Beryllium. An element with the atomic symbol Be, atomic number 4, and atomic weight 9.01218. Short exposure to this element can lead to a type of poisoning known as BERYLLIOSIS.
A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhaled rare metal BERYLLIUM or its soluble salts which are used in a wide variety of industry including alloys, ceramics, radiographic equipment, and vacuum tubes. Berylliosis is characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction in the upper airway leading to BRONCHIOLITIS; PULMONARY EDEMA; and pneumonia.
Transmembrane proteins that form the beta subunits of the HLA-DP antigens.
A group of the D-related HLA antigens (human) found to differ from the DR antigens in genetic locus and therefore inheritance. These antigens are polymorphic glycoproteins comprising alpha and beta chains and are found on lymphoid and other cells, often associated with certain diseases.
Inorganic salts of hydrofluoric acid, HF, in which the fluorine atom is in the -1 oxidation state. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed) Sodium and stannous salts are commonly used in dentifrices.
Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.
Inorganic compounds that contain aluminum as an integral part of the molecule.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)
Radioactive substances which act as pollutants. They include chemicals whose radiation is released via radioactive waste, nuclear accidents, fallout from nuclear explosions, and the like.
The branch of mathematics dealing with the purely logical properties of probability. Its theorems underlie most statistical methods. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.
Blood pressure levels that are between normotension and hypertension. Individuals with prehypertension are at a higher risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Generally, prehypertension is defined as SYSTOLIC PRESSURE of 131-139 mm Hg and/or DIASTOLIC PRESSURE of 81-89 when the optimal is 120/80 mm Hg. For diabetics and other metabolism diseases the prehypertension is around 110-129/70-79 mm Hg.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)
Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.
Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.
For-profit enterprise with relatively few to moderate number of employees and low to moderate volume of sales.
Administrator-selected management groups who are responsible for making decisions pertaining to the provision of integrated direction for various institutional functions.
Standards or regulations for construction which are designed to ensure safety against electrical hazards, fires, etc.
Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.
An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.
The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.
Rare leukoencephalopathy with infantile-onset accumulation of Rosenthal fibers in the subpial, periventricular, and subependymal zones of the brain. Rosenthal fibers are GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN aggregates found in ASTROCYTES. Juvenile- and adult-onset types show progressive atrophy of the lower brainstem instead. De novo mutations in the GFAP gene are associated with the disease with propensity for paternal inheritance.
Metastatic lesion of the UMBILICUS associated with intra-abdominal neoplasms especially of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or OVARY.
The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.
The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.
Funding resources and procedures for capital improvement or the construction of facilities.
Spectrophotometric techniques by which the absorption or emmision spectra of radiation from atoms are produced and analyzed.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
Process of preserving a dead body to protect it from decay.
Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.
A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.
Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.
Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.
Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.
Hospitals controlled by the county government.
Financial support of research activities.
The general population is unlikely to develop acute or chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are ... When beryllium is phagocytized by macrophages, the beryllium triggers macrophage apoptosis, thereby reducing beryllium ... a form of beryllium poisoning. It is distinct from acute beryllium poisoning, which became rare following occupational exposure ... The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is the standard way of determining sensitivity to beryllium. The test is ...
Acute Inflammatory Responses in the Airways and Peripheral Blood After Short-Term Exposure to Diesel Exhaust in Healthy Human ... Adverse health effects have also been observed in the general population at ambient atmospheric particle concentrations well ... Diesel exhaust includes ... acetaldehyde; antimony compounds; arsenic; benzene; beryllium compounds; bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate ... Exposures have been linked with acute short-term symptoms such as headache, dizziness, light-headedness, nausea, coughing, ...
The steady-state excursion is also a state which the heat generated by fission is balanced by the heat losses to the ambient ... The inside hemisphere with the thumb-hole next to the hand is beryllium (replacing the uranium tamper in a Fat Man bomb), with ... Diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation injury, 1961, Geneva, World Health Organization, pp. 27-48. McLaughlin et al. page ... The smell of ozone was said to be a sign of high ambient radioactivity by Chernobyl liquidators. This blue flash or "blue glow ...
Ambient traffic-related air pollution was associated with decreased cognitive function in older men. Mortality from diesel soot ... Acute (short-term) exposure ... results in irritation of the eyes, mucous membranes, ... Chronic (long-term) exposure ... has ... Diesel exhaust includes ... acetaldehyde; antimony compounds; arsenic; benzene; beryllium compounds; bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate ... Adverse health effects have also been observed in the general population at ambient atmospheric particle concentrations well ...
Beryllium fluoride and aluminium fluoride are also used as phosphatase inhibitors, since these compounds are structural mimics ... "Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Fluoride". Government of British Columbia. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. ... The Merck Index, 12th edition, Merck & Co., Inc., 1996 Muriale L, Lee E, Genovese J, Trend S (1996). "Fatality due to acute ... Abukurah AR, Moser AM Jr, Baird CL, Randall RE Jr, Setter JG, Blanke RV (1972). "Acute sodium fluoride poisoning". JAMA. 222 (7 ...
1987). "Superconductivity at 93 K in a New Mixed-Phase Y-Ba-Cu-O Compound System at Ambient Pressure". Physical Review Letters ... Acute exposure to yttrium compounds can cause shortness of breath, coughing, chest pain, and cyanosis.[9] The Occupational ... "Ueber das Beryllium und Yttrium" (PDF). Annalen der Physik. 89 (8): 577-582. Bibcode:1828AnP....89..577W. doi:10.1002/andp. ...
The ambient temperature is kept well below freezing to avoid thermal shock. A log is kept with information about the core, ... These include soot, ash, and other types of particle from forest fires and volcanoes; isotopes such as beryllium-10 created by ... The problem is more acute at locations where accumulation is high; low accumulation sites, such as central Antarctica, must be ... Pedro, J.B. (2011). "High-resolution records of the beryllium-10 solar activity proxy in ice from Law Dome, East Antarctica: ...
Acute effects occur within hours or days of the time that a person consumes a contaminant. People can suffer acute health ... Drinking water quality legislation of the United States Water quality (ambient/environmental) Water supply and sanitation in ... EPA has issued standards for antimony, arsenic, asbestos, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, cyanide, fluoride, lead ... Acute effects contaminants are the most commons type that are found in drinking water. Acute contaminants are usually easy for ...
Of the elements less often recognised as metalloids, beryllium and lead are noted for their toxicity; lead arsenate has been ... In 2003, arsenic trioxide (under the trade name Trisenox) was re-introduced for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia ... Properties noted in this section refer to the elements in their most thermodynamically stable forms under ambient conditions. ... Silicon dissolves in hot aqueous alkalis with the evolution of hydrogen, as do metals such as beryllium, aluminium, zinc, ...
The elements from groups 1-3, except for hydrogen, lithium, and beryllium, are very miscible with silver in the condensed phase ... Parenterally admistered colloidal silver causes acute silver poisoning. Some waterborne species are particularly sensitive to ... which tend to explode under ambient conditions). For example, poor thermal stability is reflected in the relative decomposition ...
Acute beryllium disease in the form of chemical pneumonitis was first reported in Europe in 1933 and in the United States in ... about 12.9 km/s at ambient conditions. Other significant properties are high specific heat (1925 J·kg−1·K−1) and thermal ... beryllium burns brilliantly forming a mixture of beryllium oxide and beryllium nitride. Beryllium dissolves readily in non- ... Beryllium is a component of several dental alloys. Beryllium is a health and safety issue for workers. Exposure to beryllium in ...
Either acute or longer-term exposure carries a danger of serious health outcomes including radiation sickness, genetic damage, ... Plutonium-238 mixed with beryllium is used to generate neutrons for research purposes. There are two aspects to the harmful ... meaning they can ignite spontaneously at ambient temperature and are therefore handled in an inert, dry atmosphere of nitrogen ... Ingestion or inhalation of large amounts may cause acute radiation poisoning and possibly death. However, no human being is ...
Practice for General Ambient Air Analyzer Procedures D3251 - 19 Test Method for Thermal Endurance Characteristics of Electrical ... for Acute Ecotoxicity Testing D8152 - 18 Practice for Measuring Field Infiltration Rate and Calculating Field Hydraulic ... 19 Guide for Using Metal Ratios in Soils to Distinguish Between Anthropogenic and Natural Beryllium D8300 - 19 Test Method for ... Hexavalent Chromium in Ambient Air Analyzed by Ion Chromatography (IC) and Spectrophotometric Measurements D7615/D7615M - 19 ...
Guide for Conducting Acute Toxicity Tests on Aqueous Ambient Samples and Effluents with Fishes, Macroinvertebrates, and ... 18a Test Method for Determination of Beryllium in Copper-Beryllium Alloys by Phosphate Gravimetry E2825 - 19 Guide for Forensic ... Guide for Acute Toxicity Test with the Rotifer Brachionus E1441 - 19 Guide for Computed Tomography (CT) E1441-RU-RU - 19 ... Guide for Acute Animal Toxicity Testing of Water-Miscible Metalworking Fluids E1303 - 95(2017) Practice for Refractive Index ...
Acute neutron radiation, as from a nuclear criticality accident, converts some of the stable 23Na in human blood to 24Na; the ... NaK is 40-90% potassium and it is liquid at ambient temperature. It is an excellent thermal and electrical conductor. Sodium- ... Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon ... The high boiling point of sodium allows the reactor to operate at ambient (normal) pressure,[70] but the drawbacks include its ...
Instead, the ambient wind at the time pushed the fire spread along the valley. As in Hiroshima, the bombing badly dislocated ... The first plutonium core, along with its polonium-beryllium urchin initiator, was transported in the custody of Project Alberta ... who suffered injuries from the blast and heat but died from complications frequently compounded by acute radiation syndrome ( ...
Oxygen does not combine with fluorine under ambient conditions, but can be made to react using electric discharge at low ... Gessner, B. D.; Beller, M.; Middaugh, J. P.; Whitford, G. M. (1994). "Acute Fluoride Poisoning from a Public Water System". New ... Alkaline earth difluorides possess strong ionic bonds but are insoluble in water, with the exception of beryllium difluoride, ... ISBN 978-1-4292-5255-3. Shulman, J. D.; Wells, L. M. (1997). "Acute Fluoride Toxicity from Ingesting Home-use Dental Products ...
Role in ambient radiation. Cosmic rays constitute a fraction of the annual radiation exposure of human beings on the Earth, ... Carbon and oxygen nuclei collide with interstellar matter to form lithium, beryllium and boron in a process termed cosmic ray ... Beryllium-10 (1.39 million years): 14N(n,p α)10Be (spallation) ... beryllium, and boron. These nuclei appear in cosmic rays in ...
... dioxide is the form in which uranium is most commonly used as a nuclear reactor fuel.[88] At ambient temperatures, UO. ... Acute cholinergic toxicity; Dose-dependent accumulation in cortex, midbrain, and vermis; Electrophysiological changes in ... Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon ...
"Endogenous sulfur dioxide protects against oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in association with inhibition of oxidative ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards. *Sulfur trioxide. *Sulfur-iodine cycle. References[edit]. *^ Sulfur dioxide, U.S. ... Beryllium oxide (BeO). *Cadmium oxide (CdO). *Calcium oxide (CaO) ...
Ambient pressure divers breathe air or gas mixtures with an oxygen fraction suited to the operating depth. Pure or nearly pure ... 2 partial pressures greater than 160 kPa (about 1.6 atm) may lead to convulsions (normally fatal for divers). Acute oxygen ... Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon ... where acute oxygen toxicity can be managed without the risk of drowning. Deeper diving requires significant dilution of O. 2 ...
The structure of the β phase is called A15 cubic; it is metastable, but can coexist with the α phase at ambient conditions ... hair and nails by plasma emission spectrometry in a case of severe acute intoxication in man". Journal of forensic sciences. 42 ... Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon ...
Very pure gem™quality beryl is better known as either aquamarine (blue or blue-green) or emerald (green). Beryllium is the ... A key distinction among beryllium compounds is that some are soluble in water, but many are not. ... Two kinds of mineral rocks, bertrandite and beryl, are mined commercially for the recovery of beryllium. ... Beryllium is an element that occurs naturally. It is present in a variety of materials, such as rocks, coal and oil, soil, and ...
... of all people occupationally-exposed to beryllium in air become sensitive to beryllium and may develop chronic beryllium ... Beryllium has been found in at least 535 of the 1,613 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection ... Lung damage has been observed in people exposed to high levels of beryllium in the air. About 1-15% ... People working or living near beryllium industries have the greatest potential for exposure to beryllium. ...
The general population is unlikely to develop acute or chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are ... This condition resembles pneumonia and is called acute beryllium disease."[6]. Individuals who are sensitive to beryllium can ... Beryllium enters the air as dust from burning coal and oil.[3] Eventually, the dust settles in the land and water. Beryllium ... "If beryllium air levels are high enough (greater than 1000 µg/m3), an acute condition can result. ...
Beryllium is the chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Be and atomic number 4. A toxic bivalent element, ... The general population is unlikely to develop acute or chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are ... If beryllium air levels are high enough (greater than 1000 μg/m³), an acute condition can result, called acute beryllium ... Chronic berylliosis is a pulmonary and systemic granulomatous disease caused by exposure to beryllium. Acute beryllium disease ...
The general population is unlikely to develop acute or chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are ... Beryllium is used as an alloying agent in the production of beryllium copper, which contains up to 2.5% beryllium. Beryllium- ... Once ignited however beryllium burns brilliantly forming a mixture of beryllium oxide and beryllium nitride.[17] Beryllium ... If beryllium concentrations in air are high enough (greater than 100 µg/m3), an acute condition can result, called acute ...
Heitbrink WA, Hall RM, Reed LD, Gibbons D [Apr 1999]. Review of ambient aerosol test procedures in ASAE standard S525. J Ag ... Castranova V, Porter DW, Hubbs, AF, Robinson VA, Goldsmith T, Battelli L, Burkhart J, Piacitelli C, Jones W [Mar 1999]. Acute ... Tinkle SS, Kittle LA, Newman LS [Sep 1999]. Partial IL-10 inhibition of the cell-mediated immune response in chronic beryllium ... Heitbrink WA, Hall RM, Reed LD, Gibbons D [Sep 1999]. The use of ambient aero-sol for testing agricultural cabs for protection ...
Proliferative response of bronchoalveolar lymphocytes to beryllium. A test for chronic beryllium disease. Ann. Intern. Med. 108 ... Acute mercurial pneumonitis. Br. J. Ind. Med. 27: 334-338.. Minar, D.W., and S. Greer. 1969. The Concept of Community: Readings ... Ambient air pollution and hospitalization for congestive heart failure among elderly people in seven large U.S. cities. Am. J. ... Acute toxicity in rats and mice exposed to hydrogen chloride gas and aerosols. Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J. 35(10): 623-631. ...
It occurs after exposure to soluble beryllium salts, which are used in the making of beryllium metal. Acute beryllium disease ... The exhaust was directed through a filter before release to the ambient environment. The main purpose of the blower was to ... Workers engaged in machining metals containing beryllium, recycling beryllium from scrap alloys, or using beryllium products ... Acute beryllium disease has been diagnosed in the past, but it is rare today. The disease typically has a quick onset with ...
... is a systemic disorder involving multiple organs, with pulmonary manifestations being most prominent and ... Histopathological studies of lungs in patients with acute beryllium disease have shown a non-specific pattern of acute and ... Ambient Air Monitoring reference and equivalent methods. Federal Register 52:24727 (July l, 1987). ... 2 Beryllium chloride is manufactured by passing chlorine over a mixture of beryllium oxide and carbon.. 3 Beryllium nitrate is ...
ATNacute tubular necrosis. *ATPadenosine 5 triphosphate. *ATPDambient temperature and pressure, dry ... Beberyllium. *BEEbasal energy expenditure. *BETbenign essential tremor. *BHSbeta-hemolytic streptococci ...
Acetaldehyde Cancer, chronic, acute Arsenic and compounds Cancer, chronic Benzene Cancer, chronic, acute Beryllium and ... Estimates of arsenic, beryllium compounds, and cadmium compounds ambient air concentrations could not be modeled because these ... Acetaldehyde Cancer, chronic, acute Arsenic and compounds Cancer, chronic Benzene Cancer, chronic, acute Beryllium and ... Estimates of arsenic, beryllium compounds, and cadmium compounds ambient air concentrations could not be modeled because these ...
The general population is unlikely to develop acute or chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are ... When beryllium is phagocytized by macrophages, the beryllium triggers macrophage apoptosis, thereby reducing beryllium ... a form of beryllium poisoning. It is distinct from acute beryllium poisoning, which became rare following occupational exposure ... The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is the standard way of determining sensitivity to beryllium. The test is ...
Finally residents of neighborhoods surrounding a beryllium plant can be exposed to beryllium that contaminates the ambient air. ... There is also an acute form of the disease which presents as an acute chemical pneumonitis from a non-specific inflammatory ... Exposure to beryllium is essential for the disease to occur. Exposure can occur in an industrial situation in which beryllium ... Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) may develop in individuals who are exposed to beryllium due to a hypersensitivity immune ...
National Ambient Air Quality Standards ("NAAQSs") are set forth for seven chemicals or chemical groups: SO.sub.X, CO, NO.sub.X ... This report must address: (1) actions taken to contain or respond to the release; (2) any known or anticipated acute or chronic ... Additionally, emission standards are set forth for asbestos, beryllium, mercury and vinyl chloride. Primary Standards are set ... reviews any chemical substance that is or will be produced in sufficient quantity that it may cause significant acute or ...
Kriebel D, Brain JD, Sprince NL, Kazemi H. The pulmonary toxicity of beryllium. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988 Feb; 137(2):464-73. ... A new technique for collecting ambient diesel particles for bioassays. Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1987 May; 48(5):487-93. PMID: ... Pulmonary removal of circulating endotoxin results in acute lung injury in sheep. Lab Invest. 1988 Aug; 59(2):219-30. PMID: ...
D1357 Practice for Planning the Sampling of the Ambient Atmosphere. D3249 Practice for General Ambient Air Analyzer Procedures ... D6485 Standard Guide for Risk Characterization of Acute and Irritant Effects of Short-Term Exposure to Volatile Organic ... D7202 Standard Test Method for Determination of Beryllium in the Workplace by Extraction and Optical Fluorescence Detection ... D1357 Standard Practice for Planning the Sampling of the Ambient Atmosphere. D1607 Standard Test Method for Nitrogen Dioxide ...
Comparison of the acute oxidative damage of transition metals on two cell lines. ... Murine lung responses to ambient particulate matter: genomic analysis and influence on airway hyperresponsiveness. ... Genetic testing for beryllium: worker knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes. Authors. Silver K; Kukulka G ...
In light of mounting evidence that ambient exposures to chemicals could cause birth defects, scientists did a review of ... Even the highest exposures were only fractions of federal limits, which had been established to protect workers from acute ... beryllium and nickel. The same year, 65,000 customers of the Great Oaks Water Company in south San Jose learned that their ...
Association between ambient noise exposure, hearing acuity, and risk of acute occupational injury. Cantley LF, Galusha D, ... Sensitization and chronic beryllium disease at a primary manufacturing facility, part 2: validation of historical exposures. ... Concentration in ambient air and uptake in the body.. Övrum Per, Hultengren M, Lindqvist T Original article 1978;4(4):295-303 ... Acute effects after occupational endotoxin exposure at a spa. Holm M, Johannesson S, Torén K, Dahlman-Höglund A Original ...
The steady-state excursion is also a state which the heat generated by fission is balanced by the heat losses to the ambient ... The inside hemisphere with the thumb-hole next to the hand is beryllium (replacing the uranium tamper in a Fat Man bomb), with ... Diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation injury, 1961, Geneva, World Health Organization, pp. 27-48. McLaughlin et al. page ... The smell of ozone was said to be a sign of high ambient radioactivity by Chernobyl liquidators. This blue flash or "blue glow ...
Acute Inflammatory Responses in the Airways and Peripheral Blood After Short-Term Exposure to Diesel Exhaust in Healthy Human ... Adverse health effects have also been observed in the general population at ambient atmospheric particle concentrations well ... Diesel exhaust includes ... acetaldehyde; antimony compounds; arsenic; benzene; beryllium compounds; bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate ... Exposures have been linked with acute short-term symptoms such as headache, dizziness, light-headedness, nausea, coughing, ...
The working duration of exposed workers was less than 3 months and the mean ambient beryllium level was 3.4 μg/m(3), 112.3 μg/m ... ambient beryllium level after process change was non-detectable (, 0.1 μg/m(3)). The number of T lymphocytes and the amount of ... External exposure to beryllium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometer as recommended by the NIOSH analytical method ... Multiple logistic regression analysis showed lymphocytes to be affected by beryllium exposure (odd ratio = 7.293; p , 0.001). ...
7787475 Beryllium chloride 7787497 Beryllium fluoride 7787555 Beryllium nitrate CER CER CER CER CER HR DOT DOT 7787715 Bromine ... "Acute" toxicity refers to exposure of short duration, i.e., a single brief exposure; "chronic" toxicity refers to exposure of ... "Report on Recommended Ambient Air Quality Guidelines for Toxic Air Contaminants." June, 1983. Contact: Nick Ciseretti (215) 686 ... tribasic Mevinphos Nickel sulfate Beryllium chloride Beryllium fluoride Beryllium nitrate Ammonium chromate Potassium chromate ...
Among the acute effects of formaldehyde are irritations of the eyes, the nose, and the throat. In 1980, laboratory studies ... To beryllium dust or fumes 35 ( 24 ) ) may burn skin! Edema arise, formalin toxicity, and formalin Intoxication during ... This study measured the formaldehyde exposure through ambient and personal air sampling, assessed the symptoms of poor health ... As such, acute (short term) formaldehyde exposure concentrations > 0.05 ppm can cause irritation of the eyes, nose, throat and ...
Acute exposures over a few months are outside the scope of this analysis. If a shorter mission takes place, exposure to toxic ... However, maintaining a particulate concentration below 1 mg/m3 would also be consistent with EPA National Ambient Air Quality ... Based on the predicted concentrations of hexavalent chromium, arsenic, beryllium, and cadmium, as a worst-case scenario, the ... Noncancer acute or chronic effects could result in lung injury in the form of silicosis or in other specific organ damage. Lung ...
Acute-onset persistent olfactory deficit resulting from multiple overexposures to ammonia vapor at work.. The Journal of the ... Chest wall shrapnel-induced beryllium-sensitization and associated pulmonary disease.. Sarcoidosis, vasculitis, and diffuse ... Annual average ambient particulate matter exposure estimates, measured home particulate matter, and hair nicotine are ... Is Smoking a Predictor for Acute Mountain Sickness? Findings From a Meta-Analysis.. Nicotine & tobacco research : official ...
Beryllium is a lightweight metal that can cause acute or chronic disease. Sensitivity testing is performed with an in vitro ... Beryllium (Be) is a lightweight metal that can cause acute or chronic disease that may be asymptomatic. Occupational exposure ... Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test (Be-LPT). Technical Brief. Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test (Be-LPT). ... If all six beryllium indices are less than 3.0, this signifies a normal result, meaning no evidence of beryllium sensitization. ...
Exposure to ambient air PM has been associated with both acute and chronic adverse health effects, especially in sensitive ... beryllium; Cd, cadmium; Co, cobalt; F, flouride; N[H.sup.+.sub.4], ammonium; N[O.sup.-.sub.2], nitrite; N[O.sup.-.sub.3], ... The likely major acute inhalation hazards of WTC P[M.sub.2.5] based on the results from this study are due to the presence of ... To determine whether respirable WTC P[M.sub.2.5] is more or less toxic than typical ambient air P[M.sub.2.5], we compared the ...
  • A key distinction among beryllium compounds is that some are soluble in water, but many are not. (cdc.gov)
  • In air, beryllium compounds are present mostly as fine dust particles. (cdc.gov)
  • Insoluble beryllium compounds remain in ocean water for a few hundred years before settling to the bottom of the ocean. (cdc.gov)
  • In the environment, chemical reactions can change the water-soluble beryllium compounds into insoluble forms. (cdc.gov)
  • A key distinction identifies the most serious hazardous waste sites in among beryllium compounds is that some are the nation. (cdc.gov)
  • In air, beryllium compounds are present mostly and mix with beryllium that is already there. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium compounds are commercially mined, and the beryllium is purified for use in nuclear weapons and reactors, aircraft and space vehicle structures, instruments, x-ray machines, and mirrors. (cdc.gov)
  • Some beryllium compounds will dissolve in water, but most stick to particles and settle to the bottom. (cdc.gov)
  • The most important commercial sources of beryllium and its compounds are beryl and bertrandite. (earth.com)
  • The number of workers exposed to beryllium or beryllium compounds has been estimated to be 21,000. (cdc.gov)
  • It occurs on exposure to beryllium in its alloy form or in one of its various chemical compounds. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Table 1 outlines the properties of beryllium and its compounds. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • 1 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for seven compounds (7-PAH), benzene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde 2 Arsenic, beryllium compounds, cadmium compounds 5 Overall, filling data gaps in the emissions inventory reduced uncertainties dramatically. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Berylliosis, or chronic beryllium disease (CBD), is a chronic allergic-type lung response and chronic lung disease caused by exposure to beryllium and its compounds, a form of beryllium poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Benzene, formaldehyde, and hydrogen sulfide were the most common compounds to exceed acute and other health-based risk levels. (ctdbase.org)
  • This rule strengthens the regulations governing the use of beryllium and its compounds. (bvsalud.org)
  • 3) Review the definition of beryllium and its compounds in the Ordinance on Prevention of Hazards due to Specified Chemical Substances. (bvsalud.org)
  • People working or living near beryllium industries have the greatest potential for exposure to beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • Long term exposure to beryllium can increase the risk of developing lung cancer in people. (cdc.gov)
  • Occupational exposure to beryllium occurs at places where the chemical is mined, processed, or converted into metal, alloys, and other chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • In some individuals, a single exposure to beryllium can cause berylliosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exposure to beryllium is essential for the disease to occur. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • External exposure to beryllium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometer as recommended by the NIOSH analytical method 7300. (semanticscholar.org)
  • These results show that short-term exposure to beryllium does not induce immune dysfunction but is probably associated with lymphocytes proliferation. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Beryllium oxide is also made from beryllium ores and is used to make specialty ceramics for electrical and high-technology applications. (cdc.gov)
  • When a substance is released from a large area, Beryllium oxide is also made from beryllium ores such as an industrial plant, or from a container, such and is used to make specialty ceramics for electrical as a drum or bottle, it enters the environment. (cdc.gov)
  • At standard temperature and pressures beryllium resists oxidation when exposed to air (although its ability to scratch glass is probably due to the formation of a thin layer of the oxide). (earth.com)
  • Beryllium oxide is useful for many applications that require an excellent heat conductor, with high strength and hardness, with a very high melting point, and that acts as an electrical insulator. (earth.com)
  • Beryllium oxide is used to make higher than normal levels of beryllium in air. (cdc.gov)
  • 2 Beryllium chloride is manufactured by passing chlorine over a mixture of beryllium oxide and carbon. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • 3 Beryllium nitrate is produced by the action of nitric acid on beryllium oxide. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Exposure can occur in an industrial situation in which beryllium as a pure metal, oxide or alloy can become airborne. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Beryllium can become airborne as a result of any heat treatment of the metal, machining, grinding, lapping or when alloys or metal have been exposed to the environment and a rust of beryllium oxide forms on the surface. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • A Comparative Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Wipe Sampling Materials to Remove Beryllium from Differently Textured Surfaces Using Zinc Oxide as a Surrogate. (utah.edu)
  • OBJECTIVES: Beryllium is primarily used in its metallic form, in alloys, or in beryllium oxide ceramics. (bvsalud.org)
  • Most of the beryllium ore that is mined is converted into alloys (mixtures of metals). (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium alloys are also used in automobiles, computers, sports equipment (such as golf clubs and bicycle frames), and dental bridges. (cdc.gov)
  • Most of the beryllium ore that is mined is converted been found in at least 535 of the 1,613 current or into alloys (mixtures of metals). (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium alloys are also used in beryllium is found may increase. (cdc.gov)
  • People working in industries where beryllium is mined, processed, machined, or converted into metal, alloys, and other chemicals may be exposed to high levels of beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • [2] Additionally, beryllium ores are used in specialty ceramics for electrical and high-technology applications and beryllium alloys are used in automobiles, computers, sports equipment (golf clubs and bicycle frames), and dental bridges. (sourcewatch.org)
  • A toxic bivalent element, It is a steel grey, strong, light-weight yet brittle, alkaline earth metal, that is primarily used as a hardening agent in alloys (most notably, beryllium copper). (earth.com)
  • Beryllium-copper alloys are used in a wide variety of applications because of their electrical and thermal conductivity, high strength and hardness, nonmagnetic properties, along with good corrosion and fatigue resistance. (earth.com)
  • Due to their stiffness, light weight, and dimensional stability over a wide temperature range, beryllium-copper alloys are also used in the defense and aerospace industries as light-weight structural materials in high-speed aircraft, missiles, space vehicles and communication satellites. (earth.com)
  • Beryllium ore is mined, processed, machined, or converted into metal, alloys, and and the beryllium is purified for use in nuclear weapons and other chemicals may be exposed to high levels of beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium alloys are used in automobiles, be exposed to higher than normal levels of beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • It is primarily used as a hardening agent in alloys, notably beryllium copper. (blogspot.com)
  • Workers engaged in machining metals containing beryllium, recycling beryllium from scrap alloys, or using beryllium products may also be exposed to higher levels of beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • About 1-15% of all people occupationally-exposed to beryllium in air become sensitive to beryllium and may develop chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an irreversible and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs. (cdc.gov)
  • Acute beryllium disease usually resolves within months of stopping beryllium work, but some affected workers later develop chronic beryllium disease. (cdc.gov)
  • After reviewing them, we discussed the issues concerning occupational health management of workers exposed to beryllium in Japan. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: It was suggested that the following should be considered as the issues of management of occupational health of workers exposed to beryllium in Japan: (1) Collect epidemiologic data on health hazards from beryllium exposure in Japan. (bvsalud.org)
  • Because beryllium is recognized as a sensitizing and carcinogenic agent, the management of occupational health for workers who may be occupationally exposed to beryllium has long been an important issue in the world. (bvsalud.org)
  • EPA has come from industry discharges of waste water and found that the levels of beryllium in drinking water from beryllium dust in the air from industrial in different parts of the United States are extremely activities settling over water. (cdc.gov)
  • Lung damage has been observed in people exposed to high levels of beryllium in the air. (cdc.gov)
  • The general population is exposed to normally low levels of beryllium in air, food, and water. (cdc.gov)
  • People living near these industries may also be exposed to higher than normal levels of beryllium in air. (cdc.gov)
  • People living near uncontrolled hazardous waste sites may be exposed to higher than normal levels of beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • This condition is called chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and can occur many years after exposure to higher than normal levels of beryllium (greater than 0.2 µg/m 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The general population is unlikely to develop acute or chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are normally very low (0.00003-0.0002 µg/m 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Most people are exposed to low levels of beryllium in air, food, and water. (sourcewatch.org)
  • [5] People can be exposed to higher levels of beryllium if they work mining, processing, or otherwise working with beryllium. (sourcewatch.org)
  • People living near these industries or near hazardous waste sites may also be exposed to high levels of beryllium. (sourcewatch.org)
  • chronic beryllium disease because ambient air levels of beryllium are normally very low (0.00003-0.0002 ug/m3). (cdc.gov)
  • Friedrich Wöhler and A. A. Bussy independently isolated the metal in 1828 by reacting potassium on beryllium chloride. (earth.com)
  • Friedrich Wöhler [ 5 ] and Antoine Bussy independently isolated the metal in 1828 by reacting potassium and beryllium chloride. (blogspot.com)
  • The latter product may be converted to beryllium fluoride for reduction by magnesium to metallic beryllium, or to beryllium chloride for electrolytic reduction. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • 1) How many grams of beryllium chloride are needed to make 125 mL of a 10% solution? (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is the standard way of determining sensitivity to beryllium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Testing for an individual's sensitivity to beryllium is performed with an in vitro lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT). (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • The blood lymphocyte proliferation test for beryllium sensitization (Be-LPT) is measured by radioactive 3 H-thymidine uptake in a cell culture system on two different days after exposure to a range of beryllium sulfate to re-stimulate effector memory CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • Some people (1-15%) become sensitive to beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • Individuals who are sensitive to beryllium can develop an inflammatory reaction in the respiratory system. (sourcewatch.org)
  • This condition resembles pneumonia and is called acute beryllium disease Occupational and community air standards are effective in preventing most acute lung damage. (cdc.gov)
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), working under an interagency agreement with the Office of Regulatory Analysis of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), conducted a study to survey occupational exposures to beryllium to document engineering controls and work practices affecting those exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • It is distinct from acute beryllium poisoning, which became rare following occupational exposure limits established around 1950. (wikipedia.org)
  • The current US limit for airborne beryllium is 0.2 mcg/m 3 exposure for an eight hour day with a short term exposure limit of 2 mcg/m 3 over a 15 minute sampling period according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Under these circumstances, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) had published a rule in January 2017, to prevent the development of chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. (bvsalud.org)
  • With the announcement of the OSHA rule in January 2017, the purpose of this study is to gain insight into the health problems and industrial hygiene associated with the use of beryllium and share the issues related to the management of occupational health for persons working with beryllium in Japan. (bvsalud.org)
  • Management of occupational health that emphasizes reduction of beryllium sensitization and early detection of beryllium-sensitized workers is important. (bvsalud.org)
  • Beryllium is used as an alloying agent in the production of beryllium copper. (earth.com)
  • Its main use is in the production of beryllium metal by reduction with magnesium. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • This condition resembles pneumonia and is called acute beryllium disease. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry, ToxFAQs for Beryllium , Accessed August 28, 2010. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Beryllium produces a direct corrosive effect to tissue, and can cause a chronic life-threatening allergic disease called berylliosis in susceptible persons. (blogspot.com)
  • Chronic beryllium disease occurs when a sensitized worker's lungs react with beryllium that has been inhaled, producing lung granulomas and scarring. (cdc.gov)
  • Chronic beryllium disease usually has a slow onset of symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • However, when chronic beryllium disease pro-gresses, the widespread granulomas and associated lung damage cause chronic chest symptoms such as coughing and shortness of breath on exertion. (cdc.gov)
  • Other symptoms that may develop in some persons with chronic beryllium disease are unusual fatigue, night sweats, and weight loss. (cdc.gov)
  • Some people with chronic beryllium disease eventually require supplemental oxygen, become severely disabled, and even die because of respiratory failure or insufficiency. (cdc.gov)
  • Acute beryllium disease has been diagnosed in the past, but it is rare today. (cdc.gov)
  • Controlling beryllium exposures to prevent chronic beryllium disease should also reduce the risk for lung cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • Additional information on preventing sensitization and disease from beryllium exposure can be found in a recent NIOSH Alert (NIOSH 2011). (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium disease is a systemic disorder involving multiple organs, with pulmonary manifestations being most prominent and common. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Route of exposure is by inhalation and the disease can be either acute or chronic. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Acute disease is extremely rare currently, and none has been reported since the first widespread industrial use of beryllium in the 1940s after industrial hygiene measures had been implemented to limit high-dose exposures. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Chronic beryllium disease continues to be reported. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) may develop in individuals who are exposed to beryllium due to a hypersensitivity immune response to the metal beryllium. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Beryllium has a potential to become airborne as either dust or fume and most workers that have potential exposure may develop beryllium sensitization and eventually, chronic beryllium disease. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Workers who have the potential to be exposed to greater than 0.1 ugm/m3 of beryllium can be thought of as at risk for developing beryllium disease. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • In addition to the environmental risk, genetic risk factors play a role in the susceptibility to beryllium disease. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The HLA polymorphism of having a glutamate on position 69 of the HLA DP protein, which carries the greatest risk, is present in about 90 percent of patients with beryllium disease as well as about 40 percent of the general population. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • This genetic marker appears to be a risk factor for the ability to develop a hypersensitivity reaction to beryllium but not of whether someone who has developed a hypersensitivity reaction will develop the disease. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in blood as a biomarker of disease progression. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Deficient and dysfunctional regulatory T cells in the lungs of chronic beryllium disease subjects. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Beryllium-ferritin: lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage apoptosis in chronic beryllium disease. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Beryllium (Be) is a lightweight metal that can cause acute or chronic disease that may be asymptomatic. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • however, for the most part, it occurs in individuals carrying certain HLA alleles such as HLA - DPB1 in 83%-97% of individuals with chronic beryllium disease (CBD). (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • CBD is much more common than the acute disease nowadays which is typically a chronic non-caseating granulomatous inflammation in individuals who develop beryllium-specific, cell-mediated immunity (typically CD4+ T cells). (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • Correlation between the clinical status of CBD (chronic beryllium disease) and in vitro responses to beryllium in an LPT was developed. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • HLA-DBP1 and chronic beryllium disease: a HuGE review. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • Inhaling particulate containing beryllium may cause a serious, chronic lung disease called Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) in some individuals. (medpdffinder.com)
  • The immunologic mechanisms involved in the progression from beryllium sensitization and disease as well as the development of biomarkers that could potentially detect this progression in the absence of invasive procedures is also a major interest. (ucdenver.edu)
  • RESULTS: It has been reconfirmed that in recent years, the most serious health problem due to beryllium exposure is chronic beryllium disease caused by beryllium sensitization. (bvsalud.org)
  • Notable gemstones which contain beryllium include beryl (aquamarine, emerald) and chrysoberyl. (blogspot.com)
  • Published reports indicate that coal slag abrasives, such as Black Beauty™, contain beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • The test is performed by acquiring either peripheral blood or fluid from a bronchial alveolar lavage, and lymphocytes are cultured with beryllium sulfate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ingestion of magnets can cause acute cobalt toxicity. (brainkart.com)
  • If breathing has stopped, perform artificial respiration and obtain medical help Beryllium: The beryllium in this product is not known to cause acute health effects. (medpdffinder.com)
  • Annual Review of Appendix O MAACs 2010 TRPS 3/31/2011 March 31, 2011 Page 2 of 55 The Technical Projects & Resources Section of the Air Quality Division is charged with an annual review of the toxic air contaminants (TAC) Maximum Acceptable Ambient Concentrations (MAAC) found in Appendix O of the Air Quality Regulations. (ok.gov)
  • When beryllium is phagocytized by macrophages, the beryllium triggers macrophage apoptosis, thereby reducing beryllium clearance from the lungs and eventually resulting in secondary necrosis and lysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beryllium-stimulated reactive oxygen species and macrophage apoptosis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • On June 21-23, 2004, research personnel from NIOSH conducted a site visit at the Annapolis Water Reclamation Facility in Annapolis, MD. The purpose of the study was to identify and describe the control technology and work practices in use during abrasive blasting operations in Secondary Clarifier No. 2, and measure beryllium exposures associated with the use of Black Beauty™ coal slag abrasive. (cdc.gov)
  • Definitive diagnosis of berylliosis is based on history of beryllium exposures, documented beryllium sensitivity and granulomatous inflammation on lung biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • A bivalent element, beryllium is found naturally only combined with other elements in minerals. (blogspot.com)
  • A major portion of beryllium in soil does not dissolve in water and remains bound to soil, so it is not likely to move deeper into the ground and enter groundwater. (cdc.gov)
  • Most beryllium in soil does not dissolve in water and remains bound to soil. (cdc.gov)
  • Most beryllium in soil does not dissolve in water and individuals may develop an inflammatory reaction in the remains bound to soil. (cdc.gov)
  • Most beryllium products of human origin that enter waterways come from industry discharges of waste water and from beryllium dust in the air from industrial activities settling over water. (cdc.gov)
  • Most beryllium beryllium dust out of the air. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium dust enters the air from burning coal and oil. (cdc.gov)
  • This beryllium dust will eventually settle over the land and water. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium enters the air as dust from burning coal and oil. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Health risks exist if beryllium-containing materials are dispersed as a dust, fume, mist, or beryllium-containing solution or suspension that can be inhaled or come into contact with unprotected skin. (cdc.gov)
  • The chemical health threat from Martian airborne dust and soil can be considered in terms of acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term) effects. (nap.edu)
  • The report stated that adults showed that the rock and the resulting dust particles last about 14 years in this trade and are often replaced contained iron, zinc, cadmium, nickel, lead, chromium, by their children who themselves become severely ill barium, beryllium, and aluminium. (who.int)
  • Commercial use of beryllium metal presents technical challenges due to the toxicity (especially by inhalation) of beryllium-containing dusts. (blogspot.com)
  • Hazards: Holmium has a low level of acute toxicity, however, large amounts of holmium salts can cause severe damage if inhaled, consumed orally, or injected. (espimetals.com)
  • This study investigated the in vitro toxicity of ambient PM collected near industrial sites in relation to particle size and composition. (biomedcentral.com)
  • He has vast experience conducting, interpreting (including statistical evaluation), and reporting acute and chronic toxicity, and bioaccumulation tests. (testamericainc.com)
  • Murine lung responses to ambient particulate matter: genomic analysis and influence on airway hyperresponsiveness. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium concentrations in atmospheric particulate and soil samples in and around a Beryllium Processing Facility (BPF) have been measured. (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • Beryllium: Particulate that becomes lodged under the skin has the potential to induce sensitization and skin lesions. (medpdffinder.com)
  • Currently, most production of this metal is accomplished by reducing beryllium fluoride with magnesium metal. (earth.com)
  • 1 Beryllium fluoride is made by the decompensation at 900-950 ºC of ammonium beryllium fluoride. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • The two most important methods of extracting beryllium from the ore are the sulphate process and the fluoride process. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Beryllium fluoride. (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • Beryllium enters the air, water, and soil as a result of natural and human activities. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium enters the air, water, and soil as a result or when rain or snow falls. (cdc.gov)
  • The beryllium, now in a water-soluble form, is leached from the sludge, and ammonium hydroxide is added to the leach liquor, which is then fed to a crystallizer where ammonium alum is crystallized out. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • With single or prolonged exposure by inhalation the lungs may become sensitized to beryllium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of note, the authors of a 2006 study suggested that beryllium inhalation was not the only form of exposure and perhaps skin exposure was also a cause, as they found that a reduction in beryllium inhalation did not result in a reduction in CBD or beryllium sensitization. (wikipedia.org)
  • This write-up provides an overview of a control technology and exposure assessment on beryllium exposure during abrasive blasting with coal-slag conducted by the Engineering and Physical Hazards Branch (EPHB), Division of Applied Research and Technology, NIOSH (Crouch et al 2003). (cdc.gov)
  • Information on what is Beryllium, the symptoms and health hazards associated with Beryllium contamination. (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • Beryllium ores are used to make speciality ceramics for electrical and high-technology applications. (cdc.gov)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have determined that beryllium is a human carcinogen. (cdc.gov)
  • The EPA has determined that beryllium is a probable human carcinogen. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium is also a probably human carcinogen, as long term exposure can increase the risk of developing lung cancer. (sourcewatch.org)
  • In susceptible persons, beryllium exposure can lead to a cell-mediated immune response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ratios of greater-than-or-equal-to 3.0 in two or more beryllium indices constitute an abnormal response that is compatible with beryllium hypersensitivity. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • Of beryllium's 10 isotopes, only beryllium-9 is stable. (earth.com)
  • It occurs after exposure to soluble beryllium salts, which are used in the making of beryllium metal. (cdc.gov)
  • Bertrandite, a low-grade ore (0.1 to 3%) with an acid-soluble beryllium content, is now being mined and processed in Utah. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Emissions from burning coal and oil increase beryllium levels in the air. (cdc.gov)
  • Emissions from particles eventually end up back in the soil or in the burning coal and oil increase beryllium levels in the bottoms of lakes, rivers, and ponds, where they stay air. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium, an industrial substance suspected of having carcinogenic potential, is notable for its lightness in weight, high tensile strength and corrosion resistance. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Beryllium's chemical similarity to aluminum was probably why beryllium was missed in previous searches. (blogspot.com)
  • Beryllium is the lightest metal. (cdc.gov)
  • Pure beryllium metal is used in nuclear weapons and reactors, aircraft and space vehicle structures, instruments, x-ray machines, and mirrors. (cdc.gov)
  • harm you and because these sites may be sources of Pure beryllium metal is used in nuclear weapons exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium metal did not become readily available until 1957. (earth.com)
  • Other significant properties are the high values for specific heat (1925 J·kg −1 ·K −1 ) and thermal conductivity (216 W·m −1 ·K −1 ), which make beryllium the metal with the best heat dissipation characteristics per unit weight. (blogspot.com)
  • 4 Beryllium nitride is prepared by heating beryllium metal powder in an oxygen-free, nitrogen atmosphere at 700-1,400 ºC. (iloencyclopaedia.org)
  • Beryllium is a lightweight metal used in many industries, including but not limited to aerospace and aircraft, alloy manufacturing, nuclear reactors, dental implants, ceramics and costume jewelry. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Beryllium is a lightweight metal with a high melting point, high strength, and good electrical conductivity. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • Beryllium (Be) is the smallest of all the metal cations and is relatively immobile in natural waters at neutral pH. (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • The element beryllium is a grey metal that is stronger than steel and lighter than aluminum. (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • Cobalt is a hard, steel-grey or silver-grey coloured, somewhat malleable, magnetic, ductile metal, which exists in two allotropic forms with the hexagonal (alpha) form more stable at ambient temperatures than the cubic (beta) form. (brainkart.com)
  • Beryllium enters waterways from the wearing away of rocks and soil. (cdc.gov)
  • however, disposal of coal ash, incinerator ash, and industrial wastes may increase the amount of beryllium in soil. (cdc.gov)
  • Most of it comes from dissolving beryllium out of beryllium particles may remain in the air for about rocks and soil that water runs over and through. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium enters waterways from the Only a very small part is from the settling of wearing away of rocks and soil. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium also enters water from erosion of rocks and soil and from industrial waste. (sourcewatch.org)
  • In the soil, most beryllium remains bound to the soil. (sourcewatch.org)
  • It enters water from erosion of rocks and soil, and from standards are effective in preventing acute lung damage. (cdc.gov)
  • If all six beryllium indices are less than 3.0, this signifies a normal result , meaning no evidence of beryllium sensitization. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • Some ` Children should avoid playing in soils near uncontrolled people who are sensitized to beryllium may not have any hazardous waste sites where beryllium may have been symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • A potential association was found for exposure to ambient air concentrations of suspected neurotoxicant hazardous air pollutants, specifically aromatic solvents, among place of residence in 2002 and 1999 and risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. (ctdbase.org)
  • The symptoms and lung function abnormalities often respond to corticosteroid medication such as prednisone or other medications that suppress the immune system response to beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • To investigate the effects of short-term exposure of beryllium on the human immune system, the proportion of T-lymphocytes such as CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD95, and NK cells, andthe proportion of B cells and TNFα level in peripheral blood and immunoglobulins in the serum of 43 exposed workers and 34 healthy control subjects were studied. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Beryllium-specific immune response in primary cells from healthy individuals. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Beryllium is an element that occurs naturally. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium, as a chemical component, is naturally found in some food. (doemijglutenvrij.nl)
  • The number of T lymphocytes and the amount of immunoglobulins in the beryllium-exposed workers and control subjects were not significantly different, except for the total number of lymphocytes and CD95 (APO1/FAS). (semanticscholar.org)
  • The total number of lymphocytes was higher in the beryllium-exposed individuals than in the healthy control subjects. (semanticscholar.org)
  • This study measured the formaldehyde exposure through ambient and personal air sampling, assessed the symptoms of poor health as well as estimating the health risk among hospital workers. (auroraitservices.co.uk)
  • Beryllium: The health effect of ingestion of beryllium in the form found in this product is unknown. (medpdffinder.com)
  • Some people who are sensitized to beryllium may not have any symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium has been found in at least 535 of the 1,613 current or former NPL sites. (cdc.gov)
  • As more sites are evaluated, the sites at which beryllium is found may increase. (cdc.gov)
  • More information on the chemical and physical properties, production, and uses of beryllium is found in Chapters 4, 5, and 6. (cdc.gov)
  • Beryllium has been found in at least 535 of the 1,613 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (cdc.gov)
  • In the Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey , a 2009 test of 84 samples of sewage sludge from around the U.S., the EPA found beryllium in 83 samples (99%) in concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 2.3 parts per million. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Beryllium is found in 30 different minerals, the most important of which are bertrandite, beryl, chrysoberyl, and phenacite. (earth.com)
  • At one time beryllium was referred to as glucinium (from Greek glykys, sweet), due to the sweet taste of its salts. (earth.com)
  • [ 8 ] For about 160 years, beryllium was also known as glucinum or glucinium (with the accompanying chemical symbol " Gl " [ 9 ] ), the name coming from the Greek word for sweet: γλυκυς, due to the sweet taste of its salts. (blogspot.com)
  • Beryllium-sensitized individuals may remain asymptomatic for life, but approximately 6-8% develop CBD every year. (clevelandcliniclabs.com)
  • The James Webb Space Telescope (Beryllium related details from NASA here) (http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/Telescope/mirrortale/) will have 18 hexagonal beryllium sections for its mirrors. (earth.com)
  • This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for Beryllium . (cdc.gov)
  • This public health statement tells you about beryllium and the effects of exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • This public health statement tells you about commercially for the recovery of beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • This fact sheet answers the most frequently sked health questions about beryllium. (cdc.gov)
  • How can beryllium affect my health? (cdc.gov)
  • These findings suggest that Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone ambient air concentrations may adversely affect cardiovascular health, as measured by the dispensing of glyceryl trinitrates for angina pectoris. (ctdbase.org)
  • METHODS: We collected information regarding the beryllium industry, beryllium exposure, beryllium-induced health disorders, OSHA rule of January 2017, and regulations for beryllium use in Japan. (bvsalud.org)
  • Most of the beryllium in water settles in the material on the bottom with sediment. (cdc.gov)

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