A family of the class Urodela which includes 4 living genera, about 33 species, and occurs only in North America. Adults are usually terrestrial, but the larval forms are aquatic.

Relative contributions of bipolar cell and amacrine cell inputs to light responses of ON, OFF and ON-OFF retinal ganglion cells. (1/6)

Light-evoked postsynaptic currents (lePSCs) were recorded from ON, OFF and ON-OFF ganglion cells in dark-adapted salamander retinal slices under voltage clamp conditions, and the cell morphology was examined using Lucifer yellow fluorescence with confocal microscopy. The current-voltage relations of the lePSCs in all three types of ganglion cells are approximately linear within the cells' physiological range. The average chloride/cation conductance ratio (Deltag(Cl)(NR)/Deltag(C)(NR)) of the lePSCs is near 3, suggesting that ganglion cell light responses are associated with a greater postsynaptic conductance change at the amacrine-ganglion cell inhibitory synapses than at the bipolar-ganglion cell excitatory synapses. By comparing the charge transfer of lePSCs in normal Ringer's and in picrotoxin+strychnine+Imidazole-4-acidic acid, we found that the GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine-bipolar cell feedback synapses decreased the light-induced glutamatergic vesicle release from bipolar cells to all ganglion cells, and the degree of release reduction varied widely from ganglion cell to ganglion cell, with a range of 3-28 fold.  (+info)

The chromaffin cells of urodele amphibians. (2/6)

Different conditions in the arrangement of the adrenal gland are observed in urodeles. The gland consists of islets scattered on the ventral surface of the kidneys, the amount, size and position of the islets varying consistently within different families and even within genera. The infraordinal variation also extends to the fine structure of the gland, as observed in 14 species belonging to 6 different families. The ultrastructural characteristics of chromaffin cells and their relationships with interrenal cells appear to be related to the phyletic position. In primitive urodeles (Sirenidae, Proteidae) the chromaffin cells are isolated or in small groups, mostly separated from interrenal cells and often in contact with renal cells. In neourodeles (Amphiumidae, Ambystomidae, Salamandridae, Plethodontidae) the chromaffin cells appear generally grouped and intermingled with steroidogenic cells. Some cytological characteristics of chromaffin cells, such as nerve supply and the shape and electron density of chromaffin granules exhibit a variability related to phyletic position.  (+info)

The transplantation of eyes to genetically eyeless salamanders: visual projections and somatosensory interactions. (3/6)

Eyes were transplanted from normal axolotls to eyeless mutants, and several anatomical and physiological observations were made on the central visual centers in these animals. Some central projections were bilateral to the optic centers of the thalamus and midbrain, some traveled ipsilaterally to the same centers, and the rest grew down the spinal cord. This is similar to what has been found in eyes transplanted to normal hosts. The type of projection made in eyeless hosts correlated with the site of nerve entry into the CNS as in control hosts. Thus, the transplanted projection did not appear to be influenced by the host's optic nerves and tracts or lack of them. In spite of the transplanted optic fibers' taking abnormal paths, they made normally organized topographic maps on the host tecta. The visual and somatosensory topographic projections to the tectum were found to be in near perfect register normally, but in eyeless mutants to which rotated eyes had been transplanted, they were not. Acetylcholinesterase activity, found in the primary optic neuropil in normal animals, was greatly diminished in eyeless mutants, yet normal mutants with grafted eyes. Finally, transplantation of an eye to an eyeless mutant corrected the abnormally dark pigmentation caused by eyelessness but only in those cases of bilateral central innervation.  (+info)

Pigment patterns of larval salamanders (Ambystomatidae, Salamandridae): the role of the lateral line sensory system and the evolution of pattern-forming mechanisms. (4/6)

In many species of salamanders, pigment cells derived from the neural crest give rise to a horizontal stripe pattern in hatchling larvae. A defining element of these horizontal stripe patterns is a region over the middle of the myotomes that is relatively free of melanophores. This study shows that formation of a "melanophore-free region" and horizontal stripe pattern in Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum (family Ambystomatidae) correlates with the development of the trunk lateral line sensory system. Moreover, prevention of lateral line development results in greater densities of melanophores in the middle of the flank, essentially eliminating the melanophore-free region in this taxon. A phylogenetic survey also revealed that ablation of the lateral lines has qualitatively similar effects on melanophores in seven of eight additional taxa (Ambystomatidae: A. barbouri, A. maculatum, A. talpoideum; Salamandridae: Notophthalmus viridescens, Pleurodeles waltl, Taricha granulosa, T. rivularis). In Taricha torosa, however, a superficially similar melanophore-free region forms prior to lateral line development, and ablation of the lateral lines does not perturb the horizontal stripe pattern. Finally, heterospecific grafting experiments demonstrated that T. torosa lateral lines are competent to generate a melanophore-free region, and T. torosa melanophores are competent to respond to cues associated with the lateral lines. These results indicate that lateral line-dependent pattern-forming mechanisms are common and probably ancestral within the families Ambystomatidae and Salamandridae and suggest that these ancestral mechanisms have been retained in T. torosa as redundant, lateral line-dependent mechanisms for stripe formation have evolved.  (+info)

Large, rapidly evolving intergenic spacers in the mitochondrial DNA of the salamander family Ambystomatidae (Amphibia: Caudata). (5/6)

We report the presence, in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of all of the sexual species of the salamander family Ambystomatidae, of a shared 240-bp intergenic spacer between tRNAThr and tRNAPro. We place the intergenic spacer in context by presenting the sequence of 1,746 bp of mtDNA from Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum, describe the nucleotide composition of the intergenic spacer in all of the species of Ambystomatidae, and compare it to other coding and noncoding regions of Ambystoma and several other vertebrate mtDNAs. The nucleotide substitution rate of the intergenic spacer is approximately three times faster than the substitution rate of the control region, as shown by comparisons among six Ambystoma macrodactylum sequences and eight members of the Ambystoma tigrinum complex. We also found additional inserts within the intergenic spacers of five species that varied from 87-444 bp in length. The presence of the intergenic spacer in all sexual species of Ambystomatidae suggests that it arose at least 20 MYA and has been a stable component of the ambystomatid mtDNA ever since. As such, it represents one of the few examples of a large and persistent intergenic spacer in the mtDNA of any vertebrate clade.  (+info)

Intraspecific heterochrony and life history evolution: decoupling somatic and sexual development in a facultatively paedomorphic salamander. (6/6)

Morphological features such as size and shape are the most common focus in studies of heterochronic change. Frequently, these easily observed and measured features are treated as a major target of selection, potentially ignoring traits more closely related to fitness. We question the primacy of morphological data in studies of heterochrony, and instead suggest that principal sources of fitness, such as life history characteristics, are not only the chief targets of selection, but changes in them may necessitate changes in other (subordinate) elements of the organism. We use an experimental approach to investigate the timing of metamorphosis and maturation in a facultatively paedomorphic salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum. We determine that individuals possessing the well-known paedomorphic phenotype are peramorphic with regard to maturation, through the process of predisplacement (an earlier onset of maturation). Combining the well studied ecology of dimorphic A. talpoideum populations with theories of heterochronic mechanisms and life history evolution, we conclude that age at maturation is the principal target of selection and that morphological changes are secondary effects. Increased attention to the intimate connection between life history evolution and heterochrony is the most promising route to a better understanding of both.  (+info)

Ambystomatidae is a family of salamanders commonly known as the mole salamanders. This family includes several genera and species of primarily North American salamanders, with a few species found in northeastern Asia. These amphibians are characterized by their fossorial (burrowing) habits and their external gills, which persist into adulthood in some species.

Mole salamanders typically have a stocky body and short limbs, with moist, smooth skin. They are generally found in forested areas, where they spend much of their time underground in burrows or beneath logs and rocks. Some mole salamander species are fully aquatic as adults, while others are terrestrial and return to the water only to breed.

One of the most well-known mole salamanders is the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), a fully aquatic species that exhibits neoteny, meaning it retains its larval features throughout its entire life. The axolotl has become a popular subject for scientific research due to its ability to regenerate lost body parts.

Overall, Ambystomatidae represents an important family of salamanders with unique adaptations that allow them to thrive in various environments.

... tolweb.org/Ambystomatidae/15448 Data related to Ambystomatidae at Wikispecies Media related to Ambystomatidae at Wikimedia ... "Ambystomatidae , amphibian family , Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 2022-04-23. "AmphibiaWeb - Ambystomatidae". ... Ambystomatidae is a family of salamanders belonging to the order Caudata in the class Amphibia. It contains two genera, ... Neoteny has been observed in several species in Ambystomatidae, and some of them like the axolotl live all of their lives under ...
Ambystomatidae is a family of mostly terrestrial salamanders. Commonly called "mole salamanders", most members of this family ... "Ambystomatidae". AmphibiaWeb. University of California, Berkeley. Archived from the original on October 9, 2020. Retrieved ...
Ambystoma macrodactylum is a member of the Ambystomatidae, also known as the mole salamanders. The Ambystomatidae originated ... Ambystomatidae was isolated to the southeast of the mid-Continental or Western Interior Seaway during the Cretaceous (~145.5-66 ... Larson A (1996). "Ambystomatidae". Tree of Life Web Project. Archived from the original on 2021-03-03. Retrieved 2010-01-14. ... The Ambystomatidae are also members of suborder Salamandroidea, which includes all the salamanders capable of internal ...
Ambystomatidae and Dicamptodontidae. J. Morphol. 212:305-322. Sever, D. M. 1983b. Eurycea junaluska. Cat. Amer. Amphib. Rept. ...
"Endoparasites of the ringed salamander, Ambystoma annulatum (Caudata: Ambystomatidae), from Arkansas." The Southwestern ... but also spreads widely in the family Ambystomatidae. Rhabditid nematodes (Rhabdias ranae) are the second most common parasite ...
Ambystomatidae Herpseeker.dk IUCN redlist of threatened Ambystomatidae (CS1: Julian-Gregorian uncertainty, Articles with short ... amphibiaweb.org/lists/Ambystomatidae.shtml Data related to Ambystomatidae at Wikispecies Media related to Ambystoma at ... Rhyacosiredon was previously considered a separate genus within the family Ambystomatidae. However, cladistic analysis of the ...
... is a species of mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. Typically gains a lot of population ... Lemos-Espinal, Julio A. (2015). "Diet of larval Ambystoma rivulare (Caudata: Ambystomatidae), a threatened salamander from the ...
... talpoideum's diet consists almost completely of various arthropods and only a small number of other Ambystomatidae larvae. In ... Ambystomatidae), from northeastern Arkansas". The Southwestern Naturalist. 41 (1): 62-64. Indiana Legislative Services Agency ( ...
They are included in the family Ambystomatidae, or alternatively, in their own monogeneric family Dicamptodontidae. Pacific ... Ambystomatidae)" (PDF). Miscellaneous Publications. Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan. 149: 1-94. hdl:2027.42/56393. ...
The California giant salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) is a species of salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. Dicamptodon ... Ambystomatidae)" (PDF). Miscellaneous Publications Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (149): 1-94. Retrieved 2011-09-29 ...
Ambystomatidae). The Southwestern Naturalist, 28(1), 100-102. cited at [1] Anderson, J. D. (1975). Ambystoma ordinarium. ...
... is a mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. This species, typically 4.1-8.9 cm (1+3⁄5-3+1⁄2 in) long when mature, is ...
Family: Mole Salamanders Ambystomatidae Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) inhabits the northwest Pacific coast of ...
The long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum, Baird 1849) is a mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. This species ...
In the families Ambystomatidae and Salamandridae, the male's tail, which is larger than that of the female, is used during the ... Except for terrestrial species in the three families Plethodontidae, Ambystomatidae, and Salamandridae, salamanders mate in ...
The long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum, Baird 1849) is a mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. This species ...
The granular salamander or ajolote (Ambystoma granulosum) is a species of mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. It is ...
... an amphibian in the family Ambystomatidae. The species is native to a small portion of the southeastern coastal plain of the ...
Ambystomatidae)". Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. 100A (3): 653-660. doi:10.1016/0300-9629(91)90385-P. Ruth, Benjamin ...
Ambystomatidae), from Northern Louisiana". Journal of Parasitology. 94 (3): 727-730. doi:10.1645/GE-1414.1. PMID 18605797. ...
The Leora's stream salamander or ajolote (Ambystoma leorae) is a rare species of mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. ...
The Tarahumara salamander (Ambystoma rosaceum) is a freshwater species of mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae, endemic ...
... is a species of mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. It is typically considered endemic to Mexico, although its range ...
... whereas species belonging to the Ambystomatidae are facultative paedomorphs. In the Catholic Church, Holy Days of Obligation or ...
Ambystomatidae) and Notophthalmus viridescens (Salamandridae): The ecological morphology of two neotenic strategies". Journal ...
... is a mole salamander in the family Ambystomatidae. This species, typically 4.1-8.9 cm (1+3⁄5-3+1⁄2 in) long when mature, is ...
10 species Family Ambystomatidae - mole salamanders, 37 species. The Pacific mole salamanders of genus Dicamptodon (4 species) ... Ascaphidae From Ambystomatidae: Dicamptodontidae From Caeciliidae: Scolecomorphidae, Typhlonectidae From Ichthyophiidae: ...
EN IUCN Family Ambystomatidae (mole salamanders) Reticulated flatwoods salamander (Ambystoma bishopi) VU IUCN California tiger ...
Puxiong salamander Genus Ranodon Genus Salamandrella Family Ambystomatidae Genus Ambystoma - Mole salamander Family Amphiumidae ...
Ambystomatidae Mabee's salamander Ambystoma mabeei Spotted salamander Ambystoma maculatum Marbled salamander Ambystoma opacum ...
... tolweb.org/Ambystomatidae/15448 Data related to Ambystomatidae at Wikispecies Media related to Ambystomatidae at Wikimedia ... "Ambystomatidae , amphibian family , Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 2022-04-23. "AmphibiaWeb - Ambystomatidae". ... Ambystomatidae is a family of salamanders belonging to the order Caudata in the class Amphibia. It contains two genera, ... Neoteny has been observed in several species in Ambystomatidae, and some of them like the axolotl live all of their lives under ...
Ambystomatidae (mole salamanders). Amphiumidae (amphiumas). Cryptobranchidae (giant salamanders, hellbenders). Dicamptodontidae ...
Ambystomatidae. Ambystoma tigrinum Eastern Tiger Salamander. Collection info. Point Map. Species Profile. Animated Map. ...
Ambystomatidae genus Ambystoma species Ambystoma maculatum Name. Synonyms. Amblystoma maculatum Shaw, 1802. Ambystoma carolina ...
family Ambystomatidae *order Caudata *class Amphibia *species associated with this habitat: Ambystoma lermaense *keywords: ...
Ambystomatidae], Pleurodeles waltl [Urodela: Salamandridae], Bufo bufo [Anura: Bufonidae], Nanorana parkeri [Anura: ...
Family: Ambystomatidae. *Scientific Name: Ambystoma barbouri. *Other Names: n/a. *Adult Size: 4 to 7 inches (10.16 to 17.78 cm) ...
Frogs, toads and mole salamanders (Ambystomatidae) at various stages of maturity comprise the majority of amphibians sampled ...
Family: Ambystomatidae (30 sp.) Family: Amphiumidae (3 sp.) Family: Cryptobranchidae (6 sp.) ...
The Marbled Salamander is a stout salamander with a broad head and thick legs. These salamanders are black in coloration and adult males are usually patterned with a series of white, bone-shaped, stripes going down the back and tail. Females can be distinguished by having grayish stripes.. SC Distribution: Coastal Zone, Coastal Plains, Sandhills, Piedmont, Blue Ridge ...
Adventures of a Recreational ...
Family: Ambystomatidae. Eastern Tiger Salamander, more...Tiger Salamander (es: Salamandra tigre) [Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum ( ...
Ambystomatidae. Genus. Ambystoma. Scientific Name. Ambystoma mavortium. Other Names. Western tiger salamander. ...
Ambystoma talpoideum (Holbrook, 1838) ...
Golden Axolotl are aquatic salamanders that live at the bottom of freshwater bodies of water and prefer to remain alone, they are very tranquil peaceful fish.
Mole SalamandersAmbystomatidae * Spotted SalamanderAmbystoma maculatum * Marbled SalamanderAmbystoma opacum * Mole Salamander ...
Family: Ambystomatidae. Adults range up to about 4 inches, juveniles just metamorphosed from tadpoles are only 1 inch long. ...
Mole Salamanders (Ambystomatidae) Mole Salamanders: Ambystomatidae Mole, Gary D(avid) 1964- Mole, Giant Golden ...
Ambystomatidae - Querzahnmolche Östlicher Tigersalamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) Systematik Reihe: Landwirbeltiere (Tetrapoda) … ...
Ambystomatidae. ambystomid. ambystomid salamander. amchoor. AMD. am-dram. ameba. Copyright © WordWeb Software ...
The axolotl, also known as Ambystoma mexicanum, belongs to the family Ambystomatidae and is a neotenic salamander species. ...
Ambystomatidae) include the Spotted Salamander (A. maculatum), the Marbled Salamander (A. opacum) and the Axolotl (A. mexicanum ...
Several other members of the Ambystomatidae occur in wholly perrenibranchiate populations in Central America, including A. In ...
It is a urodele amphibian; that is, it is equipped with a tail and is part of the salamanders, the family "Ambystomatidae," and ...
aaaaaa, acanthisittidae, adelophthalmidae, ambystomatidae, amphibolurinae, amphiprioninae, ampullariidae, amygdaloideae, ...
Family Ambystomatidae Mole Salamanders Ambystomatidae: information (1) Ambystomatidae: pictures (46) * Genus Ambystoma ...
Amphibian Conservation at The Amphibian Foundation. Conserving regional and globally imperiled species from further population declines.
Mole Salamanders (Ambystomatidae) *Jefferson Salamander *Marbled Salamander *Spotted Salamander *True Salamanders and Newts ( ...
  • The axolotl, also known as Ambystoma mexicanum, belongs to the family Ambystomatidae and is a neotenic salamander species. (bestpetstips.com)
  • that is, it is equipped with a tail and is part of the salamanders, the family "Ambystomatidae," and the genus "Ambystoma," a very curious name that comes from "ambys" meaning blunt and "stoma" or mouth. (animales-itonids.com)
  • Ambystomatidae is a family of salamanders belonging to the order Caudata in the class Amphibia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Frogs, toads and mole salamanders (Ambystomatidae) at various stages of maturity comprise the majority of amphibians sampled from April to May. (clevelandmetroparks.com)
  • Neoteny has been observed in several species in Ambystomatidae, and some of them like the axolotl live all of their lives under water in their larval stage. (wikipedia.org)
  • It belongs to the Ambystomatidae family, to the genus Ambystoma and to the Tigrinum group. (axolotls-cie.com)