Walkers: Walking aids generally having two handgrips and four legs.Carcinoma 256, Walker: A transplantable carcinoma of the rat that originally appeared spontaneously in the mammary gland of a pregnant albino rat, and which now resembles a carcinoma in young transplants and a sarcoma in older transplants. (Stedman, 25th ed)African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Infant Equipment: Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Mexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Orthopedic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.United StatesEuropean Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Canes: Sticks used as walking aids. The canes may have three or four prongs at the end of the shaft.North AmericaAmerican Samoa: A group of islands of SAMOA, in the southwest central Pacific. Its capital is Pago Pago. The islands were ruled by native chiefs until about 1869. An object of American interest beginning in 1839, Pago Pago and trading and extraterritorial rights were granted to the United States in 1878. The United States, Germany, and England administered the islands jointly 1889-99, but in 1899 they were granted to the United States by treaty. The Department of the Interior has administered American Samoa since 1951. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p44)American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Crutches: Wooden or metal staffs designed to aid a person in walking. (UMDNS,1999)Balsams: Resinous substances which most commonly originate from trees. In addition to resins, they contain oils, cinnamic acid and BENZOIC ACID.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.South AmericaAdenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.AlaskaLatin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.Consumer Product SafetyIndians, South American: Individual members of South American ethnic groups with historic ancestral origins in Asia.Vaginal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VAGINA.Dependent Ambulation: To move about or walk on foot with the use of aids.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.American Cancer Society: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of cancer through education and research.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Southwestern United States: The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Central AmericaShoesEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Carcinosarcoma: A malignant neoplasm that contains elements of carcinoma and sarcoma so extensively intermixed as to indicate neoplasia of epithelial and mesenchymal tissue. (Stedman, 25th ed)Forefoot, Human: The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters: A family of MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that require ATP hydrolysis for the transport of substrates across membranes. The protein family derives its name from the ATP-binding domain found on the protein.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Accidents, HomeAmericas: The general name for NORTH AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; and SOUTH AMERICA unspecified or combined.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.Orthoptera: An order of insects comprising two suborders: Caelifera and Ensifera. They consist of GRASSHOPPERS, locusts, and crickets (GRYLLIDAE).Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.MissouriIndians, Central American: Individual members of Central American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia. Mexican Indians are not included.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Homebound Persons: Those unable to leave home without exceptional effort and support; patients (in this condition) who are provided with or are eligible for home health services, including medical treatment and personal care. Persons are considered homebound even if they may be infrequently and briefly absent from home if these absences do not indicate an ability to receive health care in a professional's office or health care facility. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p309)Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.South DakotaSafety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.ArizonaCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Hymenoptera: An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.TexasEquipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.CaliforniaOklahomaSarcoma, YoshidaAgrobacterium tumefaciens: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.Meningomyelocele: Congenital, or rarely acquired, herniation of meningeal and spinal cord tissue through a bony defect in the vertebral column. The majority of these defects occur in the lumbosacral region. Clinical features include PARAPLEGIA, loss of sensation in the lower body, and incontinence. This condition may be associated with the ARNOLD-CHIARI MALFORMATION and HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp35-6)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Nucleotides: The monomeric units from which DNA or RNA polymers are constructed. They consist of a purine or pyrimidine base, a pentose sugar, and a phosphate group. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.ChicagoAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.MexicoNew MexicoAlligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cerebral Palsy: A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)American Native Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continents of the Americas.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Azides: Organic or inorganic compounds that contain the -N3 group.Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.North CarolinaGlucose Solution, Hypertonic: Solution that is usually 10 percent glucose but may be higher. An isotonic solution of glucose is 5 percent.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Vanadates: Oxyvanadium ions in various states of oxidation. They act primarily as ion transport inhibitors due to their inhibition of Na(+)-, K(+)-, and Ca(+)-ATPase transport systems. They also have insulin-like action, positive inotropic action on cardiac ventricular muscle, and other metabolic effects.Diabetic Foot: Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.Leukotriene C4: The conjugation product of LEUKOTRIENE A4 and glutathione. It is the major arachidonic acid metabolite in macrophages and human mast cells as well as in antigen-sensitized lung tissue. It stimulates mucus secretion in the lung, and produces contractions of nonvascular and some VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.
  • Walker's work envisions a mangled American nightmare that felt at a certain time, to some, excessive in its barbarity, dangerous in its dredging up of racism's dead and buried ghosts. (yahoo.com)
  • Yet as Hilton Als wrote in a 2007 review of Walker's work, " slavery is a nightmare from which no American has yet awakened ," and Trump's inability to condone white supremacy makes that statement abundantly clear. (yahoo.com)
  • Walker's business continued to develop, as she not only marketed her hair care products but also tutored African American men and women in their use, recruiting a group called "Walker Agents. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In spite of critics, Walker's hair care methods gained increasing popularity among African American women, who enjoyed products designed especially for them. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Observers estimated that Walker's company had about three thousand agents for whom Walker held annual conventions where they were tutored in product use, hygienic care techniques, and marketing strategies. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Martin, co-author of the book, "Tea Party Patriots: The Second American Revolution," believes that Walker's election sets the stage for voters to choose "fiscal responsibility" and "constitutionally limited government" though her organization refrains from endorsing specific candidates. (newsmax.com)
  • Walker's experience was as an artilleryman, but during World War II , he commanded a sub-unit of the Canadian-American First Special Service Force . (wikipedia.org)
  • And that the second word under Walker's entry in R. Tucker Abbott's Directory of American Malacologists , after the word lawyer, is "amateur. (blogspot.com)
  • Madam CJ Walker's eponymous company, Madame CJ Walker Manufacturing, started off as a small door-to-door and mail order business based in Denver, Colorado. (ranker.com)
  • The company - Madame CJ Walker Manufacturing - stayed in business until 1981, 62 years after Walker's death. (ranker.com)
  • Because of Williams and Walker's extremely busy schedule and also perhaps because of George Walker's reluctance to record (it is said that he detested the way his voice sounded on recordings), Victor did not record Williams and Walker after their November 1901 session. (loc.gov)
  • That is the word black American assemblage artist Betye Saar used in 1997 to describe the work of Kara Walker . (yahoo.com)
  • In 1986, Walker was appointed the first African-American professor at any Southern Baptist seminary, eventually being elected to the faculty in 1997. (christianpost.com)
  • She, along with thousands of other women, were honored in the newly-dedicated Women in Military Service for America Memorial in October 1997. (americancivilwar.com)
  • And so it is that when a sixteen-year-old American named John Walker Lindh converts to Islam in 1997, he begins calling himself Suleyman al-Faris and sets about trying to master the language of the Prophet, peace be upon him. (esquire.com)
  • In recent years, improvements to walkers have decreased injuries, such as a 1997 standard that called for walkers to be wider than doorways. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Before joining the AFL-CIO in 1997, Walker served as field director of the Preamble Center for Public Policy, where she helped coordinate both press and field work on progressive policy issues like corporate accountability and fair trade. (epi.org)
  • The exhibition of collaged drawings, paintings and silhouettes Walker made during the summer of 2017 is currently on view at Sikkema Jenkins & Co in New York City. (yahoo.com)
  • Kara Walker, "Slaughter of the Innocents (They Might be Guilty of Something)," 2017, cut paper on canvas, 79 by 220 inches. (yahoo.com)
  • At the time, her estate was worth $600,000 - 8 million dollars in 2017 money - making her the wealthiest African American woman in the country at the time. (ranker.com)
  • Published: Adam Isen & Maya Rossin-Slater & W. Reed Walker, 2017. (nber.org)
  • MADISON, WI - Americans for Prosperity-Wisconsin (AFP-WI) today announced a new seven-figure investment in television and digital advertisements asking Wisconsinites to thank Governor Scott Walker for his successful, pro-growth economic policies that have lowered the state's unemployment rate to an historic 2.8 percent. (wispolitics.com)
  • Governor Scott Walker continues to build on his strong record of reform. (wispolitics.com)
  • Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government in the wake of the Great Recession. (powells.com)
  • Using Scott Walker and Wisconsinandrsquo;s prominent and protracted debate about the appropriate role of government, Cramer illuminates the contours of rural consciousness, showing how place-based identities profoundly influence how people understand politics, regardless of whether urban politicians and their supporters really do shortchange or look down on those living in the country. (powells.com)
  • Tea Party Patriots founder Jenny Beth Martin tells Newsmax that Tuesday's decisive victory for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker will have "huge" implications on the November presidential election. (newsmax.com)
  • Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker said Washington should follow the lead of the country's 30 Republican governors, and talk like regular Americans. (newsmax.com)
  • The $3 billion contract is signed, but Gov. Scott Walker says the state has several things to do to make the planned Foxconn Technology Group factory in Racine County a reality. (wpr.org)
  • Gov. Scott Walker thinks the push to replace "America's Dairyland" on Wisconsin's license plates is udderly ridiculous. (wpr.org)
  • Scott Walker wants nothing more than power to make decisions to be rid of the middle class. (progressive.org)
  • We are working to make sure our operations will run smoothly and safely for all our attendees at the 2020 UPHA/American Royal National Championship Horse Show in November. (saddlehorsereport.com)
  • Not content with her domestic achievements, Walker traveled to the Caribbean and Latin America to promote her business and to recruit individuals to teach her hair care methods. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Walker Evans , (born November 3, 1903, St. Louis, Missouri , U.S.-died April 10, 1975, New Haven , Connecticut), American photographer whose influence on the evolution of ambitious photography during the second half of the 20th century was perhaps greater than that of any other figure. (britannica.com)
  • Evans's friend James Stern remembered-almost half a century later-that he and Evans had gone to Abbott's apartment to see Atget's work, perhaps for the first time in America. (britannica.com)
  • Walker Evans' American Photographs is widely deemed the most important photobook ever published. (artbook.com)
  • Originally conceived to be a catalogue to accompany his one-man show at The Museum of Modern Art in 1938 (the first solo show MoMA had given to a photographer), it quickly became a document so definitive of its era that curator John Szarkowski wrote that "it was difficult to know now whether Walker Evans recorded the America of his youth, or invented it. (artbook.com)
  • John T. Hill, excerpted from Walker Evans: American Photographs . (artbook.com)
  • At this point, some 75 years after its first display, there isn't much to debate about Walker Evans' American Photographs . (blogspot.com)
  • There are fascinating connections in every direction: the bold contrast between Evans' puritanical restraint and the heroic gestures (and scale) of the AbEx painters, the dialogue between Evans' vision of America and the one implied by Jasper Johns' encaustic flag or a Rauschenberg combine, and the interest in vernacular signage and cultural signifiers starting with Evans and being reconsidered by the Pop artists. (blogspot.com)
  • For the off-road and NASCAR driver, see Walker Evans (racing driver) . (wikipedia.org)
  • Walker Evans (November 3, 1903 - April 10, 1975) was an American photographer and photojournalist best known for his work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) documenting the effects of the Great Depression . (wikipedia.org)
  • Walker Evans was a seminal figure in the development of American documentary photography in the early to mid-twentieth century. (mocp.org)
  • However, Evans had produced many of the images exhibited in "American Photographs" (1938), the first solo show given to a photographer by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. (mocp.org)
  • His work is held in many collections and has been the subject of many retrospectives at such institutions at the George Eastman House, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and, notably, the Museum of Modern Art in New York in a 1971 exhibition simply entitled "Walker Evans. (mocp.org)
  • Published: Eva Lyubich & Joseph Shapiro & Reed Walker, 2018. (nber.org)
  • Naomi Walker joined EPI in 2018 as director of the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN), a national network of more than 60 state-level policy research and advocacy organizations coordinated by EPI. (epi.org)
  • SAN FRANCISCO, June 30 -- Canes and walkers used to prevent falls are themselves associated with more than 47,000 serious injuries each year among older adults, the CDC warned. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Rather than being a cause of alarm, Dr. Stevens said the findings from their study of surveillance data of emergency department-treated injuries are a call for better training in use of canes and walkers and also better design of the mobility aids. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Elderly adults who use canes and walkers as walking aids should be assessed and fitted by a physical therapist to avoid fall related injuries. (disabled-world.com)
  • The authors mentioned during this ebook, together with James Fenimore Cooper, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Leslie Marmon Silko, position this cross-cultural touch in nature, not just collapsing cultural and racial barriers, but in addition complicating divisions among 'wilderness' and 'civilization. (clubhouserestaurant.com)
  • Based on total UK sales data, Walkers were the best selling crisps brand as recorded by Nielsen (52 week data to 18.11.17). (tesco.com)
  • Celebrating 70 Years of the Nation's Favourite - In 1948, Leicester Butcher Henry Walker took the humble potato and created a delicious new snack, Walkers Crisps. (tesco.com)
  • If you like these Oven Baked with Veg then why not also try our Walkers Oven Baked crisps. (tesco.com)
  • Walker and Williams appeared in The Gold Bug (1895), Clorindy (1898), The Policy Player (1899), Sons of Ham (1900), In Dahomey (1903), Abyssinia (1906), and Bandanna Land (1907). (aaregistry.org)
  • With the help of her family and her second husband, Charles Joseph Walker, a newspaperman whom she had married in 1906 after she moved to Denver, she began to advertise a growing number of hair care products. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In 1906 with the advent of their show Abyssinia , Williams and Walker were engaged by The Columbia Record Company. (loc.gov)
  • Thus, in the early years of African slavery, the religious traditions of West Africa, often already blended in syncretism with Islam, were no doubt part of the American religious landscape. (pluralism.org)
  • And he became an international authority on freshwater limpets, publishing important contributions on the ancylids of South America and Africa, as well as revising our own continental fauna here at home . (blogspot.com)
  • By 1910, Walker had moved the Mme. (pbs.org)
  • Working closely with her daughter Lelia (who later changed her name to A'Lelia), Walker opened a school for "hair culturists" in Pittsburgh-Lelia College-which operated from 1908 to 1910. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In 1910 the Walkers moved to Indianapolis, where they established a modern factory to produce their products. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Having established a Constitutional framework for political and religious freedom, America still lived with the disquieting lie of its harshest institution: slavery. (pluralism.org)
  • From the standpoint of America's ongoing encounter with religious difference, the institution of slavery played a tremendous role in shaping American religious life. (pluralism.org)
  • Slavery forced white Americans to rethink their own religious identity, struggling with the deepest dictates of their conscience and the practices of their churches. (pluralism.org)
  • The crisis revolving around race relations in America and the recent events surrounding this crisis have made the Hein Company rethink the idea of financially profiting from the sale of a collection on slavery. (illinois.edu)
  • Therefore, the decision was made not to charge for this collection, but to provide Slavery in America and the World free to anyone with an interest in the subject: libraries, institutions, students, researchers, or any other entity within our global community. (illinois.edu)
  • Additionally, walker-friendly marathons treat distance walkers with the same respect as the elite runners, encouraging a pleasurable, high-standard experience for all race entrants. (trails.com)
  • Each April, 35,000 runners and walkers flock to the Country Music Marathon in Nashville , Tennessee. (trails.com)
  • An illiterate, impoverished daughter of freed slaves built the largest black-owned business in America, made a fortune, and touched thousands with her philanthropy. (pbs.org)
  • American Photographs points over and over again to the unhappy lot of the poor and the dispossessed in 1930s America. (artbook.com)
  • American Photographs continues to go out of print for long stretches of time, and the first edition of Errata's 2009 spread-by-spread reprint followed suit. (artbook.com)
  • A 75th anniversary edition of American Photographs has been published by the museum ( here ) and can be purchased in the bookshop for $35. (blogspot.com)
  • The photographs that made up the exhibit and book have influenced generations of downstream artists, capturing Depression-era America with a sense of exacting clarity and respectful austerity. (blogspot.com)
  • Looking to immerse yourself in black history and learn how past generations of African Americans helped shape life in the United States today? (aarp.org)
  • Today, the 25,000-acre site includes the Jacobs Jackson Home Site, one of the railroad's first safe houses, and Bezel Church, where African Americans worshipped at that time. (aarp.org)
  • African Americans repeatedly questioned how their owners could consider themselves noble in their own fight for independence from England while simultaneously believing that it was wrong for slaves to do the same. (loc.gov)
  • William Monroe Trotter was a Harvard-educated journalist and activist who championed equal rights for African Americans. (biography.com)
  • Attorney Charles H. Houston helped create the legal precedents that led to the rejection of "separate but equal" schools for African Americans. (biography.com)
  • Finding music by African Americans on early phonograph records is more difficult than one might surmise. (loc.gov)
  • Authoritative, up-to-date data on the living standards of American workers. (epi.org)
  • Reuters) - American Jimmy Walker took advantage of a late collapse by overnight leader Brooks Koepka to win his first PGA Tour title by two shots at the Frys.com Open in San Martin, California on Sunday. (yahoo.com)
  • Something delicious has been baked at Walkers, Walkers Oven Baked with Veg is a range of Sweet Potato and Beetroot snacks, seasoned to perfection and baked for extra crispy crunchiness, with 40% less fat**, and all the great taste of Walkers. (tesco.com)
  • Now that's an all-American dilemma, full of the delicious moral ambiguities we have come to expect from the worlds FX so boldly creates. (tvguide.com)
  • At the time, Walker was known primarily for two things: her use of paper cutouts and her propensity for twisting history's darkest moments into sick jokes. (yahoo.com)
  • T. Vaughn Walker, the first African American elected as a full-time professor at a Southern Baptist Convention seminary, passed away at age 68. (christianpost.com)
  • At a time when all references to the American South were unfairly smeared with bigotry, ignorance and hate, Mayberry showed a small North Carolina town of tolerance, wisdom and love. (conservativetruth.org)
  • Bruce Walker is a long-time conservative writer whose work is published regularly at popular conservative sites such as American Thinker. (conservativetruth.org)
  • In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. (powells.com)
  • Marathons categorized as 'walker-friendly' are races with an attainable time limit, an early start, ample participant support, a clearly marked course and energizing race-day entertainment. (trails.com)
  • With an official seven-hour course time limit, a 16-minute-mile goal pace is attainable by the majority of walker participants. (trails.com)
  • With race-day start temperatures in the low 60s, pleasant weather conditions can encourage any walker to finish the race under the seven-hour time limit. (trails.com)
  • The Portland marathon has an extended time limit of eight hours, allowing walkers of varied ability to complete the race with an 18-minute-mile pace. (trails.com)
  • The early start time of 5 a.m. allows walkers to complete more mileage before the heightened tropical afternoon temperatures. (trails.com)
  • The race does not have a time limit, allowing for distance walkers of all abilities to complete their first (or 50th) marathon. (trails.com)
  • This latter dimension of his appeal should not be underestimated: at a time when MSM types and (more subtly) Jeb Bush and Chris Christie continue to suggest Republicans must become less feral to reach beyond their base, here's Walker saying he won three elections in four years in a blue state by going medieval on unions, abortionists and Big Government. (motherjones.com)
  • Walker began command of one of the force's three regiments while still in the United States, and commanded the 3rd Regiment throughout its time in Italy. (wikipedia.org)
  • During that time, Walker repeatedly protested to President Eisenhower that using Federal troops to enforce racial integration was against his conscience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diane Nash is an African-American civil rights activist and Freedom Rider whose campaigns during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s were some of the most consequential of their time. (biography.com)
  • For example, patients may need more time or multiple sessions with a physical therapist or occupational therapist along with proper fitting for a cane or walker, she said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • With the African slave trade, the first sizeable group of Muslims also came to America. (pluralism.org)
  • While slave trade statistics are fraught with imprecision and the existence of Islam was frequently not even recognized by those keeping the numbers, it has been estimated that somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of the slaves brought to America between 1711 and 1808 were Muslim. (pluralism.org)
  • In 1995, Walker joined Thelma Houston, CeCe Peniston, Phoebe Snow and Lois Walden to record a gospel album in common, Good News in Hard Times , as the quintet called The Sisters of Glory. (aaregistry.org)
  • In 1893, in San Francisco, Walker at the age of 20 met Bert Williams, who was a year younger. (aaregistry.org)
  • The two men set up an agency, The Williams and Walker Company, to support Black actors and other performers, create networking, and produce new works. (aaregistry.org)
  • Walker became the straight man--dressed a little too high-style and spending all the money he could borrow or trick out of the lazy, careless, unlucky Williams--and Williams became the sorrowful, comical-in-spite-of-himself patsy. (aaregistry.org)
  • Paul R. Williams, a renowned African American architect from Los Angeles, designed the homes, which offer an open carport, simple landscaping and a large backyard. (aarp.org)
  • So why hire Ernest Hogan, Cole and Johnson, Williams and Walker, and others when the in-house talent could do the job? (loc.gov)
  • Walker, along with his partner Bert Williams, were perhaps the most famous (to both black and white audiences) black entertainers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. (loc.gov)
  • In October 1901 Williams and Walker made the first of their 15 recordings (both as soloists and a duo) for the Victor Talking Machine Company. (loc.gov)
  • The Victor sessions yielded only three Walker solos compared to two duets with Williams and Williams' eight solo recordings. (loc.gov)
  • Another factor likely contributing to the limited number of recordings was the expense involved in bringing in big stars such as Williams and Walker. (loc.gov)
  • Rick Osteen, official photographer at the All American Horse Classic, has proofs available online at www.rickosteen.com and despite not being able to set up his viewing table he and wife Joni are fulfilling orders as quickly as possible. (saddlehorsereport.com)
  • JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) - Gov. Bill Walker is expected to introduce legislation setting out a framework for calculating property-tax payments for the state and municipalities from a major liquefied natural gas project. (washingtontimes.com)
  • In the early 1950s Walker founded her own Gospel music group The Caravans , enlisting fellow singers from The Robert Anderson Singers (Ora Lee Hopkins, Elyse Yancey and Nellie Grace Daniels). (aaregistry.org)
  • Mary Edwards Walker, one of the nation's 1.8 million women veterans, was the only one to earn the Congressional Medal of Honor, for her service during the Civil War. (americancivilwar.com)
  • Prior to joining EPI, Naomi Walker served as assistant to the president at the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), the nation's largest and fastest-growing public services employees union, with more than 1.6 million active and retired members. (epi.org)
  • The history of Payne Theological Seminary, one of the nation's oldest African American seminaries is now at your fingertips, thanks to a collaboration between Payne and Princeton Theological Seminary. (illinois.edu)
  • One of the largest employers of African American women, she carefully screened, groomed, and trained a 3,000-person strong sales force that was motivated by working on commission. (pbs.org)
  • Walker became one of the best-known women in America. (pbs.org)
  • The hair process was controversial because many felt that African American women should wear their hair in natural styles rather than attempt to change the texture from curly to straight. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin was an American community leader and women's rights activist who focused particularly on issues affecting African-American women. (biography.com)
  • Women had a higher rate of injury than men for both walkers and for canes (rate ratios 2.6 and 1.4, respectively), which, again, likely reflected a physically weaker group. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The contempt for women continues with a policy that requires women seeking abortion to have an ultrasound (Walker justified the measure by saying ultrasounds are "just a cool thing") and a proposed 20-week abortion ban that will endanger the lives of medically fragile pregnant women. (progressive.org)
  • President Donald Trump just signed an executive order encouraging businesses in the U.S. to put American workers first and hire them before foreign applicants. (americanfreepress.net)
  • Walker, who served as a professor at the Louisville, Kentucky-based Southern Baptist Theological Seminary for 30 years, died late Saturday evening. (christianpost.com)
  • And so it is that now he is imprisoned in America for twenty years, and part of his sentence is that America will not allow him to speak Arabic. (esquire.com)
  • After testing, it was determined that Walker did indeed have MS and would in all likelihood be unable to walk within a few years and would pass away from MS a few years after that. (nticentral.org)
  • NTI wants to wish Clay Walker a happy birthday today and for years to come! (nticentral.org)
  • A blacksmith for some 25 years, Walker had long associations with such trainers as Effinger, Chris Reiser, Mike Barlow, Wendy Winstead, Kathy Boggs, and Joe T. Smith. (saddlehorsereport.com)
  • The work grew from an extensive system of note cards that he compiled for his personal use over many years, recording not just the descriptions of new species as they were published, but indeed any note or comment regarding any species of North American freshwater mollusk to appear in the literature over several decades. (blogspot.com)
  • The study, conducted by government researchers, examined six years of emergency room records and found that the walker was associated seven times more with injury-related falls than was the cane. (disabled-world.com)
  • The reason for this is likely that those who use walkers represent a more vulnerable population that is weaker, frailer, and has more balance and mobility limitations than those who use canes, the researchers noted. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Walker was popularly referred to as the "Queen of Gospel Music" for her outstanding achievements within the genre after the death of Mahalia Jackson in 1972. (aaregistry.org)