Drug Information Services: Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.Pamphlets: Printed publications usually having a format with no binding and no cover and having fewer than some set number of pages. They are often devoted to a single subject.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Therapeutic Equivalency: The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.North CarolinaResearch Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Methyltestosterone: A synthetic hormone used for androgen replacement therapy and as an hormonal antineoplastic agent (ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS, HORMONAL).United States Department of Homeland Security: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to domestic national security.United StatesHuman Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.South CarolinaAdministration, Sublingual: Administration of a soluble dosage form by placement under the tongue.Buprenorphine: A derivative of the opioid alkaloid THEBAINE that is a more potent and longer lasting analgesic than MORPHINE. It appears to act as a partial agonist at mu and kappa opioid receptors and as an antagonist at delta receptors. The lack of delta-agonist activity has been suggested to account for the observation that buprenorphine tolerance may not develop with chronic use.Naloxone: A specific opiate antagonist that has no agonist activity. It is a competitive antagonist at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.Meprobamate: A carbamate with hypnotic, sedative, and some muscle relaxant properties, although in therapeutic doses reduction of anxiety rather than a direct effect may be responsible for muscle relaxation. Meprobamate has been reported to have anticonvulsant actions against petit mal seizures, but not against grand mal seizures (which may be exacerbated). It is used in the treatment of ANXIETY DISORDERS, and also for the short-term management of INSOMNIA but has largely been superseded by the BENZODIAZEPINES. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p603)Opioid-Related Disorders: Disorders related or resulting from abuse or mis-use of opioids.Narcotic Antagonists: Agents inhibiting the effect of narcotics on the central nervous system.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Central Nervous System Depressants: A very loosely defined group of drugs that tend to reduce the activity of the central nervous system. The major groups included here are ethyl alcohol, anesthetics, hypnotics and sedatives, narcotics, and tranquilizing agents (antipsychotics and antianxiety agents).Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Opiate Substitution Treatment: Medical treatment for opioid dependence using a substitute opiate such as METHADONE or BUPRENORPHINE.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Receptors, Phencyclidine: Specific sites or molecular structures on cell membranes or in cells with which phencyclidine reacts or to which it binds to elicit the specific response of the cell to phencyclidine. Studies have demonstrated the presence of multiple receptor sites for PCP. These are the PCP/sigma site, which binds both PCP and psychotomimetic opiates but not certain antipsychotics, and the PCP site, which selectively binds PCP analogs.Pipecolic AcidsReceptors, sigma: A class of cell surface receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Sigma receptors were originally considered to be opioid receptors because they bind certain synthetic opioids. However they also interact with a variety of other psychoactive drugs, and their endogenous ligand is not known (although they can react to certain endogenous steroids). Sigma receptors are found in the immune, endocrine, and nervous systems, and in some peripheral tissues.Phencyclidine: A hallucinogen formerly used as a veterinary anesthetic, and briefly as a general anesthetic for humans. Phencyclidine is similar to KETAMINE in structure and in many of its effects. Like ketamine, it can produce a dissociative state. It exerts its pharmacological action through inhibition of NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). As a drug of abuse, it is known as PCP and Angel Dust.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Cyclization: Changing an open-chain hydrocarbon to a closed ring. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Diphenylacetic AcidsHeterocyclic Compounds, Bridged-Ring: A class of organic compounds which contain two rings that share a pair of bridgehead carbon atoms.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Narcissism: A psychoanalytic term meaning self-love.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Opium: The air-dried exudate from the unripe seed capsule of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, or its variant, P. album. It contains a number of alkaloids, but only a few - MORPHINE; CODEINE; and PAPAVERINE - have clinical significance. Opium has been used as an analgesic, antitussive, antidiarrheal, and antispasmodic.KansasDextrorphan: Dextro form of levorphanol. It acts as a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, among other effects, and has been proposed as a neuroprotective agent. It is also a metabolite of DEXTROMETHORPHAN.Ethylmorphine: A narcotic analgesic and antitussive. It is metabolized in the liver by ETHYLMORPHINE-N-DEMETHYLASE and used as an indicator of liver function.Hydrocodone: Narcotic analgesic related to CODEINE, but more potent and more addicting by weight. It is used also as cough suppressant.Nalbuphine: A narcotic used as a pain medication. It appears to be an agonist at kappa opioid receptors and an antagonist or partial agonist at mu opioid receptors.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Etorphine: A narcotic analgesic morphinan used as a sedative in veterinary practice.Codeine: An opioid analgesic related to MORPHINE but with less potent analgesic properties and mild sedative effects. It also acts centrally to suppress cough.Etidocaine: A local anesthetic with rapid onset and long action, similar to BUPIVACAINE.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Dibucaine: A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006)Halofenate: An antihyperlipoproteinemic agent and uricosuric agent.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Pharmacopoeias as Topic: Authoritative treatises on drugs and preparations, their description, formulation, analytic composition, physical constants, main chemical properties used in identification, standards for strength, purity, and dosage, chemical tests for determining identity and purity, etc. They are usually published under governmental jurisdiction (e.g., USP, the United States Pharmacopoeia; BP, British Pharmacopoeia; P. Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopoeia). They differ from FORMULARIES in that they are far more complete: formularies tend to be mere listings of formulas and prescriptions.Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Databases, Chemical: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific chemicals.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Databases, Pharmaceutical: Databases devoted to knowledge about PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS.Pharmacological Processes: The metabolism of drugs and their mechanisms of action.Methoxyflurane: An inhalation anesthetic. Currently, methoxyflurane is rarely used for surgical, obstetric, or dental anesthesia. If so employed, it should be administered with NITROUS OXIDE to achieve a relatively light level of anesthesia, and a neuromuscular blocking agent given concurrently to obtain the desired degree of muscular relaxation. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p180)

Risk appraisal of narcotic sedation for children. (1/6)

Since the use of narcotics was initially advocated 28 years ago, serious adverse reactions, including fatalities, have been reported. At least four factors appear to contribute to these reactions: multiple drug administration, excessive dosage, inadequate monitoring, and ineffectual emergency care. Because of the relatively high incidence of life-threatening reactions and the complexity of the required emergency care, the routine use of pediatric sedation techniques that require large doses of narcotics cannot be advocated for use in the private office.  (+info)

Effects of variable alphaprodine dose levels on arterial blood gases in rhesus monkeys. (2/6)

The administration of alphaprodine submucosally in doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg to ketaminized rhesus monkeys resulted in Po(2) levels significantly lower than those observed for controls (ketamine only) at the 10 min level. There was a significant increase in Po(2) levels between the 10 and 20 min intervals, thereafter, Po(2) levels returned toward normal and were not statistically different from baseline. Higher alphaprodine doses (1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg) resulted in a non-significant increase in Pco(2) values. Monitoring Po(2) levels during sedation seems preferable to monitoring Pco(2) in view of the findings of this study.  (+info)

Conscious sedation for minor gynecologic surgery in the ambulatory patient. A pilot study. (3/6)

A conscious sedation regimen consisting of alphaprodine, hydroxyzine, and methohexital together with intensive behavior modification was evaluated in an open pilot study for patients undergoing minor gynecologic surgery. This combination was found to result in hemodynamic stability, satisfactory patient compliance, and patient and surgeon acceptance. Patients were unable to recognize words taught to them just after drugs were administered.Electroencephalogram (EEG) changes seen in general anesthesia or deep sedation were not found in the EEG records of a subset of patients. These findings suggest that conscious sedation can provide adequate relief of pain and anxiety for minor gynecologic procedures when local anesthesia can achieve only partial pain relief.  (+info)

The effect of narcotic analgesics on the uptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine and (-)-metaraminol by blood platelets. (4/6)

1. The effects of narcotic analgesic and related drugs were studied on the uptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and (-)-metaraminol by blood platelets.2. The most potent drug in inhibiting the uptake of 5-HT (10 muM) by human platelets was methadone, followed by pentazocine>piminodine approximately pethidine approximately anileridine approximately cyclazocine approximately thebaine > dextropropoxyphene. Alphaprodine, papaverine, apomorphine, nalorphine, codeine, and morphine were almost without effect. Methadone was slightly less active than desipramine, and had 10% of the activity of imipramine under similar conditions. Naloxone did not antagonize the effect of methadone on 5-HT uptake.3. The most potent inhibitor of metaraminol (3 muM) uptake by human platelets was piminodine, followed by pentazocine>/=anileridine>cyclazocine=methadone > dextropropoxyphene approximately thebaine >/= papaverine approximately alphaprodine >pethidine>morphine. The activity of morphine was 1% of that of piminodine. Piminodine was more potent than desipramine and protriptyline under similar conditions. The order of potency of drugs studied in inhibiting the uptake of metaraminol by rabbit platelets was similar to that obtained with human platelets.4. The effects of the analgesics studied on inhibiting uptake of monoamines did not correlate with their pain-relieving properties.  (+info)

Opioid analgesics in anesthesia: with special reference to their use in cardiovascular anesthesia. (5/6)

In this article, an attempt has been made to review the use of receptor stimulating pure agonist opioids in anesthesia, especially in patients with cardiovascular disease. Particular emphasis has been placed on the use of opioids in high doses to produce anesthesia, techniques that recently have become popular in cardiovascular anesthesia. A major benefit of opioid anesthesia is the cardiovascular stability obtained during induction and throughout operation, even in patients with severely impaired cardiac function. There is a considerable body of evidence to support this claim when fentanyl is used. Anesthetic doses of morphine are associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disturbances and other problems, and, therefore, more attention to detail is required in order to achieve adequate anesthesia and hemodynamic stability. Although other opioids have been used as sole or principal agents in anesthesia for cardiovascular surgery, none have gained widespread acceptance. Meperidine, for example, which is widely used in lower (nonanesthetic) doses as a supplement to nitrous oxide in cardiac and noncardiac surgery, has proved unsuitable because of severe hemodynamic disturbances when high doses are given. However, initial reports concerning two of the newer agonist opioids, sufentanil and alfentanil, suggest that they may prove to be suitable alternatives and perhaps provide advantages over morphine and fentanyl in patients with or without cardiovascular disease. Although cardiovascular stability usually can be assured in the chronically sick cardiac patient with opioid anesthesia, this is not always so with the healthier patient, particularly those presenting for coronary artery surgery. A frequently occurring problem in these patients is hypertension during or after sternotomy, which can result in myocardial ischemia and infarction. The incidence of severe hypertension (increases in systolic blood pressure greater than 20% of control values) can be reduced drastically by increasing the dose of opioid, e.g., up to 140 micrograms/kg of fentanyl. However, despite such large doses, some patients will continue to need treatment with vasodilators, inhalation anesthetics, or other supplements at certain periods during cardiovascular operations. The use of very large doses of opioids also will prolong postoperative respiratory depression. High doses of opioids can reduce or prevent the hormonal and metabolic responses to the stress of surgery. However, even very large doses of fentanyl or its newer analogues do not prevent marked increases in plasma catecholamine concentrations in response to cardiopulmonary bypass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)  (+info)

Neonatal neurobehavioral effects of inhalation analgesia for vaginal delivery. (6/6)

The authors studied the neonatal neurobehavioral effects of nitrous oxide:oxygen and enflurane:oxygen inhalation analgesia for vaginal delivery. Parturients were assigned randomly to receive no inhalation agent (Group 1, n = 21); enflurane, 0.3 to 0.8 per cent, and oxygen (Group 2, n = 22); or nitrous oxide, 30 to 50 per cent, and oxygen (Group 3, n = 18). Infants were tested at 15 min, 2 h, and 24 h of age using the Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity Score (NACS); and at 2 and 24 h using the Early Neonatal Neurobehavioral Scale (ENNS). No significant differences in neurobehavioral status occurred. For all groups, scores tended to be lowest at two hours of age. We conclude that neither enflurane nor nitrous oxide analgesia adversely affects neonatal neurobehavioral status at 15 min, 2 h, or 24 h of age.  (+info)

*Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

Alphaprodine (α-1,3-dimethyl-4-phenyl-4-piperidinol propionate) Anileridine (ethyl 1-[2-(p-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4- ...

*Drug policy of India

Alphacetylmethadol Alphameprodine Alphamethadol Alpha-methylfentanyl Alpha-methylthiofentanyl Alphaprodine Alprazolam ...

*Prodine

Both exhibit optical isomerism and alphaprodine and betaprodine are racemates. Alphaprodine was reported to closely related to ... Alphaprodine has a duration of action of 1 to 2 hours and 40 to 60 mg is equal to 10 mg of morphine via the subcutaneous route ... Alphaprodine has a DEA ACSCN of 9010 and 2013 manufacturing quota of 3 grammes; betaprodine has an ACSCN of 9611 and a 2 gramme ... Alphaprodine was sold under several brand names, mainly Nisentil and Prisilidine. It was mainly used for pain relief in ...

*Diphenoxylate

It is most closely related to anileridine; other somewhat more distant relatives include alphaprodine and piritramide. It is ...

*Desmethylprodine

This research produced the analgesic alphaprodine (Nisentil, Prisilidine), a very closely related compound. In 1976, a 23-year- ...

*Piritramide

... and somewhat more distantly alphaprodine. Not being in clinical use in the United States, it is a Schedule I Narcotic ...

*Phenindamine

... does exhibit optical isomerism as do other chemicals of its general type ranging from pethidine and alphaprodine ...

*Phenadoxone

... and alphaprodine (Nisentil). Phenadoxone has a US DEA ACSCN of 9637 and recently has had a zero annual manufacturing quota ...

*Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs

... allylprodine alphameprodine alphaprodine betameprodine betaprodine desmethylprodine (MPPP) PEPAP trimeperidine Synthetic 4- ...

*Opium Law

... acetylmethadol alphacetylmethadol alphameprodine alphamethadol alphamethylfentanyl alphamethylthiofentanyl alphaprodine ...

*List of drugs: Al

Alphamul Alphanate AlphaNine SD alphaprodine (INN) Alphaquin HP Alpharedisol Alphatrex Alphazine alpidem (INN) alpiropride (INN ...

*Misuse of Drugs Act (Ireland)

Alphameprodine Alphamethadol Alphaprodine Anileridine Benzethidine Benzylmorphine (3-benzylmorphine) Betacetylmethadol ...

*List of MeSH codes (D03)

... alphaprodine MeSH D03.383.621.050 --- anabasine MeSH D03.383.621.080 --- betalains MeSH D03.383.621.080.500 --- betacyanins ...

*Pethidine

... alphaprodine, MPPP, etc.), bemidones (ketobemidone, etc.) and others more distant, including diphenoxylate and analogues. ...

*Alphacetylmethadol

... as is the case with other common opiate/opioid medications such as diacetylmorphine and alphaprodine), with an ACSCN of 9603 ...

*Piminodine

40 to 60 mg of alphaprodine and 10 mg of morphine. Oral formulations were also available. Piminodine has similar effects to ...
0067]The following opiates, opioids, tranquillisers or other narcotics are substances with a psychotropic action, i.e. have a potential of abuse, and hence are preferably not contained in the dosage form according to the invention: alfentanil, allobarbital, allylprodine, alphaprodine, alprazolam, amfepramone, amphetamine, amphetaminil, amobarbital, anileridine, apocodeine, barbital, bemidone, benzylmorphine, bezitramide, bromazepam, brotizolam, buprenorphine, butobarbital, butorphanol, camazepam, carfentanil, cathine/D-norpseudoephedrine, chlordiazepoxide, clobazam clofedanol, clonazepam, clonitazene, clorazepate, clotiazepam, cloxazolam, cocaine, codeine, cyclobarbital, cyclorphan, cyprenorphine, delorazepam, desomorphine, dextromoramide, dextropropoxyphene, dezocine, diampromide, diamorphone, diazepam, dihydrocodeine, dihydromorphine, dihydromorphone, dimenoxadol, dimephetamol, dimethylthiambutene, dioxaphetylbutyrate, dipipanone, dronabinol, eptazocine, estazolam, ethoheptazine, ...
Pethidine, also known as meperidine and sold under the brand name Demerol among others, is a synthetic opioid pain medication of the phenylpiperidine class. Synthesized in 1939 as a potential anticholinergic agent by the German chemist Otto Eisleb, its analgesic properties were first recognized by Otto Schaumann while working for IG Farben, Germany. Pethidine is the prototype of a large family of analgesics including the pethidine 4-phenylpiperidines (piminodine, anileridine and others), the prodines (alphaprodine, MPPP, etc.), bemidones (ketobemidone, etc.) and others more distant, including diphenoxylate and analogues. Pethidine is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe pain, and is delivered as a hydrochloride salt in tablets, as a syrup, or by intramuscular, subcutaneous, or intravenous injection. For much of the 20th century, pethidine was the opioid of choice for many physicians; in 1975, 60% of doctors prescribed it for acute pain and 22% for chronic severe pain. Compared with ...
We have emailed you at with instructions on how to set up a new password. If you do not receive an email in the next 24 hours, or if you misplace your new password, please contact:. ASA members: ...
Hydroxyzine is both an antihistamine and anxiolytic and its use as a mild tranquilliser is especially common in dentistry and it retains some popularity in obstetrics, where for many years it was especially preferred for its ability to boost the effectiveness of alphaprodine (Nisentil), a narcotic analgesic related to pethidine as well as permit later use of scopolamine or benzodiazepines better than other drugs might.
Varicose vein surgeries are routine outpatient procedures, which are often performed under local anaesthesia. The use of local anaesthesia both minimises the risk to patients and is cost effective, however, a number of patients still experience pain during surgery. Surgical teams must therefore decide to administer either a general or local anaesthetic based on their subjective qualitative assessment of patient anxiety and sensitivity to pain, without any means to objectively validate their decision. To this end, we develop a 3-D polynomial surface fit, of physiological metrics and numerical pain ratings from patients, in order to model the link between the modulation of cardiovascular responses and pain in varicose vein surgeries ...
Possible link between high prenatal BPA levels and neonatal neurobehavioral abnormalities; study advises pregnant women to reduce exposure levels. A new case study examining an infants neurobehavioral abnormalities and extremely high bisphenol A (BPA) concentration of the babys mother suggests a link between the two. The study, Environmental Health Perspectives: A Case Study of High Prenatal Bisphenol A Exposure and Infant Neonatal Neurobehavior, was led by researcher Sheela Sathyanarayana, MD of Seattle Childrens Research Institute, and recently published online in Environmental Health Perspectives.. BPA, a synthetic, man-made chemical, is used in a wide variety of products including: can linings; hard polycarbonate plastics such as baby bottles and reusable cups; and dental sealants. Food may be the single largest source of BPA exposure due to contamination of foods during preparation and processing. BPA has estrogenic (hormone-like) properties. In animal studies, exposure to BPA early in ...
Aramine® (metaraminol bitartrate) has been found in the possession of horse trainers and veterinarians who have been investigated for possible inappropriate drug administration to racing horses. Metaraminol (3-hydroxyphenylisopropanolamine) is a sympathomimetic amine that directly and indirectly affects adrenergic receptors, with alpha effects being predominant. Because it has the potential to affect the performance of a racing horse, its use is prohibited. In the present study, methods for the detection of metaraminol were developed. Metaraminol was found to be extracted with poor recovery (, 50%) from aqueous solutions by routine basic extraction or cation exchange/reversed-phase solid-phase extraction techniques. However, an extractive acetylation method gave good (, 90%) recovery of metaraminol from aqueous samples. Sequential urine samples collected from horses administered metaraminol intramuscularly at 0.02, 0.10, and 0.23 mg/kg were extracted by the developed extractive acetylation ...
Learn about Aramine (Metaraminol) may treat, uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications.
Friday, January 12, 2018Expand your practice through quality referrals from happy, confident patients who have faced their fears and received excellent care from you and your team!The fear and anxiety experienced by millions of Americans receiving dental care is a well-documented reality. Research suggests nearly 30% of adults would benefit from some form of anxiolysis or sedation to receive dental care. Only 60% of these patients do well with nitrous oxide sedation alone, meaning 34 million fearful individuals are avoiding routine and necessary dental visits.This course is designed to teach you how to take the stress out of dentistry, allowing optimal dental care.Please review your states rulings and codes prior to registering for this course. Minnesota Administrative Rules3100.3600 ADMINISTRATION OF GENERAL ANESTHESIA, DEEP SEDATION, MODERATE SEDATION, MINIMAL SEDATION, AND NITROUS OXIDE INHALATION ANALGESIA.https://www.revisor.mn.gov/rules/?id=3100.3600Wisconsin State LegislatureChapter DE 11
Anesthesiology is the practice of medicine that uses specific drugs to render your entire body-or part of your body-insensitive to pain. Anesthesia will enable you to tolerate a surgical procedure comfortably, with minimal emotional stress. Based upon the type of surgery you are having, among other factors, there are different types of anesthesia.. An anesthesiologist is a doctor of medicine with three or more additional years of specialty training in anesthesia. Anesthesiologists are involved in intensive care, cardiac resuscitation, respiratory therapy and pain treatment. Their primary role, however, is to care for patient needs during surgery or obstetrics, and in the immediate postoperative period.. Overlake Anesthesiologists, P.S., is a team of highly qualified, board-certified physicians who provide anesthesia services at Overlake. Many have additional expertise in obstetric, pediatric and cardiovascular anesthesia. Overlake Anesthesiologists has been administering anesthetics at Overlake ...
Gynecologic Surgery - The gynecologic surgery experts at Reston Hospital Center help you take care of yourself so you can take care of those you love.
Neurotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects of manganese phosphate/sulfate mixture in male sprague-dawley rats following subchronic inhalation ...
The persistence of neurobehavioral effects in female rats (Mol:WIST) exposed to 500 ppm technical xylene (dimethylbenzene, GAS-no 1330-20-7) for 6 hours per day on days 7-20 of prenatal development was studied. The dose level was selected so as not to induce maternal toxicity or decreased viability of offspring. Investigations of learning and memory abilities were performed using a Morris water maze. This task requires rats to spatially navigate, using distal extramaze cues to locate a small platform under the surface of the water in a large pool. At the age of 16 weeks, the exposed offspring showed impairments when the platform was relocated in the pool. Impaired performances after platform relocation were also observed in exposed offspring at 28 and 55 weeks of age, although the difference was not statistically significant at 55 weeks. These data could indicate that the effect was partly reversible, although over a long time period. However, another explanation could be that the animals became ...
Diethelm Wallwiener, Atlas of Gynecologic Surgery, 4th edition English | ISBN: 3136507045 | 2014 | 676 pages | PDF | 68 MB http://nitroflare.com/view/F5A968D
Womens Health Associates provides many in-office procedures with state of the art equipment to ensure you receive the best quality care
No other journal can match Anesthesia & Analgesia for its original and significant contributions to the anesthesiology field. Each monthly issue features peer-reviewed articles reporting on the latest advances in drugs, preoperative preparation, patient monitoring, pain management, pathophysiology, and many other timely topics. Backed by internationally-known authorities who serve on the Editorial Board and as Section Editors, Anesthesia &Analgesia is your gateway to everything that is happening in anesthesia and 14 related subspecialties: Analgesia; Ambulatory Anesthesia; Anesthetic Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Anesthesia; Critical Care and Trauma; Economics, Education, and Policy; Neurosurgical Anesthesia; Obstetric Anesthesia; Pain Mechanisms; Pain Medicine; Pediatric Anesthesia; Regional Anesthesia; Patient Safety; and Technology, Computing and Simulation.
No other journal can match Anesthesia & Analgesia for its original and significant contributions to the anesthesiology field. Each monthly issue features peer-reviewed articles reporting on the latest advances in drugs, preoperative preparation, patient monitoring, pain management, pathophysiology, and many other timely topics. Backed by internationally-known authorities who serve on the Editorial Board and as Section Editors, Anesthesia &Analgesia is your gateway to everything that is happening in anesthesia and 14 related subspecialties: Analgesia; Ambulatory Anesthesia; Anesthetic Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Anesthesia; Critical Care and Trauma; Economics, Education, and Policy; Neurosurgical Anesthesia; Obstetric Anesthesia; Pain Mechanisms; Pain Medicine; Pediatric Anesthesia; Regional Anesthesia; Patient Safety; and Technology, Computing and Simulation.
Dr. Thomas Ebert is a Professor of Anesthesiology and serves as the Vice Chairman for Education and Residency Program Director for the Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). He is a staff anesthesiologist at the Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, where he also serves as Chief of Anesthesiology. Dr. Ebert did his graduate training at MCW, receiving his masters and doctor of philosophy degrees for his work on the effect of age and cardiovascular disease on human baroreflexes. He has done extensive research in the field of cardiovascular anesthesia and autonomic control during anesthesia. Other research interests include obstructive sleep apnea in surgical patients and anesthetic protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury in young, human volunteers. Currently, he is seeking funding to explore the use of diet and exercise to improve the physical status of frail patients prior to elective surgery to reduce post-surgery adverse events. He has published nearly 125 ...
Metaraminol, L-1-(3-hidroksifenil)-2-aminopropan-1-ol, se može sintetisati na dva načina. Prvi način je sinteza počevši od 3-hidroksipropiofenona. Hidroksilna grupa se zaštiti alkilacijom sa benzil hloridom, dajući 3-benziloksipropiofenon. Nakon reakcije sa butil nitritom, dolazi do nitrozilacije u izonitrozoketon, koji se redukcijom vodonikom na Rejnijevem niklu pretvara u 1-(3-benziloksifenil)-2-aminopropan-1-ol, i zatim se zaštitna benzil grupa uklanja redukcijom koristeći vodonik sa paladijumskim katalizatorom, čime se formira racemski metaraminol. Željeni L-izomer se izoluje uz pomoć (+)-tartarinske kiseline.[9][10] ...
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
Visit Healthgrades for information on Dr. Victoria Tai, MD Find Phone & Address information, medical practice history, affiliated hospitals and more.
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details ...
Blood and breath concentrations from controlled exposures to acetone (67641) and methylethyl-ketone (78933) (MEK) vapors were studied in humans. The study was part of a larger study of the neurobehavioral effects of acetone and MEK. Seventy healthy male and female volunteers, 18 to 32 years old, with no previous prolonged exposure to solvents were exposed to 0 or 250 parts per million (ppm) aceton
Page contains details about rhodamine B octadecyl ester perchlorate/poly(vinyl sulfonic acid)/bovine serum albumin nanoparticles . It has composition images, properties, Characterization methods, synthesis, applications and reference articles : nano.nature.com
Ethicon is devoted to shaping the future of surgery by advancing innovation, addressing the most pressing healthcare issues and improving lives every day.
Provides superbly illustrated, authoritative guidance on operative techniques along with a thorough understanding of how to select the best procedure, how to avoid complications, and what outcomes to expect.
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As an obstetrician and gynecologist, I have an appreciation for health care needs unique to my patients. I love that medical advances over the last five to 10 years have allowed me to help many women with an array of treatment choices, especially related to gynecologic surgery.. Many women consider gynecologic surgery for various conditions, such as abnormal bleeding, pelvic pain, ovarian cysts, fibroids or endometriosis. In the past, these surgeries were often done through large abdominal incisions requiring long hospitalizations and extended recovery time. In addition, they were sometimes accompanied by more scar tissue and increased risks of bleeding and infection.. Thankfully, as with much of modern medicine, an array of minimally invasive surgery techniques now exist to provide women with more choice, convenience and benefits, depending on individual needs. These approaches are usually associated with less pain, quicker recovery, and lower risks of infection and bleeding.. Using a minimally ...
metaraminol bitartrate 33402-03-8 MSDS report, metaraminol bitartrate MSDS safety technical specifications search, metaraminol bitartrate safety information specifications ect.
The Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery Center at Mass General delivers innovative, multidisciplinary care for a full range of gynecologic conditions.
Ganstigmine (CHF2819) is a novel, orally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that induces a stimulation of brain cholinergic transmission. In vivo studies show that, in rat prefrontal cortex, extracellular acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations are significantly increased either after local (1 and 10M) or oral (1.5 and 3 mg/kg) administration. Moreover, repeated oral treatment (six consecutive days; 3 mg/kg) with ganstigmine significantly increases basal extracellular concentrations of ACh in rat prefrontal cortex. Then, acute ganstigmine administration induces a significant increase in extracellular ACh concentrations (actual values) with respect to the last sample in ganstigmine-treated rats. Concentrations of serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) are not affected by any oral dose of ganstigmine (1.5 and 3 mg/kg) used. Moreover, levels of dopamine (DA) and metabolites are not modified either. Basal extracellular concentrations of 5-HT, NA, DA and metabolites are not affected by repeated (six ...
Laura Douglass, MD, specializes in gynecologic surgery, including fertility sparing treatment for endometriosis and transabdominal cerclages (TAC) for women with an incompetent cervix.
Among nursing parturients after cesarean delivery, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with meperidine is associated with significantly more neonatal neurobehavioral depression than PCA with morphine. A single dose of epidural morphine (4
Looking for non narcotic analgesic? Here you can find the lowest price products about non narcotic analgesic. We Provide for you about non narcotic analgesic page1
Visit Healthgrades for information on Dr. William Walker, MD Find Phone & Address information, medical practice history, affiliated hospitals and more.

Compound Report CardCompound Report Card

ChEMBL Compound Description] ID:, InChI_Key:, Tradenames:NISENTIL, Synonyms:NISENTIL , ALPHAPRODINE , ALPHAPRODINE ... ALPHAPRODINE. ChEMBL Synonyms NISENTIL , ALPHAPRODINE , ALPHAPRODINE HYDROCHLORIDE. Max Phase. 0. Trade Names. ...
more infohttps://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl/compound/inspect/CHEMBL1623765

Talacen Advanced Patient Information - Drugs.comTalacen Advanced Patient Information - Drugs.com

Detailed drug Information for Talacen. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/cons/talacen.html

2018 - United States Pharmacopeial Convention2018 - United States Pharmacopeial Convention

Alphaprodine. 9010. II. Anileridine. 9020. II. Cocaine. 9041. II. Dihydrocodeine. 9120. II. ...
more infohttps://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/fed_regs/imprt/app/2018/fr0409.htm

Chapter 90 - Article 5Chapter 90 - Article 5

Article 5.. North Carolina Controlled Substances Act. 90-86. Title of Article.. This Article shall be known and may be cited as the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act. (1971, c. 919, s. 1.). 90-87. Definitions.. As used in this Article:. (1) Administer means the direct application of a controlled substance, whether by injection, inhalation, ingestion, or any other means to the body of a patient or research subject by:. a. A practitioner (or, in his presence, by his authorized agent), or. b. The patient or research subject at the direction and in the presence of the practitioner.. (2) Agent means an authorized person who acts on behalf of or at the direction of a manufacturer, distributor, or dispenser but does not include a common or contract carrier, public warehouseman, or employee thereof.. (3) Bureau means the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, United States Department of Justice or its successor agency.. (3a) Commission means the Commission for Mental Health, ...
more infohttps://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/HTML/ByArticle/Chapter_90/Article_5.html

2018 - Lipomed2018 - Lipomed

Alphaprodine. 9010. II. Anileridine. 9020. II. Cocaine. 9041. II. Codeine. 9050. II. ...
more infohttps://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/fed_regs/imprt/app/2018/fr1120_5.htm

Buprenorphine/Naloxone (Oromucosal Route, Sublingual Route) Precautions - Mayo ClinicBuprenorphine/Naloxone (Oromucosal Route, Sublingual Route) Precautions - Mayo Clinic

It is against the law and dangerous for anyone else to use your medicine. Keep your unused films or tablets in a safe and secure place. People who are addicted to drugs might want to steal this medicine. Do not use more of this medicine or take it more often than your doctor tells you to. This can be life-threatening. Symptoms of an overdose include extreme dizziness or weakness, slow heartbeat or breathing, seizures, trouble breathing, and cold, clammy skin. Call your doctor right away if you notice these symptoms. Before having any kind of surgery (including dental surgery) or emergency treatment, tell the medical doctor or dentist in charge that you are using this medicine. Serious unwanted effects can occur if certain medicines are given together with buprenorphine and naloxone combination. This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that can make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicine for allergies ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/buprenorphine-and-naloxone-buccal-mucosa-route-sublingual-route/precautions/drg-20074097?p=1

Troxyca ER Advanced Patient Information - Drugs.comTroxyca ER Advanced Patient Information - Drugs.com

Detailed drug Information for Troxyca ER. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/cons/troxyca-er.html

Naltrexone And Bupropion (Oral Route) Description and Brand Names - Mayo ClinicNaltrexone And Bupropion (Oral Route) Description and Brand Names - Mayo Clinic

Do not take naltrexone and bupropion combination with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (eg, isocarboxazid [Marplan®], phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline [Eldepryl®], tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). Do not start taking naltrexone and bupropion combination during the 2 weeks after you stop a MAO inhibitor. Wait 2 weeks after stopping naltrexone and bupropion combination before you start taking a MAO inhibitor. If you take them together or do not wait 2 weeks, you may have confusion, agitation, restlessness, stomach or bowel symptoms, a sudden high body temperature, an extremely high blood pressure, or severe convulsions. Do not use naltrexone and bupropion combination if you are also using Zyban® to quit smoking or Aplenzin® or Wellbutrin® for depression, because they also contain bupropion. Also, do not take this medicine if you are using or have used narcotic drugs (such as buprenorphine, methadone, or other habit-forming painkillers) within the past 7 to 10 days. This medicine may cause ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/naltrexone-and-bupropion-oral-route/description/drg-20122495?p=1

Chapter 893 Section 03 - 2013 Florida Statutes - The Florida SenateChapter 893 Section 03 - 2013 Florida Statutes - The Florida Senate

2. Alphaprodine.. 3. Anileridine.. 4. Bezitramide.. 5. Bulk propoxyphene (nondosage forms).. 6. Carfentanil. ...
more infohttps://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2013/893.03

Chapter 893 Section 03 - 2016 Florida Statutes - The Florida SenateChapter 893 Section 03 - 2016 Florida Statutes - The Florida Senate

2. Alphaprodine.. 3. Anileridine.. 4. Bezitramide.. 5. Bulk propoxyphene (nondosage forms).. 6. Carfentanil. ...
more infohttp://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2016/893.03

Category:Piperidines - Wikimedia CommonsCategory:Piperidines - Wikimedia Commons

De tekst is beschikbaar onder de licentie Creative Commons Naamsvermelding-Gelijk delen. Er kunnen aanvullende voorwaarden van toepassing zijn. Zie de Gebruiksvoorwaarden voor meer informatie ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Piperidines?uselang=nl

Session LawSession Law

1½) Alphaprodine. SECTION 31. The General Laws are hereby further amended by inserting after chapter 94F the following chapter ...
more infohttps://malegislature.gov/Laws/SessionLaws/Acts/2016/Chapter52

Legal database - View: Principal legislation: SECTION 314.2Legal database - View: Principal legislation: SECTION 314.2

12 Alphaprodine. 25.0. 25.0. 13 Amphecloral. 2.0. 2.0. 14 3-(2-Aminopropyl)indole (alpha-methyltryptamine (AMT)). 2.0. 2.0. ...
more infohttps://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/document?docid=PAC/19950012/Sch-314.2

Popis opojnih droga, psihotropnih tvari i biljaka iz kojih se može dobiti opojna droga te tvari koje se mogu uporabiti za...Popis opojnih droga, psihotropnih tvari i biljaka iz kojih se može dobiti opojna droga te tvari koje se mogu uporabiti za...

Alphaprodine. a-1,3-dimethyl-4-phenyl-4-propionoxypiperidine. anileridin. Anileridine. 1-p-aminophenethyl-4-phenylpiperidine-4- ...
more infohttps://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/2004_11_163_2865.html

Statute | Kansas State LegislatureStatute | Kansas State Legislature

2) Alphaprodine 9010. (3) Anileridine 9020. (4) Bezitramide 9800. (5) Bulk dextropropoxyphene (nondosage forms) 9273 ...
more infohttp://www.kslegislature.org/li/b2017_18/statute/065_000_0000_chapter/065_041_0000_article/065_041_0007_section/065_041_0007_k/

Cinchocaine - DrugBankCinchocaine - DrugBank

Alphaprodine. The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cinchocaine is combined with Alphaprodine.. Illicit ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB00527

Enflurane - DrugBankEnflurane - DrugBank

Alphaprodine. The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Enflurane is combined with Alphaprodine.. Illicit. ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB00228

Meylers Side Effects of Drugs - Elsevier Science & Technology - Literati by CredoMeyler's Side Effects of Drugs - Elsevier Science & Technology - Literati by Credo

This updated edition in the long standing series provides the latest information on many individual drugs, including the most complete coverage of their adverse reactions and interactions.
more infohttps://corp.credoreference.com/component/booktracker/edition/11102.html

2016 Chapter 2 D | United States Sentencing Commission2016 Chapter 2 D | United States Sentencing Commission

1 gm of Alphaprodine =. 100 gm of marihuana. 1 gm of Fentanyl (N-phenyl-N-[1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl] Propanamide) =. 2.5 ...
more infohttps://www.ussc.gov/guidelines/2016-guidelines-manual/2016-chapter-2-d
  • In experiments in rats in which levallorphan, nalorphine and WIN 7681 were tested against the respiratory depressant action of levo-Dromoran, levomethadone, morphine, meperidine and alphaprodine, it was found that while all possessed some ability to restore depressed respiration to normal, levallorphan was the most active. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Hydroxyzine is both an antihistamine and anxiolytic and its use as a mild tranquilliser is especially common in dentistry and it retains some popularity in obstetrics, where for many years it was especially preferred for its ability to boost the effectiveness of alphaprodine (Nisentil), a narcotic analgesic related to pethidine as well as permit later use of scopolamine or benzodiazepines better than other drugs might. (pharmaoffshore.com)