Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Rhodobacteraceae: A family in the order Rhodobacterales, class ALPHAPROTEOBACTERIA.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Rhodospirillaceae: A family of phototrophic bacteria, in the order Rhodospirillales, isolated from stagnant water and mud.Gammaproteobacteria: A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.Rhodospirillales: An order of photosynthetic bacteria representing a physiological community of predominantly aquatic bacteria.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Beijerinckiaceae: A family of aerobic gram-negative rods that are nitrogen fixers. They are highly viscous, and appear as a semitransparent slime in giant colonies.Bacteriochlorophyll A: A specific bacteriochlorophyll that is similar in structure to chlorophyll a.Acetobacteraceae: A family of gram-negative aerobic bacteria consisting of ellipsoidal to rod-shaped cells that occur singly, in pairs, or in chains.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Paracoccus: Gram-negative non-motile bacteria found in soil or brines.Roseobacter: A genus of obligately aerobic marine phototrophic and chemoorganotrophic bacteria, in the family RHODOBACTERACEAE.Biota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Betaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised of chemoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs which derive nutrients from decomposition of organic material.Heterotrophic Processes: The processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as their nutrient sources. Contrasts with AUTOTROPHIC PROCESSES which make use of simple inorganic substances as the nutrient supply source. Heterotrophs can be either chemoheterotrophs (or chemoorganotrophs) which also require organic substances such as glucose for their primary metabolic energy requirements, or photoheterotrophs (or photoorganotrophs) which derive their primary energy requirements from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (AUTOTROPHY; heterotrophy; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrients and energy requirements.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Aquatic Organisms: Organisms that live in water.Mediterranean SeaBiodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Rickettsiaceae: A family of small, gram-negative organisms, often parasitic in humans and other animals, causing diseases that may be transmitted by invertebrate vectors.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Ochrobactrum: A genus of the family BRUCELLACEAE comprising obligately aerobic gram-negative rods with parallel sides and rounded ends.Rhodovulum: A genus of facultatively or obligately anaerobic marine phototrophic bacteria, in the family RHODOBACTERACEAE.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Hyphomicrobium: A genus of rod-shaped, oval, or bean-shaped bacteria found in soil and fresh water. Polar prosthecae are present and cells reproduce by budding at the tips of the prosthecae. Cells of this genus are aerobic and grow best with one-carbon compounds. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Bacteroidetes: A phylum of bacteria comprised of three classes: Bacteroides, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria.Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis in which various denaturant gradients are used to induce nucleic acids to melt at various stages resulting in separation of molecules based on small sequence differences including SNPs. The denaturants used include heat, formamide, and urea.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Aerobiosis: Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.Gluconobacter: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped to ellipsoidal bacteria occurring singly or in pairs and found in flowers, soil, honey bees, fruits, cider, beer, wine, and vinegar. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Verrucomicrobia: A phylum of gram-negative bacteria containing seven class-level groups from a wide variety of environments. Most members are chemoheterotrophs.North SeaSphingomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative, asporogenous rods or ovoid cells, aerobic or facultative anaerobic chemoorganotrophs. They are commonly isolated from SOIL, activated sludge, or marine environments.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Ochrobactrum anthropi: A species of gram-negative, obligately aerobic rods. Motility occurs by peritrichous flagella. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Quinones: Hydrocarbon rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.Plankton: Community of tiny aquatic PLANTS and ANIMALS, and photosynthetic BACTERIA, that are either free-floating or suspended in the water, with little or no power of locomotion. They are divided into PHYTOPLANKTON and ZOOPLANKTON.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Atlantic OceanMethylocystaceae: A family of gram-negative methanotrophs in the order Rhizobiales, distantly related to the nitrogen-fixing and phototrophic bacteria.Sphingomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria characterized by an outer membrane that contains glycosphingolipids but lacks lipopolysaccharide. They have the ability to degrade a broad range of substituted aromatic compounds.Gene Transfer, Horizontal: The naturally occurring transmission of genetic information between organisms, related or unrelated, circumventing parent-to-offspring transmission. Horizontal gene transfer may occur via a variety of naturally occurring processes such as GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; and TRANSFECTION. It may result in a change of the recipient organism's genetic composition (TRANSFORMATION, GENETIC).Phototrophic Processes: Processes by which phototrophic organisms use sunlight as their primary energy source. Contrasts with chemotrophic processes which do not depend on light and function in deriving energy from exogenous chemical sources. Photoautotrophy (or photolithotrophy) is the ability to use sunlight as energy to fix inorganic nutrients to be used for other organic requirements. Photoautotrophs include all GREEN PLANTS; GREEN ALGAE; CYANOBACTERIA; and green and PURPLE SULFUR BACTERIA. Photoheterotrophs or photoorganotrophs require a supply of organic nutrients for their organic requirements but use sunlight as their primary energy source; examples include certain PURPLE NONSULFUR BACTERIA. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (AUTOTROPHY; HETEROTROPHY; chemotrophy; or phototrophy) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrients and energy requirements.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Pacific OceanOceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Waste Disposal, Fluid: The discarding or destroying of liquid waste products or their transformation into something useful or innocuous.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Water Purification: Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)Porifera: The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Sinorhizobium meliloti: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of sweet clover, MEDICAGO SATIVA, and fenugreek.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Ubiquinone: A lipid-soluble benzoquinone which is involved in ELECTRON TRANSPORT in mitochondrial preparations. The compound occurs in the majority of aerobic organisms, from bacteria to higher plants and animals.Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Anthozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Flagella: A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Nitrates: Inorganic or organic salts and esters of nitric acid. These compounds contain the NO3- radical.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.

Phylogenetic analysis of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 23S ribosomal DNA sequencing. (1/608)

Piscirickettsia salmonis, the etiologic agent of piscirickettsiosis, is a systemic disease of salmonid fish. Variations in virulence and mortality have been observed during epizootics at different geographical regions and in laboratory experiments with isolates from these different locations. This raises the possibility that biogeographical patterns of genetic variation might be a significant factor with this disease. To assess the genetic variability the 16S ribosomal DNA, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the 23S ribosomal DNA of isolates from 3 different hosts and 3 geographic origins were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results of this analysis confirm that P. salmonis is a member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria and show that the isolates form a tight monophyletic cluster with 16S rDNA similarities ranging from 99.7 to 98.5%. The ITS regions were 309 base pairs (bp), did not contain tRNA genes, and varied between isolates (95.2 to 99.7% similarity). Two-thirds of the 23S rRNA gene was sequenced from 5 of the isolates, yielding similarities ranging from 97.9 to 99.8%. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on the 16S rDNA, ITS and 23S rDNA sequence data and compared. The trees were topologically similar, suggesting that the 3 types of molecules provided similar phylogenetic information. Five of the isolates are closely related (> 99.4% 16S rDNA similarity, 99.1% to 99.7% ITS and 99.3 to 99.8% 23S rDNA similarities). The sequence of one Chilean isolate, EM-90, was unique, with 16S rDNA similarities to the other isolates ranging from 98.5 to 98.9%, the ITS from 95.2 to 96.9% and the 23S rDNA from 97.6 to 98.5%.  (+info)

Transformation of sulfur compounds by an abundant lineage of marine bacteria in the alpha-subclass of the class Proteobacteria. (2/608)

Members of a group of marine bacteria that is numerically important in coastal seawater and sediments were characterized with respect to their ability to transform organic and inorganic sulfur compounds. Fifteen strains representing the Roseobacter group (a phylogenetic cluster of marine bacteria in the alpha-subclass of the class Proteobacteria) were isolated from seawater, primarily from the southeastern United States. Although more than one-half of the isolates were obtained without any selection for sulfur metabolism, all of the isolates were able to degrade the sulfur-containing osmolyte dimethyl sulfoniopropionate (DMSP) with production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Five isolates also degraded DMSP with production of methanethiol, indicating that both cleavage and demethylation pathways for DMSP occurred in the same organism, which is unusual. Five isolates were able to reduce dimethyl sulfoxide to DMS, and several isolates also degraded DMS and methanethiol. Sulfite oxygenase activity and methanesulfonic acid oxygenase activity were also present in some of the isolates. The ability to incorporate the reduced sulfur in DMSP and methanethiol into cellular material was studied with one of the isolates. A group-specific 16S rRNA probe indicated that the relative abundance of uncultured bacteria in the Roseobacter group increased in seawater enriched with DMSP or DMS. Because this group typically accounts for >10% of the 16S ribosomal DNA pool in coastal seawater and sediments of the southern United States, clues about its potential biogeochemical role are of particular interest. Studies of culturable representatives suggested that the group could mediate a number of steps in the cycling of both organic and inorganic forms of sulfur in marine environments.  (+info)

Purification and characterization of the soluble methane monooxygenase of the type II methanotrophic bacterium Methylocystis sp. strain WI 14. (3/608)

Methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol as the first step of methane degradation. A soluble NAD(P)H-dependent methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from the type II methanotrophic bacterium WI 14 was purified to homogeneity. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA and comparison with that of other known methanotrophic bacteria confirmed that strain WI 14 is very close to the genus Methylocystis. The sMMO is expressed only during growth under copper limitation (<0.1 microM) and with ammonium or nitrate ions as the nitrogen source. The enzyme exhibits a low substrate specificity and is able to oxidize several alkanes and alkenes, cyclic hydrocarbons, aromatics, and halogenic aromatics. It has three components, hydroxylase, reductase and protein B, which is involved in enzyme regulation and increases sMMO activity about 10-fold. The relative molecular masses of the native components were estimated to be 229, 41, and 18 kDa, respectively. The hydroxylase contains three subunits with relative molecular masses of 57, 43, and 23 kDa, which are present in stoichiometric amounts, suggesting that the native protein has an alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2) structure. We detected 3.6 mol of iron per mol of hydroxylase by atomic absorption spectrometry. sMMO is strongly inhibited by Hg(2+) ions (with a total loss of enzyme activity at 0.01 mM Hg(2+)) and Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+) ions (95, 80, and 40% loss of activity at 1 mM ions). The complete sMMO gene sequence has been determined. sMMO genes from strain WI 14 are clustered on the chromosome and show a high degree of homology (at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels) to the corresponding genes from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, Methylocystis sp. strain M, and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).  (+info)

Poly(aspartic acid) degradation by a Sphingomonas sp. isolated from freshwater. (4/608)

A poly(aspartic acid) degrading bacterium (strain KT-1 [JCM10459]) was isolated from river water and identified as a member of the genus Sphingomonas. The isolate degraded only poly(aspartic acid)s of low molecular masses (<5 kDa), while the cell extract hydrolyzed high-molecular-mass poly(aspartic acid)s of 5 to 150 kDa to yield aspartic acid monomer.  (+info)

Characterization of a separate small domain derived from the 5' end of 23S rRNA of an alpha-proteobacterium. (5/608)

We demonstrate the presence of a separate processed domain derived from the 5' end of 23S rRNA in ribosomes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, a member of the alpha-++proteobacteria. Previous sequencing studies predicted intervening sequences (IVS) at homologous positions within the 23S rRNA genes of several alpha-proteobacteria, including R.palustris, and we find a processed 23S rRNA 5' domain in unfractionated RNA from several species. 5.8S rRNA from eukaryotic cytoplasmic large subunit ribosomes and the bacterial processed 23S rRNA 5' domain share homology, possess similar structures and are both derived by processing of large precursors. However, the internal transcribed spacer regions or IVSs separating them from the main large subunit rRNAs are evolutionarily unrelated. Consistent with the difference in sequence, we find that the site and mechanism of IVS processing also differs. Rhodopseudomonas palustris IVS-containing RNA precursors are cleaved in vitro by Escherichia coli RNase III or a similar activity present in R.palustris extracts at a processing site distinct from that found in eukaryotic systems and this results in only partial processing of the IVS. Surprisingly, in a reaction unlike characterized cases of eubacterial IVS processing, an RNA segment larger than the corresponding DNA insertion is removed which contains conserved sequences. These sequences, by analogy, serve to link the 23S rRNA 5' rRNA domains or 5.8S rRNAs to the main portion of other prokaryotic 23S rRNAs or to eukaryotic 28S rRNAs, respectively.  (+info)

Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and related members of the alpha subdivision of the Proteobacteria in dogs with cardiac arrhythmias, endocarditis, or myocarditis. (6/608)

Cardiac arrhythmias, endocarditis, or myocarditis was identified in 12 dogs, of which 11 were seroreactive to Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii antigens. Historical abnormalities were highly variable but frequently included substantial weight loss, syncope, collapse, or sudden death. Fever was an infrequently detected abnormality. Cardiac disease was diagnosed following an illness of short duration in most dogs, but a protracted illness of at least 6 months' duration was reported for four dogs. Valvular endocarditis was diagnosed echocardiographically or histologically in eight dogs, two of which also had moderate to severe multifocal myocarditis. Four dogs lacking definitive evidence of endocarditis were included because of seroreactivity to B. vinsonii antigens and uncharacterized heart murmurs and/or arrhythmias. Alpha proteobacteria were not isolated from the blood by either conventional or lysis centrifugation blood culture techniques. Using PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene, B. vinsonii was identified in the blood or heart valves of three dogs. DNA sequence alignment of PCR amplicons derived from blood or tissue samples from seven dogs clustered among members of the alpha subdivision of the Proteobacteria and suggested the possibility of involvement of one or more alpha proteobacteria; however, because of the limited quantity of sequence, the genus could not be identified. Serologic or molecular evidence of coinfection with tick-transmitted pathogens, including Ehrlichia canis, Babesia canis, Babesia gibsonii, or spotted fever group rickettsiae, was obtained for seven dogs. We conclude that B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and closely related species of alpha proteobacteria are an important, previously unrecognized cause of arrhythmias, endocarditis, myocarditis, syncope, and sudden death in dogs.  (+info)

Oxidation of methyl halides by the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1. (7/608)

Washed cell suspensions of the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1 grown on methyl bromide (MeBr) were able to consume methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl iodide (MeI) as well as MeBr. Consumption of >100 microM MeBr by cells grown on glucose, acetate, or monomethylamine required induction. Induction was inhibited by chloramphenicol. However, cells had a constitutive ability to consume low concentrations (<20 nM) of MeBr. Glucose-grown cells were able to readily oxidize [(14)C]formaldehyde to (14)CO(2) but had only a small capacity for oxidation of [(14)C]methanol. Preincubation of cells with MeBr did not affect either activity, but MeBr-induced cells had a greater capacity for [(14)C]MeBr oxidation than did cells without preincubation. Consumption of MeBr was inhibited by MeI, and MeCl consumption was inhibited by MeBr. No inhibition of MeBr consumption occurred with methyl fluoride, propyl iodide, dibromomethane, dichloromethane, or difluoromethane, and in addition cells did not oxidize any of these compounds. Cells displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the various methyl halides, with apparent K(s) values of 190, 280, and 6,100 nM for MeBr, MeI, and MeCl, respectively. These results suggest the presence of a single oxidation enzyme system specific for methyl halides (other than methyl fluoride) which runs through formaldehyde to CO(2). The ease of induction of methyl halide oxidation in strain IMB-1 should facilitate its mass culture for the purpose of reducing MeBr emissions to the atmosphere from fumigated soils.  (+info)

Characterization and identification of numerically abundant culturable bacteria from the anoxic bulk soil of rice paddy microcosms. (8/608)

Most-probable-number (liquid serial dilution culture) counts were obtained for polysaccharolytic and saccharolytic fermenting bacteria in the anoxic bulk soil of flooded microcosms containing rice plants. The highest viable counts (up to 2.5 x 10(8) cells per g [dry weight] of soil) were obtained by using xylan, pectin, or a mixture of seven mono- and disaccharides as the growth substrate. The total cell count for the soil, as determined by using 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, was 4.8 x 10(8) cells per g (dry weight) of soil. The nine strains isolated from the terminal positive tubes in counting experiments which yielded culturable populations that were equivalent to about 5% or more of the total microscopic count population belonged to the division Verrucomicrobia, the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides division, clostridial cluster XIVa, clostridial cluster IX, Bacillus spp., and the class Actinobacteria. Isolates originating from the terminal positive tubes of liquid dilution series can be expected to be representatives of species whose populations in the soil are large. None of the isolates had 16S rRNA gene sequences identical to 16S rRNA gene sequences of previously described species for which data are available. Eight of the nine strains isolated fermented sugars to acetate and propionate (and some also fermented sugars to succinate). The closest relatives of these strains (except for the two strains of actinobacteria) were as-yet-uncultivated bacteria detected in the same soil sample by cloning PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes (U. Hengstmann, K.-J. Chin, P. H. Janssen, and W. Liesack, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:5050-5058, 1999). Twelve other isolates, which originated from most-probable-number counting series indicating that the culturable populations were smaller, were less closely related to cloned 16S rRNA genes.  (+info)

Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Pelagibacterales; Pelagibacteraceae; Candidatus Pelagibacter; Candidatus Pelagibacter ...
O clado SAR11, ou familia Pelagibacteraceae,[1] define unha liñaxe de bacterias que é extremadamente común no océano.[2] As bacterias do clado SAR11 son aproximadamente unha de cada tres células que se encontran na superficie dos océanos. En conxunto, as bacterias SAR11 estímase que supoñen entre a cuarta parte e a metade de todas as células procariotas do océano. As bacterias SAR11 clasifícanse como alfaproteobacterias, e entre elas está a especie mariña máis abundante Pelagibacter ubique. As bacterias deste clado son inusualmente pequenas.[3] Pelagibacter ubique e especies relacionadas son organismos oligótrofos e aliméntanse de fontes orgánicas de carbono disoltas e de nitróxeno.[2] Non poden fixar o carbono ou o nitróxeno, pero poden realizar o ciclo do ácido cítrico coa derivación do ciclo do glioxilato e poden sintetizar todos os aminoácidos menos a glicina,[4] e algúns cofactores.[5] Son tamén peculiares polo seu requirimento de xofre reducido.[6] Pelagibacter ...
Hao, Xiaodi, Wang, Qilin, Cao, Yali and Van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M. (2010) Experimental evaluation of decrease in the activities of polyphosphate/glycogen-accumulating organisms due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 106 3: 399-407. doi:10.1002/bit.22703 ...
basis of record Lee, K.-B., Liu, C.-T., Anzai, Y., Kim, H., Aono, T., and Oyaizu, H. 2005. The hierarchical system of the Alphaproteobacteria: description of Hyphomonadaceae fam. nov., Xanthobacteraceae fam. nov. and Erythrobacteraceae fam. nov. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 55:1907-1919. [details] ...
By the way, I have recently read that Pelagibacter, arguably the most abundant organism on this planet (or at least a strong contender for the title) is a close cousin of the mitochondrion ancestor -- they could even be treated as sister taxa, according to some analyses. Pelagibacter has the smallest genome of all free-living life forms, but it can make twenty amino acids and most of the common cofactors. One hypothesis about the evolution of alphaproteobacteria is that the common ancestor of Rickettsiales (including the proto-mitochondrion) was an endosymbiont (of the eocyte ancestor of Eukaryota?), and that Pelagibacter reverted to a free-swimming lifestyle after its genome had undergone slimming down in the intracellular environment, but before it lost any of its essential metabolic genes to the hosts nuclear genome. I suspect, however, that its incredibly vast population (measured in octillions, no less) may be a sufficient explanation of the extremely streamlined genome.. Delete ...
There is some disagreement on the phylogeny of the orders, especially for the location of the Pelagibacterales, but overall there is some consensus. This issue stems form the large difference in gene content (eg. genome streamlining in Pelagibacter ubique) and the large difference in GC-richness between members of several order.[2] Specifically,Pelagibacterales, Rickettsiales and Holosporales contains species with AT-rich genomes. It has been argued that it could be a case of convergent evolution that would result in an artefactual clustering.[6][7][8] However, several studies disagree,.[2][9][10][11] Furthermore, it has been found that the GC-content of ribosomal RNA, the traditional phylogenetic marker, little reflects the GC-content of the genome: for example, members of the Holosporales have a much higher ribosomal GC-content than members of the Pelagibacterales and Rickettsiales, which have similarly low genomic GC-content, because they are more closely related to species with high genomic ...
Basic Information on Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii ................................. 114 Ixodes ricinus and Midichloria mitochondrii, a Special
The Pelagibacterales are an order in the Alphaproteobacteria composed of free-living bacteria that make up roughly one in three cells at the oceans surface.[1][2][3] Overall, members of the Pelagibacterales are estimated to make up between a quarter and a half of all prokaryotic cells in the ocean. Initially, this taxon was known solely by metagenomic data and was known as the SAR11 clade. It was first placed in the Rickettsiales, but was later raised to the rank of order, and then placed as sister order to the Rickettsiales in the subclass Rickettsidae.[3] It includes the highly abundant marine species Pelagibacter ubique. Bacteria in this clade are unusually small.[4] Due to their small genome size and limited metabolic function, Pelagibacterales have become a model organism for streamlining theory.[5] P. ubique and related species are oligotrophs (scavengers) and feed on dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen.[2] They are unable to fix carbon or nitrogen, but can perform the TCA cycle with ...
Alphaproteobacteria show a great versatility in adapting to a broad range of environments and lifestyles, with the association between bacteria and plants as one of the most intriguing, spanning from relatively unspecific nonsymbiotic association (as rhizospheric or endophytic strains) to the highly species-specific interaction of rhizobia. To shed some light on possible common genetic features in such a heterogeneous set of plant associations, the genomes of 92 Alphaproteobacteria strains were analyzed with a fuzzy orthologs-species detection approach. This showed that the different habitats and lifestyles of plant-associated bacteria (soil, plant colonizers, symbiont) are partially reflected by the trend to have larger genomes with respect to nonplant-associated species. A relatively large set of genes specific to symbiotic bacteria (73 orthologous groups) was found, with a remarkable presence of regulators, sugar transporters, metabolic enzymes, nodulation genes and several genes with unknown
Two non-motile, orange- or yellow-pigmented bacteria, designated strains KYW48T and KYW147T, were isolated from seawater collected from the South Sea, Republic of Korea. Cells of both strains were Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The major fatty acids of strain KYW48T were C18 : 1ω7c (35.3 %), summed feature 3 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c) (22.7 %), C17 : 1ω6c (19.8 %), C14 : 0 2-OH (7.4 %) and C16 : 0 (5.9 %), and those of strain KYW147T were C18 : 1ω7c (36.0 %), summed feature 3 (18.3 %), C16 : 0 (14.7 %), 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c (10.7 %), C16 : 0 2-OH (9.1 %) and C18 : 1ω9c (8.0 %). The predominant isoprenoid quinone of both strains was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). The DNA G+C contents of strains KYW48T and KYW147T were 63.8 and 67.2 mol%, respectively. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains KYW48T and KYW147T were grouped with the members of the family Erythrobacteraceae and formed a distinct clade with the members of the genus
If you have ever been bitten by a tick, there is a significant chance that you now also have midi-chlorians! To be precise, a micro-organism called Midichloria mitochondrii* that belongs to the order of Rickettsiales. Evolutionary speaking, these Rickettsiales are closely related to organisms that once evolved into our mitochondria; in that sense Midichloria is very much connected to our force of life. Unfortunately, as far as is known, the real Midichloria does not incorporate super-human powers. Data about this micro-organism is scarce, but recent publications show that it deserves more attention (1-3).. Many hard ticks, such as Ixodes ricinus, are infected with Midichloria - it is present in all females and about half of all the male ticks. The endosymbiont is located inside the cells of the tick, and in particular in the mitochondria, which it slowly consumes. Incidentally, the tick itself does not seem to be affected. Midichloria is the first micro-organism that is known to be able to ...
ID A3UI32_9RHOB Unreviewed; 478 AA. AC A3UI32; DT 03-APR-2007, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 03-APR-2007, sequence version 1. DT 25-OCT-2017, entry version 70. DE RecName: Full=Chromosomal replication initiator protein DnaA {ECO:0000256,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00377, ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU000577, ECO:0000256,SAAS:SAAS00724181}; GN Name=dnaA {ECO:0000256,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00377}; GN ORFNames=OA2633_09574 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EAP89505.1}; OS Oceanicaulis sp. HTCC2633. OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodobacterales; OC Hyphomonadaceae; Oceanicaulis. OX NCBI_TaxID=314254 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EAP89505.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000006011}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EAP89505.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000006011} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=HTCC2633 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EAP89505.1, RC ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000006011}; RX PubMed=21036991; DOI=10.1128/JB.01267-10; RA Oh H.M., Kang I., Vergin K.L., Lee K., Giovannoni S.J., Cho J.C.; RT "Genome sequence of Oceanicaulis ...
Bacteria are mediators of biogeochemical cycles and are in this way vital for maintaining life on earth. Their distribution, abundance and functioning are driven by environmental heterogeneity and dynamic change in abiotic and biotic factors. Both, freshwater lakes and oceans play central roles in the global carbon cycle and bacteria in these systems perform many services for the ecosystems, such as the transfer of organic carbon from primary producers to higher trophic levels. With estimated relative abundances up to 50% of the total bacterioplankton, the Alphaproteobacteria lineage SAR11 is the most abundant group of aquatic bacteria. It is globally distributed and can be partitioned into multiple sub-clades, one of which is exclusive to freshwaters. Until recently, the distribution, abundance and ecological role of this freshwater SAR11 named LD12 was unknown. The aim of the thesis was to study the drivers and mechanisms that influence the dynamics of aquatic bacterial communities in general ...
G. Li*, P.J.B. Brown*, J.X. Tang, J. Xu, E.M. Quardokus, C. Fuqua and Y.V. Brun. 2012. Stimulation of bacterial adhesin production by surface contact. Mol Micro. 83:41-51.*equal contributions. Cover feature and cover image. Accompanied by a commentary article. Recommended by Faculty of 1000. Highlighted in NIH Biomedical Beat and NSF Research in Action series.. 2011. Chertkov, O., P.J.B. Brown, D.T. Kysela, 18 authors, H.-P. Klenk, Y.V. Brun. 2011. Complete genome sequence of Hirschia baltica type strain (IFAM 1418T). 2011. Stand Genomic Sci. 5:287-297. P.J.B. Brown*, D.T. Kysela*, and Y.V. Brun. 2011. Polarity and the diversity of growth mechanisms in bacteria. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 22: 790-798. *equal contributions P.J.B. Brown, D.T. Kysela, A. Buechlein, C. Hemmerich, and Y.V. Brun. 2011. Genome sequences of eight morphologically diverse Alphaproteobacteria. J. Bacteriol. 193:4567-4568.. 2010. M.L. Kovarik, P.J.B. Brown, D.T. Kysela, C. Berne, A.C. Kinsella, Y.V. Brun, and S.C. Jacobson. 2010. ...
Biohazard level, growth media and temperature, gram stain, industrial applications and more information for Altererythrobacter ishigakiensis.
Biohazard level, growth media and temperature, gram stain, industrial applications and more information for Aminobacter niigataensis.
Biotin (vitamin H or vitamin B7) is the essential cofactor of biotin-dependent carboxylases, such as pyruvate carboxylase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Mammals cannot synthesize biotin, while in bacteria, fungi, and plants it is synthesized from pimelate thioester through different pathways. In E. coli and many organisms, pimelate thioester is derived from malonyl-ACP. The pathway starts with the methylation to malonyl-ACP methyl ester, followed by the fatty acid chain elongation cycle to form pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester, which is then demethylated to form pimeloyl-ACP [MD:M00572]. Pimeloyl-ACP is converted to biotin through the final four steps in the biotin bicyclic ring assembly, which are conserved among biotin-producing organisms [MD:M00123]. In B. subtilis, biotin is derived from pimeloyl-ACP formed by oxidative cleavage of long-chain acyl-ACPs [MD:M00573]. Some bacteria synthesize biotin from pimeloyl-CoA derived from pimelate [MD:M00577]. Biotin is covalently attached to biotin-dependent ...
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria have emerged as a serious threat to human and animal health. Bdellovibrio spp. and Micavibrio spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that prey on other Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the ability of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus to prey on MDR Gram-negative clinical strains was examined. Although the potential use of predatory bacteria to attack MDR pathogens has been suggested, the data supporting these claims is lacking. By conducting predation experiments we have established that predatory bacteria have the capacity to attack clinical strains of a variety of ß-lactamase-producing, MDR Gram-negative bacteria. Our observations indicate that predatory bacteria maintained their ability to prey on MDR bacteria regardless of their antimicrobial resistance, hence, might be used as therapeutic agents where other antimicrobial drugs fail.
Mono- and Stereopictres of 5.0 Angstrom coordination sphere of Iron atom in PDB 2ca3: Sulfite Dehydrogenase From Starkeya Novella R55M Mutant
Sie sind hier: Enhanced catalytic performance of immobilized Parvibaculum lavamentivorans alcohol dehydrogenase in a gas phase bioreactor using glycerol as an additive. ...
Hyphomonas neptunium ATCC ® 15444D-5™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Hyphomonas neptunium strain 14-15 TypeStrain=True Application:
The utilization of carbon compounds by L. alexandrii DSM 17067T was also determined for this study using PM01 microplates in an OmniLog phenotyping device (BIOLOG Inc., Hayward, CA, USA). The microplates were inoculated at 28°C with a cell suspension at a cell density of approximately 85% Turbidity and dye D. Further additives were artificial sea salts, vitamins, trace elements and NaHC03. The exported measurement data were further analyzed with the opm package for R [24], using its functionality for statistically estimating parameters from the respiration curves such as the maximum height, and automatically translating these values into negative, ambiguous, and positive reactions. The strain was studied in six independent biological replicates, and reactions with a distinct behavior between the repetitions were regarded as ambiguous and are not listed below.. L. alexandrii DSM 17067T was positive for glycerol, D-xylose, D-mannitol, L-glutamic acid, D,L-malic acid, D-ribose, D-fructose, ...
The utilization of carbon compounds by H. phototrophica DFL-43T was also determined for this study using PM01 microplates in an OmniLog phenotyping device (BIOLOG Inc., Hayward, CA, USA). The microplates were inoculated at 28°C with a cell suspension at a cell density of 85% Turbidity and dye D. Further additives were artificial sea salts, vitamins, trace elements and NaHCO3. The exported measurement data were further analyzed with the opm package for R [25], using its functionality for statistically estimating parameters from the respiration curves such as the maximum height, and automatically translating these values into negative, ambiguous, and positive reactions. The strain was studied in two independent biological replicates, and reactions with a different behavior between the two repetitions were regarded as ambiguous and are not listed below.. H. phototrophica DFL-43T was positive for D,L-malic acid, D-cellobiose, D-fructose, D-galactonic acid-γ-lactone, D-galactose, D-galacturonic ...
The Brown lab is interested in understanding the principles that govern bacterial morphology, a readily observable facet of microbial cell biology. One of the major unsolved questions in microbiology is how bacteria generate specific shapes. Bacteria exhibit an amazing diversity of shapes and sizes that are precisely reproduced at every generation, indicating that morphology plays an important role in the life of these bacteria. Impressive progress has been made in the past few years in understanding the mechanism of cell shape determination in a few model bacterial systems, including the discovery that bacteria possess a cytoskeleton, but we are still very far having a comprehensive understanding of how bacterial morphologies are generated. The Brown lab takes advantage of recent technical advances in microscopy, construction of fluorescent fusion proteins, and a gene depletion strategy, to make strides in understanding how bacteria generate specific morphologies.. In most bacteria, the cell ...
basis of record De Grave, S. & C.H.J.M. Fransen. (2011). Carideorum catalogus: the recent species of the dendrobranchiate, stenopodidean, procarididean and caridean shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda). Zool. Med. Leiden. 85(9): 30.ix.2011: 195-589 figs 1-59. (look up in IMIS) [details] Available for editors ...
Members of the order Neotaenioglossa are mostly gonochoric and broadcast spawners. Life cycle: Embryos develop into planktonic trocophore larvae and later into juvenile veligers before becoming fully grown adults (Ref. 833). ...
Curated}} {{Biorealm Genus}} [[Image:e_ezovicum.png,frame,right,Erythromicrobium ezovicum Image from [http://141.150.157.117:8080/prokPUB/chaphtm/309/COMPLETE.htm V. V. Yurkov, "Aerobic Phototrophic Proteobacteria", March, 2001. Springer-Verlag New York, LLC.]]] ==Classification== ===Higher order taxa:=== Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Sphingomonadales; Erythrobacteraceae ===Species:=== Erythromicrobium ezovicum, E. hydrolyticum, E. ramosum, Erythromicrobium sp. {, , height="10" bgcolor="#FFDF95" , NCBI: [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi?id=35810 Taxonomy] ,} ==Description and Significance== Despite the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a (Bchl a), Erythromicrobium is not capable of growing photosynthetically, which distinguishes the bacterium from other Bchl a-containing groups. Other main features include low levels of photosynthetic units in cells and strong inhibition by light of Bchl a synthesis (Yurkov et al). Due to the ...
p 42 Proteins. "These workhorse molecules of life take part in essentially every cellular and extracellular structure and activity. " p 43 good detailed section on types and functions of proteins p 44 Diagrams of protein structure p 45 Cell membrane details. p 46 Diagram of phospholipid structure p 46 Diagrams of phospholipid bilayer and some details of cell membrane with integral proteins. p 48 diagram of fluid mosaic model. p 48 DNA discussion p 49 DNA structure diagram p 50 Central dogma of molecular biology p 51 Excellent perspective of DNA macrostructure leading to chromosome. p 52 Diagram for central dogma, transcription and translation. Ch. 3 The Bare Essentials p53 Talks about the minimimum of essential content for something to be called "life" p55 Pelagibacter unique as most streamlined genome, 1354 gene products for bacteria that makes up 25% of microbial cells in the open ocean. p59 Estimates of essential genome size. p61 Summary of essential steps required for life, leading one to ...
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Rhizobiaceae; Rhizobium/Agrobacterium group; ...
If it is tripping because of a run away current, what ballast resistance are you using in your fusor circuit? My system would surge over 100 ma at startup but I had a simple x-former and diodes so not an issue; I did have a ballast resistor in my circuit and it was both the ohm and wattage Richard recommended but a fusor can act much as a dead short for a fraction of a second. That can trip any feedback system for PS that have that feature so that might be the issue ...
If it is tripping because of a run away current, what ballast resistance are you using in your fusor circuit? My system would surge over 100 ma at startup but I had a simple x-former and diodes so not an issue; I did have a ballast resistor in my circuit and it was both the ohm and wattage Richard recommended but a fusor can act much as a dead short for a fraction of a second. That can trip any feedback system for PS that have that feature so that might be the issue ...
p>An evidence describes the source of an annotation, e.g. an experiment that has been published in the scientific literature, an orthologous protein, a record from another database, etc.,/p> ,p>,a href="/manual/evidences">More…,/a>,/p> ...
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Looking for online definition of neptunium in the Medical Dictionary? neptunium explanation free. What is neptunium? Meaning of neptunium medical term. What does neptunium mean?
We examined the distribution of NAGS and NAGK across the three domains of life. Although NAGK is found in archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes, such as plants, algae and fungi, initially, we were only able to find sequences similar to either E. coli or mammalian NAGS in beta-proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria and three species of alpha-proteobacteria [48-50]. The three alpha-proteobacteria, M. maris, O. alexandrii and P. bermudensis, also appear to harbor acetylornithine transcarbamylase (argF) genes suggesting that their arginine biosynthesis pathway is similar to the one in X. campestris [7]. Identification of the alpha-proteobacterial NAGS genes that are closely related to the corresponding vertebrate, fungal and algal genes and to fungal NAGK is intriguing because mitochondria are thought to have arisen by endosymbiosis between proto-eukaryotic cell and an alpha-proteobacteria. Current thought suggests that the alpha-proteobacteria of the order Rickettsiales are the extant relatives of the ...
The repABC plasmid family, which is extensively present within Alphaproteobacteria, and some secondary chromosomes of the Rhizobiales have the particular feature that all the elements involved in replication and partitioning reside within one transcriptional unit, the repABC operon. Given the functional interactions among the elements of the repABC operon, and the fact that they all reside in the same operon, a common evolutionary history would be expected if the entire operon had been horizontally transferred. Here, we tested whether there is a common evolutionary history within the repABC operon. We further examined different incompatibility groups in terms of their differentiation and degree of adaptation to their host. We did not find a single evolutionary history within the repABC operon. Each protein had a particular phylogeny, horizontal gene transfer events of the individual genes within the operon were detected, and different functional constraints were found within and between the Rep proteins
The Rickettsiales, also called rickettsias, are an order of small Alphaproteobacteria that are endosymbionts of eukaryotic cells. Some are notable pathogens, including Rickettsia, which causes a variety of diseases in humans, and Ehrlichia, which causes diseases in livestock. Another genus of well-known Rickettsiales are the Wolbachia, which infect approximately two-thirds of all arthropods and nearly all filarial nematodes . Genetic studies support the endosymbiotic theory according to which mitochondria and related organelles developed from members of this group. The Rickettsiales are difficult to cultivate, because they rely on eukaryotic host cells for their survival. The Rickettsiales further consist of three known families, the Rickettsiaceae, the Midichloriaceae and the Anaplasmataceae. Most studies also support the inclusion of the Holosporaceae, but one study has challenged this view . Here, the Holosporaceae are the sole representatives of its own order, the Holosporales and as such ...
HOT_ID Domain Phylum Class Order Family Genus Species Status Warning Type_strain 16S_rRNA Clone_count Clone_% Clone_rank Synonyms NCBI_taxon_id NCBI_pubmed_count NCBI_nucleotide_count NCBI_protein_count Genome_ID General_info Cultivability Phenotypic_characteristics Prevalence Disease References 001 Bacteria Proteobacteria Alphaproteobacteria Rhizobiales Bartonellaceae Bartonella schoenbuchensis Named NR_025410 0 0.00 0 Strain TFI A28SC 9 93 5894 SEQF2664 N/A 002 Bacteria Proteobacteria Alphaproteobacteria Caulobacterales Caulobacteraceae Caulobacter sp. oral taxon 002 Phylotype DQ493433 2 0.01 409 Oral Clone AW149 0 2 0 N/A 003 Bacteria Proteobacteria Alphaproteobacteria Sphingomonadales Sphingomonadaceae Sphingomonas echinoides Named ATCC 14820 AF385529 2 0.01 409 Oral Clone AV069 0 2 0 N/A 004 Bacteria Proteobacteria Alphaproteobacteria Sphingomonadales Sphingomonadaceae Sphingomonas sp. oral taxon 004 Phylotype AF385533 1 0.00 459 Oral Clone AW030 0 1 0 N/A 006 Bacteria Proteobacteria ...
One contentious method by which bacteria deal with a maladapted situation is what has been coined adaptive, directed or stress induced-mutation. This involves mutants that compensate for some form of sub-lethal stress appearing in large numbers from an apparently non-dividing cell population after a protracted period of time. In Mesorhizobium loti this was first observed in the non-symbiotic strains CJ1 and N18. The stress-induced mutation involved the activation of a cryptic chromosomal dctABD locus which allowed these strains to utilize succinate as a sole carbon source (Dct+). In the current study the symbiotic strain R7A, which containsan integrative and conjugative element ICEMlSymR7A, was also shown to produce Dct+ mutants when under stress, when its active dct locus on ICEMlSymR7A was deleted. However a derivative of R7A cured of ICEMlSymR7A (strain R7ANS), did not form mutant colonies strongly suggesting that the causative locus was located on ICEMlSymR7A. In this work, the ...
A bacterial strain, B5-2(T), was isolated from an ice core drilled from Muztagh Glacier, China. Strain B5-2(T) was a Gram-stainnegative, short rod-shaped, motile by polar flagella, aerobic bacterium. The major fatty acids of strain B5-2(T) were summed feature 8 (C-18 : 1 omega 7c and/ or C-18 : 1 omega 6c) and iso-C-13 : 0. The G+C content of the DNA from strain B5-2(T) was 69.3 mol%. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain B5-2(T) was Q-10. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, an unidentified phospholipid and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the novel strain B5-2(T) shared highest similarity (96.7 %) with Aureimonas altamirensis S21B(T). On the basis of the results of this polyphasic study, strain B5-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Aureimonas, for which the name Aureimonas glaciei sp. nov. is ...
A clase Alphaproteobacteria comprende dez ordes, que son: Magnetococcales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales, Caulobacterales, Kiloniellales, Kordiimonadales, Parvularculales e Sneathiellales.[4][5] Nas árbores filoxenéticas baseadas en secuencias concatenadas de grandes conxuntos de datos de proteínas, as especies destes ordes das que xa se secuenciou o xenoma ramifícanse na seguinte orde, desde a rama máis antiga á máis recente: Magnetococcales-Rickettsiales-Rhodospirillales-Sphingomonadales-Rhodobacterales-(Caulobacterales-Parvularculales)- Rhizobiales.,[6][7][8] As análises comparativas dos xenomas secuenciados levaron á descuberta de moitas mutacións por insercións e delecións (indeis) conservados en proteínas amplamente distribuídas e nas proteínas completas (é dicir, proteínas "sinatura"), que son características distintivas ou ben de todas as Alphaproteobacteria, ou ben das súas ordes principais (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, ...
This work has been made available to the staff and students of the University of Sydney for the purposes of research and study only. It constitutes material that is held by the University for the purposes of reporting for HERDC and the ERA. This work may not be downloaded, copied and distributed to any third party ...
Sun et al., (in review), The Abundant Marine Bacterium Pelagibacter Simultaneously Catabolizes Dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the Gases Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol: ProteomeXchange Accession: PXD001717. ...
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Tissue tropism and metabolic pathways of Midichloria mitochondrii suggest tissue-specific functions in the symbiosis with Ixodes ricinus / E. Olivieri, S. Epis, M. Castelli, I. Varotto Boccazzi, C. Romeo, A. Desirò, C. Bazzocchi, C. Bandi, D. Sassera. - In: TICKS AND TICK-BORNE DISEASES. - ISSN 1877-959X. - (2019 Jun 03). [Epub ahead of print ...
CNG kanali so ionski prenašalni kanali, katerih delovanje je regulirano z molekulami cNMP. Njihove funkcije v celicah so zelo različne. Običajni CNG so po zgradbi heterotetrameri. Vsaka podenota ima posebno CNBD strukturo, na kateri je vezavno mesto za cNMP. Za odprtje takega kanala je potrebnih več molekul liganda. Mehanizem je kooperativen in poteka prek alosteričnih konformacij. V raziskavi[7] so natančneje preučili zgradbo in delovanje ionskega CNG kanala iz bakterije Mesorhizobium loti (mlCNG) in ionskega kanala iz celic morskega ježka (CNGK). Kanali mlCNG so homotetrameri. Štiri enake podenote so po zgradbi podobne podenotam klasičnih CNG kanalov. CNGK kanali pa so psevdotetrameri, kar pomeni, da gre za eno daljšo polipeptidno verigo, ki pa je na videz organizirana v štiri različne podenote. Tudi te podenote imajo veliko podobnosti s tistimi v klasičnih CNG kanalih. Kljub podobnostim pa se mlCNG in CNGK razlikujejo od klasičnih CNG kanalov in sicer je bistvena razlika v tem, ...
Carlson is used to represent some of the harshest themes in the novella; hes bitter and nasty and has very little respect for emotional sentiment. As a result, Carlson represents the classic, stereotypical ranch worker and the harsh realities of migrant life. Using his voice to end the novella is significant because it epitomises all of the absurdities of the ranch way of life; at the end of the novel, George is left to face all of the same horrible realities as the rest of the workers, he has no companion and his dream is now out of reach. Having a character who represents all of those negative qualities of ranch life end the novel highlights the idea that George was always doomed to face those negativities. The rhetorical question is also significant because its ironic and encourages the reader to continue questioning the book even after its end ...
As noted on Monday, I was trying a little experiment: I flung my Atlanta Burns novella, SHOTGUN GRAVY, up onto Amazons exclusive Kindle "KDP Select" program which purports to offer authors two key benefits: first, the ability to take part in Kindle lending which further grants authors access to a large "pot" of money monthly; second, the advantage (or, some might say, "advantage") of putting your work up online for free.. As of late, a number of folks have noticed a phenomenon. You put your work up for free, and then when it once more re-enters paid gravity, suddenly the book becomes a Purchasing Magnet whereupon droves and flocks and herds and gaggles of Amazon readers come out of the woodwork to buy the recently-free book. A lot of authors have been attempting to jump this promotions bones (evidenced by the sudden flurry of "My work is free suddenly!" broadcasts).. Well, I figured, lets try it.. SHOTGUN GRAVYs a novella that did well in its first month but kind of tapered off - it gets a ...
As noted on Monday, I was trying a little experiment: I flung my Atlanta Burns novella, SHOTGUN GRAVY, up onto Amazons exclusive Kindle "KDP Select" program which purports to offer authors two key benefits: first, the ability to take part in Kindle lending which further grants authors access to a large "pot" of money monthly; second, the advantage (or, some might say, "advantage") of putting your work up online for free.. As of late, a number of folks have noticed a phenomenon. You put your work up for free, and then when it once more re-enters paid gravity, suddenly the book becomes a Purchasing Magnet whereupon droves and flocks and herds and gaggles of Amazon readers come out of the woodwork to buy the recently-free book. A lot of authors have been attempting to jump this promotions bones (evidenced by the sudden flurry of "My work is free suddenly!" broadcasts).. Well, I figured, lets try it.. SHOTGUN GRAVYs a novella that did well in its first month but kind of tapered off - it gets a ...
Alphaproteobacteria in China". Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine. 4 (3): 248. doi:10.1016/S1995-7645(11)60079-5. PMID ...
Some Alphaproteobacteria can grow at very low levels of nutrients and have unusual morphology such as stalks and buds. Others ... Garrity GM, Bell JA, Lilburn T (2005). "Class I. Alphaproteobacteria class. nov.". In Brenner DJ, Krieg NR, Staley JT, Garrity ... Alphaproteobacteria: Brucella, Rhizobium, Agrobacterium, Caulobacter, Rickettsia, Wolbachia, etc. Betaproteobacteria: ...
nov.) in the Alphaproteobacteria". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 55 (Pt 5): 2033-2037. doi ...
Alphaproteobacteria Order: Rhizobiales Family: Bartonellaceae. Gieszczykiewicz 1939. Genus: Bartonella. Strong et al. 1915 ...
The Pelagibacterales are an order in the Alphaproteobacteria composed of free-living bacteria that make up roughly one in three ... Subgroup V, which includes alphaproteobacterium HIMB59, basal to the remainder. The above results in a cladogram of the ... "The SAR11 group of alpha-proteobacteria is not related to the origin of mitochondria". PLOS ONE. 7 (1): e30520. Bibcode ... "New rRNA gene-based phylogenies of the Alphaproteobacteria provide perspective on major groups, mitochondrial ancestry and ...
Alpha Proteobacteria Order: Rhizobiales Family: Rhizobiaceae Genus: Agrobacterium Type species Agrobacterium tumefaciens. ( ...
... is a family of Alphaproteobacteria. They are gram-negative and aerobic. The bacteria of this family derive ...
4-46, a species of alphaproteobacteria. The motif is presumed to function as a non-coding RNA. Weinberg Z, Wang JX, Bogue J, et ...
nov., two members of the class Alphaproteobacteria". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 61 (11 ...
Rodríguez-Ezpeleta N, Embley TM (2012). "The SAR11 group of alpha-proteobacteria is not related to the origin of mitochondria ... Williams KP, Sobral BW, Dickerman AW (2007). "A robust species tree for the alphaproteobacteria". J. Bacteriol. 189 (13): 4578- ... The Rickettsiales, also called rickettsias, are an order of small Alphaproteobacteria that are endosymbionts of eukaryotic ... 2015). "Single-cell genomics of a rare environmental alphaproteobacterium provides unique insights into Rickettsiaceae ...
... are a family of the Alphaproteobacteria. An important feature is the presence of sphingolipids in the outer ...
"The origin of mitochondrial cristae from alphaproteobacteria". Molecular Biology and Evolution: msw298. doi:10.1093/molbev/ ...
Mohammed JP, Mattner J (July 2009). "Autoimmune Disease Triggered by Infection with Alphaproteobacteria". Expert Review of ...
It is a basal group in the Alphaproteobacteria. Bazylinski, D. A.; Williams, T. J.; Lefevre, C. T.; Berg, R. J.; Zhang, C. L.; ... Magnetococcus marinus is a species of Alphaproteobacteria that has the peculiar ability to form a structure called a ... Nov.) at the base of the Alphaproteobacteria". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 63: 801. doi: ... "New rRNA gene-based phylogenies of the Alphaproteobacteria provide perspective on major groups, mitochondrial ancestry and ...
nov., a slightly thermophilic member of the Alphaproteobacteria". Systematic and applied microbiology. 33 (2): 60-6. doi: ... nov., a slightly thermophilic member of the Alphaproteobacteria". Systematic and applied microbiology. 33 (2): 60-6. doi: ...
The SAM-II riboswitch is a RNA element found predominantly in alpha-proteobacteria that binds S-adenosyl methionine (SAM). Its ... 2005). "Evidence for a second class of S-adenosylmethionine riboswitches and other regulatory RNA motifs in alpha-proteobacteria ... Page for SAM riboswitch (alpha-proteobacteria) at Rfam. ... and other methionine and SAM biosynthesis genes in other alpha-proteobacteria ...
Moreover, groups of genes with homology to the RcGTA are present in the chromosomes of various types of alphaproteobacteria. ... Another known case of a GTA present in alphaproteobacteria is the Bartonella GTA (BaGTA). The Bartonellaceae do not contain ... Lang, AS and Beatty, JT (2007) "Importance of widespread gene transfer agent genes in alpha-proteobacteria." Trends in ... The GTA produced by the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, named R. capsulatus GTA (RcGTA), is currently the best ...
nov., a novel alpha-proteobacterium". The Journal of general and applied microbiology. 50 (5): 249-54. PMID 15747229. Lee, H.-W ...
nov., a novel alpha-proteobacterium". The Journal of general and applied microbiology. 50 (5): 249-54. PMID 15747229. Jjemba, ...
nov., an alphaproteobacterium from compost". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 62 (Pt 12): ...
nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-Proteobacteria". J Gen Appl Microbiol. 50 (3): 159-67. doi:10.2323/jgam.50.159. ...
The Rhizobiales are an order of Gram-negative Alphaproteobacteria. The rhizobia, which fix nitrogen and are symbiotic with ... "Multiphyletic origins of methylotrophy in Alphaproteobacteria, exemplified by comparative genomics of Lake Washington isolates ...
nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-proteobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 51 (Pt 2): 559-63. doi:10.1099/00207713 ...
Lo N, Beninati T, Sacchi L, Bandi C (2006b). An alpha-proteobacterium invades the mitochondria of the tick Ixodes ricinus. In ... Beninati, T.; Lo, N.; Sacchi, L.; Genchi, C.; Noda, H.; Bandi, C. (2004). "A novel alpha-proteobacterium resides in the ... Rickettsiales), an ecologically widespread clade of intracellular alphaproteobacteria". Applied and Environmental Microbiology ... "New rRNA gene-based phylogenies of the Alphaproteobacteria provide perspective on major groups, mitochondrial ancestry and ...
nov., an alphaproteobacterium isolated from soil". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 56 (Pt 10 ... nov., an alphaproteobacterium isolated from soil". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 56 (Pt 10 ...
It showed that the beta-Proteobacteria accounted for between 26.4 and 71.5%, the alpha-Proteobacteria 2.3-10.6%, the gamma- ...
Alphaproteobacteria is a class of bacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria (See also bacterial taxonomy). Its members are highly ... "Alphaproteobacteria". List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN). Archived from the original on 2013-01-27 ... The Alphaproteobacteria is a diverse taxon and comprises several phototrophic genera, several genera metabolising C1-compounds ... nov.) at the base of the Alphaproteobacteria. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.038927-0 Gupta RS (2005). "Protein ...
Your basket is currently empty. i ,p>When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the basket to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later.,p>,a href=/help/basket target=_top>More...,/a>,/p> ...
"Genome Sequence of Strain IMCC14465, Isolated from the East Sea, Belonging to the PS1 Clade of Alphaproteobacteria.". Yang S.J. ... This proteome is part of the alpha proteobacterium IMCC14465 pan proteome (fasta) ...
Members of the Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were identified as potential keystone taxa, and exhibited numerous ... Members of the Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were identified as potential keystone taxa, and exhibited numerous ... with significantly higher levels of Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria in potentially-active hypoliths. Several phyla known ... with significantly higher levels of Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria in potentially-active hypoliths. Several phyla known ...
... the genomes of 92 Alphaproteobacteria strains were analyzed with a fuzzy orthologs-species detection approach. This showed that ... Alphaproteobacteria show a great versatility in adapting to a broad range of environments and lifestyles, with the association ... Alphaproteobacteria show a great versatility in adapting to a broad range of environments and lifestyles, with the association ... Plant-Bacteria Association and Symbiosis: Are There Common Genomic Traits in Alphaproteobacteria?. Francesco Pini †. ...
Histidine kinase derived PhyT-type regulators are found also in other alphaproteobacteria, implying that the identified ... in alphaproteobacteria represents an essential feature for survival in stressful, constantly changing habitats. A variety of ...
A deeper survey of Alphaproteobacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing reveals a high diversity with Acidocella, ... A deeper survey of Alphaproteobacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing reveals a high diversity with Acidocella, ... Alphaproteobacteria were the main colonizers inside the hyaline cells of Sphagnum leaves. ... of Sphagnum-associated microbial communities were characterized by high diversity and abundance of Alphaproteobacteria but ...
Regulatable Vectors for Environmental Gene Expression in Alphaproteobacteria Adrian J. Tett, Steven J. Rudder, Alexandre ... Regulatable Vectors for Environmental Gene Expression in Alphaproteobacteria Adrian J. Tett, Steven J. Rudder, Alexandre ... Regulatable Vectors for Environmental Gene Expression in Alphaproteobacteria Adrian J. Tett, Steven J. Rudder, Alexandre ... Regulatable Vectors for Environmental Gene Expression in Alphaproteobacteria Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page ...
... a Representative of the SAR116 Clade in the Alphaproteobacteria. Hyun-Myung Oh, Kae Kyoung Kwon, Ilnam Kang, Sung Gyun Kang, ... the first cultured representative of the SAR116 clade in the Alphaproteobacteria, is reported here. The genome contains genes ... a Representative of the SAR116 Clade in the Alphaproteobacteria ... a Representative of the SAR116 Clade in the Alphaproteobacteria ... a Representative of the SAR116 Clade in the Alphaproteobacteria ...
The genome sizes of the Alphaproteobacteria range between 1 Mb and 10 Mb. This group is also connected to the origin of the ... By placing the comparison in the context of the evolution of the Alphaproteobacteria, we found that none of the measures of ... Comparative and Phylogenomic Evidence that the Alphaproteobacterium HIMB59 is not a Member of the Oceanic SAR11 Clade. Viklund ... SAR11 is a globally abundant group of Alphaproteobacteria in the oceans that is taxonomically not well defined. It has been ...
2. Abundance and diveristy of Alphaproteobacteria in the Southern Ocean: the dark side of SAR11. Open this publication in new ... Alphaproteobacteria represented by lineages such as SAR11 and Roseobacter are ubiquitous and often dominant in marine ... bacterial community dynamics, Alphaproteobacteria, SAR11, LD12, Southern Ocean, lakes National Category Ecology Research ... Southern Ocean, Alphaproteobacteria, SAR11, Roseobacter, community composition, solar radiation National Category Ecology ...
However, Rhodospirillum rubrum came as close to mitochondria as any alpha-proteobacterium investigated. This prompted a search ... A genome phylogeny for mitochondria among alpha-proteobacteria and a predominantly eubacterial ancestry of yeast nuclear genes. ...
Genome Sequence of Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506T, a Mn(II)-Oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium Possessing an Aerobic Anoxygenic ... Genome Sequence of Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506T, a Mn(II)-Oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium Possessing an Aerobic Anoxygenic ... Genome Sequence of Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506T, a Mn(II)-Oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium Possessing an Aerobic Anoxygenic ... Genome Sequence of Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506T, a Mn(II)-Oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium Possessing an Aerobic Anoxygenic ...
nov., an endophyte from a pine tree of the class Alphaproteobacteria, emended description of Geminicoccus roseus, and proposal ... nov., an endophyte from a pine tree of the class Alphaproteobacteria, emended description of Geminicoccus roseus, and proposal ...
... which is extensively present within Alphaproteobacteria, and some secondary chromosomes of the Rhizobiales have the particular ... gene transfer and diverse functional constrains within a common replication-partitioning system in Alphaproteobacteria: the ...
... rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the novel strain affiliated to the family Hyphomonadaceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria ... nov., a new alphaproteobacterium isolated from the Pacific green alga Ulva fenestrata. *Olga I. Nedashkovskaya, Andrey D. ... nov., a new alphaproteobacterium isolated from the Pacific green alga Cladophora stimpsoni, and emended descriptions of the ... nov., a new alphaproteobacterium isolated from the Pacific green alga Cladophora stimpsoni, and emended descriptions of the ...
Strain LD81T has a unique phylogenetic position, not fitting any of the known families of the Alphaproteobacteria. The 16S rRNA ... due to its distant phylogenetic position from all other alphaproteobacteria, strain LD81T (=NCIMB 14374T =JCM 14845T) is ... A novel alphaproteobacterium, strain LD81T, was isolated from the marine macroalga Laminaria saccharina. The bacterium is ... gene sequence revealed a distant relationship to species of several orders of the Alphaproteobacteria, with less than 90 % ...
... an aerobic marine alphaproteobacterium, was isolated from Mediterranean seawater at Malvarrosa beach, Valencia, Spain. The ... nov., an aerobic alphaproteobacterium isolated from surface seawater * Teresa Lucena1, María J. Pujalte1, María A. Ruvira1, ... Strain MD5T, an aerobic marine alphaproteobacterium, was isolated from Mediterranean seawater at Malvarrosa beach, Valencia, ... nov., an aerobic alphaproteobacterium isolated from surface seawater. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 62, 844 (2012); https://doi.org ...
... Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window ... nov., a marine bacterium that forms a deep branch in the alpha-Proteobacteria. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 53:1031-1036. ... Genome evolution within the alpha Proteobacteria: why do some bacteria not possess plasmids and others exhibit more than one ... alpha Proteobacteria. Version 10 March 2006 (temporary). http://tolweb.org/alpha_Proteobacteria/2303/2006.03.10 in The Tree of ...
... the clade in which strains SY3-15T and SY3-13 located was separated from the clade of the other orders of Alphaproteobacteria ... methods showed that the strains constituted a deep and separated branch from other families of Alphaproteobacteria , and the ... nov., a novel alphaproteobacterium isolated from deep seawater. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017;67:4024-4031 [CrossRef][PubMed] ... nov., a thermotolerant alphaproteobacterium isolated from a hot spring. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014;64:2805-2811 [CrossRef][ ...
Alphaproteobacteria. Alphaproteobacteria #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other. This page is a soft redirect. colspan=2 style=" ... This page is a soft redirect. Alphaproteobacteria. Garrity et al. 2006 #REDIRECTmw:Help:Magic words#Other. This page is a soft ... Alphaproteobacteria is a class of bacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria (See also bacterial taxonomy).[3] Its members are ... The Class Alphaproteobacteria is divided into three subclasses Magnetococcidae, Rickettsidae and Caulobacteridae.[2] The basal ...
Alphaproteobacteria sp. (TSD-74) TSD-74 Organism Alphaproteobacteria sp. Strain Designations: RKSG073 ...
Identification and characterization of Alphaproteobacteria phages. Grant number: 0090/IP1/2015/73. Funded by: ... As a result of the project a database of Alphaproteobacteria phages will be also created. Within this database information ... The project assumes identification of functional, inducible bacteriophages within a pool of Alphaproteobacteria from the ... available collection, as well as in silico defining of prophages present in various genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. It will be ...
RNAseq analysis of alpha-proteobacterium Gluconobacter oxydans 621H. Kranz A, Busche T, Vogel A, Usadel B, Kalinowski J, Bott M ... Kranz, A., Busche, T., Vogel, A., Usadel, B., Kalinowski, J., Bott, M., and Polen, T. (2018). RNAseq analysis of alpha- ... Kranz, A., Busche, T., Vogel, A., Usadel, B., Kalinowski, J., Bott, M., Polen, T.: RNAseq analysis of alpha-proteobacterium ... Kranz, A., Busche, T., Vogel, A., Usadel, B., Kalinowski, J., Bott, M., & Polen, T. (2018). RNAseq analysis of alpha- ...
  • Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales) is an intraovarially transmitted symbiont of insects able to exert striking phenotypes, including reproductive manipulations and pathogen blocking. (brookes.ac.uk)
  • Strain LD81 T has a relatively low DNA G+C content (51.1 mol%) and, due to its distant phylogenetic position from all other alphaproteobacteria, strain LD81 T (=NCIMB 14374 T =JCM 14845 T ) is considered as the type strain of a novel species within a new genus, for which the name Kiloniella laminariae gen. nov., sp. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Debido ás súas propiedades simbióticas, os investigadores usan frecuentemente as Alphaproteobacteria do xénero Agrobacterium nas técnicas de transferencia de xenes alleos a xenomas de plantas, e teñen tamén moitas outras aplicacións biotecnolóxicas. (wikipedia.org)
  • To shed some light on possible common genetic features in such a heterogeneous set of plant associations, the genomes of 92 Alphaproteobacteria strains were analyzed with a fuzzy orthologs-species detection approach. (mdpi.com)
  • The aim of the project is to determine and characterize a pool of lysogenic and lytic phages (and prophage sequences) of Alphaproteobacteria . (ddlemb.com)
  • A wider sampling of alphaproteobacteria and improved techniques for analyzing DNA sequences seemed to suggest that our previous hypotheses about the origin of mitochondria were wrong. (physicsforums.com)
  • nov., an endophyte from a pine tree of the class Alphaproteobacteria, emended description of Geminicoccus roseus, and proposal of Geminicoccaceae fam. (doe.gov)
  • The potentially active and total hypolithic communities differed in their composition and diversity, with significantly higher levels of Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria in potentially active hypoliths. (frontiersin.org)
  • Members of the Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were identified as potential keystone taxa, and exhibited numerous positive co-occurrences with other microbes, suggesting that these groups might have important roles in maintaining network topological structure despite their low abundance. (frontiersin.org)
  • Genomic blueprints of sponge-prokaryote symbiosis are shared by low abundant and cultivatable Alphaproteobacteria. (nature.com)
  • In addition, we detected a previously undescribed type of two-domain response regulator, named PhyR, that consists of an N-terminal sigma factor (RpoE)-like domain and a C-terminal receiver domain and is predicted to be present in essentially all Alphaproteobacteria . (pnas.org)
  • The Alphaproteobacteria is a diverse taxon and comprises several phototrophic genera, several genera metabolising C1-compounds (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • NifH libraries of Sphagnum -associated microbial communities were characterized by high diversity and abundance of Alphaproteobacteria but contained also diverse amplicons of other taxa, e.g. (frontiersin.org)
  • Among them, 15 ORFs were homologues of genes in another siphovirus ΦJL001 that infects an uncharacterized marine sponge-associated alphaproteobacterium, JL001 [ 23 ] (Figure 1 , indicated by grey shadows). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Similarity was confirmed for colonization patterns obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM): Alphaproteobacteria were the main colonizers inside the hyaline cells of Sphagnum leaves. (frontiersin.org)