An opioid analgesic chemically related to and with an action resembling that of MEPERIDINE, but more rapid in onset and of shorter duration. It has been used in obstetrics, as pre-operative medication, for minor surgical procedures, and for dental procedures. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1067)

Risk appraisal of narcotic sedation for children. (1/6)

Since the use of narcotics was initially advocated 28 years ago, serious adverse reactions, including fatalities, have been reported. At least four factors appear to contribute to these reactions: multiple drug administration, excessive dosage, inadequate monitoring, and ineffectual emergency care. Because of the relatively high incidence of life-threatening reactions and the complexity of the required emergency care, the routine use of pediatric sedation techniques that require large doses of narcotics cannot be advocated for use in the private office.  (+info)

Effects of variable alphaprodine dose levels on arterial blood gases in rhesus monkeys. (2/6)

The administration of alphaprodine submucosally in doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg to ketaminized rhesus monkeys resulted in Po(2) levels significantly lower than those observed for controls (ketamine only) at the 10 min level. There was a significant increase in Po(2) levels between the 10 and 20 min intervals, thereafter, Po(2) levels returned toward normal and were not statistically different from baseline. Higher alphaprodine doses (1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg) resulted in a non-significant increase in Pco(2) values. Monitoring Po(2) levels during sedation seems preferable to monitoring Pco(2) in view of the findings of this study.  (+info)

Conscious sedation for minor gynecologic surgery in the ambulatory patient. A pilot study. (3/6)

A conscious sedation regimen consisting of alphaprodine, hydroxyzine, and methohexital together with intensive behavior modification was evaluated in an open pilot study for patients undergoing minor gynecologic surgery. This combination was found to result in hemodynamic stability, satisfactory patient compliance, and patient and surgeon acceptance. Patients were unable to recognize words taught to them just after drugs were administered.Electroencephalogram (EEG) changes seen in general anesthesia or deep sedation were not found in the EEG records of a subset of patients. These findings suggest that conscious sedation can provide adequate relief of pain and anxiety for minor gynecologic procedures when local anesthesia can achieve only partial pain relief.  (+info)

The effect of narcotic analgesics on the uptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine and (-)-metaraminol by blood platelets. (4/6)

1. The effects of narcotic analgesic and related drugs were studied on the uptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and (-)-metaraminol by blood platelets.2. The most potent drug in inhibiting the uptake of 5-HT (10 muM) by human platelets was methadone, followed by pentazocine>piminodine approximately pethidine approximately anileridine approximately cyclazocine approximately thebaine > dextropropoxyphene. Alphaprodine, papaverine, apomorphine, nalorphine, codeine, and morphine were almost without effect. Methadone was slightly less active than desipramine, and had 10% of the activity of imipramine under similar conditions. Naloxone did not antagonize the effect of methadone on 5-HT uptake.3. The most potent inhibitor of metaraminol (3 muM) uptake by human platelets was piminodine, followed by pentazocine>/=anileridine>cyclazocine=methadone > dextropropoxyphene approximately thebaine >/= papaverine approximately alphaprodine >pethidine>morphine. The activity of morphine was 1% of that of piminodine. Piminodine was more potent than desipramine and protriptyline under similar conditions. The order of potency of drugs studied in inhibiting the uptake of metaraminol by rabbit platelets was similar to that obtained with human platelets.4. The effects of the analgesics studied on inhibiting uptake of monoamines did not correlate with their pain-relieving properties.  (+info)

Opioid analgesics in anesthesia: with special reference to their use in cardiovascular anesthesia. (5/6)

In this article, an attempt has been made to review the use of receptor stimulating pure agonist opioids in anesthesia, especially in patients with cardiovascular disease. Particular emphasis has been placed on the use of opioids in high doses to produce anesthesia, techniques that recently have become popular in cardiovascular anesthesia. A major benefit of opioid anesthesia is the cardiovascular stability obtained during induction and throughout operation, even in patients with severely impaired cardiac function. There is a considerable body of evidence to support this claim when fentanyl is used. Anesthetic doses of morphine are associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disturbances and other problems, and, therefore, more attention to detail is required in order to achieve adequate anesthesia and hemodynamic stability. Although other opioids have been used as sole or principal agents in anesthesia for cardiovascular surgery, none have gained widespread acceptance. Meperidine, for example, which is widely used in lower (nonanesthetic) doses as a supplement to nitrous oxide in cardiac and noncardiac surgery, has proved unsuitable because of severe hemodynamic disturbances when high doses are given. However, initial reports concerning two of the newer agonist opioids, sufentanil and alfentanil, suggest that they may prove to be suitable alternatives and perhaps provide advantages over morphine and fentanyl in patients with or without cardiovascular disease. Although cardiovascular stability usually can be assured in the chronically sick cardiac patient with opioid anesthesia, this is not always so with the healthier patient, particularly those presenting for coronary artery surgery. A frequently occurring problem in these patients is hypertension during or after sternotomy, which can result in myocardial ischemia and infarction. The incidence of severe hypertension (increases in systolic blood pressure greater than 20% of control values) can be reduced drastically by increasing the dose of opioid, e.g., up to 140 micrograms/kg of fentanyl. However, despite such large doses, some patients will continue to need treatment with vasodilators, inhalation anesthetics, or other supplements at certain periods during cardiovascular operations. The use of very large doses of opioids also will prolong postoperative respiratory depression. High doses of opioids can reduce or prevent the hormonal and metabolic responses to the stress of surgery. However, even very large doses of fentanyl or its newer analogues do not prevent marked increases in plasma catecholamine concentrations in response to cardiopulmonary bypass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)  (+info)

Neonatal neurobehavioral effects of inhalation analgesia for vaginal delivery. (6/6)

The authors studied the neonatal neurobehavioral effects of nitrous oxide:oxygen and enflurane:oxygen inhalation analgesia for vaginal delivery. Parturients were assigned randomly to receive no inhalation agent (Group 1, n = 21); enflurane, 0.3 to 0.8 per cent, and oxygen (Group 2, n = 22); or nitrous oxide, 30 to 50 per cent, and oxygen (Group 3, n = 18). Infants were tested at 15 min, 2 h, and 24 h of age using the Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity Score (NACS); and at 2 and 24 h using the Early Neonatal Neurobehavioral Scale (ENNS). No significant differences in neurobehavioral status occurred. For all groups, scores tended to be lowest at two hours of age. We conclude that neither enflurane nor nitrous oxide analgesia adversely affects neonatal neurobehavioral status at 15 min, 2 h, or 24 h of age.  (+info)

Alphaprodine is a synthetic opioid medication that is primarily used for its analgesic (pain-relieving) effects. It belongs to the class of drugs known as narcotic analgesics, which work by binding to specific receptors in the brain and spinal cord to reduce the perception of pain.

Alphaprodine is a controlled substance due to its potential for abuse and dependence. It can produce euphoria, drowsiness, respiratory depression, and constipation, among other side effects. Long-term use or misuse of alphaprodine can lead to physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.

Alphaprodine is not commonly used in clinical practice today due to the availability of safer and more effective pain medications. It is also not available as a generic medication, and only one branded formulation (Nisentil) was approved by the FDA for use in the United States, but it has been discontinued from the market.

Betaprodine is around five times more potent than alphaprodine but is metabolized more rapidly, and only alphaprodine was ... Both exhibit optical isomerism and alphaprodine and betaprodine are racemates. Alphaprodine is closely related to desomorphine ... Alphaprodine has a duration of action of 1 to 2 hours, and 40 to 60 mg is equivalent to 10 mg of subcutaneous morphine. Prodine ... Alphaprodine was sold under several brand names, mainly Nisentil and Prisilidine. It was most commonly used for pain relief ...
Roberts, H; Kuck, MA (19 November 1960). "Use of alphaprodine and levallorphan during labour". Canadian Medical Association ...
This research produced the analgesic alphaprodine (Nisentil, Prisilidine), a very closely related compound. In 1976, a 23-year- ...
... and somewhat more distantly alphaprodine. Not being in clinical use in the United States, it is a Schedule I Narcotic ...
... does exhibit optical isomerism as do other chemicals of its general type ranging from pethidine and alphaprodine ...
... and alphaprodine (Nisentil). Phenadoxone has a US DEA ACSCN of 9637 and recently has had a zero annual manufacturing quota ...
... acetylmethadol alphacetylmethadol alphameprodine alphamethadol alphamethylfentanyl alphamethylthiofentanyl alphaprodine ...
Alphamul Alphanate AlphaNine SD alphaprodine (INN) Alphaquin HP Alpharedisol Alphatrex Alphazine alpidem (INN) alpiropride (INN ...
Alphaprodine (α-1,3-dimethyl-4-phenyl-4-piperidinol propionate) Anileridine (ethyl 1-[2-(p-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4- ...
... alphaprodine MeSH D03.383.621.050 - anabasine MeSH D03.383.621.080 - betalains MeSH D03.383.621.080.500 - betacyanins MeSH ...
Acetylmethadol Alphacetylmethadol Alphameprodine Alphamethadol Alphaprodine Alfentanil Allylprodine Anileridine Bezitramide ...
... alphaprodine, MPPP, etc.), bemidones (ketobemidone, etc.) and others more distant, including diphenoxylate and analogues. ...
Alphameprodine Alphamethadol Alphaprodine Anileridine Benzethidine Benzylmorphine (3-benzylmorphine) Betacetylmethadol ...
40 to 60 mg of alphaprodine and 10 mg of morphine. Oral formulations were also available. Piminodine has similar effects to ...
Antihistamines, antipsychotics, antiparkinson drugs, alphaprodine, buclizine, meperidine, orphenadrine, benzodiazepines and ...
Alphaprodine Hydrochloride,N0000004294, Alfentanil Hydrochloride,N0000004288, Albuterol Sulfate,N0000004284, alatrofloxacin ... Alphaprodine,N0000006607, fumaric acid,N0000006606, clindamycin palmitate hydrochloride,N0000004572, ...
analgesic* or opioid* or opiate* or narcotic* or alfentanil or alphaprodine or buprenorphine or (buprenorphine adj2 naloxone) ... narcotics/or analgesics, opioid/or alfentanil/or alphaprodine/or buprenorphine/or buprenorphine, naloxone drug combination/or ...
ALPHAPRODINE 50113 ALPRAZOLAM 50116 ALPROSTADIL 50120 ALSEROXYLON 50125 ALUMINUM 50130 ALUMINUM ACETATE 50135 ALUMINUM AMMONIUM ...
Alphaprodine (substance). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Alphaprodine (substance). Concept Status. Published. ...
Alphaprodine Hydrochloride Narrower Concept UI. M0330746. Registry Number. CO51Q2EI5Z. Terms. Alphaprodine Hydrochloride ... Alphaprodine Preferred Term Term UI T001565. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ... Alphaprodine Preferred Concept UI. M0000798. Registry Number. 001O2254AC. Related Numbers. 561-78-4. 77-20-3. CO51Q2EI5Z. Scope ... Alphaprodine Hydrochloride Nisentil Prodine Pharm Action. Analgesics, Opioid. Narcotics. Registry Number. 001O2254AC. Related ...
Alphaprodine Hydrochloride Narrower Concept UI. M0330746. Registry Number. CO51Q2EI5Z. Terms. Alphaprodine Hydrochloride ... Alphaprodine Preferred Term Term UI T001565. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ... Alphaprodine Preferred Concept UI. M0000798. Registry Number. 001O2254AC. Related Numbers. 561-78-4. 77-20-3. CO51Q2EI5Z. Scope ... Alphaprodine Hydrochloride Nisentil Prodine Pharm Action. Analgesics, Opioid. Narcotics. Registry Number. 001O2254AC. Related ...
Alphaprodine - Preferred Concept UI. M0000798. Scope note. An opioid analgesic chemically related to and with an action ...
... alphaprodine, E0069717,Serentil,mesoridazine besylate, E0069718,Vivactil,protriptyline hydrochloride, E0069721,Vallestril, ...
Antihistamines, antipsychotics, antiparkinson drugs, alphaprodine, buclizine, meperidine, orphenadrine, benzodiazepines and ...
OPIOID ALPHAPRODINE ANALGESICS, OPIOID ANALGESICS, OPIOID ANALGESICS, OPIOID BUPRENORPHINE ANALGESICS, OPIOID BUTORPHANOL ... NARCOTICS ALPHAPRODINE NARCOTICS BUPRENORPHINE NARCOTICS BUTORPHANOL NARCOTICS CODEINE NARCOTICS DEXTROMORAMIDE NARCOTICS ... ANALGESICS ALPHAPRODINE ANALGESICS AMANTADINE ANALGESICS AMINOPYRINE ANALGESICS AMITRIPTYLINE ANALGESICS AMODIAQUINE ANALGESICS ... CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS ALPHAPRODINE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS ALPRAZOLAM CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS AMANTADINE ...
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Alarelin is also known as Synonym. SynZeal provides high-quality Alarelin Reference Standard, pharmacopeial and non-pharmacopeial impurities, degradants, and stable isotope products.
and J. Bellville, "Respiratory Effects of Alphaprodine in Man," OBST. AND GYN., vol. 31, pp. 61-68, 1968. Forrest, W., Jr., B. ...
  • There are two isomers of the trans form of prodine, alphaprodine and betaprodine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both exhibit optical isomerism and alphaprodine and betaprodine are racemates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Betaprodine is around five times more potent than alphaprodine but is metabolized more rapidly, and only alphaprodine was developed for medicinal use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Betaprodine produces more euphoria and side effects than alphaprodine at all dose levels, and it was found that 5 to 10 mg of betaprodine is equivalent to 25 to 40 mg of alphaprodine. (wikipedia.org)