Amaurosis Fugax: Transient complete or partial monocular blindness due to retinal ischemia. This may be caused by emboli from the CAROTID ARTERY (usually in association with CAROTID STENOSIS) and other locations that enter the central RETINAL ARTERY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p245)Blindness: The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.Leber Congenital Amaurosis: A rare degenerative inherited eye disease that appears at birth or in the first few months of life that results in a loss of vision. Not to be confused with LEBER HEREDITARY OPTIC NEUROPATHY, the disease is thought to be caused by abnormal development of PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS in the RETINA, or by the extremely premature degeneration of retinal cells.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Retinal Artery Occlusion: Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.cis-trans-Isomerases: Enzymes that catalyze the rearrangement of geometry about double bonds. EC 5.2.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Retinal Artery: Central retinal artery and its branches. It arises from the ophthalmic artery, pierces the optic nerve and runs through its center, enters the eye through the porus opticus and branches to supply the retina.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Remission, Spontaneous: A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.Optic Atrophy, Hereditary, Leber: A maternally linked genetic disorder that presents in mid-life as acute or subacute central vision loss leading to central scotoma and blindness. The disease has been associated with missense mutations in the mtDNA, in genes for Complex I, III, and IV polypeptides, that can act autonomously or in association with each other to cause the disease. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Omim/, MIM#535000 (April 17, 2001))Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Eye ProteinsOptic Atrophies, Hereditary: Hereditary conditions that feature progressive visual loss in association with optic atrophy. Relatively common forms include autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT) and Leber hereditary optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, HEREDITARY, LEBER).Retinal Degeneration: A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304)Rectal Diseases: Pathological developments in the RECTUM region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Retinitis Pigmentosa: Hereditary, progressive degeneration of the neuroepithelium of the retina characterized by night blindness and progressive contraction of the visual field.Photoreceptor Connecting Cilium: The bridge between the inner and the outer segments of a retinal rod or a cone photoreceptor cell. Through it, proteins synthesized in the inner segment are transported to the outer segment.Retinal Dystrophies: A group of disorders involving predominantly the posterior portion of the ocular fundus, due to degeneration in the sensory layer of the RETINA; RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM; BRUCH MEMBRANE; CHOROID; or a combination of these tissues.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Electroretinography: Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Vision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Papilledema: Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)Giant Cell Arteritis: A systemic autoimmune disorder that typically affects medium and large ARTERIES, usually leading to occlusive granulomatous vasculitis with transmural infiltrate containing multinucleated GIANT CELLS. The TEMPORAL ARTERY is commonly involved. This disorder appears primarily in people over the age of 50. Symptoms include FEVER; FATIGUE; HEADACHE; visual impairment; pain in the jaw and tongue; and aggravation of pain by cold temperatures. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed)Temporal Arteries: Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.Polymyalgia Rheumatica: A syndrome in the elderly characterized by proximal joint and muscle pain, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a self-limiting course. Pain is usually accompanied by evidence of an inflammatory reaction. Women are affected twice as commonly as men and Caucasians more frequently than other groups. The condition is frequently associated with GIANT CELL ARTERITIS and some theories pose the possibility that the two diseases arise from a single etiology or even that they are the same entity.Phototherapy: Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Defensive Medicine: The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.DenmarkUnconsciousness: Loss of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment combined with markedly reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp344-5)Migraine Disorders: A class of disabling primary headache disorders, characterized by recurrent unilateral pulsatile headaches. The two major subtypes are common migraine (without aura) and classic migraine (with aura or neurological symptoms). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments: Crystallizable fragments composed of the carboxy-terminal halves of both IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fc fragments contain the carboxy-terminal parts of the heavy chain constant regions that are responsible for the effector functions of an immunoglobulin (COMPLEMENT fixation, binding to the cell membrane via FC RECEPTORS, and placental transport). This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.

Axillary-to-carotid artery bypass grafting for symptomatic severe common carotid artery occlusive disease. (1/38)

PURPOSE: Revascularization of the internal or external carotid arteries is occasionally indicated for symptomatic atherosclerotic common carotid artery occlusion or long-segment high-grade stenosis beginning at its origin. I report the outcome of axillary artery-based bypass grafts to the distal common, internal, or external carotid arteries. METHODS: Between 1981 and 1997, 29 axillary-to-carotid bypass grafting procedures were performed on 28 patients, 15 men and 13 women, with a mean age of 68 years. Indications were transient ischemia in nine patients, amaurosis fugax in four patients, completed stroke in six patients, and nonlateralizing global ischemia in nine patients. Twenty-three common carotid arteries were totally occluded, and six had long-segment stenosis of 90% or greater beginning at the origin. Saphenous vein grafts were used in 25 procedures, and synthetic grafts were used in four. Grafts were placed to 13 internal, eight distal common, and eight external carotid arteries. RESULTS: There were no perioperative deaths; one stroke occurred (3.4%). No lymphatic or peripheral nerve complications occurred. In a 1- to 11-year follow-up period (mean, 4.5 years), there were no graft occlusions, one restenosis of 50% or greater, and two restenoses of 70% or greater. The 1-year stenosis-free rate for 50% or greater stenosis was 93%, and the 5- and 10-year rates were 87%. No late ipsilateral strokes occurred. The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 64% and 28%, respectively. Coronary artery disease was the major cause of late mortality. CONCLUSION: Axillary-to-carotid bypass grafting for severe symptomatic common carotid occlusive disease is safe, well tolerated, durable, and effective in stroke prevention. There is a high late mortality rate because of coronary artery disease in patients with severe proximal common carotid occlusive disease.  (+info)

Hemispheric symptoms and carotid plaque echomorphology. (2/38)

PURPOSE: In patients with carotid bifurcation disease, the risk of stroke mainly depends on the severity of the stenosis, the presenting hemispheric symptom, and, as recently suggested, on plaque echodensity. We tested the hypothesis that asymptomatic carotid plaques and plaques of patients who present with different hemispheric symptoms are related to different plaque structure in terms of echodensity and the degree of stenosis. METHODS: Two hundred sixty-four patients with 295 carotid bifurcation plaques (146 symptomatic, 149 asymptomatic) causing more than 50% stenosis were examined with duplex scanning. Thirty-six plaques were associated with amaurosis fugax (AF), 68 plaques were associated with transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), and 42 plaques were associated with stroke. B-mode images were digitized and normalized using linear scaling and two reference points, blood and adventitia. The gray scale median (GSM) of blood was set to 0, and the GSM of the adventitia was set to 190 (gray scale range, black = 0; white = 255). The GSM of the plaque in the normalized image was used as the objective measurement of echodensity. RESULTS: The mean GSM and the mean degree of stenosis, with 95% confidence intervals, for plaques associated with hemispheric symptoms were 13.3 (10.6 to 16) and 80.5 (78.3 to 82.7), respectively; and for asymptomatic plaques, the mean GSM and the mean degree of stenosis were 30.5 (26.2 to 34.7) and 72. 2 (69.8 to 74.5), respectively. Furthermore, in plaques related to AF, the mean GSM and the mean degree of stenosis were 7.4 (1.9 to 12. 9) and 85.6 (82 to 89.2), respectively; in those related to TIA, the mean GSM and the mean degree of stenosis were 14.9 (11.2 to 18.6) and 79.3 (76.1 to 82.4), respectively; and in those related to stroke, the mean GSM and the mean degree of stenosis were 15.8 (10.2 to 21.3) and 78.1 (73.4 to 82.8), respectively. CONCLUSION: Plaques associated with hemispheric symptoms are more hypoechoic and more stenotic than those associated with no symptoms. Plaques associated with AF are more hypoechoic and more stenotic than those associated with TIA or stroke or those without symptoms. Plaques causing TIA and stroke have the same echodensity and the same degree of stenosis. These findings confirm previous suggestions that hypoechoic plaques are more likely to be symptomatic than hyperechoic ones. They support the hypothesis that the pathophysiologic mechanism for AF is different from that for TIA and stroke.  (+info)

Clinical and pathophysiological features of amaurosis fugax in Japanese stroke patients. (3/38)

OBJECTIVE: It has been emphasized that amaurosis fugax (AmF) is caused by thromboembolism due to atheromatous lesions of the extracranial carotid artery (EC-CA) in Caucasian populations. However, there have been few studies of AmF in Japan. We analyzed the clinical and pathophysiologic features of AmF in 43 Japanese AmF patients. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-three patients presented with AmF from a group of 2,056 Japanese patients with acute ischemic stroke. We investigated angiographic and transcranial Doppler findings, precipitating factors, medical treatment and prognosis, to elucidate the pathogenetic mechanism of AmF. RESULTS: Angiographic findings revealed an intracranial lesion in 22 patients (51%), extracranial lesion in 16 (37%), and no abnormality in 5 (12%). Blood flow in the ophthalmic artery (OA) examined by the transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) showed normal antegrade flow in 24 patients and reversed flow in 7. Precipitating factors for AmF were seen in 7 out of 43 patients. Regarding the pathogenesis of AmF, the micro-thromboembolism originated from the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 25 patients, the thromboembolism was via the external carotid artery (ECA) in 7, the hemodynamic retinal vascular insufficiency in 6 patients showed various atheromatous changes in the intracranial carotid artery (IC-CA) or EC-CA, and the cause was unknown in 5. CONCLUSION: In this series of patients, AmF was mainly caused by thromboembolism from IC-CA atheromatous lesions. Micro-thromboemboli from the ECA or hemodynamic retinal vascular insufficiency, although less frequent, should also be considered as possible etiologies for AmF.  (+info)

Echomorphologic and histopathologic characteristics of unstable carotid plaques. (4/38)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Our hypothesis was that the carotid plaques associated with retinal and cerebrovascular symptomatology and asymptomatic presentation may be differ from each other. The aim of this study was to identify the sonographic and histopathologic characteristics of plaques that corresponded to these three clinical manifestations. METHODS: The echo process involved duplex preoperative imaging of 71 plaques (67 patients, 21 plaques were associated with retinal, 25 with cerebrovascular symptoms, and 25 were asymptomatic), which was performed in a longitudinal fashion. Appropriate frames were captured and digitized via S-video signal in a computer and digitized sonograms were normalized by two echo-anatomic reference points: the gray scale median (GSM) of the blood and that of the adventitia. The GSM of the plaques was evaluated to distinguish dark (low-GSM) from bright (high-GSM) plaques. Subsequent to endarterectomy, the plaques were sectioned transversely, and a slice at the level of the largest plaque area was examined for the relative size of necrotic core and presence of calcification and hemorrhage. RESULTS: Retinal symptomatology was associated with a hypoechoic plaque appearance (median GSM: 0), asymptomatic status with a hyperechoic plaque appearance (median GSM: 34), and cerebrovascular symptomatology with an intermediate plaque appearance (median GSM: 16) (P = .001). The histopathologic characteristics did not disclose differences between the three clinical groups. The hypoechoic plaque appearance was associated only with the presence of hemorrhage (median GSM for the hemorrhagic plaques, 6, and for the non-hemorrhagic ones, 20 [P = .04]). The relative necrotic core size and the presence of calcification did not show any echomorphologic predilection. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that distinct echomorphologic characteristics of plaques were associated with retinal and cerebrovascular symptomatology and asymptomatic status. Histopathologically, only the presence of hemorrhage proved to have an echomorphologic predilection.  (+info)

Types of neurovascular symptoms and carotid plaque ultrasonic textural characteristics. (5/38)

The aim of this study was to identify the echo morphology and stenosis of carotid plaques that corresponded to ipsilateral asymptomatic status, amaurosis fugax, hemispheric transient ischemic attack, and stroke. One hundred ninety-two plaques (150 patients), producing stenosis in the range of 50% to 99% and associated with various neurovascular manifestations, were studied. These plaques were imaged on duplex scans, and a series of textural features was produced in a computer to distinguish quantitatively their various echo patterns. Amaurosis fugax corresponded to dark, severely stenosed atheromas (90%); hemispheric transient ischemic attack and stroke corresponded to plaques with intermediate echoic characteristics and intermediate stenosis (80%); and asymptomatic status corresponded to bright, moderately stenosed plaques (70%; P < .05). The significance of these findings is discussed.  (+info)

Delayed onset of amaurosis fugax in a patient with type A aortic dissection post surgical repair. (6/38)

Stroke is an important complication for the surgical treatment of type A aortic dissection and it occurs immediately post operation. Many surgical techniques such as deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and retrograde cerebral perfusion have been reported to ameliorate this complication. We report here a male Taiwanese patient with type A aortic dissection involving the arch who underwent surgical repair. Amaurosis fugax appeared on the 4th day post operation. Funduscopic findings demonstrated multi focal embolization and carotid sonography revealed normal carotid arteries. The symptoms and signs improved after anticoagulation therapy. This is a rare case of delayed onset of amaurosis fugax in a patient with type A aortic dissection post surgical repair. The thromboemboli might have originated from the internal surface of the sawing area.  (+info)

Reoperation for recurrent carotid stenosis: early results and late outcome in 199 patients. (7/38)

PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of reoperations for recurrent carotid stenosis (REDOCEA) at the Cleveland Clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1989 to 1999, 206 consecutive REDOCEAs were performed in 199 patients (131 men, 68 women) with a mean age of 68 years (median, 69 years; range, 47-86 years). A total of 119 procedures (57%) were performed for severe asymptomatic stenosis, 55 (27%) for hemispheric transient ischemic attacks or amaurosis fugax, 26 (13%) for prior stroke, and 6 (3%) for vertebrobasilar symptoms. Eleven REDOCEAs (5%) were combined with myocardial revascularization, and another 19 (9%) represented multiple carotid reoperations (17 second reoperations and 2 third reoperations). Three REDOCEAs (1%) were closed primarily, and nine (4%) required interposition grafts, whereas the remaining 194 (95%) were repaired with either vein patch angioplasty (139 [68%]) or synthetic patches (55 [27%]). Three patients (2%) were lost to follow-up, but late information was available for 196 patients (203 operations) at a mean interval of 4.3 years (median, 3.9 years; maximum, 10.2 years). RESULTS: Considering all 206 procedures, there were 7 early (< 30 days) postoperative neurologic events (3.4%), including 6 perioperative strokes (2.9%) and 1 occipital hemorrhage (0.5%) on the 12th postoperative day. Seventeen additional neurologic events occurred during the late follow-up period, consisting of eight strokes (3.9%) and nine transient ischemic attacks (4.4 %). With the Kaplan-Meier method, the estimated 5-year freedom from stroke was 92% (95% CI, 88%-96%). There were two early postoperative deaths (1%), both from cardiac complications after REDOCEAs combined with myocardial revascularization procedures. With the Kaplan-Meier method, the estimated 5-year survival was 81% (range, 75%-88%). A univariate Cox regression model yielded the presence of coronary artery disease as the only variable that was significantly associated with survival (P =.024). The presence of pulmonary disease (P =.036), diabetes (P =.01), and advancing age (P =.006) was found to be significantly associated with stroke after REDOCEA. Causes of 53 late deaths were cardiovascular problems in 25 patients (47%), unknown in 14 (26%), renal failure in 4 (8%), stroke in 3 (6%), and miscellaneous in 7 (13%). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that REDOCEA may be safely performed in selected patients with recurrent carotid stenosis and that most of these patients enjoy long-term freedom from stroke.  (+info)

Clinical features of transient monocular blindness and the likelihood of atherosclerotic lesions of the internal carotid artery. (8/38)

To assess which features of transient monocular blindness (TMB) are associated with atherosclerotic changes in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA), 337 patients with sudden, transient monocular loss of vision were prospectively studied. History characteristics of the attack were compared with the presence of atherosclerotic lesions of the ipsilateral ICA. All patients were directly interviewed by a single investigator. Of all patients, 159 had a normal ICA on the relevant side, 33 had a stenosis between 0%-69%, 100 had a stenosis of 70%-99%, and 45 had an ICA occlusion. An altitudinal onset or disappearance of symptoms was associated with atherosclerotic lesions of the ipsilateral ICA. A severe (70%-99%) stenosis was also associated with a duration between 1 and 10 minutes, and with a speed of onset in seconds. An ICA occlusion was associated with attacks being provoked by bright light, an altitudinal onset, and the occurrence of more than 10 attacks. Patients who could not remember details about the mode of onset, disappearance, or duration of the attack were likely to have a normal ICA. Our findings may facilitate the clinical decision whether or not to perform ancillary investigations in these patients.  (+info)

To assess which features of transient monocular blindness (TMB) are associated with atherosclerotic changes in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA), 337 patients with sudden, transient monocular loss of vision were prospectively studied. History characteristics of the attack were compared with the presence of atherosclerotic lesions of the ipsilateral ICA. All patients were directly interviewed by a single investigator. Of all patients, 159 had a normal ICA on the relevant side, 33 had a stenosis between 0%-69%, 100 had a stenosis of 70%-99%, and 45 had an ICA occlusion.. An altitudinal onset or disappearance of symptoms was associated with atherosclerotic lesions of the ipsilateral ICA. A severe (70%-99%) stenosis was also associated with a duration between 1 and 10 minutes, and with a speed of onset in seconds. An ICA occlusion was associated with attacks being provoked by bright light, an altitudinal onset, and the occurrence of more than 10 attacks. Patients who could not remember ...
Despite the temporary nature of the vision loss, those experiencing amaurosis fugax are usually advised to consult a physician immediately as it is a symptom that usually heralds serious vascular events, including stroke.[46][47] Restated, "because of the brief interval between the transient event and a stroke or blindness from temporal arteritis, the workup for transient monocular blindness should be undertaken without delay." If the patient has no history of giant cell arteritis, the probability of vision preservation is high; however, the chance of a stroke reaches that for a hemispheric TIA. Therefore, investigation of cardiac disease is justified.[3]. A diagnostic evaluation should begin with the patients history, followed by a physical exam, with particular importance being paid to the ophthalmic examination with regards to signs of ocular ischemia. When investigating amaurosis fugax, an ophthalmologic consult is absolutely warranted if available. Several concomitant laboratory tests ...
A prospective study of amaurosis fugax was carried out in a Danish community (population 481,000); case ascertainment was based on the collaboration of practicing ophthalmologists and general practitioners. Over a 3-year period we registered 131 cases; the annual incidence of "first amaurosis fugax episodes coming to medical attention" was 8.6 and 6.2 per 100,000 population for men and women, respectively. On the basis of a comparison of the age-incidence curves for cerebral and retinal ischemic attacks, the "true" incidence of amaurosis fugax is estimated to be approximately 14/100,000/yr, or 25-30% of the reported incidence of transient ischemic attacks. Clinical and/or radiologic signs of a carotid lesion on the appropriate side were present in 56% of the patients, and an additional 27% had symptoms or signs of other organic cardiovascular disorders. Forty-three (68%) of the 63 patients who underwent arteriography had an atheromatous lesion apparently amenable to carotid endarterectomy. In ...
Amaurosis fugax symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Amaurosis fugax (Amaurosis fugax) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
Progress Reviews 201 Current Management of Amaurosis Fugax The Amaurosis Fugax Study Group We present a consensus on the pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of amaurosis fugax. The phenomenon
Amaurosis fugax (Latin fugax meaning fleeting, Greek amaurosis meaning darkening, dark, or obscure) is a painless temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes. The experience of amaurosis fugax is classically described as a temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes that appears as a black "curtain coming down vertically into the field of vision in one eye;" however, this altitudinal visual loss is relatively uncommon. In one study, only 23.8 percent of patients with transient monocular vision loss experienced the classic "curtain" or "shade" descending over their vision. Other descriptions of this experience include a monocular blindness, dimming, fogging, or blurring. Total or sectorial vision loss typically lasts only a few seconds, but may last minutes or even hours. Duration depends on the cause of the vision loss. Obscured vision due to papilledema may last only seconds, while a severely atherosclerotic carotid artery may be associated with a duration of one to ten minutes. Certainly, ...
Previous research has shown that early monocular blindness from unilateral enucleation (surgical removal of one eye) results in equivalent or enhanced form perception but impairments in aspects of motion processing (see Steeves et al., 2008). To further investigate the effects of early monocular blindness on form and motion processing, we compared binocularly and monocularly viewing controls to individuals who were unilaterally enucleated within the first few years of life. Thresholds were measured on three tasks that had not before been tested in this population; 1) contrast discrimination, 2) horizontal speed discrimination, and 3) horizontal coherent motion discrimination. Preliminary data are consistent with previous research showing early monocular blindness results in equivalent or enhanced sensitivity compared to binocularly and monocularly viewing controls at some contrasts. It also results in higher motion discrimination thresholds for lower speeds and a nasalward bias in the perception ...
• Sudden, transient loss of vision in one eye (amaurosis fugax) is associated frequently with atherosclerosis of the internal carotid artery in adults and may h
Amaurosis fugax is caused by a blockage of blood flow to the eye, usually by an embolus entering the opthalmic artery. It qualifies as a transient ischa...
Vulnerability of the brain and heart after cardiac arrest. Amaurosis fugax. A randomized clinical study of a calcium-entry blocker (lidoflazine) in the treatment of comatose survivors of cardiac arrest
Common Misdiagnosis - Misdiagnosed Amaurosis Fugax | Legal advice for people affected by dental & medical malpractice. Newsome Melton, Orlando Malpractice
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 21299/full Abstract Objective Transient monocular blindness (TMB) attacks may occur during straining activities that impede cerebral venous return. Disturbance of cerebral and orbital venous circulation may be involved in TMB. Methods Duplex ultrasonography and Doppler-flow measurement of jugular ...
To the Editor:. Doppler ultrasound1 and recently angio-computerized-tomography (angio-CT)2 and angio-magnetic-resonance (angio-MR)3 are rapidly becoming the gold standard of diagnosis of carotid occlusive disease. Advantages of these techniques are the wide availability, relative operator independence, good imaging resolution, and noninvasiveness.4 On the other hand, in certain anatomical situations such as occlusion or bilateral stenosis, or particular clinical settings such as coronary or aortic surgical emergency, they can be problematic, doubtful, or impractical, and selective carotid angiography may still play a role.. Acute coronary syndromes require prompt coronary artery angiography and eventual percutaneous intervention or referral to cardiac surgeon for urgent myocardial revascularization. Every invasive cardiologist has this problematic experience of a patient undergoing urgent coronary angiography for segment (ST) elevation or nonST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in whom ...
Advances in Vascular Medicine is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of vascular medicine.
... is a chapter in the book, Ophthalmology, containing the following 15 pages: Eye Pain without Redness, Eyelid Swelling, Decreased Visual Acuity, Dry Eye, Transient Monocular Blindness, Red Eyelid, Floaters, Diplopia, Eye Discharge, Eye Pain, Light Flashes, Proptosis, Acute Red Eye, Red Eye in Children, Acute Vision Loss.
Amaurosis fugax is a symptom of carotid artery disease. It occurs when a piece of plaque in a carotid artery breaks off and travels to the retinal artery in the eye. The carotid arteries provide the main blood supply to the brain. They are located on each side of your neck under the jaw. Plaque is a hard substance that forms when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls of arteries. Pieces of plaque can block blood flow. In people with amaurosis fugax, vision loss continues as long as the blood supply to the retinal artery is blocked. Atherosclerosis of the arteries in the neck is the main risk factor for this condition. Risk factors for atherosclerosis include heart disease, high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, and high blood pressure. ...
This is the sudden transient loss of vision in one eye (like a curtain or shade coming from above or below) due to the passage of an embolus through the retinal vessels from ipsilateral carotid vessel disease. It is a feature of a TIA in the carotid artery circulation and is often the first clinical evidence of carotid stenosis.5 About 20% of all TIAs present as amaurosis fugax.6 Amaurosis fugax may forewarn of the development of hemiparesis or blindness and should be considered a matter for urgent attention and rectification. Give aspirin immediately. Carotid endarterectomy may be required for high grade stenosis. ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
List of causes of Cerebrovascular symptoms and Coordination problems and Retina symptoms and Vision distortion, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
List of 164 causes for 3rd nerve palsy and Cerebrovascular symptoms, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Duplex ultraljud på carotiskärlen utförs på patienter exempelvis vid misstänkt stroke, Transitorisk Ischemisk Attack (TIA), Amaurosis fugax, preoperativt eller som uppföljning vid en sedan tidigare känd carotisstenos. Vid duplex carotisundersökning mäts flödeshastigheter i Arteria Carotis Communis (CCA), Arteria Carotis Interna (ICA) och Arteria Carotis Externa (ECA) och över eventuella plack samt i vissa fall mäts även diametern av kärllumen. Av störst kliniskt intresse är stenos i ICA, och när det refereras till stenos är det alltså stenos i carotis interna som avses. I denna studie ingick 160 patienter som under en 8 veckors period utfört undersökningen på Fysiologiska avdelningen vid Helsingborgs lasarett. Vid datainsamlingens start undersöktes patientjournalerna 4 veckor retrospektivt samt 4 veckor framåt i tiden vilket gav en prospektiv patientgrupp. Resultaten visade på att av totalt 320 undersökta kärl innehöll 23 kärl 40-69% ...
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Supplied Components. • Coated Clear 96 Well Plates. • 5 x Dilution Buffer. • 10 x PBS-T. • Reporting antibody. • Streptavidin-HRP Conjugate. • TMB Substrate. • Stop Solution. • Plate Sealer. Ordering information ...
Supplied Components. • Coated Clear 96 Well Plates. • 5 x Dilution Buffer. • 10 x PBS-T. • Reporting antibody. • Streptavidin-HRP Conjugate. • TMB Substrate. • Stop Solution. • Plate Sealer. Ordering information ...
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The extracranial venous system is complex and variable between individuals. Until recently, these variations were acknowledged as developmental variants and were not considered pathological findings. However, in the last decade, the presence and severity of uni- or bi-lateral jugular venous reflux have been linked to several central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as transient global amnesia, transient monocular blindness, cough headache, primary exertional headache and most recently to Alzheimers disease. The most recent introduction of a composite criteria-based vascular condition named chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) that was originally linked to multiple sclerosis increased the interest in better understanding of the role of the extracranial venous system in the pathophysiology of CNS disorders. The ultimate cause-consequence relationship between these conditions and CNS disorders has not been firmly established and further research is needed. This article collection ...
We report 13 cases of ophthalmic complications resulting from dengue infection in Singapore. We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of 13 patients with dengue fever who had visual impairment. Investigations included Humphrey automated visual field analyzer, Amsler charting, fundus fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. Twenty-two eyes of 13 patients were affected. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years. Visual acuity varied from 20/25 to counting fingers only. Twelve patients (92.3%) noted central vision impairment. Onset of visual impairment coincided with the nadir of serum thrombocytopenia. Ophthalmologic findings include macular edema and blot hemorrhages (10), cotton wool spots (1), retinal vasculitis (4), exudative retinal detachment (2), and anterior uveitis (1). All patients recovered visual acuity to 20/30 or better with residual central scotoma by 12 weeks. These new complications suggest a widening spectrum of ophthalmic complications in dengue infection.
MalaCards based summary : Cerebral Visual Impairment, also known as cortical visual impairment, is related to bosch-boonstra-schaaf optic atrophy syndrome and mental retardation, autosomal dominant 42, and has symptoms including amaurosis fugax An important gene associated with Cerebral Visual Impairment is GNB1 (G Protein Subunit Beta 1). The drugs Donepezil and Rivastigmine have been mentioned in the context of this disorder. Affiliated tissues include brain, eye and testes ...
... Klinisches W rterbuch von Otto Dornbl th. Definition und Bedeutung im historischen Lexikon der medizinischen Begriffe
Onestep QuickBlu® TMB Substrate is a solution for the detection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that is manufactured as both a ready-to-use solution as well as in a concentrated form. It rapidly produces a blue-colored reaction product which can be read at 370 nm or 655 nm, or at 450 nm when an acidic stop solution is used. QuickBlu® TMB substrates are stable for up to 4 years at 2 - 8°C. Moreover, QuickBlu® TMB substrate sensitivity is excellent when compared to other leading products. QuickBlu® TMB substrates are manufactured to ensure that the lot-to-lot variability is less than 5%. The solution can be concentrated up to 10x for easy transportation. ...
Epidemiology 40% of monocular blindness is related to trauma 40% of monocular blindness is related to trauma The leading cause of monocular blindness The leading cause of monocular blindness 70-80% injured are male 70-80% injured are male Age range is yrs but most are young Age range is yrs but most are young average age 30yr average age 30yr Incidence of penetrating eye injuries: 3.6/ Incidence of penetrating eye injuries: 3.6/ Incidence of Eye injuries requiring hospitalisation: 15.2 / Incidence of Eye injuries requiring hospitalisation: 15.2 /100000
David W. Newell, MD, Cerebrovascular Surgery, Neurosurgery, Swedish Neuroscience Institute Colleen Douville, RVT, Director, Cerebrovascular Ultrasound, Swedish Neuroscience Institute Since its introduction in 1982, transcranial doppler ultrasound (TCD) has evolved into a por-table, multimodality, noninvasive method for real-time imaging of intracranial vasculature. The detection of cerebral microemboli is among…
Patients suffering from symptomatic carotid artery stenosis, transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), amaurosis fugax or stroke receive either Revacept (single dose) plus antiplatelet monotherapy or monotherapy alone.. Patients receive a single dose of trial medication by intravenous infusion for 20 minutes. Patients are followed up one and three days after treatment, at 3 months and by a telephone interview at 12 months. ...
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3 ...
EYE GLOSSARY ; Adies Pupil, Amaurosis Fugax, Amblyopia, Amsler Grid, Aphakia, Arcus Senilis, Astigmatism etc treatment at eye care hospital itek vision centre in Noida, Delhi, Ghaziabad
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Ischemic stroke and intracranial artery disease demonstrate different characteristics depending on the race and region of the patient population. Intracranial atherosclerosis causes ,10% of ischemic strokes in white North American patients [13,14], but causes 50%-60% of strokes in Asian populations [15,16]. Hispanic and black patients demonstrate a relative rate of intracranial atherosclerosis-related strokes that is five times greater than that of white patients [17]. Hence, the most common cause of ischemic stroke worldwide could be intracranial atherosclerosis [16]. Atherosclerosis results from a cascade of endothelial dysfunction processes, infiltration of modified lipids into the intima, and vascular wall inflammation or remodeling [18]. On HR-MRI, atherosclerotic plaques, lipid cores, fibrous components, hemorrhage, and calcium are the most important components [6]. In the cervical carotid arteries, it may be easier to characterize the vascular wall, to differentiate these components, and ...
臺大位居世界頂尖大學之列,為永久珍藏及向國際展現本校豐碩的研究成果及學術能量,圖書館整合機構典藏(NTUR)與學術庫(AH)不同功能平台,成為臺大學術典藏NTU scholars。期能整合研究能量、促進交流合作、保存學術產出、推廣研究成果。. To permanently archive and promote researcher profiles and scholarly works, Library integrates the services of "NTU Repository" with "Academic Hub" to form NTU Scholars.. ...
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TMB Blotting PLUS™ for colorimetric detection in membrane assays based on Horseradish Peroxidase conjugates. Reactions develop a stable, dark blue color.
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When a person is uninsured, the typical cost of a carotid Doppler ultrasound test is about $904 in the United States, according to MDsave Incorporated. The test is normally ordered under suspicion of...
Definition of fugax in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is fugax? Meaning of fugax as a legal term. What does fugax mean in law?
Vascular imaging plays an important role in diagnosing cardiovascular disease at UnityPoint Health - Methodist. Schedule your heart test today!
Amaurosis fugax is a form of acute vision loss caused by reduced blood flow to the eye; it may be a warning sign of an ... Kaiboriboon K, Piriyawat P, Selhorst JB (May 2001). "Light-induced amaurosis fugax". American Journal of Ophthalmology. 131 (5 ...
amaurosis fugax (G45.3). *H34.0 - Prechodná oklúzia stredovej tepny sietnice. *H34.1 - Oklúzia a centralis retinae ...
It is rare that a person would visit a doctor and complain as follows: "Doctor, I have amaurosis fugax." They are more likely ...
His symptoms began at age 28 with a sudden transient visual loss (amaurosis fugax) after the funeral of a friend. During his ...
... known as amaurosis fugax). Emboli to the eye can be seen by ophthalmoscopy and are known as plaques of Hollenhorst. Emboli to ...
Symptoms such as unilateral weakness, amaurosis fugax, and double vision have higher odds of representing TIA compared to ... Amaurosis fugax (painless, temporary loss of vision) One-sided facial droop One-sided motor weakness Diplopia (double vision) ... amaurosis fugax), difficulty speaking or understanding language (aphasia), slurred speech (dysarthria), and confusion (altered ...
Amaurosis fugax Ocular ischemic syndrome Kunimoto, Dr., Lecture, Vascular diseases of the retina, AT Still University SOMA, ...
Amaurosis fugax is a temporary loss of vision that occurs in two conditions which cause a temporary reduction in ophthalmic ... "Blood pressure and pressure amaurosis." Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science 1975 Mar;14(3):237-40. PMID 1116922 A ...
Amaurosis fugax (G45.4) Transient global amnesia (G45.8) Other transient cerebral ischaemic attacks and related syndromes ( ...
... amaurosis fugax MeSH C23.888.592.763.941.162.250 --- blindness, cortical MeSH C23.888.592.763.941.256 --- color vision defects ...
Alien hand syndrome Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome Alternating hemiplegia of childhood Alzheimer's disease Amaurosis fugax ...
... , a type of non-permanent vision loss, may refer to: Amaurosis fugax, or fleeting blindness Conversion ...
... amaurosis fugax MeSH C10.597.751.941.162.250 --- blindness, cortical MeSH C10.597.751.941.256 --- color vision defects MeSH ...
... either temporary due to amaurosis fugax or potentially permanent due to retinal detachment), or cortical blindness, which ...
... amaurosis fugax) in one eye. Less common symptoms are artery sounds (bruits), or ringing in the ears (tinnitus). The common ...
... amaurosis fugax MeSH C11.966.075.250 --- blindness, cortical MeSH C11.966.075.500 --- hemianopsia MeSH C11.966.256 --- color ...
It was first described by Theodore Leber in the 19th century.[citation needed] Amaurosis fugax (Latin: fugax meaning fleeting) ... Amaurosis (Greek meaning darkening, dark, or obscure) is vision loss or weakness that occurs without an apparent lesion ... Leber's congenital amaurosis is an inherited disease resulting in optic atrophy and secondary severe vision loss or blindness. ... In a small minority of those who experience amaurosis, stroke or permanent vision loss results. Diabetes, hypertension and ...
... (Latin fugax meaning fleeting, Greek amaurosis meaning darkening, dark, or obscure) is a painless temporary ... "Current management of amaurosis fugax. The Amaurosis Fugax Study Group". Stroke. 21 (2): 201-8. February 1990. doi:10.1161/01. ... the causes of amaurosis fugax were better refined by the Amaurosis Fugax Study Group, which has defined five distinct classes ... leading to decreased blood flow manifesting as amaurosis fugax. Commonly, amaurosis fugax caused by giant cell arteritis may be ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *Acute aphasia. *Stroke *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *Acute aphasia. *Stroke *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *Acute aphasia. *Stroke *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *Acute aphasia. *Stroke *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *Acute aphasia. *Stroke *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *Acute aphasia. *Stroke *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Moyamoya disease. POCI. *precerebral: Anterior spinal artery syndrome. *Vertebrobasilar insufficiency * ...
Amaurosis fugax. *Transient global amnesia. *زبان‌پریشی. *سکته مغزی *MCA. *ACA. *PCA. *Foville's ...
Amaurosis fugax is a form of acute vision loss caused by reduced blood flow to the eye; it may be a warning sign of an ... Kaiboriboon K, Piriyawat P, Selhorst JB (May 2001). "Light-induced amaurosis fugax". American Journal of Ophthalmology. 131 (5 ...
... such as amaurosis fugax, hallucination, diplopia or irreversible visual loss. ...
Episodes of amaurosis fugax may occur prior to infarction of the optic nerve head. ... Optic nerve sheath meningiomas occasionally cause gaze-evoked amaurosis.. *There can be overlap in symptoms with optic neuritis ...
Amaurosis fugax is a temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes due to a lack of blood flow to the retina. The retina is the ... Treatment of amaurosis fugax depends on its cause. When amaurosis fugax is due to a blood clot or plaque, the concern is to ... Amaurosis fugax is not itself a disease. Instead, it is a sign of other disorders. Amaurosis fugax can occur from different ... Amaurosis fugax is a temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes due to a lack of blood flow to the retina. The retina is the ...
Amaurosis fugax is caused by a blockage of blood flow to the eye, usually by an embolus entering the opthalmic artery. It ... Amaurosis fugax is caused by a blockage of blood flow to the eye, usually by an embolus entering the opthalmic artery. It ... The most common cause of amaurosis fugax is emboli (blood clots) coming off a stenosed carotid artery. Other causes include ... Anyone with amaurosis fugax should be reviewed by a doctor with some urgency. ...
Amaurosis fugax (Latin fugax meaning fleeting, Greek amaurosis meaning darkening, dark, or obscure) is a painless temporary ... "Current management of amaurosis fugax. The Amaurosis Fugax Study Group". Stroke. 21 (2): 201-8. February 1990. doi:10.1161/01. ... the causes of amaurosis fugax were better refined by the Amaurosis Fugax Study Group, which has defined five distinct classes ... leading to decreased blood flow manifesting as amaurosis fugax. Commonly, amaurosis fugax caused by giant cell arteritis may be ...
Amaurosis fugax definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up ... amaurosis fugax. [fōō′găks′]. n.. *A temporary blindness that may result from transient ischemia caused by an insufficiency of ...
Buy Amaurosis Fugax by Eugene F. Bernstein from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK ... Amaurosis Fugax (Hardback). Eugene F. Bernstein (editor) Sign in to write a review ... Amaurosis fugax, or "fleeting blindness," has been known as a clinical entity for hundreds of years (1). Since 1859, we also ...
Amaurosis fugax. Definition Amaurosis fugax is loss of vision in one eye due to a temporary lack of blood flow to the retina. ... Amaurosis fugax is a symptom of carotid artery disease. It occurs when a piece of plaque in a carotid artery breaks off and ... Treatment of amaurosis fugax depends on the severity of the blockage in the carotid artery. The goal of treatment is to prevent ... In people with amaurosis fugax, vision loss continues as long as the blood supply to the retinal artery is blocked. ...
... amaurosis fugax. Causes. Amaurosis fugax is not itself a disease. Instead, it is a sign of other disorders. Amaurosis fugax can ... Treatment of amaurosis fugax depends on its cause. When amaurosis fugax is due to a blood clot or plaque, the concern is to ... Amaurosis fugax is a temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes due to a lack of blood flow to the retina. The retina is the ... Amaurosis fugax can also occur because of other disorders such as:. *Other eye problems, such as inflammation of the optic ...
Amaurosis fugax (Latin fugax meaning fleeting, Greek amaurosis meaning darkening, dark, or obscure) is a transient monocular ... "Amaurosis Fugax and Stenosis of the Ophthalmic Artery." - Amaurosis Fugax and Stenosis of the Ophthalmic Artery: A Case Report ... "Exercise-Induced Vasospastic Amaurosis Fugax." - Arch Ophthalmol -- Exercise-Induced Vasospastic Amaurosis Fugax, February 2002 ... the causes of amaurosis fugax were better refined by Amaurosis Fugax Study Group, which has defined five distinct causes of ...
Amaurosis Fugax: Transient complete or partial monocular blindness due to retinal ischemia. This may be caused by emboli from ... Amaurosis Fugax. Subscribe to New Research on Amaurosis Fugax Transient complete or partial monocular blindness due to retinal ... "amaurosis fugax" briskly stopped. ". 03/01/1985 - "[Ticlopidine and amaurosis fugax: results of treatment in a case with very ... "amaurosis fugax"-often precedes acute territorial cerebral ischaemia. ". 01/01/2009 - "Amaurosis fugax is the subjective ...
Bright-light amaurosis fugax: an unusual symptom of retinal hypoperfusion corrected by external carotid revascularization.. ... The most typical ocular symptom complex is amaurosis fugax characterized by loss of vision in one eye that occurs suddenly and ... We term this syndrome bright-light amaurosis fugax and document successful treatment by external carotid artery ...
Misdiagnosed Amaurosis Fugax , Legal advice for people affected by dental & medical malpractice. Newsome Melton, Orlando ... Amaurosis Fugax Diagnosis Appendicitis Misdiagnosis Bowel Obstruction Cancer Misdiagnosis Bladder Cancer Misdiagnosis Brain ... Amaurosis fugax is a loss of vision caused by a temporary blockage of blood flow to the retina. The amount of vision loss ... Treatment of amaurosis fugax depends on the amount of blockage in the carotid artery. The objective of the treatment is to ...
Amaurosis fugax in a Danish community: a prospective study.. C U Andersen, J Marquardsen, B Mikkelsen, J H Nehen, K K Pedersen ... Amaurosis fugax in a Danish community: a prospective study.. C U Andersen, J Marquardsen, B Mikkelsen, J H Nehen, K K Pedersen ... Amaurosis fugax in a Danish community: a prospective study.. C U Andersen, J Marquardsen, B Mikkelsen, J H Nehen, K K Pedersen ... In spite of the case-finding procedures employed in the study, cases of amaurosis fugax suitable for carotid surgery were thus ...
... L. ... C. J. M. Poole and R. W. R. Russell, "Mortality and stroke after amaurosis fugax," Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and ... T. G. Brott, S. Abbara et al., "Current management of amaurosis fugax," Stroke, vol. 21, pp. 201-208, 1990. View at Publisher ... P. J. Parkin, B. E. Kendall, J. Marshall, and W. I. McDonald, "Amaurosis fugax: some aspects of management," Journal of ...
Amaurosis fugax is the transient monocular loss of vision, normally lasting a few seconds to a few minutes, secondary to ... 2. Current management of amaurosis fugax. The Amaurosis Fugax Study Group. (1990) Stroke. 21 (2): 201-8. Pubmed ... Amaurosis fugax is the transient monocular loss of vision, normally lasting a few seconds to a few minutes, secondary to ... Although different etiologies will have different radiographic features, a work-up of a patient presenting with amaurosis fugax ...
... and treatment information for Amaurosis fugax (Amaurosis fugax) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, ... Introduction: Amaurosis fugax »Symptoms of Amaurosis fugax Amaurosis fugax: Related Diseases. Amaurosis fugax: Amaurosis fugax ... Amaurosis fugax: »Introduction: Amaurosis fugax »Symptoms of Amaurosis fugax Amaurosis fugax: Transient complete or partial ... Basic Summary for Amaurosis fugax *Symptoms of Amaurosis fugax *Misdiagnosis of Amaurosis fugax Amaurosis fugax: Related ...
... is a temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes due to a lack of blood flow to the retina. The retina is the ... Amaurosis fugax Amaurosis fugax. Diseases and Conditions Transient monocular blindness; Transient monocular visual loss; TMVL; ... Treatment of amaurosis fugax depends on its cause. When amaurosis fugax is due to a blood clot or plaque, the concern is to ... Amaurosis fugax is not itself a disease. Instead, it is a sign of other disorders. Amaurosis fugax can occur from different ...
She is in her ?early 60s with posture induced amaurosis in one eye- Happens when in bed. We looked at her carotids and they ...
Treatment of amaurosis fugax depends on its cause. When amaurosis fugax is due to a blood clot or plaque, the concern is to ... Amaurosis fugax is not itself a disease. Instead, it is a sign of other disorders. Amaurosis fugax can occur from different ... Amaurosis fugax is a temporary loss of vision in one or both eyes due to a lack of blood flow to the retina. The retina is the ... Amaurosis fugax increases your risk for stroke.. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if any vision loss ...
... and Amaurosis. AF can be confused with Amaurosis, another ocular condition characterized by partial or complete ... Amaurosis fugax Etymology. The name of this condition comes from a merger of the Greek term "Amaurosis" standing for "dark", " ... Picture 1 - Amaurosis fugax. Depending on the cause, the loss of vision may also last up to a few hours. In some cases, the ... Amaurosis fugax Causes. AF is usually a result of a short-lived absence of blood flow to the retina. In case Cartoid Artery ...
... - 2 Studies Found. Status. Study Completed. Study Name: Carotid Artery Stenting Outcomes in the Standard Risk ...
... amaurosis fugax) is associated frequently with atherosclerosis of the internal carotid artery in adults and may h ... Amaurosis fugax in children is uncommon and an underlying cause is rarely demonstrated. Recurrent episodes of amaurosis fugax ... Amaurosis Fugax in Teenagers: A Migraine Variant. Richard Appleton, MB; Kevin Farrell, MB; J. Raymond Buncic, MD; et al Alan ... Appleton R, Farrell K, Buncic JR, Hill A. Amaurosis Fugax in Teenagers: A Migraine Variant. Am J Dis Child. 1988;142(3):331-333 ...
Amaurosis fugax is a condition in which a person cannot see out of one or both eyes due to a lack of blood flow to the eye(s). ... How is amaurosis fugax diagnosed?. If youre experiencing symptoms of amaurosis fugax, dont ignore them. Call your doctor. ... What is the prognosis for amaurosis fugax?. Amaurosis fugax is a concerning symptom because it can indicate the likelihood a ... What are the symptoms of amaurosis fugax?. When a person experiences amaurosis fugax, their vision may suddenly appear to cloud ...
  • This can lead to jaw claudication and headache (30-80% of cases), and visual disturbances (20% of cases) such as amaurosis fugax, hallucination, diplopia or irreversible visual loss. (gponline.com)
  • Atherosclerotic carotid artery: Amaurosis fugax may present as a type of transient ischemic attack (TIA), during which an embolus unilaterally obstructs the lumen of the retinal artery or ophthalmic artery, causing a decrease in blood flow to the ipsilateral retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • To evaluate the difference of the retinal vascular perfusion between in the affected and unaffected eyes in patients with unilateral amaurosis fugax. (arvojournals.org)
  • In amaurosis fugax, the superficial retinal vascular perfusion in the affected eyes was decreased in the all regions except the Outer nasal regions. (arvojournals.org)
  • Considering the amaurosis secondary to refractory giant-cell arteritis, steroid dosage was increased, and antiplatelet therapy with aspirin was started. (hindawi.com)
  • In the following days, the patient showed a slight benefit in the articular pain but developed an episode of amaurosis fugax. (hindawi.com)
  • Commonly, amaurosis fugax caused by giant cell arteritis may be associated with jaw claudication and headache. (wikipedia.org)