Sapindus: A plant genus of the family SAPINDACEAE that contain SAPONINS.Rheum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE. Members contain chrysophanic acid, rhein, EMODIN, and other ANTHRAQUINONES. The roots were formerly used as PURGATIVES.Saponins: A type of glycoside widely distributed in plants. Each consists of a sapogenin as the aglycone moiety, and a sugar. The sapogenin may be a steroid or a triterpene and the sugar may be glucose, galactose, a pentose, or a methylpentose.Sapindaceae: The soapberry plant family of the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some members contain SAPONINS.TriterpenesMagnolia: A plant genus of the family MAGNOLIACEAE. The germacranolide sesquiterpene lactones costunolide, parthenolide, and costunolide diepoxide have been isolated from the leaves. Bark contains honokiol and magnolol. Parts are an ingredient of Banxia Houpo Tang.Lignans: A class of dibenzylbutane derivatives which occurs in higher plants and in fluids (bile, serum, urine, etc.) in man and other animals. These compounds, which have a potential anti-cancer role, can be synthesized in vitro by human fecal flora. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Magnoliaceae: A plant family of the order Magnoliales, subclass Magnoliidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are trees and shrubs having an elongated conelike floral axis with fragrant flowers that have six tepals (sepals and petals that are not distinctly different) and many spirally arranged stamens.Biphenyl CompoundsPlant Bark: The outer layer of the woody parts of plants.Ancylostoma: A genus of nematode intestinal parasites that consists of several species. A. duodenale is the common hookworm in humans. A. braziliense, A. ceylonicum, and A. caninum occur primarily in cats and dogs, but all have been known to occur in humans.South AmericaAncylostomiasis: Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus ANCYLOSTOMA. Characteristics include anemia, dyspepsia, eosinophilia, and abdominal swelling.Indians, South American: Individual members of South American ethnic groups with historic ancestral origins in Asia.Necator americanus: A common parasite of humans in the moist tropics and subtropics. These organisms attach to villi in the small intestine and suck blood causing diarrhea, anorexia, and anemia.Necatoriasis: Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus NECATOR. The resulting anemia from this condition is less severe than that from ANCYLOSTOMIASIS.Campanulaceae: A plant family of the order Campanulales, subclass Asteridae, class MagnoliopsidaGuatemalaPeace Corps: It was established in 1961 and made an independent agency in 1981. Its mission is to help the people of interested countries in meeting their need for trained men and women, and to help promote better mutual understanding between Americans and citizens of other countries. (United States Government Manual, 2006-2007, pg497)Panama Canal ZoneForestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.Volunteers: Persons who donate their services.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Coumaric Acids: Hydroxycinnamic acid and its derivatives. Act as activators of the indoleacetic acid oxidizing system, thereby producing a decrease in the endogenous level of bound indoleacetic acid in plants.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.HondurasFibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Hypertrophy: General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).Coniferophyta: A plant division of GYMNOSPERMS consisting of cone-bearing trees and shrubs.Cupressaceae: A plant family of the order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta (conifers). They are mainly resinous, aromatic evergreen trees.Ocotea: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The common name of stinkwood is also used for Zieria (RUTACEAE).Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Genome Components: The parts of a GENOME sequence that are involved with the different functions or properties of genomes as a whole as opposed to those of individual GENES.New Caledonia: A group of islands in Melanesia constituting a French overseas territory. The group includes New Caledonia (the main island), Ile des Pins, Loyalty Island, and several other islet groups. The capital is Noumea. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1774 and visited by various navigators, explorers, and traders from 1792 to 1840. Occupied by the French in 1853, it was set up as a penal colony 1864-94. In 1946 it was made a French overseas territory. It was named by Captain Cook with the 5th and 6th century A.D. Latin name for Scotland, Caledonia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p830 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)Melanesia: The collective name for the islands of the Pacific Ocean northeast of Australia, including NEW CALEDONIA; VANUATU; New Hebrides, Solomon Islands, Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, FIJI, etc. Melanesia (from the Greek melas, black + nesos, island) is so called from the black color of the natives who are generally considered to be descended originally from the Negroid Papuans and the Polynesians or Malays. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p748 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p344)MissouriNature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Creativity: The ability to generate new ideas or images.Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Rhus: A plant genus of the family Anacardiaceae, order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae. It is a source of gallotannin (TANNIC ACID) and of somewhat edible fruit. Do not confuse with TOXICODENDRON which used to be part of this genus.Philodendron: A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. As a houseplant it sometimes poisons children and animals.Inflorescence: A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.Hematemesis: Vomiting of blood that is either fresh bright red, or older "coffee-ground" in character. It generally indicates bleeding of the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Toxicodendron: A genus (formerly part of Rhus genus) of shrubs, vines, or trees that yields a highly allergenic oleoresin which causes a severe contact dermatitis (DERMATITIS, TOXICODENDRON). The most toxic species are Toxicodendron vernix (poison sumac), T. diversilobum (poison oak), and T. radicans (poison ivy). T. vernicifera yields a useful varnish from which certain enzymes (laccases) are obtained.
The edible fruit is three chambered like Sapindus trifoliatus. Allophyllus cobbe is a variable plant with a broad distribution ... in India, South Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, and Papua New Guinea. The plants size is 10 metres (33 ft) high and 13 m ...
This is a list of genera in the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, which includes the soapberries (Sapindus), maples (Acer), and ... Acevedo-Rodrígue, Pedro (2011). "Allophylastrum: a new genus of Sapindaceae from northern South America". PhytoKeys. 5: 39-43. ... Radlkofer, L. (1878). "Ueber Sapindus und damit in Zusammenhang stehende Pflanzen". Sitzungsberichte der mathematisch- ... 365 Sapindus, p. 367 Oliver, Daniel (1898). "Dipteronia sinensis". Hooker's Icones Plantarum (in Latin). 19. pl. 1898. ...
2005). Elsevier's Dictionary of Trees: Volume 1 - North America. ISBN 0-444-51784-7. Shreve, Forrest; Ira Loren Wiggins (1964 ... Celastrus Maytenus Sapindus Zinowiewia Celastrus mexicanus Holotype (Fragment) Hooker, William J. (1841). Icones Plantarum. IV ... 353-. Neotropical Herbarium Specimens Radlkofer, Ludwig A. T. (1878). "Über Sapindus und damit in Zusammenhang stehende ...
Biota of North America Program 2014 state-level distribution map Benito Baeza (March 20, 2017). "Idaho Fish and Game Ask ... Unrelated plants in the genus Sapindus produce very toxic saponins and are also commonly denominated "soapberry" along with the ... a word derived from the historic Chinook Jargon trading language spoken in the North American Pacific Northwest in the 19th and ...
Canada buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) is also known as "soapberry" and is native to North America. This shrub bears ... Soapberry is a common name for several plants and may refer to: Plants in the genus Sapindus, native to warm temperate to ...
... particularly in North America where between one and three species are accepted. Sapindus delavayi (China, India) Sapindus ... Soapnut, Ritha) Sapindus emarginatus Vahl (Southern Asia) Sapindus laurifolius Vahl - Ritha (India) Sapindus marginatus Willd ... Flora of India: Sapindus Flora of Pakistan: Sapindus Flora of China: Sapindus species list. ... saponaria - Wingleaf Soapberry (southeastern United States, Caribbean, island of Hawaiʻi, Central and South America) Sapindus ...
Certain Native American tribes used extracts from North American plants as hair shampoo; for example the Costanoans of present- ... Sapindus, also known as soapberries or soapnuts, a tropical tree widespread in India, is called Ksuna (Sanskrit: क्षुण) in ... The North American Hair Research Society has a program to certify functional claims based on third party testing. Shampoos made ... A very effective early shampoo was made by boiling Sapindus with dried Indian gooseberry (amla) and a selection of other herbs ...
It was first described from the southern United States, but it is probably an introduction to North America. It is found in ... Sapindus oahuensis). The larva pupates for 11 to 13 days in a whitish cocoon amongst its frass. The pupa is 4 to 5 millimeters ... and South America. The wingspan is 9 to 12 millimeters. The moth has brown forewings with pale streaks and plain grey hindwings ...
American everlasting (Gamochaeta americana) American tarwort (Flourensia cernua) American threefold (Trixis californica) annual ... Sapindus saponaria) bebelamo (Sideroxylon occidentale) bully (Sideroxylon persimile) mamey sapote (Pouteria sapota) sapodilla ( ... The Sonoran Desert is located in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico in North America. The Sonoran Desert ... American dodder (Cuscuta americana) bayhops (Ipomoea pes-caprae) beach morning glory (Ipomoea imperati) bejuco blanco (Ipomoea ...
... litchi Sapindus - soapberries Sapindus drummondii - western soapberry Sapindus saponaria - wingleaf soapberry Sapindus ... American hornbeam Corylus - hazels Corylus americana - American hazel; American hazelnut Corylus avellana - common hazelnut ... North American gooseberry Ribes nigrum - black currant Ribes rubrum - red currant; cultivated currant Ribes sanguineum - ... American elm; white elm Ulmus bergmanniana - Bergmann's elm Ulmus canescens - grey elm; grey-leafed elm; hoary elm Ulmus ...
... s are also found in the botanical family Sapindaceae, with its defining genus Sapindus (soapberry or soapnut), and in ... Many of California's Native American tribes traditionally used soaproot, (genus Chlorogalum) and/or the root of various yucca ... "Arrow and fish poison of the American southwest", Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology Tinde Van Andel, The ...
Popular sources of nectar include milkweeds (Asclepias) and western soapberry trees (Sapindus saponaria). The debilitating, ... and as far north as Nevada, Oklahoma, and Kansas. Much of the fieldwork done on H. ustulata was performed in the Sonoran Desert ... Annals of the Entomological Society of America 49 (1956): 447-66. Petrunkevitch, Alexander. "Tarantula versus Tarantula-hawk: A ...
Sapindus), hibiscus flowers, ritha (Sapindus mukorossi) and arappu (Albizzia amara). Guru Nanak, the founding prophet and the ... The American Statistician. Boston: American Statistical Association. 52 (3): 218-221. doi:10.2307/2685927. JSTOR 2685927. ... Sapindus, also known as soapberries or soapnuts, is called Ksuna (Sanskrit: क्षुण) in ancient Indian texts and its fruit pulp ... The American Mathematical Monthly 103(1): 1-17. Fraser, Gordon (2006). The New Physics for the Twenty-first Century. England: ...
... and small mammals in North America, USDA Forest Service general technical report RM-166, pp. 72-86 Davis, J.H. (1943), The ... Species associated with aboriginal activity include red mulberry (Morus rubra) and soapberry (Sapindus saponaria), and those ... floridanum), which is found only on the Miami Rock Ridge and the fern grottos of north-central Florida. Several state listed ... Newly acquired land parcels on North Key Largo are being allowed to succeed to hammock through planting of hardwoods and ...
Pre-Columbian North AmericaEdit. Certain Native American tribes used extracts from North American plants as hair shampoo; for ... Sapindus, also known as soapberries or soapnuts, a tropical tree widespread in India, is called ksuna (Sanskrit: क्षुण)[6] in ... The North American Hair Research Society has a program to certify functional claims based on third-party testing. Shampoos made ... Pre-Columbian South AmericaEdit. Before quinoa can be eaten the saponin must be washed out from the grain prior to cooking. Pre ...
Sapindus), hibiscus flowers, ritha (Sapindus mukorossi) and arappu (Albizzia amara). Guru Nanak, the founding prophet and the ... Muslims carried Shatranj to North Africa, Sicily, and Spain by the 10th century where it took its final modern form of chess. ... Sapindus, also known as soapberries or soapnuts, is called Ksuna (Sanskrit: क्षुण) in ancient Indian texts and its fruit pulp ... A very effective early shampoo was made by boiling Sapindus with dried Indian gooseberry (aamla) and a few other herbs, using ...
As of 2008, the captive population in North America had grown to 74 individuals, with most of them born at the San Diego Zoo; ... Trees from which exudates are eaten are from the following families: Sapindaceae (Sapindus), Euphorbiaceae (Vernicia), Fabaceae ... Fuller, G.; Kuhar, C. W.; Dennis, P. M.; Lukas, K. E. (2013). "A survey of husbandry practices for lorisid primates in North American ... The first documented pygmy slow loris in North America was kept at Hawaii's Honolulu Zoo in 1968. In 1986, about 37 pygmy ...
Arnett, J (2010). "Camassia quamash, Blue Camas - 6 (1)". North American Native Plant Society:. Retrieved Mar 10, 2016. Turner ... Unrelated plants in the genus Sapindus produce highly toxic saponins and share the common name soapberry with the edible Canada ... Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/topic/Salish Moerman, D.E. Native american food plants: An ethnobotanical dictionary. ...
The main business sectors are the centre and north of the city. Calle 98 is an exclusive area located north of Barranquilla, ... Sapindus saponaria and varieties of palm trees like Roystonea regia and Phoenix roebelenii. Fruit trees in the area include ... mainly in the north and centre), residences (528 in 2007, 467 in, 2006 mainly in the north), financial institutions (20 in 2006 ... Plazas Among the plazas of the city are Plaza de Bolívar, located at the north end of the promenade of the same name which is ...
In 2002, a group of artisans from San Cristóbal de las Casas won the UNESCO Handcrafts Prize for Latin America and the ... POACEAE: Coix lacryma-jobi L., and SAPINDACEAE: Sapindus saponaria L. Leather working was introduced to the state by the ... It is the oldest artisan organization in the Chiapas highlands, founded in 1976, by American W. Morris and indigenous weaver ...
American cowslip) Dodonaea (hop bush) Dolichandrone Dombeya Doodia (hacksaw fern, rasp fern) Doronicum (leopard's bane) ... Sapindus Sapium (tallow tree) Saponaria (soapwort) Sarcocapnos Sarcocaulon Sarcococca Saritaea Sarmienta Sarracenia (pitcher ...
... particularly in North America where between one and three species are accepted. Sapindus delavayi (China, India) Sapindus ... Soapnut, Ritha) Sapindus emarginatus Vahl (Southern Asia) Sapindus laurifolius Vahl - Ritha (India) Sapindus marginatus Willd ... Flora of India: Sapindus Flora of Pakistan: Sapindus Flora of China: Sapindus species list. ... saponaria - Wingleaf Soapberry (southeastern United States, Caribbean, island of Hawaiʻi, Central and South America) Sapindus ...
Arborvitae, Nigra American (Thuja occidentalis Nigra) A cultivar of the American arborvitae, the Nigra American arborvitae is ... Sapindus drummondii) The western soapberry earned its name because the fruit gives off a lather when mixed with water. In fact ... Hazelnut, American (Corylus americana) The American hazelnut (also known as the American filbert) is a native shrub of the ... Full Speed A Hedge® American Pillar (Thuja occidentalis American Pillar) The American Pillar arborvitae is a favorite, ...
The edible fruit is three chambered like Sapindus trifoliatus. Allophyllus cobbe is a variable plant with a broad distribution ... in India, South Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, and Papua New Guinea. The plants size is 10 metres (33 ft) high and 13 m ...
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center focused on protecting and preserving North Americas native plants through native plant ... FNA: Find Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii in the Flora of North America (if available) Google: Search Google for Sapindus ... Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii. Sapindus saponaria L. var. drummondii (Hook. & Arn.) L.D. Benson. Western soapberry, ... Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA). Soapberry Hairstreak. (Phaeostrymon alcestis). Larval Host. ...
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center focused on protecting and preserving North Americas native plants through native plant ... Sapindus drummondii or Rhus aromatica for Austria. Hy! Im from Austria/Europe, and interested in some North American native ... Is western soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii) dioecious?. Hi! I found different information on the flowering habits ... It would be great if you can help me with my two questions: Sapindus drummondii I read from different... view the full question ...
The Live Oak produces the hardest wood in North America, and was widely used in early American shipbuilding. The frame of USS ... Sapindus drummondii. The Soapberry is named for its use of the fruits. When crushed in water the berries create suds that were ... American Elm. Ulmus americana. The American Elm is a long-lived tree that can withstand winter temperatures as low as -42 °C. ... The specific epithet occidentalis means "western", a designation that Linnaeus often used to distinguish North American and ...
1 brand in America! - Premium de-seeded. - Fresh, saponin-rich, wild-harvested, sun-dried Sapindus Mukorossi fruit from the ... NaturOli Soap Nuts are selected for optimal quality & highest effectiveness - wild harvested Sapindus Mukorossi soap berries. ...
Sapindus saponaria. soapberry. American origin. Asia, E. Polynesia. BC?. Schoenoplectus californicus. bulrush. American origin ... Sapindus saponaria. soapberry. American origin. Asia, E. Polynesia. BC?. Schoenoplectus californicus. bulrush. American origin ... American origin. East Asia, Oceania. AD 1500. Pharbitis hederacea. ivy-leaf morn glory. American origin. India, China. AD 1000 ... Society for American Archaeology,1953), 62-71; Wendell H. Camp, "A possible source for American pre-Columbian gourds," American ...
American Society of Animal Science. Subject. Brachiaria dictyoneura; Cratylia argentea; Protein; Protozoa; Saponins; Tropical ... Effects of Sapindus saponaria fruits on ruminal fermentation and duodenal nitrogen flow of sheep fed a tropical grass diet with ...
American Cotinus obovatus snowberry Symphoricarpos albus soapberry, Florida Sapindus marginatus soapberry, western Sapindus ... American Sambucus canadensis elder, Pacific red Sambucus callicarpa elliottia Elliottia racemosa elm Ulmus spp. elm, American ... American Fagus grandifolia beech, European Fagus sylvatica birch, black Betula lenta birch, bog Betula pumila birch, cut leaf ... American Prunus americana plum, beach Prunus maritima plum, Canada Prunus nigra plum, Chickasaw Prunus angustifolia plum, ...
Sapindus rarak DC.. Solanum aculeatissimum Jacq.. Dutch eggplant. Solanum aethiopicum L.. Chinese scarlet eggplant. ... American nightshade. Solanum anguivi Lam.. Solanum donianum Walp.. Solanum granulosoleprosum Dunal. Solanum incanum L.. Bitter ...
American Forests: At the hub of the restoration process for the Rio Grande is Chris Best who came to the refuge in 1990 after ... Sapindus saponaria) or Mexican soapberry, an old-growth species; and Vaseys adelia (Adelia vaseyi), which is rare. As the ... Adding to the pressures on the already stressed ecosystem is NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande ... and about half the butterfly species found in North America. During a quick 20-minute walk on the refuges A trail I saw ...
The range extends well into South America and the Caribbean islands. This species is very easy in cultivation, and can even be ... Also seen Fouquieria macdougalii, Guazuma ulmifolia, oaks including Quercus chihuahuensis, Sapindus saponaria, Taxodium ... Often on sheer canyon walls and cliffs, and large rocks, usually with north-facing exposures or shaded. Also common as an ... SE and EC Sonora and SW Chihuahua to South America and West Indies. ...
Sweet leaf is a plant from South America used to flavor mate and other drinks. ... Sapindus... 5 SOAPNUT / SOAPBERRY seeds (Sapindus mukorossi). 3,99 € Add to cart ... native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America.. The species Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, commonly known as ...
APA (American Psychological Association). Haider, M. R., Alam, M. S. & Anita, R. S. (2016). Effect of pre-sowing treatment on ... effect_of_pre_sowing_treatment_on_seed_....................of_sapindus_mukorossi_gaertn._an_important_medicinal_plants_in_ ... Title: Effect of pre-sowing treatment on seed germination and seedlings growth of Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn. - an important ... Thapa, H. B. & Gautam, S. K. (2006). Augmentation of germination in Sapindus mukorossi due to acid scarification in Jhanjhatpur ...
For 30 years, this was the benchmark for dictionaries in America. It was the first American dictionary to include many diagrams ... Sapindus). It produces lather that leaves the hair soft, shiny and manageable.People also used many other products such as ...
... and other states in the north and east of India. Sapindus laurifolia grows in the the north and east of the country, ... Sapindus emarginatus and Sapindus mukorossi, for instance, grow throughout Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Orissa, Himachal Pradesh ... for the small pink berries growing throughout parts of North America. Though these fruits also have high levels of saponin like ... given its widespread use amongst this group in parts of North America. ...
M. Chen, Z.-W. Chen, Z.-J. Long, J.-L. Liu, H.-W. Gao, and Y.-J. Wang, "Effects of sapindus saponins on inflammatory response ... Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 110, no. 18, pp. 7440-7445, 2013. View at ... Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 104, no. 35, pp. 14074-14079, 2007. View ... American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology, vol. 279, no. 6, pp. H2939-H2946, 2000. View at: Google ...
Latin American Journal of Pharmacy; vol. 27, no. 6 2008 Biological activity and isolated compounds in Sapindus saponaria L. and ... other plants of the genus Sapindus Pelegrini, Denise D.; Tsuzuki, Joyce K.; Amado, Ciomar A. B.; Cortez, Diógenes A. G.; ...
A species of Sapindus, or soap-. berry. tree, whose seeds 槵子 are used for rosaries.. ... 1) alphabet; ABCs; (2) American Broadcasting Company; ABC; (3) Audit Bureau of Circulations; ABC; (4) activity-based costing; ... tree, Sapindus detergens, 木槵子, whose berries are used for rosaries. Name of a bhikṣu.. ...
What are soapnuts? Sapindus mukorossi - the Soapnut Tree - is native to India and the Himalayas, and it produces a small, black ... People in Nepal and India as well as Native Americans have known about the amazing cleaning powers of soapnuts for hundreds of ... This weeks quote is from American novelist and pioneering environmentalist … The post Earth911 Inspiration: Be True to the ...
... litchi Sapindus - soapberries Sapindus drummondii - western soapberry Sapindus saponaria - wingleaf soapberry Sapindus ... American hornbeam Corylus - hazels Corylus americana - American hazel; American hazelnut Corylus avellana - common hazelnut ... North American gooseberry Ribes nigrum - black currant Ribes rubrum - red currant; cultivated currant Ribes sanguineum - ... American elm; white elm Ulmus bergmanniana - Bergmanns elm Ulmus canescens - grey elm; grey-leafed elm; hoary elm Ulmus ...
INTRODUCTION: the species Sapindus saponaria L. is widely distributed in America. The abundant presence of saponins is ... INTRODUCCIÓN: la especie Sapindus saponaria L. se encuentra ampliamente distribuida en el continente americano. La abundante ... Determinación de saponinas y otros metabolitos secundarios en extractos acuosos de Sapindus saponaria L. (jaboncillo) / ... stems and fruit of Sapindus saponaria L. and identify other metabolites that may be present in the plant. METHODS: the extracts ...
Trees develop a basic vase shape but do not grow as rapidly as the American elm. The leaves are dark green with a medium-fine ... Western soapberry (Sapindus drummondii). Large trees for shade or specimen. *20 to 30 feet ... American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana). Large trees for shade or specimen. *20 to 30 feet ... Sometimes called Japanese Zelkova, this tree was once considered a replacement for the American elm because it is a relative ...
The North American consumer is moving towards becoming an informed buyer. An average American is now aware of facts that ... The larger variety of soap nuts (Sapindus Mukorrosi) is widely used as a natural detergent and cleaning aid all over the world ...
  • lama), Sapindus oahuensis (aulu), Pipturus albidus (mamaki), Elaeocarpus bifidus (kalia), Nestegis sandwicensis (olopua), and Psyrdax odoratum (alahee). (encyclopedia.com)
  • It would be great if you can help me with my two questions: Sapindus drummondii I read from different. (wildflower.org)
  • dogwood, alternate leaf Cornus alternifolia dogwood, flowering Cornus florida dogwood, gray Cornus racemosa dogwood, Pacific Cornus nuttallii dogwood, red osier Cornus stolonifera dogwood, roughleaf Cornus drummondii dogwood, roundleaf Cornus rugosa doveplum Coccoloba diversifolia elder, American Sambucus canadensis elder, Pacific red Sambucus callicarpa elliottia Elliottia racemosa elm Ulmus spp. (fed.us)
  • The American Elm is a long-lived tree that can withstand winter temperatures as low as -42 °C. Although the trees were once widely planted as shade trees, Dutch Elm disease was introduced in the 1930's, and destroyed much of the population. (cameron.edu)
  • 阿梨瑟吒) ariṣṭa(ka), the soap- berry tree, Sapindus detergens, 木槵子, whose berries are used for rosaries. (orientaloutpost.com)
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera - Tree - superfood high in vitamin C, calcium, protein, oil, Moringa may provide the boost in energy, nutrition and health you've been seeking. (blogspot.com)
  • Since 1997, our revegetation program has received funding for 326,000 seedlings through AMERICAN FORESTS' Global ReLeaf Forests, enough to restore native vegetation on 1,185 acres-nearly two square miles-of refuge cropland,' says Ken Merritt, project leader for South Texas Refuges Complex, which includes the LRGV NWR and Santa Anna NWR. (peacecorpsonline.org)
  • Soap nut family contains a number of economic plants such as Litchi (Litchi chinensis), soap-nut trees (Sapindus mukotossi), Sugar Maple (Acer saccharinum) and many other plants distributed thoughout the tropical and subtropical regions of world. (bimbima.com)
  • In addition to the positive financial impact to the indigenous people where sapindus trees grow wild, the fact that harvest and packaging has zero carbon or fossil fuel consumption is very rarely noted. (metaefficient.com)
  • Sponsored by the Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife and American Forests, the program focuses attention on the largest trees in each species, as a way to raise awareness about the importance of healthy trees and forests. (hawaii.gov)
  • bicrenata American Spikenard Aristolochiaceae (Birthwort Family) Aristolochia watsonii Indian-root Asclepiadaceae (Milkweed Family) Asclepias asperula Antelope Horns Milkweed Asclepias brachystephana Shortcrown Milkweed Asclepias hypoleuca Mahogany Milkweed Asclepias involucrata Dwarf Milkweed Asclepias latifolia Broadleaf Milkweed Asclepias macrotis Long Horned Milkweed Asclepias nummularia Tufted Milkweed Asclepias oenotheroides Zizotes Milkweed Asclepias subverticillata Poison Milkweed Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Milkweed Asclepias uncialis Wheel Milkweed Funastrum crispum Wavy-Leaf Milkvine Funastrum cynanchoides subsp. (wnmu.edu)