosome. The uncharged tRNA is then released from the E site.
6. The next charged tRNA carrying an appropriate amino acid binds to the A site, and the process repeats until a stop codon is reached on the mRNA.
7. Upon encountering a stop codon, release factors recognize it and facilitate the release of the completed polypeptide chain from the final tRNA in the P site. The ribosome then dissociates from the mRNA, allowing for further translational events to occur.

Translational peptide chain elongation is a crucial step in protein synthesis and requires precise coordination between various components of the translation machinery, including ribosomes, tRNAs, amino acids, and numerous accessory proteins.

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources. Its chemical formula is C11H12N2O2. Tryptophan plays a crucial role in various biological processes as it serves as a precursor to several important molecules, including serotonin, melatonin, and niacin (vitamin B3). Serotonin is a neurotransmitter involved in mood regulation, appetite control, and sleep-wake cycles, while melatonin is a hormone that regulates sleep-wake patterns. Niacin is essential for energy production and DNA repair.

Foods rich in tryptophan include turkey, chicken, fish, eggs, cheese, milk, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. In some cases, tryptophan supplementation may be recommended to help manage conditions related to serotonin imbalances, such as depression or insomnia, but this should only be done under the guidance of a healthcare professional due to potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

Post-transcriptional RNA processing refers to the modifications and regulations that occur on RNA molecules after the transcription of DNA into RNA. This process includes several steps:

1. 5' capping: The addition of a cap structure, usually a methylated guanosine triphosphate (GTP), to the 5' end of the RNA molecule. This helps protect the RNA from degradation and plays a role in its transport, stability, and translation.
2. 3' polyadenylation: The addition of a string of adenosine residues (poly(A) tail) to the 3' end of the RNA molecule. This process is important for mRNA stability, export from the nucleus, and translation initiation.
3. Intron removal and exon ligation: Eukaryotic pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) contain intronic sequences that do not code for proteins. These introns are removed by a process called splicing, where the flanking exons are joined together to form a continuous mRNA sequence. Alternative splicing can lead to different mature mRNAs from a single pre-mRNA, increasing transcriptomic and proteomic diversity.
4. RNA editing: Specific nucleotide changes in RNA molecules that alter the coding potential or regulatory functions of RNA. This process is catalyzed by enzymes like ADAR (Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA) and APOBEC (Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Catalytic Polypeptide-like).
5. Chemical modifications: Various chemical modifications can occur on RNA nucleotides, such as methylation, pseudouridination, and isomerization. These modifications can influence RNA stability, localization, and interaction with proteins or other RNAs.
6. Transport and localization: Mature mRNAs are transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for translation. In some cases, specific mRNAs are localized to particular cellular compartments to ensure local protein synthesis.
7. Degradation: RNA molecules have finite lifetimes and undergo degradation by various ribonucleases (RNases). The rate of degradation can be influenced by factors such as RNA structure, modifications, or interactions with proteins.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Nitrogenous group transferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nitrogen-containing groups from one molecule to another. These enzymes play a crucial role in various metabolic pathways, including the biosynthesis and degradation of amino acids, nucleotides, and other nitrogen-containing compounds.

The term "nitrogenous group" refers to any chemical group that contains nitrogen atoms. Examples of nitrogenous groups include amino groups (-NH2), amide groups (-CONH2), and cyano groups (-CN). Transferases that move these groups from one molecule to another are classified as nitrogenous group transferases.

These enzymes typically require cofactors such as ATP, NAD+, or other small molecules to facilitate the transfer of the nitrogenous group. They follow the general reaction mechanism of a transferase enzyme, where the substrate (donor) binds to the active site of the enzyme and transfers its nitrogenous group to an acceptor molecule, resulting in the formation of a new product.

Examples of nitrogenous group transferases include:

* Glutamine synthetase, which catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to glutamine by adding an ammonia group (-NH3) from ATP.
* Aspartate transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the transfer of a carbamoyl group (-CO-NH2) from carbamoyl phosphate to aspartate during pyrimidine biosynthesis.
* Argininosuccinate synthetase, which catalyzes the formation of argininosuccinate by transferring an aspartate group from aspartate to citrulline during the urea cycle.

Understanding nitrogenous group transferases is essential for understanding various metabolic pathways and their regulation in living organisms.

Archaeal proteins are proteins that are encoded by the genes found in archaea, a domain of single-celled microorganisms. These proteins are crucial for various cellular functions and structures in archaea, which are adapted to survive in extreme environments such as high temperatures, high salt concentrations, and low pH levels.

Archaeal proteins share similarities with both bacterial and eukaryotic proteins, but they also have unique features that distinguish them from each other. For example, many archaeal proteins contain unusual amino acids or modifications that are not commonly found in other organisms. Additionally, the three-dimensional structures of some archaeal proteins are distinct from their bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts.

Studying archaeal proteins is important for understanding the biology of these unique organisms and for gaining insights into the evolution of life on Earth. Furthermore, because some archaea can survive in extreme environments, their proteins may have properties that make them useful in industrial and medical applications.

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify the chemical components of a mixture or compound. It works by ionizing the sample, generating charged molecules or fragments, and then measuring their mass-to-charge ratio in a vacuum. The resulting mass spectrum provides information about the molecular weight and structure of the analytes, allowing for identification and characterization.

In simpler terms, mass spectrometry is a method used to determine what chemicals are present in a sample and in what quantities, by converting the chemicals into ions, measuring their masses, and generating a spectrum that shows the relative abundances of each ion type.

Araliaceae is a family of flowering plants, also known as the aralia family or ivy family. It includes a wide variety of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants, many of which have compound leaves and small clusters of flowers. Some well-known members of this family include the genera Aralia (commonly called "aralias" or "devil's walkingsticks"), Panax (which includes ginseng), Hedera (common ivy), and Schefflera (also known as umbrella trees). The plants in this family are found primarily in tropical and subtropical regions around the world.

Eukaryotic cells are complex cells that characterize the cells of all living organisms except bacteria and archaea. They are typically larger than prokaryotic cells and contain a true nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles. The nucleus houses the genetic material, DNA, which is organized into chromosomes. Other organelles include mitochondria, responsible for energy production; chloroplasts, present in plant cells and responsible for photosynthesis; endoplasmic reticulum, involved in protein synthesis; Golgi apparatus, involved in the processing and transport of proteins and lipids; lysosomes, involved in digestion and waste disposal; and vacuoles, involved in storage and waste management. Eukaryotic cells also have a cytoskeleton made up of microtubules, intermediate filaments, and actin filaments that provide structure, support, and mobility to the cell.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Endoribonucleases are enzymes that cleave RNA molecules internally, meaning they cut the phosphodiester bond between nucleotides within the RNA chain. These enzymes play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as RNA processing, degradation, and quality control. Different endoribonucleases recognize specific sequences or structural features in RNA substrates, allowing them to target particular regions for cleavage. Some well-known examples of endoribonucleases include RNase III, RNase T1, and RNase A, each with distinct substrate preferences and functions.

Glycine is a simple amino acid that plays a crucial role in the body. According to the medical definition, glycine is an essential component for the synthesis of proteins, peptides, and other biologically important compounds. It is also involved in various metabolic processes, such as the production of creatine, which supports muscle function, and the regulation of neurotransmitters, affecting nerve impulse transmission and brain function. Glycine can be found as a free form in the body and is also present in many dietary proteins.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins are the proteins that are produced by the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism is a single-celled eukaryote that has been widely used as a model organism in scientific research for many years due to its relatively simple genetic makeup and its similarity to higher eukaryotic cells.

The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been fully sequenced, and it is estimated to contain approximately 6,000 genes that encode proteins. These proteins play a wide variety of roles in the cell, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, regulating gene expression, maintaining the structure of the cell, and responding to environmental stimuli.

Many Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins have human homologs and are involved in similar biological processes, making this organism a valuable tool for studying human disease. For example, many of the proteins involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination in yeast have human counterparts that are associated with cancer and other diseases. By studying these proteins in yeast, researchers can gain insights into their function and regulation in humans, which may lead to new treatments for disease.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Gel chromatography is a type of liquid chromatography that separates molecules based on their size or molecular weight. It uses a stationary phase that consists of a gel matrix made up of cross-linked polymers, such as dextran, agarose, or polyacrylamide. The gel matrix contains pores of various sizes, which allow smaller molecules to penetrate deeper into the matrix while larger molecules are excluded.

In gel chromatography, a mixture of molecules is loaded onto the top of the gel column and eluted with a solvent that moves down the column by gravity or pressure. As the sample components move down the column, they interact with the gel matrix and get separated based on their size. Smaller molecules can enter the pores of the gel and take longer to elute, while larger molecules are excluded from the pores and elute more quickly.

Gel chromatography is commonly used to separate and purify proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules based on their size and molecular weight. It is also used in the analysis of polymers, colloids, and other materials with a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Cysteine is a semi-essential amino acid, which means that it can be produced by the human body under normal circumstances, but may need to be obtained from external sources in certain conditions such as illness or stress. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH2SH, and it contains a sulfhydryl group (-SH), which allows it to act as a powerful antioxidant and participate in various cellular processes.

Cysteine plays important roles in protein structure and function, detoxification, and the synthesis of other molecules such as glutathione, taurine, and coenzyme A. It is also involved in wound healing, immune response, and the maintenance of healthy skin, hair, and nails.

Cysteine can be found in a variety of foods, including meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, legumes, nuts, seeds, and some grains. It is also available as a dietary supplement and can be used in the treatment of various medical conditions such as liver disease, bronchitis, and heavy metal toxicity. However, excessive intake of cysteine may have adverse effects on health, including gastrointestinal disturbances, nausea, vomiting, and headaches.

Peptide biosynthesis is the process by which cells synthesize peptides, short chains of amino acids. This process is mediated by enzymes called peptide synthetases, which catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between individual amino acids to create a longer chain. Peptide biosynthesis typically occurs through one of two pathways: ribosomal or non-ribosomal.

Ribosomal peptide biosynthesis involves the use of the cell's translational machinery, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs (tRNAs), to synthesize peptides from a messenger RNA (mRNA) template. This process is highly regulated and typically results in the production of small, linear peptides that are further modified by enzymes to create bioactive molecules such as hormones or neurotransmitters.

Non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis (NRPS), on the other hand, is a more complex process that involves large multifunctional enzyme complexes called non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). These enzymes are capable of synthesizing a wide variety of structurally diverse peptides, including cyclic and branched peptides, as well as those containing non-proteinogenic amino acids. NRPSs typically consist of multiple modules, each responsible for adding a single amino acid to the growing peptide chain. The modular nature of NRPS systems allows for great diversity in the types of peptides that can be synthesized, making them important sources of bioactive molecules with potential therapeutic applications.

Chromatography is a technique used in analytical chemistry for the separation, identification, and quantification of the components of a mixture. It is based on the differential distribution of the components of a mixture between a stationary phase and a mobile phase. The stationary phase can be a solid or liquid, while the mobile phase is a gas, liquid, or supercritical fluid that moves through the stationary phase carrying the sample components.

The interaction between the sample components and the stationary and mobile phases determines how quickly each component will move through the system. Components that interact more strongly with the stationary phase will move more slowly than those that interact more strongly with the mobile phase. This difference in migration rates allows for the separation of the components, which can then be detected and quantified.

There are many different types of chromatography, including paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Each type has its own strengths and weaknesses, and is best suited for specific applications.

In summary, chromatography is a powerful analytical technique used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture based on their differential distribution between a stationary phase and a mobile phase.

Sequence analysis in the context of molecular biology and genetics refers to the systematic examination and interpretation of DNA or protein sequences to understand their features, structures, functions, and evolutionary relationships. It involves using various computational methods and bioinformatics tools to compare, align, and analyze sequences to identify patterns, conserved regions, motifs, or mutations that can provide insights into molecular mechanisms, disease associations, or taxonomic classifications.

In a medical context, sequence analysis can be applied to diagnose genetic disorders, predict disease susceptibility, inform treatment decisions, and guide research in personalized medicine. For example, analyzing the sequence of a gene associated with a particular inherited condition can help identify the specific mutation responsible for the disorder, providing valuable information for genetic counseling and family planning. Similarly, comparing the sequences of pathogens from different patients can reveal drug resistance patterns or transmission dynamics, informing infection control strategies and therapeutic interventions.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Biocatalysis is the use of living organisms or their components, such as enzymes, to accelerate chemical reactions. In other words, it is the process by which biological systems, including cells, tissues, and organs, catalyze chemical transformations. Biocatalysts, such as enzymes, can increase the rate of a reaction by lowering the activation energy required for the reaction to occur. They are highly specific and efficient, making them valuable tools in various industries, including pharmaceuticals, food and beverage, and biofuels.

In medicine, biocatalysis is used in the production of drugs, such as antibiotics and hormones, as well as in diagnostic tests. Enzymes are also used in medical treatments, such as enzyme replacement therapy for genetic disorders that affect enzyme function. Overall, biocatalysis plays a critical role in many areas of medicine and healthcare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nucleoside Q" is not a recognized or established term in medical or biological nomenclature. Nucleosides are organic molecules consisting of a pentose sugar (ribose or deoxyribose) linked to a nitrogenous base (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, or uracil). There is no "Q" nucleoside in the standard nomenclature.

If you have any questions about specific nucleosides or related compounds, I'd be happy to try and help clarify those for you!

'Bacillus' is a genus of rod-shaped, gram-positive bacteria that are commonly found in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. Many species of Bacillus are capable of forming endospores, which are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals, allowing them to survive for long periods in harsh environments. The most well-known species of Bacillus is B. anthracis, which causes anthrax in animals and humans. Other species of Bacillus have industrial or agricultural importance, such as B. subtilis, which is used in the production of enzymes and antibiotics.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight mistake in your question. "Archaeal" is not a term used to describe genes but rather a group of single-celled organisms that are classified as archaea.

Archaea are one of the three domains of life, along with bacteria and eukaryotes (which include plants, animals, and fungi). Archaea are unique because they share characteristics with both bacteria and eukaryotes, but they also have many features that are distinctly their own. For example, archaea have a different cell membrane structure than bacteria and eukaryotes, which allows them to thrive in extreme environments such as hot springs, salt mines, and deep-sea vents.

Genes, on the other hand, are segments of DNA that contain the instructions for making proteins or performing other important functions in an organism's cells. All living organisms, including archaea, have genes that are passed down from generation to generation. Archaeal genes are made up of the same four nucleotides (A, T, C, and G) as bacterial and eukaryotic genes, and they code for proteins and RNA molecules that are essential for the survival and reproduction of archaea.

So, to summarize, there is no specific definition for "Archaeal genes" because "archaeal" is not a term used to describe genes. However, we can say that archaeal genes are segments of DNA that contain the instructions for making proteins and performing other important functions in archaea.

Adenine nucleotides are molecules that consist of a nitrogenous base called adenine, which is linked to a sugar molecule (ribose in the case of adenosine monophosphate or AMP, and deoxyribose in the case of adenosine diphosphate or ADP and adenosine triphosphate or ATP) and one, two, or three phosphate groups. These molecules play a crucial role in energy transfer and metabolism within cells.

AMP contains one phosphate group, while ADP contains two phosphate groups, and ATP contains three phosphate groups. When a phosphate group is removed from ATP, energy is released, which can be used to power various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. The reverse reaction, in which a phosphate group is added back to ADP or AMP to form ATP, requires energy input and often involves the breakdown of nutrients such as glucose or fatty acids.

In addition to their role in energy metabolism, adenine nucleotides also serve as precursors for other important molecules, including DNA and RNA, coenzymes, and signaling molecules.

In the context of medicine, "chemistry" often refers to the field of study concerned with the properties, composition, and structure of elements and compounds, as well as their reactions with one another. It is a fundamental science that underlies much of modern medicine, including pharmacology (the study of drugs), toxicology (the study of poisons), and biochemistry (the study of the chemical processes that occur within living organisms).

In addition to its role as a basic science, chemistry is also used in medical testing and diagnosis. For example, clinical chemistry involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood and urine to detect and measure various substances, such as glucose, cholesterol, and electrolytes, that can provide important information about a person's health status.

Overall, chemistry plays a critical role in understanding the mechanisms of diseases, developing new treatments, and improving diagnostic tests and techniques.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

Fatty acid synthases (FAS) are a group of enzymes that are responsible for the synthesis of fatty acids in the body. They catalyze a series of reactions that convert acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA into longer chain fatty acids, which are then used for various purposes such as energy storage or membrane formation.

The human genome encodes two types of FAS: type I and type II. Type I FAS is a large multifunctional enzyme complex found in the cytoplasm of cells, while type II FAS consists of individual enzymes located in the mitochondria. Both types of FAS play important roles in lipid metabolism, but their regulation and expression differ depending on the tissue and physiological conditions.

Inhibition of FAS has been explored as a potential therapeutic strategy for various diseases, including cancer, obesity, and metabolic disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand the complex mechanisms regulating FAS activity and its role in human health and disease.

Chemical phenomena refer to the changes and interactions that occur at the molecular or atomic level when chemicals are involved. These phenomena can include chemical reactions, in which one or more substances (reactants) are converted into different substances (products), as well as physical properties that change as a result of chemical interactions, such as color, state of matter, and solubility. Chemical phenomena can be studied through various scientific disciplines, including chemistry, biochemistry, and physics.

A cell-free system is a biochemical environment in which biological reactions can occur outside of an intact living cell. These systems are often used to study specific cellular processes or pathways, as they allow researchers to control and manipulate the conditions in which the reactions take place. In a cell-free system, the necessary enzymes, substrates, and cofactors for a particular reaction are provided in a test tube or other container, rather than within a whole cell.

Cell-free systems can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells. They can be used to study a wide range of cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, protein folding, and metabolism. For example, a cell-free system might be used to express and purify a specific protein, or to investigate the regulation of a particular metabolic pathway.

One advantage of using cell-free systems is that they can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes without the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive cell culture or genetic manipulation. Additionally, because cell-free systems are not constrained by the limitations of a whole cell, they offer greater flexibility in terms of reaction conditions and the ability to study complex or transient interactions between biological molecules.

Overall, cell-free systems are an important tool in molecular biology and biochemistry, providing researchers with a versatile and powerful means of investigating the fundamental processes that underlie life at the cellular level.

I apologize for any confusion, but "plants" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "plants" refers to a large and diverse group of organisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, which is the process of converting sunlight into chemical energy. Plants are typically characterized by having cells with cell walls containing cellulose, chloroplasts containing the pigment chlorophyll, and the ability to synthesize their own food through photosynthesis.

In a medical or biological context, you might be thinking of "plant-based" or "phytomedicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as a form of medicine or treatment. Phytomedicines have been used for thousands of years in many traditional systems of medicine, and some plant-derived compounds have been found to have therapeutic benefits in modern medicine as well. However, "plants" itself does not have a medical definition.

Prokaryotic cells are simple, single-celled organisms that do not have a true nucleus or other membrane-bound organelles. They include bacteria and archaea. The genetic material of prokaryotic cells is composed of a single circular chromosome located in the cytoplasm, along with small, circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. Prokaryotic cells have a rigid cell wall, which provides protection and support, and a flexible outer membrane that helps them to survive in diverse environments. They reproduce asexually by binary fission, where the cell divides into two identical daughter cells. Compared to eukaryotic cells, prokaryotic cells are generally smaller and have a simpler structure.

Esters are organic compounds that are formed by the reaction between an alcohol and a carboxylic acid. They are widely found in nature and are used in various industries, including the production of perfumes, flavors, and pharmaceuticals. In the context of medical definitions, esters may be mentioned in relation to their use as excipients in medications or in discussions of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Esters can also be found in various natural substances such as fats and oils, which are triesters of glycerol and fatty acids.

Cyclic peptides are a type of peptides in which the N-terminus and C-terminus of the peptide chain are linked to form a circular structure. This is in contrast to linear peptides, which have a straight peptide backbone with a free N-terminus and C-terminus. The cyclization of peptides can occur through various mechanisms, including the formation of an amide bond between the N-terminal amino group and the C-terminal carboxylic acid group (head-to-tail cyclization), or through the formation of a bond between side chain functional groups.

Cyclic peptides have unique structural and chemical properties that make them valuable in medical and therapeutic applications. For example, they are more resistant to degradation by enzymes compared to linear peptides, which can increase their stability and half-life in the body. Additionally, the cyclic structure allows for greater conformational rigidity, which can enhance their binding affinity and specificity to target molecules.

Cyclic peptides have been explored as potential therapeutics for a variety of diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. They have also been used as tools in basic research to study protein-protein interactions and cell signaling pathways.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Threonine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH(OH)CH3. Threonine plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including protein synthesis, immune function, and fat metabolism. It is particularly important for maintaining the structural integrity of proteins, as it is often found in their hydroxyl-containing regions. Foods rich in threonine include animal proteins such as meat, dairy products, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like lentils and soybeans.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Oligoribonucleotides are short, synthetic chains of ribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of RNA (ribonucleic acid). These chains typically contain fewer than 20 ribonucleotide units, and can be composed of all four types of nucleotides found in RNA: adenine (A), uracil (U), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). They are often used in research for various purposes, such as studying RNA function, regulating gene expression, or serving as potential therapeutic agents.

Transferases are a class of enzymes that facilitate the transfer of specific functional groups (like methyl, acetyl, or phosphate groups) from one molecule (the donor) to another (the acceptor). This transfer of a chemical group can alter the physical or chemical properties of the acceptor molecule and is a crucial process in various metabolic pathways. Transferases play essential roles in numerous biological processes, such as biosynthesis, detoxification, and catabolism.

The classification of transferases is based on the type of functional group they transfer:

1. Methyltransferases - transfer a methyl group (-CH3)
2. Acetyltransferases - transfer an acetyl group (-COCH3)
3. Aminotransferases or Transaminases - transfer an amino group (-NH2 or -NHR, where R is a hydrogen atom or a carbon-containing group)
4. Glycosyltransferases - transfer a sugar moiety (a glycosyl group)
5. Phosphotransferases - transfer a phosphate group (-PO3H2)
6. Sulfotransferases - transfer a sulfo group (-SO3H)
7. Acyltransferases - transfer an acyl group (a fatty acid or similar molecule)

These enzymes are identified and named according to the systematic nomenclature of enzymes developed by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). The naming convention includes the class of enzyme, the specific group being transferred, and the molecules involved in the transfer reaction. For example, the enzyme that transfers a phosphate group from ATP to glucose is named "glucokinase."

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Molecular conformation, also known as spatial arrangement or configuration, refers to the specific three-dimensional shape and orientation of atoms that make up a molecule. It describes the precise manner in which bonds between atoms are arranged around a molecular framework, taking into account factors such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsional angles.

Conformational isomers, or conformers, are different spatial arrangements of the same molecule that can interconvert without breaking chemical bonds. These isomers may have varying energies, stability, and reactivity, which can significantly impact a molecule's biological activity and function. Understanding molecular conformation is crucial in fields such as drug design, where small changes in conformation can lead to substantial differences in how a drug interacts with its target.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

Guanosine is a nucleoside that consists of a guanine base linked to a ribose sugar molecule through a beta-N9-glycosidic bond. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as serving as a building block for DNA and RNA during replication and transcription. Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) are important energy carriers and signaling molecules involved in intracellular regulation. Additionally, guanosine has been studied for its potential role as a neuroprotective agent and possible contribution to cell-to-cell communication.

Carbon isotopes are variants of the chemical element carbon that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^{12}C), which contains six protons and six neutrons. However, carbon can also come in other forms, known as isotopes, which contain different numbers of neutrons.

Carbon-13 (^{13}C) is a stable isotope of carbon that contains seven neutrons in its nucleus. It makes up about 1.1% of all carbon found on Earth and is used in various scientific applications, such as in tracing the metabolic pathways of organisms or in studying the age of fossilized materials.

Carbon-14 (^{14}C), also known as radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon that contains eight neutrons in its nucleus. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere through the interaction of cosmic rays with nitrogen gas. Carbon-14 has a half-life of about 5,730 years, which makes it useful for dating organic materials, such as archaeological artifacts or fossils, up to around 60,000 years old.

Carbon isotopes are important in many scientific fields, including geology, biology, and medicine, and are used in a variety of applications, from studying the Earth's climate history to diagnosing medical conditions.

According to the US National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), Succinate-CoA Ligases are defined as:

Enzymes that catalyze the conversion of succinyl-CoA and diphosphate into CoA, carbon dioxide, and a high-energy phosphate bond in an ATP or a GTP molecule. They are classified into two types according to the type of high-energy phosphate bond they form: adenosine triphosphatases (succinate-coa ligase (adenosine triphosphate)) or guanosine triphosphatases (succinate-coa ligase (guanosine triphosphate)).

Source: National Library of Medicine. (2021). Succinate-CoA Ligases. In: MeSH Database. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine. Available at:

A chemical model is a simplified representation or description of a chemical system, based on the laws of chemistry and physics. It is used to explain and predict the behavior of chemicals and chemical reactions. Chemical models can take many forms, including mathematical equations, diagrams, and computer simulations. They are often used in research, education, and industry to understand complex chemical processes and develop new products and technologies.

For example, a chemical model might be used to describe the way that atoms and molecules interact in a particular reaction, or to predict the properties of a new material. Chemical models can also be used to study the behavior of chemicals at the molecular level, such as how they bind to each other or how they are affected by changes in temperature or pressure.

It is important to note that chemical models are simplifications of reality and may not always accurately represent every aspect of a chemical system. They should be used with caution and validated against experimental data whenever possible.

Enzyme stability refers to the ability of an enzyme to maintain its structure and function under various environmental conditions, such as temperature, pH, and the presence of denaturants or inhibitors. A stable enzyme retains its activity and conformation over time and across a range of conditions, making it more suitable for industrial and therapeutic applications.

Enzymes can be stabilized through various methods, including chemical modification, immobilization, and protein engineering. Understanding the factors that affect enzyme stability is crucial for optimizing their use in biotechnology, medicine, and research.

Phosphatidylcholines (PtdCho) are a type of phospholipids that are essential components of cell membranes in living organisms. They are composed of a hydrophilic head group, which contains a choline moiety, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. Phosphatidylcholines are crucial for maintaining the structural integrity and function of cell membranes, and they also serve as important precursors for the synthesis of signaling molecules such as acetylcholine. They can be found in various tissues and biological fluids, including blood, and are abundant in foods such as soybeans, eggs, and meat. Phosphatidylcholines have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their role in maintaining healthy lipid metabolism and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Pseudouridine is a modified nucleoside that is formed through the enzymatic process of pseudouridylation, where a uracil base in RNA is replaced by a pseudouracil base. Pseudouridine is structurally similar to uridine, but the uracil base is linked to the ribose sugar at carbon-5 rather than carbon-1, which leads to altered chemical and physical properties. This modification can affect RNA structure, stability, and function, and has been implicated in various cellular processes such as translation, splicing, and gene regulation.

Amino acid isomerases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of one amino acid stereoisomer to another. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism and biosynthesis of amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins.

Amino acids can exist in two forms, called L- and D-stereoisomers, based on the spatial arrangement of their constituent atoms around a central carbon atom. While most naturally occurring amino acids are of the L-configuration, some D-amino acids are also found in certain proteins and peptides, particularly in bacteria and lower organisms.

Amino acid isomerases can convert one stereoisomer to another by breaking and reforming chemical bonds in a process that requires energy. This conversion can be important for the proper functioning of various biological processes, such as protein synthesis, neurotransmitter metabolism, and immune response.

Examples of amino acid isomerases include proline racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of L-proline and D-proline, and serine hydroxymethyltransferase, which converts L-serine to D-serine. These enzymes are essential for maintaining the balance of amino acids in living organisms and have potential therapeutic applications in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

An operon is a genetic unit in prokaryotic organisms (like bacteria) consisting of a cluster of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule, which then undergoes translation to produce multiple proteins. This genetic organization allows for the coordinated regulation of genes that are involved in the same metabolic pathway or functional process. The unit typically includes promoter and operator regions that control the transcription of the operon, as well as structural genes encoding the proteins. Operons were first discovered in bacteria, but similar genetic organizations have been found in some eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast.

A point mutation is a type of genetic mutation where a single nucleotide base (A, T, C, or G) in DNA is altered, deleted, or substituted with another nucleotide. Point mutations can have various effects on the organism, depending on the location of the mutation and whether it affects the function of any genes. Some point mutations may not have any noticeable effect, while others might lead to changes in the amino acids that make up proteins, potentially causing diseases or altering traits. Point mutations can occur spontaneously due to errors during DNA replication or be inherited from parents.

Dinucleoside phosphates are the chemical compounds that result from the linkage of two nucleosides through a phosphate group. Nucleosides themselves consist of a sugar molecule (ribose or deoxyribose) and a nitrogenous base (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, or uracil). When two nucleosides are joined together by an ester bond between the phosphate group and the 5'-hydroxyl group of the sugar moiety, they form a dinucleoside phosphate.

These compounds play crucial roles in various biological processes, particularly in the context of DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. For instance, dinucleoside phosphates serve as building blocks for the formation of longer nucleic acid chains during replication and transcription. They are also involved in signaling pathways and energy transfer within cells.

It is worth noting that the term "dinucleotides" is sometimes used interchangeably with dinucleoside phosphates, although technically, dinucleotides refer to compounds formed by joining two nucleotides (nucleosides plus one or more phosphate groups) rather than just two nucleosides.

Protein engineering is a branch of molecular biology that involves the modification of proteins to achieve desired changes in their structure and function. This can be accomplished through various techniques, including site-directed mutagenesis, gene shuffling, directed evolution, and rational design. The goal of protein engineering may be to improve the stability, activity, specificity, or other properties of a protein for therapeutic, diagnostic, industrial, or research purposes. It is an interdisciplinary field that combines knowledge from genetics, biochemistry, structural biology, and computational modeling.

Isopentenyladenosine (IPA) is a derivative of adenosine, which is a nucleoside consisting of adenine attached to ribose sugar via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. In Isopentenyladenosine, an isopentenyl group (a hydrocarbon chain with five carbon atoms) is added to the N6 position of the adenine base.

Isopentenyladenosine is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of cytokinins, a class of plant hormones that play crucial roles in cell division and differentiation, shoot initiation, leaf expansion, apical dominance, root growth, and other developmental processes.

It's worth noting that Isopentenyladenosine is not typically used as a medical term or definition but rather in the context of biochemistry and plant physiology.

A codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies a particular amino acid during the process of protein synthesis, or codes for the termination of translation. In DNA, these triplets are read in a 5' to 3' direction, while in mRNA, they are read in a 5' to 3' direction as well. There are 64 possible codons (4^3) in the genetic code, and 61 of them specify amino acids. The remaining three codons, UAA, UAG, and UGA, are terminator or stop codons that signal the end of protein synthesis.

Terminator codons, also known as nonsense codons, do not code for any amino acids. Instead, they cause the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome, which is the complex machinery responsible for translating the genetic code into a protein. This process is called termination or translation termination.

In prokaryotic cells, termination occurs when a release factor recognizes and binds to the stop codon in the A site of the ribosome. This triggers the hydrolysis of the peptidyl-tRNA bond, releasing the completed polypeptide chain from the tRNA and the ribosome. In eukaryotic cells, a similar process occurs, but it involves different release factors and additional steps to ensure accurate termination.

In summary, a codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies an amino acid or signals the end of protein synthesis. Terminator codons are specific codons that do not code for any amino acids and instead signal the end of translation, leading to the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome.

Base pairing is a specific type of chemical bonding that occurs between complementary base pairs in the nucleic acid molecules DNA and RNA. In DNA, these bases are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). Adenine always pairs with thymine via two hydrogen bonds, while guanine always pairs with cytosine via three hydrogen bonds. This precise base pairing is crucial for the stability of the double helix structure of DNA and for the accurate replication and transcription of genetic information. In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine and pairs with adenine.

Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endonuclease enzyme complex that is found in all three domains of life: archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Its primary function is to process precursor transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules by cleaving the 5' leader sequence to generate mature tRNAs.

RNase P is unique because it consists of both a protein component and an RNA subunit, known as the RNA moiety or RNA catalytic subunit. In bacteria and archaea, the RNA subunit is primarily responsible for the enzymatic activity, while in eukaryotes, the protein component plays a more significant role.

RNase P's function in tRNA processing is essential for protein synthesis, as mature tRNAs are necessary for decoding messenger RNA (mRNA) sequences and translating them into proteins during translation. Dysregulation or mutations in RNase P can lead to various human diseases, including mitochondrial disorders, neurodevelopmental abnormalities, and cancer.

Aspartic acid is an α-amino acid with the chemical formula HO2CCH(NH2)CO2H. It is one of the twenty standard amino acids, and it is a polar, negatively charged, and hydrophilic amino acid. In proteins, aspartic acid usually occurs in its ionized form, aspartate, which has a single negative charge.

Aspartic acid plays important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and energy production. It is also a key component of many enzymes and proteins, where it often contributes to the formation of ionic bonds and helps stabilize protein structure.

In addition to its role as a building block of proteins, aspartic acid is also used in the synthesis of other important biological molecules, such as nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. It is also a component of the dipeptide aspartame, an artificial sweetener that is widely used in food and beverages.

Like other amino acids, aspartic acid is essential for human health, but it cannot be synthesized by the body and must be obtained through the diet. Foods that are rich in aspartic acid include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, legumes, and some fruits and vegetables.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

Fungal proteins are a type of protein that is specifically produced and present in fungi, which are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds. These proteins play various roles in the growth, development, and survival of fungi. They can be involved in the structure and function of fungal cells, metabolism, pathogenesis, and other cellular processes. Some fungal proteins can also have important implications for human health, both in terms of their potential use as therapeutic targets and as allergens or toxins that can cause disease.

Fungal proteins can be classified into different categories based on their functions, such as enzymes, structural proteins, signaling proteins, and toxins. Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in fungal cells, while structural proteins provide support and protection for the cell. Signaling proteins are involved in communication between cells and regulation of various cellular processes, and toxins are proteins that can cause harm to other organisms, including humans.

Understanding the structure and function of fungal proteins is important for developing new treatments for fungal infections, as well as for understanding the basic biology of fungi. Research on fungal proteins has led to the development of several antifungal drugs that target specific fungal enzymes or other proteins, providing effective treatment options for a range of fungal diseases. Additionally, further study of fungal proteins may reveal new targets for drug development and help improve our ability to diagnose and treat fungal infections.

Triazenes are a class of organic compounds that contain a triazene functional group, which is composed of three nitrogen atoms bonded in a row (-N=N-NH-). In the context of medicine, certain triazene derivatives have been studied and used in cancer chemotherapy. For example, dacarbazine (also known as DTIC) is a triazene anticancer drug that is used to treat malignant melanoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. These compounds are believed to work by alkylating DNA, which can disrupt cancer cell growth and division. However, their use is limited due to side effects and the development of resistance in some cases.

Peptide elongation factors are a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the process of protein synthesis in cells, specifically during the elongation stage of translation. They assist in the addition of amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain by facilitating the binding of aminoacyl-tRNAs (transfer RNAs with attached amino acids) to the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs.

In prokaryotic cells, there are two main peptide elongation factors: EF-Tu and EF-G. EF-Tu forms a complex with aminoacyl-tRNA and delivers it to the ribosome's acceptor site (A-site), where the incoming amino acid is matched with the corresponding codon on the mRNA. Once the correct match is made, GTP hydrolysis occurs, releasing EF-Tu from the complex, allowing for peptide bond formation between the new amino acid and the growing polypeptide chain.

EF-G then enters the scene to facilitate translocation, the movement of the ribosome along the mRNA, which shifts the newly formed peptidyl-tRNA from the A-site to the P-site (peptidyl-tRNA site) and makes room for another aminoacyl-tRNA in the A-site. This process continues until protein synthesis is complete.

In eukaryotic cells, the equivalent proteins are called EF1α, EF1β, EF1γ, and EF2 (also known as eEF1A, eEF1B, eEF1G, and eEF2). The overall function remains similar to that in prokaryotes, but the specific mechanisms and protein names differ.

Proline is an organic compound that is classified as a non-essential amino acid, meaning it can be produced by the human body and does not need to be obtained through the diet. It is encoded in the genetic code as the codon CCU, CCC, CCA, or CCG. Proline is a cyclic amino acid, containing an unusual secondary amine group, which forms a ring structure with its carboxyl group.

In proteins, proline acts as a structural helix breaker, disrupting the alpha-helix structure and leading to the formation of turns and bends in the protein chain. This property is important for the proper folding and function of many proteins. Proline also plays a role in the stability of collagen, a major structural protein found in connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, and skin.

In addition to its role in protein structure, proline has been implicated in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, apoptosis, and oxidative stress response. It is also a precursor for the synthesis of other biologically important compounds such as hydroxyproline, which is found in collagen and elastin, and glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Enzyme repression is a type of gene regulation in which the production of an enzyme is inhibited or suppressed, thereby reducing the rate of catalysis of the chemical reaction that the enzyme facilitates. This process typically occurs when the end product of the reaction binds to the regulatory protein, called a repressor, which then binds to the operator region of the operon (a group of genes that are transcribed together) and prevents transcription of the structural genes encoding for the enzyme. Enzyme repression helps maintain homeostasis within the cell by preventing the unnecessary production of enzymes when they are not needed, thus conserving energy and resources.

Ion exchange chromatography is a type of chromatography technique used to separate and analyze charged molecules (ions) based on their ability to exchange bound ions in a solid resin or gel with ions of similar charge in the mobile phase. The stationary phase, often called an ion exchanger, contains fixed ated functional groups that can attract counter-ions of opposite charge from the sample mixture.

In this technique, the sample is loaded onto an ion exchange column containing the charged resin or gel. As the sample moves through the column, ions in the sample compete for binding sites on the stationary phase with ions already present in the column. The ions that bind most strongly to the stationary phase will elute (come off) slower than those that bind more weakly.

Ion exchange chromatography can be performed using either cation exchangers, which exchange positive ions (cations), or anion exchangers, which exchange negative ions (anions). The pH and ionic strength of the mobile phase can be adjusted to control the binding and elution of specific ions.

Ion exchange chromatography is widely used in various applications such as water treatment, protein purification, and chemical analysis.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

Lipopeptides are a type of molecule that consists of a lipid (fatty acid) tail attached to a small peptide (short chain of amino acids). They are produced naturally by various organisms, including bacteria, and play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, signaling, and as components of bacterial membranes. Some lipopeptides have also been found to have antimicrobial properties and are being studied for their potential use as therapeutic agents.

Aromatic amino acids are a specific type of amino acids that contain an aromatic ring in their side chain. The three aromatic amino acids are phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Trp). These amino acids play important roles in various biological processes, including protein structure and function, neurotransmission, and enzyme catalysis.

The aromatic ring in these amino acids is composed of a planar six-membered carbon ring that contains alternating double bonds. This structure gives the side chains unique chemical properties, such as their ability to absorb ultraviolet light and participate in stacking interactions with other aromatic residues. These interactions can contribute to the stability and function of proteins and other biological molecules.

It's worth noting that while most amino acids are classified as either "hydrophobic" or "hydrophilic," depending on their chemical properties, aromatic amino acids exhibit characteristics of both groups. They can form hydrogen bonds with polar residues and also engage in hydrophobic interactions with nonpolar residues, making them versatile building blocks for protein structure and function.

Carbon-sulfur ligases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the formation of carbon-sulfur bonds, which are covalent bonds between carbon and sulfur atoms. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of cofactors, vitamins, and other organic compounds.

Carbon-sulfur ligases typically use ATP as an energy source to activate a sulfur atom, which is then transferred to a carbon atom in a substrate molecule. The resulting carbon-sulfur bond can be either thioether or thioester linkages, depending on the specific enzyme and reaction.

Examples of carbon-sulfur ligases include biotin synthase, lipoic acid synthase, and thiamine biosynthesis enzymes. These enzymes are essential for the function of various metabolic pathways and are therefore important targets for drug development and therapeutic intervention.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Arginine is an α-amino acid that is classified as a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid, depending on the developmental stage and health status of the individual. The adult human body can normally synthesize sufficient amounts of arginine to meet its needs, but there are certain circumstances, such as periods of rapid growth or injury, where the dietary intake of arginine may become necessary.

The chemical formula for arginine is C6H14N4O2. It has a molecular weight of 174.20 g/mol and a pKa value of 12.48. Arginine is a basic amino acid, which means that it contains a side chain with a positive charge at physiological pH levels. The side chain of arginine is composed of a guanidino group, which is a functional group consisting of a nitrogen atom bonded to three methyl groups.

In the body, arginine plays several important roles. It is a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide, a molecule that helps regulate blood flow and immune function. Arginine is also involved in the detoxification of ammonia, a waste product produced by the breakdown of proteins. Additionally, arginine can be converted into other amino acids, such as ornithine and citrulline, which are involved in various metabolic processes.

Foods that are good sources of arginine include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, nuts, seeds, and legumes. Arginine supplements are available and may be used for a variety of purposes, such as improving exercise performance, enhancing wound healing, and boosting immune function. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking arginine supplements, as they can interact with certain medications and have potential side effects.

'Methanosarcina barkeri' is not a medical term, but a species name in the domain of microbiology. It refers to a type of archaea (single-celled organisms) that is capable of methanogenesis - producing methane as a metabolic byproduct. This microorganism is commonly found in anaerobic environments such as wetlands, digestive tracts of animals, and sewage sludge. It's not something that typically has a direct medical definition or relevance, unless in the context of specific research or environmental/industrial settings.

Northern blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and analyze specific RNA molecules (such as mRNA) in a mixture of total RNA extracted from cells or tissues. This technique is called "Northern" blotting because it is analogous to the Southern blotting method, which is used for DNA detection.

The Northern blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Electrophoresis: The total RNA mixture is first separated based on size by running it through an agarose gel using electrical current. This separates the RNA molecules according to their length, with smaller RNA fragments migrating faster than larger ones.

2. Transfer: After electrophoresis, the RNA bands are denatured (made single-stranded) and transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or nylon membrane using a technique called capillary transfer or vacuum blotting. This step ensures that the order and relative positions of the RNA fragments are preserved on the membrane, similar to how they appear in the gel.

3. Cross-linking: The RNA is then chemically cross-linked to the membrane using UV light or heat treatment, which helps to immobilize the RNA onto the membrane and prevent it from washing off during subsequent steps.

4. Prehybridization: Before adding the labeled probe, the membrane is prehybridized in a solution containing blocking agents (such as salmon sperm DNA or yeast tRNA) to minimize non-specific binding of the probe to the membrane.

5. Hybridization: A labeled nucleic acid probe, specific to the RNA of interest, is added to the prehybridization solution and allowed to hybridize (form base pairs) with its complementary RNA sequence on the membrane. The probe can be either a DNA or an RNA molecule, and it is typically labeled with a radioactive isotope (such as ³²P) or a non-radioactive label (such as digoxigenin).

6. Washing: After hybridization, the membrane is washed to remove unbound probe and reduce background noise. The washing conditions (temperature, salt concentration, and detergent concentration) are optimized based on the stringency required for specific hybridization.

7. Detection: The presence of the labeled probe is then detected using an appropriate method, depending on the type of label used. For radioactive probes, this typically involves exposing the membrane to X-ray film or a phosphorimager screen and analyzing the resulting image. For non-radioactive probes, detection can be performed using colorimetric, chemiluminescent, or fluorescent methods.

8. Data analysis: The intensity of the signal is quantified and compared to controls (such as housekeeping genes) to determine the relative expression level of the RNA of interest. This information can be used for various purposes, such as identifying differentially expressed genes in response to a specific treatment or comparing gene expression levels across different samples or conditions.

Trypsin is a proteolytic enzyme, specifically a serine protease, that is secreted by the pancreas as an inactive precursor, trypsinogen. Trypsinogen is converted into its active form, trypsin, in the small intestine by enterokinase, which is produced by the intestinal mucosa.

Trypsin plays a crucial role in digestion by cleaving proteins into smaller peptides at specific arginine and lysine residues. This enzyme helps to break down dietary proteins into amino acids, allowing for their absorption and utilization by the body. Additionally, trypsin can activate other zymogenic pancreatic enzymes, such as chymotrypsinogen and procarboxypeptidases, thereby contributing to overall protein digestion.

Sulfur-containing amino acids are a type of amino acid that contain sulfur atoms in their side chains. There are three sulfur-containing amino acids that are considered essential for human health: methionine, cysteine, and homocysteine.

Methionine is an essential amino acid, which means that it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. It contains a sulfur atom in its side chain and plays important roles in various biological processes, including methylation reactions, protein synthesis, and detoxification.

Cysteine is a semi-essential amino acid, which means that it can be synthesized by the human body under normal conditions but may become essential during periods of growth or illness. It contains a sulfhydryl group (-SH) in its side chain, which allows it to form disulfide bonds with other cysteine residues and contribute to the stability and structure of proteins.

Homocysteine is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is derived from methionine metabolism. It contains a sulfur atom in its side chain and has been linked to various health problems, including cardiovascular disease, when present at elevated levels in the blood.

Other sulfur-containing amino acids include taurine, which is not incorporated into proteins but plays important roles in bile acid conjugation, antioxidant defense, and neuromodulation, and cystathionine, which is an intermediate in methionine metabolism.

A sequence deletion in a genetic context refers to the removal or absence of one or more nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA or RNA) from a specific region in a DNA or RNA molecule. This type of mutation can lead to the loss of genetic information, potentially resulting in changes in the function or expression of a gene. If the deletion involves a critical portion of the gene, it can cause diseases, depending on the role of that gene in the body. The size of the deleted sequence can vary, ranging from a single nucleotide to a large segment of DNA.

DEAE-cellulose chromatography is a method of purification and separation of biological molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and enzymes. DEAE stands for diethylaminoethyl, which is a type of charged functional group that is covalently bound to cellulose, creating a matrix with positive charges.

In this method, the mixture of biological molecules is applied to a column packed with DEAE-cellulose. The positively charged DEAE groups attract and bind negatively charged molecules in the mixture, such as nucleic acids and proteins, while allowing uncharged or neutrally charged molecules to pass through.

By adjusting the pH, ionic strength, or concentration of salt in the buffer solution used to elute the bound molecules from the column, it is possible to selectively elute specific molecules based on their charge and binding affinity to the DEAE-cellulose matrix. This makes DEAE-cellulose chromatography a powerful tool for purifying and separating biological molecules with high resolution and efficiency.

Phospholipids are a major class of lipids that consist of a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. The head is composed of a phosphate group, which is often bound to an organic molecule such as choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol. The tails are made up of two fatty acid chains.

Phospholipids are a key component of cell membranes and play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the cell. They form a lipid bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing outwards and the hydrophobic tails facing inwards, creating a barrier that separates the interior of the cell from the outside environment.

Phospholipids are also involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, and protein function regulation. Additionally, they serve as emulsifiers in the digestive system, helping to break down fats in the diet.

A dipeptide is a type of molecule that is formed by the condensation of two amino acids. In this process, the carboxyl group (-COOH) of one amino acid combines with the amino group (-NH2) of another amino acid, releasing a water molecule and forming a peptide bond.

The resulting molecule contains two amino acids joined together by a single peptide bond, which is a type of covalent bond that forms between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another. Dipeptides are relatively simple molecules compared to larger polypeptides or proteins, which can contain hundreds or even thousands of amino acids linked together by multiple peptide bonds.

Dipeptides have a variety of biological functions in the body, including serving as building blocks for larger proteins and playing important roles in various physiological processes. Some dipeptides also have potential therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of hypertension or muscle wasting disorders.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

Uridine is a nucleoside that consists of a pyrimidine base (uracil) linked to a pentose sugar (ribose). It is a component of RNA, where it pairs with adenine. Uridine can also be found in various foods such as beer, broccoli, yeast, and meat. In the body, uridine can be synthesized from orotate or from the breakdown of RNA. It has several functions, including acting as a building block for RNA, contributing to energy metabolism, and regulating cell growth and differentiation. Uridine is also available as a dietary supplement and has been studied for its potential benefits in various health conditions.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that is a key component of ribosomes, which are the cellular structures where protein synthesis occurs in cells. In ribosomes, rRNA plays a crucial role in the process of translation, where genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into proteins.

Ribosomal RNA is synthesized in the nucleus and then transported to the cytoplasm, where it assembles with ribosomal proteins to form ribosomes. Within the ribosome, rRNA provides a structural framework for the assembly of the ribosome and also plays an active role in catalyzing the formation of peptide bonds between amino acids during protein synthesis.

There are several different types of rRNA molecules, including 5S, 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA, which vary in size and function. These rRNA molecules are highly conserved across different species, indicating their essential role in protein synthesis and cellular function.

Base composition in genetics refers to the relative proportion of the four nucleotide bases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, so the base composition is often expressed in terms of the ratio of adenine + thymine (A-T) to guanine + cytosine (G-C). This ratio can vary between species and even between different regions of the same genome. The base composition can provide important clues about the function, evolution, and structure of genetic material.

Amino+Acyl-tRNA+Synthetases at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) AARS human gene location ... An aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS or ARS), also called tRNA-ligase, is an enzyme that attaches the appropriate amino acid onto ... In humans, the 20 different types of aa-tRNA are made by the 20 different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, one for each amino acid ... Amino Acid + tRNA + ATP → Aminoacyl-tRNA + AMP + PPi Some synthetases also mediate an editing reaction to ensure high fidelity ...
... or aminoacylated with a tRNA to form their respective aa-tRNA. Every amino acid has its own specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase ... "Amino acid-dependent stability of the acyl linkage in aminoacyl-tRNA". RNA. 20 (6): 758-64. doi:10.1261/rna.044123.113. PMC ... Aminoacyl-AMP + tRNAAminoacyl-tRNA + AMP The overall net reaction is: Amino Acid + ATP + tRNAAminoacyl-tRNA + AMP + PPi ... Aminoacyl-tRNA (also aa-tRNA or charged tRNA) is tRNA to which its cognate amino acid is chemically bonded (charged). The aa- ...
Colson P, Fournous G, Diene SM, Raoult D (2013). "Codon usage, amino acid usage, transfer RNA and amino-acyl-tRNA synthetases ...
"Active site titration and aminoacyl adenylate binding stoichiometry of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases". Biochemistry. 14 (1): 1-4. ... His earlier kinetic studies on chymotrypsin demonstrated the formation of an acyl enzyme as an intermediate in the hydrolysis ... Hartley also studied other enzymes, such as aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (with Alan Fersht), xylose isomerase and glucose ... Winter, G.P.; Hartley, B.S. (1977). "The amino acid sequence of tryptophanyl tRNA Synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus ...
Her work has also provided fundamental insights into how retroviral replication involves host amino acyl tRNA synthetases and ... "Role of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Infectious Diseases and Targets for Therapeutic Development", Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases ... Musier-Forsyth K. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and tRNAs in human disease: an introduction to the JBC Reviews thematic series. J ... Musier-Forsyth, Karin (2019-04-05). "Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and tRNAs in human disease: an introduction to the JBC Reviews ...
... aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and ribosomes. Conversely, some enzymes display enzyme promiscuity, having broad specificity and ... Faergeman NJ, Knudsen J (April 1997). "Role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters in the regulation of metabolism and in cell ... Ibba M, Soll D (2000). "Aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis". Annual Review of Biochemistry. 69: 617-650. doi:10.1146/annurev.biochem.69.1 ... Rodnina MV, Wintermeyer W (2001). "Fidelity of aminoacyl-tRNA selection on the ribosome: kinetic and structural mechanisms". ...
These are the first viruses reported to possess genes for amino-acyl tRNA synthetases for all 20 standard amino acids. The ... carrying 20 aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS) and 70 transfer RNAs (tRNA), while the rest are involved in RNA maturation and ...
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzymes consume ATP in the attachment tRNA to amino acids, forming aminoacyl-tRNA complexes. ... Dozens of ATP equivalents are generated by the beta-oxidation of a single long acyl chain. In oxidative phosphorylation, the ... Aminoacyl transferase binds AMP-amino acid to tRNA. The coupling reaction proceeds in two steps: aa + ATP ⟶ aa-AMP + PPi aa-AMP ... tRNA ⟶ aa-tRNA + AMP The amino acid is coupled to the penultimate nucleotide at the 3′-end of the tRNA (the A in the sequence ...
This aminoacyl-tRNA precursor is produced in an ATP-dependent reaction carried out by an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. This ... The acyl chains in the fatty acids are extended by a cycle of reactions that add the acyl group, reduce it to an alcohol, ... lack all amino acid synthesis and take their amino acids directly from their hosts. All amino acids are synthesized from ... 855-6. ISBN 978-0-7216-0240-0. Ibba M, Söll D (May 2001). "The renaissance of aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis". EMBO Reports. 2 (5): ...
This is accomplished by screening libraries of mutant amino acyl tRNA synthetases for mutants which charge nonsense-codon tRNAs ... The organism which expresses such a synthetase can then be genetically programmed to incorporate the unnatural amino acid into ... Normally, the unnatural amino acid itself must be synthesized in the lab and supplied to the organism by adding it to the ... The unnatural amino acid must also be able to pass through the organism's cell membrane into the interior of the organism. More ...
These are exemplified by work on amino acyl tRNA synthetases, crucial to protein synthesis in all living organisms and analyses ... Thermophilus seryl-tRNA synthetase complexed with tRNA(Ser)". Science. New York, N.Y. 263 (5152): 1404-10. doi:10.1126/science. ... "A second class of synthetase structure revealed by X-ray analysis of Escherichia coli seryl-tRNA synthetase at 2.5 Å". Nature. ...
... amino acyl-trna synthetases MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.050 - alanine-tRNA ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.100 - arginine-tRNA ... glutamate-trna ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.350 - glycine-trna ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.400 - histidine-trna ligase ... leucine-trna ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.550 - lysine-trna ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.600 - methionine-trna ligase ... serine-trna ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.800 - threonine-tRNA ligase MeSH D08.811.464.263.200.850 - tryptophan-tRNA ligase ...
During the course of these experiments, he discovered that yeast strains in which an essential amino-acyl-tRNA synthetase had ... While looking for tRNA duplication, Bernard Dujon discovered the amplification of its cognate tRNA synthetase. Fascinated by ... Whole-genome sequencing of these mutants showed that the chromosomal segment containing the foreign tRNA synthetase had been ... Bernard Dujon tried to tackle this problem by setting up an experimental system to study the evolution of tRNA genes. ...
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that mispair tRNAs with the wrong amino acids can produce mischarged aminoacyl-tRNAs, which can ... The correct amino acid is covalently bonded to the correct transfer RNA (tRNA) by amino acyl transferases. The amino acid is ... Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (enzymes) catalyze the bonding between specific tRNAs and the amino acids that their anticodon ... Then, a peptide bond forms between the amino acid of the tRNA in the A site and the amino acid of the charged tRNA in the P/E ...
VARS Berg P, Bergmann FH, Ofengand EJ, Dieckmann M (1961). "The enzymic synthesis of amino acyl derivatives of ribonucleic acid ... Other names in common use include valyl-tRNA synthetase, valyl-transfer ribonucleate synthetase, valyl-transfer RNA synthetase ... Bergmann FH, Berg P, Dieckmann M (1961). "The enzymic synthesis of amino acyl derivatives of ribonucleic acid II. The ... This enzyme participates in valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis and aminoacyl-trna biosynthesis. As of late 2007, 5 ...
Berg P, Bergmann FH, Ofengand EJ, Dieckmann M (1961). "The enzymic synthesis of amino acyl derivatives of ribonucleic acid I. ... isoleucyl-transfer RNA synthetase, isoleucine-transfer RNA ligase, isoleucine-tRNA synthetase, and isoleucine translase. This ... Other names in common use include isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, isoleucyl-transfer ribonucleate synthetase, ... Bergmann FH, Berg P, Dieckmann M (1961). "The enzymic synthesis of amino acyl derivatives of ribonucleic acid II. The ...
Leucyl-tRNA synthetase ALLEN EH, GLASSMAN E, SCHWEET RS (1960). "Incorporation of amino acids into ribonucleic acid. I. The ... Berg P, Bergmann FH, Ofengand EJ, Dieckmann M (1961). "The enzymic synthesis of amino acyl derivatives of ribonucleic acid I. ... leucyl-transfer RNA synthetase, leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase, leucine-tRNA synthetase, and leucine translase. ... Other names in common use include leucyl-tRNA synthetase, leucyl-transfer ribonucleate synthetase, ...
SARS belongs to the class II amino-acyl tRNA family and is found in all humans; its encoded enzyme, seryl-tRNA synthetase, is ... function and evolution of seryl-tRNA synthetases: implications for the evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and the genetic ... function and evolution of seryl-tRNA synthetases: implications for the evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and the genetic ... Heckl M, Busch K, Gross HJ (May 1998). "Minimal tRNA(Ser) and tRNA(Sec) substrates for human seryl-tRNA synthetase: ...
This reaction, called tRNA charging, is catalyzed by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. A specific tRNA synthetase is responsible for ... Succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase catalyzes the removal of acyl group from N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid to yield L,L ... Aminoacyl − AMP + tRNA ↽ − − ⇀ aminoacyltRNA + AMP {\displaystyle {\ce {{Aminoacyl-AMP}+ tRNA <=> {aminoacyl-tRNA}+ AMP}}} ... both of which are catalyzed by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, produces a charged tRNA that is ready to add amino acids to the ...
β-Oxidation uses pyruvate carboxylase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and β-ketothiolase. Amino acid production is facilitated by ... succinyl-CoA synthetase, fumarase, and malate dehydrogenase. The urea cycle is facilitated by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I ... Protein synthesis makes use of mitochondrial DNA, RNA, and tRNA. Regulation of processes makes use of ions (Ca2+/K+/Mg+). ... These amino acids are then used either within the matrix or transported into the cytosol to produce proteins. Regulation within ...
Bergmann FH, Berg P, Dieckmann M (1961). "The enzymic synthesis of amino acyl derivatives of ribonucleic acid II. The ... effects of coupling mutations in the acceptor stem on recognition of tRNAs by Escherichia coli Met-tRNA synthetase and Met-tRNA ... and aminoacyl-trna biosynthesis. During oxidative stress, methionine-tRNA ligase might be phosphorylated, which results in ... Other names in common use include methionyl-tRNA synthetase, methionyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase, methionyl-transfer ...
Depletion of isoleucyl-tRNA results in inhibition of protein synthesis. The uncharged form of the tRNA binds to the aminoacyl- ... A proposed mode of action of pseudomonic acid as an inhibitor of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase". The Journal of Biological ... The mupirocin pathway also contains several tandem acyl carrier protein doublets or triplets. This may be an adaptation to ... Yanagisawa T, Lee JT, Wu HC, Kawakami M (September 1994). "Relationship of protein structure of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase with ...
During that period, he worked on the structure of threonyl-tRNA synthetase. In 2002, he moved back to India, since then he is ... His laboratory has elucidated the mechanism of D-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase 1 (DTD1), where he has shown how an invariant 'cross- ... His laboratory is also interested in understanding the roles of a class of lipid metabolising enzymes called Fatty acyl-AMP ... The group has also identified the role of archaeal-derived chiral proofreader D-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase 2 (DTD2) in removing N ...
Most conserved is the primary sequence of the amino acyl acceptor stem. This portion of the molecule has an invariable A ... Following the addition of CCA at the 3' discriminator nucleotide, the tmRNA can be charged by alanyl-tRNA synthetase with ... including the acceptor stem with elements like those in alanine tRNA that promote its aminoacylation by alanine-tRNA ligase. It ... P2 is a helix of variable length (3 to 10 base pairs) and corresponds to the anticodon stem of tRNAs, yet without an anticodon ...
relC) and the ribosome-associated (p)ppGpp synthetase I, RelA; deacylated tRNA bound in the ribosomal A-site is the primary ... This in turn causes the cell to divert resources away from growth and division and toward amino acid synthesis in order to ... A Battesti; E Bouveret (2006). "Acyl carrier protein/SpoT interaction, the switch linking SpoT-dependent stress response to ... "Thermodynamic characterization of ppGpp binding to EF-G or IF2 and of initiator tRNA binding to free IF2 in the presence of GDP ...
It is encoded by the pAgK84 plasmid of A. tumefaciens and targets a tRNA synthetase. The agnG gene encodes a protein of 496 aas ... The protein members of the PST family are generally of 400-500 amino acyl residues in length and traverse the membrane as ... The bacterial proteins are of about 450 amino acyl residues in length and exhibit 12 putative transmembrane segments (TMSs). ... "Major biocontrol of plant tumors targets tRNA synthetase". Science. 309 (5740): 1533. doi:10.1126/science.1116841. PMID ...
ACAD10: encoding protein Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 10 ACSS3: encoding protein Acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain ... encoding enzyme tRNA pseudouridine synthase A PUS7L: encoding enzyme Pseudouridylate synthase 7 homolog-like protein PZP: ... encoding protein a protein of 377 amino acid residues FAM60A: encoding protein FAM60A FAM186B: encoding protein Protein FAM186B ... "genetype trna"[Properties] OR "genetype scrna"[Properties] OR "genetype snrna"[Properties] OR "genetype snorna"[Properties]) ...
The activation of mTOR by leucine is mediated through Rag GTPases, leucine binding to leucyl-tRNA synthetase, leucine binding ... Alpha-Amino acids, Proteinogenic amino acids, Ketogenic amino acids, Branched-chain amino acids, Essential amino acids, E- ... by 4 carnitine acyl-CoA transferases distributed in subcellular compartments likely serves as an important reservoir for acyl ... September 2017). "Control of leucine-dependent mTORC1 pathway through chemical intervention of leucyl-tRNA synthetase and RagD ...
Ward WH, Fersht AR (July 1988). "Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase acts as an asymmetric dimer in charging tRNA. A rationale for half-of- ... In these serine proteases, the E* intermediate is an acyl-enzyme species formed by the attack of an active site serine residue ... by site-directed mutagenesis of conserved amino acid residues, or by studying the behaviour of the enzyme in the presence of ... Allosteric enzymes include mammalian tyrosyl tRNA-synthetase, which shows negative cooperativity, and bacterial aspartate ...
... tRNA dimethylallyltransferase EC 2.5.1.76: cysteate synthase EC 2.5.1.77: Now EC 2.5.1.147, 5-amino-6-(D-ribitylamino)uracil-L- ... acyl-carrier-protein] S-acetyltransferase EC 2.3.1.39: [acyl-carrier-protein] S-malonyltransferase EC 2.3.1.40: acyl-[acyl- ... glutamine synthetase]-adenylyl-L-tyrosine phosphorylase EC 2.7.7.90: 8-amino-3,8-dideoxy-manno-octulosonate ... tRNA (guanine46-N7)-methyltransferase EC 2.1.1.34: tRNA (guanosine18-2′-O)-methyltransferase EC 2.1.1.35: tRNA (uracil54-C5)- ...
Amino+Acyl-tRNA+Synthetases at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) AARS human gene location ... An aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS or ARS), also called tRNA-ligase, is an enzyme that attaches the appropriate amino acid onto ... In humans, the 20 different types of aa-tRNA are made by the 20 different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, one for each amino acid ... Amino Acid + tRNA + ATP → Aminoacyl-tRNA + AMP + PPi Some synthetases also mediate an editing reaction to ensure high fidelity ...
... are enzymes that join amino acids to tRNAs. Although they are housekeeping enzymes essential for protein synthesis, aaRSs are ... These investigations will undoubtedly provide some of the most fundamental understanding of how and possibly why synthetases ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases, Animals, Humans, Protein Biosynthesis, RNA, Transfer, Amino Acid-Specific, Signal Transduction ... Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are enzymes that join amino acids to tRNAs. Although they are housekeeping enzymes essential ...
The multicenter study of a new assay for simultaneous detection of multiple anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in myositis and ... The multicenter study of a new assay for simultaneous detection of multiple anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in myositis and ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases 86% * Myositis 76% * Interstitial Lung Diseases 68% * Multicenter Studies 54% ...
Arabidopsis seryl-tRNA synthetase : the first crystal structure and novel protein interactor of plant aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase ... Listeriolysin O binding affects cholesterol and phospholipid acyl chain dynamics in fluid cholesterol-rich bilayers. Chem. Eur ... Archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with the ribosome to recycle tRNAs. Nucleic acids research, 2014, 42:5191-5201, ... Indirect routes to aminoacyl-tRNA : the diversity of prokaryotic cysteine encoding systems. Frontiers in genetics, 2022, 12:1- ...
Targeting class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with pyrimidine substituted aminoacyl-sulfamoyl nucleosides. ... De novo design of 2-aminooxazoles as inhibitors of bacterial β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH). ... Novel synthetic approach for kinase inhibitors containing (Z)-3-[amino(phenyl)methylidene]-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one structure ... substituted 3-benzamidopyrazine-2-carboxamides and docking into a homology model of mycobacterial prolyl-tRNA synthetase. ...
2019Role of host tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in retroviral replicationJ Biol Chem. 294:5352-5364 ... 2020Crystallographic structure of wild-type SARS-CoV-2 main protease acyl-enzyme intermediate with physiological C-terminal ... E, F) Representative gel of primer extension assays to monitor the presence of m2,2G in tRNA-Met-CAU or mt-tRNA-Ile-UAU from ... Based upon this assay, vector-transfected WT human cells exhibited an RT block at position 26 of tRNA-Met-CAU and mt-tRNA-Ile- ...
aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase status:Confirmed UniProt:O01541 protein_id:AAB52339.1 MS arx-1 Caenorhabditis elegans actin status: ... Acyl CoA binding protein status:Confirmed UniProt:Q9XXJ2 protein_id:CAA19448.1 PSP ...
Synthetases: Acyl CoA Synthetase, Amino-Acyl tRNA Synthetases, NAD Synthetase. *Phosphodiesterases: cAMP, cGMP ...
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are required in all three domains of life to add the correct amino acid to its cognate tRNA, an ... Acyl transferase (AT) domains transfer methylmalonyl extender units to their acyl carrier protein (ACP) partner domains. The ... attaches glutamic acid to both tRNAglu and tRNAgln. The misacylated glu-tRNAgln is then converted to gln-tRNAgln by the GatCAB ... in which glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) binds to tRNAgln, glutamine and ATP and first forms a glutaminyl adenylate molecule ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases. Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Annexin III. Annexin A3. ... D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ...
Preparation method of aminoacyl transport ribonucleic acid synthetase recognition protein chip. Xie, B., Meng, Q. & Xie, W., ...
S-Malonyltransferase, Acyl-Carrier Protein use Acyl-Carrier Protein S-Malonyltransferase S-Mephenytoin 4-Hydroxylase use ... S Adenosyl L Methionine Dependent tRNA Methyltransferase ABH8 use AlkB Homolog 8, tRNA Methyltransferase ... S-Adenosylmethionine Synthetase use Methionine Adenosyltransferase S-Adenosylmethionine-Protein Carboxymethyl Transferase use ... S 18506 use 5-Amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole ... S-Acetyltransferase, Acyl-Carrier Protein use Acyl-Carrier ...
These synthetases perform an integral step in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by charg … ... Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) are essential in the process of transferring genetic information from ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases / genetics* Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH ... Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in human disease Svetlana Konovalova et al. Mol Genet Metab. 2013 Apr. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases / chemistry* Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH ... for aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases shown in A. C) Immunoblot analysis of aminoacyl t-RNA synthetases GARS, KARS, and WARS in ... The Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase and tRNA Expression Levels Are Deregulated in Cancer and Correlate Independently with Patient ... Functional and pathologic association of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with cancer. Sung Y, Yoon I, Han JM, Kim S. Sung Y, et al. ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * Catalytic Domain Medicine & Life Sciences 65% ... A Minimal TrpRS Catalytic Domain Supports Sense/Antisense Ancestry of Class I and II Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases. Molecular Cell ... A Minimal TrpRS Catalytic Domain Supports Sense/Antisense Ancestry of Class I and II Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases. In: Molecular ... We describe here the use of protein design to show experimentally that a minimal class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase active site ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins Medicine & Life Sciences 95% ... In addition, inactivation of hsp90 interfered with the in vivo incorporation of the nascent aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases into the ... Heat shock protein 90 mediates protein-protein interactions between human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. In: Journal of Biological ... In addition, inactivation of hsp90 interfered with the in vivo incorporation of the nascent aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases into the ...
... charging tRNA molecules with cognate amino acids. Heterozygosity for variants in five genes (,i,AARS1,/i,, ,i,GARS1,/i,, ,i, ... Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential enzymes with a critical role in protein synthesis: ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases Grants and funding * R35 GM136441/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States ... Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential enzymes with a critical role in protein synthesis: charging tRNA molecules with ...
Cusack, S. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 7, 881-889 (1997). ... Facile synthesis of N-acyl-aminoacyl-pCpA for preparation of mischarged fully ribo tRNA. Bioconjug. Chem. 25, 2086-2091 (2014). ... tRNA). A non-coding RNA molecule that carries an amino acid and helps to decode messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein; tRNAs ... Natural amino acids do not require their native tRNAs for efficient selection by the ribosome. Nat. Chem. Biol. 5, 947-953 ( ...
Stereospecificity control in aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases: New evidence of D-amino acids activation and editing. ... Dive into the research topics of Stereospecificity control in aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases: New evidence of D-amino acids ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases 94% * Transfer RNA 62% * Amino Acids 48% * RNA, Transfer, Ala 40% ...
two classes of aminoacyl tRNAs. Definition. Class I-aminoacyl tRNA synthetases first add the amino acid to the 2`-OH of the ... G protein that binds aminoacyl-tRNA and delivers it to the A site, can bind any amino-acyl-tRNA and deliver it to the ribosome ... What to tRNA synthetases do?. Definition. covelantely attach the proper amino acid to a specific tRNA molecule by recognizing ... What does a class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetase do?. Definition. covalently joins the amino acid to the 3`-OH of the terminal ...
a.97: An anticodon-binding domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases [48162] (1 superfamily). multihelical; consists of two ... a.28: Acyl carrier protein-like [47335] (3 superfamilies). 4 helices, bundle; helix 3 is shorter than others; up-and-down. ... a.27: Anticodon-binding domain of a subclass of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases [47322] (1 superfamily). core: 4 helices; ... a.203: Putative anticodon-binding domain of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) [101352] (1 superfamily). multihelical; consists of ...
Sanchita Hatis laboratory focused on computational protein dynamics of amino acyl-tRNA synthetases. In 2012, he was selected ...
... end of its own species of tRNA by an enzyme known as amino-acyl tRNA synthetase. ... the amino-acyl bond that connected the amino acid to its corresponding tRNA is broken, and the tRNA is thus able to leave the P ... Two sites exist on a ribosome for activated tRNAs: the peptidyl site and the amino-acyl site (P site and A site respectively). ... The 3′ UAC 5′ anticodon of the tRNA is paired with the complementary 5′ AUG 3′ mRNA codon. The second tRNA enters the A site. ...
Amino Acyl T RNA Synthetases Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases Aminoacyl Transfer RNA Synthetase Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Transfer RNA ... 2005; see AMINO ACYL-TRNA LIGASES 1998-2004, see AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES 1972-1997. History Note. 2005(1972); use LIGASES ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases [D08.811.464.263.200] * Alanine-tRNA Ligase [D08.811.464.263.200.050] ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases Preferred Term Term UI T403145. Date12/20/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2001). ...
Amino Acyl T RNA Synthetases Amino Acyl-tRNA Ligases Aminoacyl Transfer RNA Synthetase Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Transfer RNA ... 2005; see AMINO ACYL-TRNA LIGASES 1998-2004, see AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES 1972-1997. History Note. 2005(1972); use LIGASES ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases [D08.811.464.263.200] * Alanine-tRNA Ligase [D08.811.464.263.200.050] ... Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases Preferred Term Term UI T403145. Date12/20/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2001). ...
cc: aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase multienzyme complex. Modulator protein function. GO:0003754. mf: chaperon activity ... mf: acyl carrier activity. Transmembrane transporter. GO:0019793. mf: ISG15 carrier activity ...
mh:Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases (1) Order by. Year (decreasing). Relevance. Year (increasing). ... Profil épidémiologique, clinique et valeur diagnostique des anticorps anti-Jo1 (anticorps anti-aminoacyl-t-RNA-synthétases). ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases 100% * Exons 90% * Phenotype 65% * Vertebrates 64% * Tryptophan-tRNA Ligase 63% ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases PubMed MeSh Term ©2023 Regents of the University of Colorado , Terms of Use , Powered by VIVO Data ... Tyrosine-tRNA Ligase PubMed MeSh Term *Overview. Overview. subject area of * SPECIFIC SUBSTITUTION INTO THE ANTICODON LOOP OF ...
Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases. Lysine. Abstract. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) is a major tool in genetic code expansion ... With this method, we evolved novel PylRS variants with enhanced activity and amino acid specificity. Finally, we employed an ... The structure also illustrates why tRNA recognition by PylRS is anticodon independent: the anticodon does not contact the ... using noncanonical amino acids, yet its structure and function are not completely understood. Here we describe the crystal ...
  • This can happen when two amino acids have different properties even if they have similar shapes-as is the case with valine and threonine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although not all synthetases have a domain with the sole purpose of editing, they make up for it by having specific binding and activation of their affiliated amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amino acids are attached to the hydroxyl (-OH) group of the adenosine via the carboxyl (-COOH) group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can be grouped as follows: Amino acids which use class II aaRS seem to be evolutionarily older. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transfer-RNAs for different amino acids differ not only in their anticodon but also at other points, giving them slightly different overall configurations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The alpha helical anticodon binding domain of arginyl-, glycyl- and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases is known as the DALR domain after characteristic conserved amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • These synthetases perform an integral step in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by charging tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. (nih.gov)
  • Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential enzymes with a critical role in protein synthesis: charging tRNA molecules with cognate amino acids. (nih.gov)
  • Fig. 6: Charging tRNA with unnatural amino acids using acylation chemistry. (nature.com)
  • An enzymatic part of the ribosome called peptidyl transferase then creates a peptide bond to link the two amino acids. (evolutionnews.org)
  • A subclass of enzymes that aminoacylate AMINO ACID-SPECIFIC TRANSFER RNA with their corresponding AMINO ACIDS . (nih.gov)
  • In a typical scenario, an aaRS consists of a catalytic domain (where both the above reactions take place) and an anticodon binding domain (which interacts mostly with the anticodon region of the tRNA). (wikipedia.org)
  • We deleted the anticodon binding domain from tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase and fused the discontinuous segments comprising its active site. (nyu.edu)
  • An enrichment-based pathway mapping of the androgen-regulated proteomic data sets revealed a significant dysregulation of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, indicating an increase in protein biosynthesis- a hallmark during prostate cancer progression. (nih.gov)
  • The emergence of polypeptide catalysts for amino acid activation, the slowest step in protein synthesis, poses a significant puzzle associated with the origin of biology. (nyu.edu)
  • We describe here the use of protein design to show experimentally that a minimal class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase active site might have functioned in the distant past. (nyu.edu)
  • EPRS and IRS form a macromolecular protein complex with at least six other tRNA synthetases and three cofactors, hsp90 preferentially binds to most of the complex-forming enzymes rather than those that are not found in the complex. (korea.ac.kr)
  • Thus, hsp90 appears to mediate protein-protein interactions of mammalian tRNA synthetases. (korea.ac.kr)
  • The two ribosomal subunits then lock around the mRNA and the process of translation into a protein begins, with the necessary amino acid subunits being delivered by transfer RNA molecules. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Once the tRNA is charged, a ribosome can transfer the amino acid from the tRNA onto a growing peptide, according to the genetic code. (wikipedia.org)
  • The E.coli ribosome has how many binding sites for tRNA? (flashcardmachine.com)
  • Two sites exist on a ribosome for activated tRNAs: the peptidyl site and the amino-acyl site (P site and A site respectively). (evolutionnews.org)
  • The accuracy of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase is so high that it is often paired with the word "superspecificity" when it is compared to other enzymes that are involved in metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two classes of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, each composed of ten enzymes: Class I has two highly conserved sequence motifs. (wikipedia.org)
  • An aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS or ARS), also called tRNA-ligase, is an enzyme that attaches the appropriate amino acid onto its corresponding tRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each amino acid becomes attached at its carboxyl terminus to the 3′ end of its own species of tRNA by an enzyme known as amino-acyl tRNA synthetase. (evolutionnews.org)
  • In addition, some aaRSs have additional RNA binding domains and editing domains that cleave incorrectly paired aminoacyl-tRNA molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • It does so by catalyzing the transesterification of a specific cognate amino acid or its precursor to one of all its compatible cognate tRNAs to form an aminoacyl-tRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, the 20 different types of aa-tRNA are made by the 20 different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, one for each amino acid of the genetic code. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is sometimes called "charging" or "loading" the tRNA with an amino acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • The synthetase first binds ATP and the corresponding amino acid (or its precursor) to form an aminoacyl-adenylate, releasing inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). (wikipedia.org)
  • The adenylate-aaRS complex then binds the appropriate tRNA molecule's D arm, and the amino acid is transferred from the aa-AMP to either the 2'- or the 3'-OH of the last tRNA nucleotide (A76) at the 3'-end. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mechanism can be summarized in the following reaction series: Amino Acid + ATP → Aminoacyl-AMP + PPi Aminoacyl-AMP + tRNA → Aminoacyl-tRNA + AMP Summing the reactions, the highly exergonic overall reaction is as follows: Amino Acid + tRNA + ATP → Aminoacyl-tRNA + AMP + PPi Some synthetases also mediate an editing reaction to ensure high fidelity of tRNA charging. (wikipedia.org)
  • covelantely attach the proper amino acid to a specific tRNA molecule by recognizing specific bases in the acceptor stem, anticodon stem, or anticodon of tRNAs. (flashcardmachine.com)
  • Upon formation of the peptide bond, the amino-acyl bond that connected the amino acid to its corresponding tRNA is broken, and the tRNA is thus able to leave the P site. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Aminoacyl tRNA therefore plays an important role in RNA translation, the expression of genes to create proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both classes of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are multidomain proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • It aminoacylates at the 2'-OH of a terminal adenosine nucleotide on tRNA, and it is usually monomeric or dimeric (one or two subunits, respectively). (wikipedia.org)
  • It aminoacylates at the 3'-OH of a terminal adenosine on tRNA, and is usually dimeric or tetrameric (two or four subunits, respectively). (wikipedia.org)
  • Since tRNA synthetase improperly acylates the tRNA when the synthetase is overproduced, a limit must exist on the levels of aaRSs and tRNAs in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, inactivation of hsp90 interfered with the in vivo incorporation of the nascent aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases into the multi-ARS complex. (korea.ac.kr)
  • The identified mutation spectrum suggests that only mutation types that allow some residual tRNA-charging activity can result in the described mtARS diseases but the molecular mechanisms behind the selective tissue involvement are not currently understood. (nih.gov)
  • Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) are essential in the process of transferring genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to the complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. (nih.gov)
  • Interaction of hsp90 with human glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS) was found by genetic screening, co-immunoprecipitation, and in vitro binding experiments. (korea.ac.kr)
  • Another contribution to the accuracy of these synthetases is the ratio of concentrations of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and its cognate tRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitochondrial Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase and Disease: The Yeast Contribution for Functional Analysis of Novel Variants. (nih.gov)
  • Although phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase is class II, it aminoacylates at the 2'-OH. (wikipedia.org)
  • the tRNA is found to be improperly charged), the aminoacyl-tRNA bond is hydrolyzed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unexpectedly, the clinical presentations of these diseases are highly specific to the affected synthetase. (nih.gov)
  • Increasing the Mg2+ concentration leads to an increase in the equilibrium constants for the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases' reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been kinetically studied, showing that Mg2+ ions play an active catalytic role and therefore aaRs have a degree of magnesium dependence. (wikipedia.org)