alpha-Linolenic Acid: A fatty acid that is found in plants and involved in the formation of prostaglandins.Linolenic Acids: Eighteen-carbon essential fatty acids that contain three double bonds.Linoleic Acids: Eighteen-carbon essential fatty acids that contain two double bonds.Linoleic Acid: A doubly unsaturated fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycosides. It is an essential fatty acid in mammalian nutrition and is used in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and cell membranes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Fatty Acids, Unsaturated: FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.Fatty Acids, Essential: Long chain organic acid molecules that must be obtained from the diet. Examples are LINOLEIC ACIDS and LINOLENIC ACIDS.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)gamma-Linolenic Acid: An omega-6 fatty acid produced in the body as the delta 6-desaturase metabolite of linoleic acid. It is converted to dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, a biosynthetic precursor of monoenoic prostaglandins such as PGE1. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Dietary Fats, Unsaturated: Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Stearic Acids: A group of compounds that are derivatives of octadecanoic acid which is one of the most abundant fatty acids found in animal lipids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Lipoxygenase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class primarily found in PLANTS. It catalyzes reactions between linoleate and other fatty acids and oxygen to form hydroperoxy-fatty acid derivatives.Linseed Oil: The fixed oil obtained from the dried ripe seed of linseed, Linum usitatissimum (L. Linaceae). It is used as an emollient in liniments, pastes, and medicinal soaps, and in veterinary medicine as a laxative. It is also called flaxseed oil. (Dorland, 28th ed)Docosahexaenoic Acids: C22-unsaturated fatty acids found predominantly in FISH OILS.Fatty Acid Desaturases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the stereoselective, regioselective, or chemoselective syn-dehydrogenation reactions. They function by a mechanism that is linked directly to reduction of molecular OXYGEN.Chromatography, Gas: Fractionation of a vaporized sample as a consequence of partition between a mobile gaseous phase and a stationary phase held in a column. Two types are gas-solid chromatography, where the fixed phase is a solid, and gas-liquid, in which the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid supported on an inert solid matrix.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Flax: A plant genus of the family LINACEAE that is cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen cloth). It contains a trypsin inhibitor and the seed is the source of LINSEED OIL.Borago: A plant genus of the family BORAGINACEAE.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Dictionaries, ChemicalAgrochemicals: Chemicals used in agriculture. These include pesticides, fumigants, fertilizers, plant hormones, steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins, etc.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Biopharmaceutics: The study of the physical and chemical properties of a drug and its dosage form as related to the onset, duration, and intensity of its action.Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases: Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor.Lipoxins: Trihydroxy derivatives of eicosanoic acids. They are primarily derived from arachidonic acid, however eicosapentaenoic acid derivatives also exist. Many of them are naturally occurring mediators of immune regulation.Arachidonic Acid: An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.Aristolochic Acids: Nitro-phenanthrenes occurring in ARISTOLOCHIACEAE and other plants. They derive from stephanine (APORPHINES) by oxidative ring cleavage. The nitro group is a reactive alkylator (ALKYLATING AGENTS) that binds to biological macromolecules. Ingestion by humans is associated with nephropathy (NEPHRITIS). There is no relationship to the similar named aristolochene (SESQUITERPENES).Fatty Acids, Omega-3: A group of fatty acids, often of marine origin, which have the first unsaturated bond in the third position from the omega carbon. These fatty acids are believed to reduce serum triglycerides, prevent insulin resistance, improve lipid profile, prolong bleeding times, reduce platelet counts, and decrease platelet adhesiveness.Milk, HumanSeafood: Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.DiglyceridesLiver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Diacylglycerol Kinase: An enzyme of the transferase class that uses ATP to catalyze the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol to a phosphatidate. EC 2.7.1.107.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Poly I-C: Interferon inducer consisting of a synthetic, mismatched double-stranded RNA. The polymer is made of one strand each of polyinosinic acid and polycytidylic acid.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Postprandial Period: The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.Rhizomucor: A genus of zygomycetous fungi of the family Mucoraceae, order MUCORALES.TriglyceridesAcademic DissertationsTriacetin: A triglyceride that is used as an antifungal agent.Medicare Part C: The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 establishes a Medicare+Choice program under part C of Title XVIII, Section 4001, of the Social Security Act. Under this program, an eligible individual may elect to receive Medicare benefits through enrollment in a Medicare+Choice plan. Beneficiaries may choose to use private pay options, establish medical savings accounts, use managed care plans, or join provider-sponsored plans.Fitness Centers: Facilities having programs intended to promote and maintain a state of physical well-being for optimal performance and health.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)United StatesAppointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.

High-linoleate and high-alpha-linolenate diets affect learning ability and natural behavior in SAMR1 mice. (1/510)

Semipurified diets incorporating either perilla oil [high in alpha-linolenate, 18:3(n-3)] or safflower oil [high in linoleate, 18:2(n-6)] were fed to senescence-resistant SAMR1 mouse dams and their pups. Male offspring at 15 mo were examined using behavioral tests. In the open field test, locomotor activity during a 5-min period was significantly higher in the safflower oil group than in the perilla oil group. Observations of the circadian rhythm (48 h) of spontaneous motor activity indicated that the safflower oil group was more active than the perilla oil group during the first and second dark periods. The total number of responses to positive and negative stimuli was higher in the safflower oil group than in the perilla oil group in the light and dark discrimination learning test, but the correct response ratio was lower in the safflower oil group. The difference in the (n-6)/(n-3) ratios of the diets reflected the proportions of (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids, rather than those of (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain total fatty acids, and in the proportions of (n-6) and (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids in the total polyunsaturated fatty acids of the brain phospholipids. These results suggest that in SAMR1 mice, the dietary alpha-linolenate/linoleate balance affects the (n-6)/(n-3) ratio of brain phospholipids, and this may modify emotional reactivity and learning ability.  (+info)

Effect of dietary alpha-linolenic acid on thrombotic risk factors in vegetarian men. (2/510)

BACKGROUND: Vegetarians have lower platelet and plasma concentrations of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than do omnivores. We recently showed that male vegetarians have higher platelet aggregability than do omnivores. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether male vegetarians (n = 17) who consumed an increased amount of dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) showed any changes in their tissue profile of PUFAs, plasma thromboxane concentrations, platelet aggregability, or hemostatic factors. DESIGN: During the study, all subjects maintained their habitual vegetarian diets except that a proportion of dietary fat was replaced with vegetable oils and margarines that were provided. Initially, all subjects consumed a low-ALA diet (containing safflower oil and safflower oil-based margarine) for 14 d; they then consumed either a moderate-ALA diet (containing canola oil and canola oil-based margarine) or a high-ALA diet (containing linseed oil and linseed oil-based margarine) for 28 d. Blood samples were collected at day 0 (baseline), day 14, and day 42. RESULTS: Eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, total n-3 PUFAs, and the ratio of n-3 to n-6 PUFAs were significantly increased (P < 0.05), whereas the ratio of arachidonic acid to eicosapentaenoic acid was decreased (P < 0.05), in platelet phospholipids, plasma phospholipids, and triacylglycerols after either the moderate-ALA or high-ALA diet compared with the low-ALA diet. No significant differences were observed in thrombotic risk factors. CONCLUSION: ALA from vegetable oils (canola and linseed) has a beneficial effect on n-3 PUFA concentrations of platelet phospholipids and plasma lipids in vegetarian males.  (+info)

Dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid and risk of fatal ischemic heart disease among women. (3/510)

BACKGROUND: Experimental studies in laboratory animals and humans suggest that alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) may reduce the risk of arrhythmia. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the association between dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid and risk of fatal ischemic heart disease (IHD). DESIGN: This was a prospective cohort study. The intake of alpha-linolenic acid was derived from a 116-item food-frequency questionnaire completed in 1984 by 76283 women without previously diagnosed cancer or cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: During 10 y of follow-up, we documented 232 cases of fatal IHD and 597 cases of nonfatal myocardial infarction. After adjustment for age, standard coronary risk factors, and dietary intake of linoleic acid and other nutrients, a higher intake of alpha-linolenic acid was associated with a lower relative risk (RR) of fatal IHD; the RRs from the lowest to highest quintiles were 1.0, 0.99, 0.90, 0.67, and 0.55 (95% CI: 0.32, 0.94; P for trend = 0.01). For nonfatal myocardial infarction there was only a modest, nonsignificant trend toward a reduced risk when extreme quintiles were compared (RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.61, 1.19; P for trend = 0.50). A higher intake of oil and vinegar salad dressing, an important source of alpha-linolenic acid, was associated with reduced risk of fatal IHD when women who consumed this food > or =5-6 times/wk were compared with those who rarely consumed this food (RR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.27, 0.76; P for trend = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the hypothesis that a higher intake of alpha-linolenic acid is protective against fatal IHD. Higher consumption of foods such as oil-based salad dressing that provide polyunsaturated fats, including alpha-linolenic acid, may reduce the risk of fatal IHD.  (+info)

Prevention of sudden cardiac death by dietary pure omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in dogs. (4/510)

BACKGROUND: Rat diets high in fish oil have been shown to be protective against ischemia-induced fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Increasing evidence suggests that this may also apply to humans. To confirm the evidence in animals, we tested a concentrate of the free fish-oil fatty acids and found them to be antiarrhythmic. In this study, we tested the pure free fatty acids of the 2 major dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil: cis-5,8,11,14, 17-eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5omega-3) and cis-4,7,10,13,16, 19-docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6omega-3), and the parent omega-3 fatty acid in some vegetable oils, cis-9,12,15-alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3omega-3), administered intravenously on albumin or a phospholipid emulsion. METHODS AND RESULTS: The tests were performed in a dog model of cardiac sudden death. Dogs were prepared with a large anterior wall myocardial infarction produced surgically and an inflatable cuff placed around the left circumflex coronary artery. With the dogs running on a treadmill 1 month after the surgery, occlusion of the left circumflex artery regularly produced ventricular fibrillation in the control tests done 1 week before and after the test, with the omega-3 fatty acids administered intravenously as their pure free fatty acid. With infusion of the eicosapentaenoic acid, 5 of 7 dogs were protected from fatal ventricular arrhythmias (P<0.02). With docosahexaenoic acid, 6 of 8 dogs were protected, and with alpha-linolenic acid, 6 of 8 dogs were also protected (P<0.004 for each). The before and after control studies performed on the same animal all resulted in fatal ventricular arrhythmias, from which they were defibrillated. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that purified omega-3 fatty acids can prevent ischemia-induced ventricular fibrillation in this dog model of sudden cardiac death.  (+info)

Antisense-mediated depletion of potato leaf omega3 fatty acid desaturase lowers linolenic acid content and reduces gene activation in response to wounding. (5/510)

Fatty acid omega3 desaturases act on membrane lipids to catalyse the formation of trienoic fatty acids, the most abundant in plant tissues being alpha-linolenic acid. This fatty acid is a precursor of jasmonic acid, a plant growth regulator involved in the control of wound-induced gene activation in plants and in the induction of tuberization in potato. We isolated a potato omega3 desaturase cDNA, possibly encoding a plastidial isoform, and used it to investigate its expression pattern throughout plant development and in response to wounding. Plastidial omega3 desaturase gene transcripts accumulate rapidly upon wounding, preceding the jasmonate-dependent induction of the wound-responsive proteinase inhibitor II gene. We generated transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing an antisense RNA to this plastidial omega3 desaturase. Selected transgenic lines in which the cognate omega3 desaturase mRNA is largely depleted show a marked reduction, of up to 60%, in trienoic acids in leaves and tubers. In these lines, a corresponding reduction in jasmonate content and proteinase inhibitor II expression is observed upon wounding. Our results indicate that a reduction in omega3 desaturase mRNA levels compromises the wound-induced activation of proteinase inhibitor II, suggesting that wound-induced synthesis of linolenic acid is required for jasmonic acid production. The antisense-mediated depletion of fatty acid omega3 desaturases is a viable alternative for reducing trienoic fatty acid content in plant species in which a mutant screening approach is not applicable.  (+info)

Differences in essential fatty acid requirements by enteral and parenteral routes of administration in patients with fat malabsorption. (6/510)

BACKGROUND: Essential fatty acid (EFA) requirements of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are uncertain. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the influence of the route of administration (enteral compared with parenteral) on plasma phospholipid EFA concentrations. DESIGN: Intestinal absorption, parenteral supplement of EFAs, and plasma phospholipid EFA concentrations were investigated in balance studies in 4 groups (A, B, C, and D) of 10 patients with short-bowel syndrome and a fecal loss of >2000 kJ/d. Groups A (fat malabsorption <50%) and B (fat malabsorption >50%) did not receive HPN, whereas group C received HPN containing lipids (7.5 and 1.2 g/d linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively) and group D received fat-free HPN. RESULTS: Intestinal absorption of linoleic and linolenic acids was 8.9 and 1.3 g/d and 2. 6 and 0.4 g/d in groups A and B, respectively, whereas EFA absorption was negligible in groups C and D. Thus, intestinal absorption of EFAs in group A corresponded to parenteral EFA supplements in group C, whereas group D was almost totally deprived of EFAs. The median plasma phospholipid concentration of linoleic acid decreased by 21.9%, >16.3%, >13.8%, 11.0%, and >7.7% and linolenic acid by 0.3%, 0.2%, 0.2%, >0.2%, and 0.1%, respectively, in 10 healthy control subjects and groups A, B, C, and D (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Intestinally absorbed EFAs maintained plasma EFA status better than did an equal quantity of parenterally supplied EFAs. Intravenous requirements of EFAs in patients with negligible absorption of EFAs are probably higher than the amounts recommended to patients with preserved intestinal absorption of EFAs.  (+info)

Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibits delta6 desaturation in the microalga Porphyridium cruentum. (7/510)

Treatment of the microalga Porphyridium cruentum with salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibited growth and affected fatty acid composition. At a relatively low concentration (40 microM) SHAM predominantly inhibits Delta6 desaturation. The effect of the inhibitor was most intense in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine, in which the proportions of the downstream products of the Delta6 desaturase were reduced, whereas that of the substrate, 18:2, increased. As a result of the availability of 18:2, 18:3omega3, which under normal conditions is not observed, appeared predominantly in chloroplastic lipids. Pulse labeling with linoleic acid has shown that SHAM inhibits Delta6 desaturation almost immediately, suggesting an apparent inhibition of the activity of the desaturase, rather than its synthesis or that of its cofactors. Furthermore, the addition of gamma-linolenic acid to SHAM-inhibited cultures relieved the inhibition. Following exposure to the inhibitor, 18:3omega3 appeared first in chloroplastic glycolipids and only later in PC, indicating that the former are the substrates for the first dedicated step of the proposed omega3 pathway in this alga.  (+info)

Exposure to flaxseed or its lignan component during different developmental stages influences rat mammary gland structures. (8/510)

Reduction of the highly proliferative terminal end bud (TEB) structures in the developing mammary gland by differentiation to alveolar buds (ABs) and lobules has been suggested to be protective against mammary cancer. Flaxseed is high in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and secoisolariciresinol diglycoside (SDG). SDG is the precursor of mammalian lignans, which can affect mammary gland structures. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of lifetime, gestation and lactation or after-weaning exposure to 5 or 10% flaxseed or SDG and flaxseed oil components on the mammary gland structures of virgin female rat offspring at post-natal day 50. Lifetime or gestation and lactation exposure to flaxseed altered mammary gland structure development, whereas exposure to flaxseed after weaning had no effect. Lifetime or gestation and lactation exposure to 5% flaxseed caused endocrine changes, as suggested by delayed puberty onset and reduced number of estrous cycles. These changes reduced exposure to endogenous estrogens, leading to atrophy of mammary TEB structures. SDG, but not flaxseed oil, at the level found in 5% flaxseed produced similar effects as 5% flaxseed. This suggested that the lignans were the component in flaxseed responsible for the observed effects. Lifetime or gestation and lactation exposure to 10% flaxseed also caused endocrine changes, as suggested by early puberty onset and lengthened cycles due to prolonged estrus. This increased exposure to endogenous estrogens and stimulated mammary gland differentiation, as indicated by fewer TEBs and more ABs. Thus, lifetime or gestation and lactation exposure to 5 or 10% flaxseed induced structural changes in the mammary gland that may potentially reduce mammary cancer risk.  (+info)

Alpha Linolenic Acid Benefits for Skin, Acne, Bodybuilding, Cholesterol, Weight Loss, Heart Health & Omega 3 Fatty Acid Source. Possible Side Effects.
Flax Oil (Certified Oorganic is a building block for omega 3 fatty acids and is the most powerful and highest source of the essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid. It has a vitamin-like activity in the body and is essential for metabolism. Flax oil helps maintain cholesterol levels that are already within the normal range. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) helps support platelet aggregation levels that are already within the normal range. ALA supports cartilage and joint function, and maintains heart health. INGREDIENTS: SERVING SIZE: 1 gel/SERVINGS PER CONTAIENR:100 AMOUNT PER SERVING: Flax oil(Certified organic and cold pressed).....................1000 mg Extracted without chemicals. Gelatin, Glycerin. Free of coatings, binders, fillers, dairy, wheat, eggs, soy, yeast, corn, sugar, starch, preservatives or hydrogenated oil.
In order to satisfy the bodily needs of EPA and DHA, which vary by life stage, these fatty acids are recommended by various organizations to be obtained directly from the consumption of omega-3 LCPUFA-rich foods, such as fatty fish and seafood. In effect, this bypasses the endogenous conversion of ALA. Several studies have determined that the fractional conversion of ingested ALA to DHA in humans ranges from less than 0.1% to 5%. The rest may be used for the generation of energy and stored in adipose tissue. In normal adults consuming a western diet, it is now accepted that with no changes in the diet, improvements in DHA status cannot be achieved by supplementation with ALA. The studies that showed that only a very low portion of ingested ALA is converted to DHA, were carried out with ALA doses between 1 and 3.5 g per day. However, few studies have explicitly addressed the situation when ALA intake is much higher, i.e. higher than, or comparable to, the amount of LA ingested to achieve tissue ...
Alpha-li nole nic acid (ALA) is the most commo n omega-3 fatty acid i n the Wester n diet. The relatio n of dietary i ntake of ALA to prostate ca ncer risk remai ns u nresolved. We prospectively evalu
Purpose.: Systemic polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were shown to improve the symptoms of dry eye syndrome due to their anti-inflammatory effects. This study evaluated the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of PUFAs on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Methods.: HCE cells were incubated for 2 hours with different concentrations of PUFAs: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and linoleic acid (LA). Oleic acid (OA) and dexamethasone (DM) served as negative and positive controls, respectively. Cells were stimulated with either polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) complex. The protein contents and mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α were evaluated with multiplex fluorescent bead immunoassay and real-time PCR, respectively. The expression of inhibitory factor-κBα (I-κBα) was evaluated with real-time PCR. Results.: The protein and mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α were significantly increased after ...
Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases like myocardial infarctions and strokes. The formation of these atherosclerotic plaques occurs through localized inflammatory responses in blood vessels. Epidemiological evidence suggests omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) decrease vascular inflammation. The omega-3 FAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) reduce inflammation through pathways that may include the free fatty acid-4 (FFA-4) receptor. While EPA and DHA are well studied, less is known about the essential omega-3 FA from which they are synthesized: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Thus, this study will investigate whether ALA can activate the FFA-4 receptor and thereby contribute to anti-inflammatory responses in the endothelium. Although the FFA-4 receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor, its activation reduces the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB thereby decreasing the synthesis and release of inflammatory cytokines. The resulting decrease in inflammatory cytokines
Previous observational studies have reported associations between prostate cancer and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). However, few investigations have been able to study this relationship prospectively and in well-controlled settings. Moreover, no studies have determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence ALA metabolism are associated with this common cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore associations between prostatic levels of ALA, SNPs and prostate cancer-specific biomarkers in samples collected from a previous randomized clinical trial conducted using a presurgical model and which tested the effects of flaxseed supplementation, a rich source of ALA, prior to prostatectomy (n = 134). Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was determined and immunohistochemistry was used to assess tumor proliferation rate (Ki67). Prostatic ALA was determined with gas chromatography. Seven previously identified SNPs associated with delta-6 desaturase activity (rs99780, rs174537, ...
Metabolism of alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid to their respective acids. Both of these processes are catalyzed primarily by FADS1 and FADS2. The conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids is catalysed by prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 and the conversion of arachidonic acid to lipoxins is catalysed by different types of lipoxygenases ...
Insulin resistance-related obesity and diabetes mellitus are the predominant causes of fatty liver disease. Here we examine the effects of dietary diacylglycerol (DG), which is a minor component of plant oils, on lipid accumulation and the expression
RESULTS: A greater intake of n-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid + docosapentaenoic acid + alpha-linolenic acid) was associated with lower ventricular ectopy (beta = -0.35, P = 0.011), and this effect remained after cardiovascular comorbidities were controlled for (beta = -0.47, P = 0.003). Higher concentrations of both marine-based (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid) (beta = -0.21, P = 0.060) and plant-based (alpha-linolenic acid) (beta = -0.33, P = 0.024) fatty acids remained associated with lower ventricular ectopy after cardiovascular comorbidities were controlled for ...
To treat abnormal heart rhythms, two grams of fish oil have been taken by mouth daily for 14-379 days. Four capsules containing two grams of fish oil composed of 0.464 grams of EPA, 0.335 grams of DHA, and 0.162 grams of other n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have been taken by mouth daily for 12 months. A dose of 1.8 grams of fish oil containing 42% EPA plus 30% DHA has been taken by mouth daily for two years. Four one-gram capsules containing 2.6 grams of EPA plus DHA have been taken by mouth for 12 months. Two, four, or six capsules of fish oil, with 260 milligrams of DHA, and 60 milligrams of EPA per one-gram capsule, have been taken by mouth for 12 weeks. A dose of six grams of DHA-rich fish oil has been taken by mouth daily for 12 weeks; DHA-rich fish oil providing 0.36 grams of EPA and 1.56 grams of DHA daily has been taken by mouth daily in the form of Hi-DHA from Nu-Mega Ingredients Pty. Ltd. Doses of 0.85-1.24 grams of EPA plus 1.0-1.76 grams of DHA have been taken ...
The major danger you experience from fish petrol omega 3 essential fatty acids side effects are the effect of poor quality fat, with low purity levels and a lot of products containing numerous toxins from.that fish. A process identified as molecular distillation is the easiest method to remove the toxins...
The answer is loud, strong NO. There are 2 essential fatty acids, alpha linolenic acid (ALA/omega-3) and linolenic acid (LA/ omega-6). They are called essential because our bodies cannot make them. We eat lots of Omega-6 which is found in animal products and vegetable oils. We eat less Omega-3 which is found in leafy greens, nuts, seeds and fatty fish that eat omega-3 rich seaweed. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in the diet should be close to 2:1, but in the American diet it is about 20:1. We have an imbalance of omega-6 to omega-3 not a true deficiency of omega-3. If we ate less omega-6 foods and more foods with a 1:1 ratio such as leafy greens there would be no problem, but instead of advising us to eat whole nutrient-dense foods, "health experts" advised us to eat more omega-3 in the form of fatty fish or fish oil supplements. The reason given is that omega-3 in fish and fish oil are the same as the active omega-3 fats in our bodies, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ...
Mamil Nite Special Formula information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Dumex, Mamil Nite Special Formula indications, usages and related health products lists
Dutch Lady Step 2 information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Dutch Lady Milk Industries, Dutch Lady Step 2 indications, usages and related health products lists
Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of molecular entities focused on small chemical compounds.
What to Eat for a Stronger, Healthier Brain. Whether youre looking to combat brain fog or wish to reduce your risk of developing Alzheimers or dementia, consuming a healthy diet should be your first line of defense. In recent years, research has revealed a host of powerful "superfoods" which both improve everyday brain function and protect against age-related cognitive decline, such as the 10 foods listed below:. 1. Walnuts. Not only are walnuts packed with heart-healthy and anti-inflammatory nutrients, they are high in alpha linolenic acid (ALA), which promotes blood flow to the brain, keeping it oxygenated and healthy. A preliminary study on mice with Alzheimers disease suggests that ALA may help to ease symptoms of the condition.. 2. Olive Oil. Olive oil is an excellent source of monounsaturated fats, which help to protect the brain against the effects of aging.. 3. Berries. Berries, especially blueberries, are essential to good brain health. According to a recent study published in the ...
Vitamin B12 Can be obtained from marmite, fortified breakfast cereals and plant milks. Vitamin D Can be made from UV-B light. Retinol (animal form of vitamin A) Can also be made from beta-carotene (present in vegetables such as carrots, sweet potato and dark green leafy veg). Long chain n-3 PUFA (*Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids). Long chain n-3 PUFA can be made from ALA (Alpha Linolenic Acid) found in foods such as flaxseed oil, rapeseed oil, and soybean oil. Taurine (an essential amino acid). Our body can also produce it from cysteine. Cysteine is present in foods such as red peppers, garlic, onions, broccoli, brussels sprout, oats. ...
Omega 3 fatty acids contain health supporting essential fatty acids such as Alpha Linolenic Acid (AHA), Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) & Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA). It may work to reduce inflammation, joint paint & promote respiratory, brain & cognitive function.
The good and known flaxseeds has benefits in preventing and treating many diseases including cancer and it also helps in the diet, and its most important ingredient is the fluid that is released when in contact with water, but all of its properties are best experienced when using ground.. It is a very full of omega 3 fatty acids, and vitamins and trace elements such as potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zing, manganese, selenium and also, it contains phytoestrogens which are hormones whose chemical structure is similar to that of the estrogen. The shell of it is thin and is indigestible, and very rich in cellulose fibers. The flaxseeds has healing properties which are known since antiquity and very helpful in reducing the cholesterol and prevention of cardiovascular disease, The omega 3 acids can affect the lowering of the blood pressure, and it contains alpha linolenic acid which reduces the risk of the heart attack and also cancer ...
People who are allergic to fish should avoid fish oil or omega-3 fatty acid products derived from fish. People who are allergic or hypersensitive to nuts should avoid alpha linolenic acid or omega-3 fatty acid products that are derived from the types of nuts to which they react. Avoid during active bleeding. Use cautiously with bleeding disorders, diabetes, low blood pressure or drugs, herbs or supplements that treat any such conditions. Use cautiously before surgery. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that intake be limited in pregnant/nursing women to a single six-ounce meal per week and less than two ounces per week in young children. For farm-raised, imported or marine fish, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that pregnant/nursing women and young children avoid eating types with higher levels of methylmercury and less than 12 ounces per week of other fish types. Women who might become pregnant are advised to eat seven ounces or less per week of fish with ...
People who are allergic to fish should avoid fish oil or omega-3 fatty acid products derived from fish. People who are allergic or hypersensitive to nuts should avoid alpha linolenic acid or omega-3 fatty acid products that are derived from the types of nuts to which they react. Avoid during active bleeding. Use cautiously with bleeding disorders, diabetes, low blood pressure or drugs, herbs or supplements that treat any such conditions. Use cautiously before surgery. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that intake be limited in pregnant/nursing women to a single six-ounce meal per week and less than two ounces per week in young children. For farm-raised, imported or marine fish, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that pregnant/nursing women and young children avoid eating types with higher levels of methylmercury and less than 12 ounces per week of other fish types. Women who might become pregnant are advised to eat seven ounces or less per week of fish with ...
People who are allergic to fish should avoid fish oil or omega-3 fatty acid products derived from fish. People who are allergic or hypersensitive to nuts should avoid alpha linolenic acid or omega-3 fatty acid products that are derived from the types of nuts to which they react. Avoid during active bleeding. Use cautiously with bleeding disorders, diabetes, low blood pressure or drugs, herbs or supplements that treat any such conditions. Use cautiously before surgery. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that intake be limited in pregnant/nursing women to a single six-ounce meal per week and less than two ounces per week in young children. For farm-raised, imported or marine fish, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that pregnant/nursing women and young children avoid eating types with higher levels of methylmercury and less than 12 ounces per week of other fish types. Women who might become pregnant are advised to eat seven ounces or less per week of fish with ...
Taking aim. For now, people use dietary targets rather than blood-level goals-that is, if they think about omega-3s at all. The recommendation of several public health organizations that everyone eat fish twice a week just isnt on the radar screens of most homes or doctors offices. Moreover, not everyone responds the same way to a meal of omega-3s. Genes influence levels of omega-3s in the body, much as they do cholesterol. Some people, such as women of childbearing age, seem to be more effective in generating EPA and DHA from a lesser source, called alpha linolenic acid, found in certain plant oils. And, of course, not every fish meal delivers the same dose of nutrients. Nevertheless, the Japanese, who consume eight to 15 times more fish than we do-and have higher omega-3 blood levels to prove it-experience less heart disease and greater longevity despite smoking more ...
This is coming with a total of 33 calories, 6 grams of carbs (2 of which are fiber) and 3 grams of protein.. Kale contains very little fat, but a large portion of the fat in it is the omega-3 fatty acid called alpha linolenic acid.. Given the incredibly low calorie content, kale is among the most nutrient dense foods in existence. Eating more kale is a great way to dramatically increase the total nutrient content of your diet.. ...
The consequence of total fat consumption on circulating plasma lipids and the incidence of cardiovascular disease has long been a central theme in nutrition research. Less well known is the influence of specific fatty acids on vascular endothelial function and the oxidative and inflammatory responses characteristic of atherogenesis. Omega 3 ( ω-3) fatty acids, including plant derived alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) and marine derived eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA) have been shown to effectively modulate multiple cardiovascular risk factors in epidemiological, animal model and human clinical investigations. ALA is most commonly consumed as a major component of dietary canola and flaxseed oils and has a recommended intake of 1.1 and 1.6 g/d for women and men, respectively. EPA and DHA are consumed as fatty fish or fish oil and algae supplements with current recommended intakes of 500 mg/d (combined EPA and DHA).. ALA is thought to improve ...
The importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to brain health has been demonstrated in multiple studies. To assess whether lower dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), ...
Trial registration: a 40% increase in the probability of pregnancy The Large prospective cohort studies have demonstrated the findings of a subsequent case control study by another impact of female and male preconceptional nutritional research group also suggested that fertility outcomes status on fertility, perinatal and long term health of the were improved in couples with a Mediterranean diet offspring More recently, research has shown that In a further prospective study of the association between variations in preconceptional diet may impact IVF out- dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids, significant comes. A Mediterranean diet high in vegetable oils, fish, correlations were observed between the reported dietary vegetables and legumes and low in carbohydrate-rich intake of the omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) alpha-linolenic acid snacks was positively associated with red blood cell fol- and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and embryo morph- ate and vitamin B6 in blood and follicular fluid and ...
What are Omega 3 fatty acids?. These polyunsaturated fats are essential nutrients as they cannot be synthesized in our body. The omega 3 fatty acids are made up of short chain alpha-linolenic acid and the long chain docosahexanoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA). Examples of foods rich in omega 3 fatty acids are fish, shellfish, flaxseed, walnuts and soy bean.. Importance to the retina?. The brain and eye are highly enriched with omega 3 fatty acids which accumulate in these tissues during early neonatal life. DHA is a major structural lipid in the retina particularly the disc membranes of the photoreceptor outer segments. The photoreceptors are very metabolically active as they are responsible for converting light energy into electrical impulses to be transmitted to the brain for interpretation of images. Consequently, a steady supply of DHA is required for normal retinal function. The complete function of omega 3 fatty acids in the retina is still not fully understood but it is ...
Helps support a balanced diet for a horse by targeting the nutritional gap between commercial feeds and what nature intended - now with more joint support. Fresh-ground flaxseed base is rich in balanced omega-3 and -6 fatty acids essential for everyday health, heart and cardiovascular systems, and healthy joints. Supports immune system and energy production. Promotes healthy skin and coat. Proprietary, patented cold processing ensures maximum nutrient retention while packaging keeps it fresh without preservatives. For all horses.1/3 cup serving contains min 18% crude protein, min 28% crude fat, max 15% crude fiber, max 10% moisture, min 2,000 mg linoleic acid (omega-6), min 5,200 mg alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3), max 5% ash, max 0.5% salt, min 1.25% potassium and min 4,800 mg/max 5,200 mg glucosamine HCl. No added preservatives, or artificial colors or flavors.Directions: 1/3 cup for an adult horse weighing 1,100 lbs. Begin supplementation with half total amount and increase to full amount over course
Danish chef Oscar Umahro Cadogan offers us a Sesame-Flaxseed Shake with Banana that beats a regular milkshake, both in terms of taste and nutritive value. The sesame seeds contain lots of calcium and other minerals and the flaxseed is rich in alpha-linolenic acid, which is anti-inflammatory.
Results: There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between the OL SPL content and the serum total cholesterol (TCHOL) in all 62 patients (r=-0.294; p=0.020). Analogous correlation was marginally significant for the LDL (r=-0.245; p=0.055). After a division into 2 groups based on the median of the OL, the group with OL higher than median had significantly lower both TCHOL and LDL (p=0.014; p=0.033, respectively). OL correlated positively with the alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n3; r=0.281; p=0.027) but inversely with the stearic acid (18:0; r=-0.303; p=0.017 ...
This site provides free full-text articles (from American Psychologist, etc.) and other resources re: assessment, therapy, forensics, etc.
Download this Premium Vector about Dentist icons collection, and discover more than 9 Million Professional Graphic Resources on Freepik
Search and download thousands of Swedish university dissertations (essays). Full text. Free. Dissertation: ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID Postprandial Lipid Metabolism and Enzymatic Interesterification of Triacylgylcerols.
Save 44% Lindberg - Flaxseed Oil Organic 1,000 mg 90 Softgels Flaxseed Oil 1,000 mg Cold Pressed, Pure Supports Skin, Joints and Heart* 1,000 mg Flaxseed Oil 500 mg Omega-3s Flaxseed Oil is one of natures richest vegetarian sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 essential fatty acid that is vital for good health. ALA helps maintain healthy skin, joints and cell membranes and promotes cardiovascular and nervous system health.* Cold pressed from non-GMO flaxseeds. Hexane free. Typical Flaxseed Oil Composition Per Softgel: Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA) (Omega-3) -- 500 mg Linolenic Acid (LA) (Omega-6) -- 110 mg Oleic Acid (OA) (Omega-9) -- 110 mg Other Fatty Acids -- 50 mg
Save 44% Lindberg - Flaxseed Oil Organic 1,000 mg 180 Softgels Flaxseed Oil 1,000 mg Cold Pressed Supports Skin, Joints and Heart* 1,000 mg Flaxseed Oil 500 mg Omega-3s Flaxseed Oil is one of natures best vegetarian sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 essential fatty acid that is vital for good health. ALA helps maintain healthy skin, joints and cell membranes and promotes cardiovascular and nervous system health.* Cold pressed from non-genetically engineered flaxseeds. Hexane free. Typical Flaxseed Oil Composition Per Softgel: Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA) (Omega-3) -- 500 mg Linolenic Acid (LA) (Omega-6) -- 110 mg Oleic Acid (OA) (Omega-9) -- 110 mg Other Fatty Acids -- 50 mg
Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST) muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05) the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05) decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05) upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study
The effects on humans of the ω-3 (omega-3) and ω-6 (omega-6) essential fatty acids (EFAs) are best characterized by their interactions; they cannot be understood separately. Arachidonic acid (AA) is a 20-carbon ω-6 conditionally essential fatty acid. It sits at the head of the "arachidonic acid cascade" - more than 20 different signalling paths that control a wide array of bodily functions, but especially those functions involving inflammation, cell growth and the central nervous system. Most AA in the human body derives from dietary linoleic acid (another essential fatty acid, 18:2 ω-6), which is derived from nuts, seeds, vegetable oils and animal fats. In the inflammatory response, two other groups of dietary essential fatty acids form cascades that parallel and compete with the arachidonic acid cascade. EPA (20:5 ω-3) provides the most important competing cascade. It is ingested from oily fish, and algae oil or derived from dietary alpha-linolenic acid found in, for instance, walnuts, ...
Purpose There is an increased interest in the benefits of conjugated α-linolenic acid (CLNA) on obesity-related complications such as insulin resistance and diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate whether a 1 % dietary supplementation of mono-CLNA isomers (c9-t11-c15-18:3 + c9-t13-c15-18:3) improved glucose and lipid metabolism in neonatal pigs. Methods Since mono-CLNA isomers combine one conjugated two-double-bond system with an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) structure, the experimental protocol was designed to isolate the dietary structural characteristics of the molecules by comparing a CLNA diet with three other dietary fats: (1) conjugated linoleic acid (c9-t11-18:2 + t10-c12-18:2; CLA), (2) non-conjugated n-3 PUFA, and (3) n-6 PUFA. Thirty-two piglets weaned at 3 weeks of age were distributed among the four dietary groups. Diets were isoenergetic and food intake was controlled by a gastric tube. After 2 weeks of supplementation, gastro-enteral (OGTT) and parenteral ...
Natural Plant Extract Omega3 Oil Cold Pressed Bulk Flaxseed Oil - Baili Products Made In China, China Manufacturer. Application: Myocardial Infraction Cerebal Nerve System Brain Senile Dementia Memory/Eyesight Flaxseed (Linseed) oil is rich in Omega 3 series of alpha-linolenic acid. It has been widely used in medicine, health food and cosmetics industries. Alpha-linolenic acid and its
Alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega 3 and 6 family respectively, and are both essential to health. These fatty acids have a number of important function in humans, and deficiency of either results in degeneration, disease and ultimately death. One of the most important functions of the essential fatty acids is the production of eicosanoids via a series of enzymatic reactions. Eicosanoids are short lived hormones that modulate inflammation, immunity, platelet aggregation, cellular growth and cellular differentiation. Plants produce ALA and LA, and humans then consume these fats in their diets. In humans, ALA and LA are converted to dihomo-γ-linoleic acid (DGLA), eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (AA), which are the final precursors to the formation of eicosanoids. Dietary sources can also provide EPA, DGLA and AA directly.. The formation of eicosanoids from the essential fatty acids is shown in figure 1. Fatty acids ...
Ideal nutritional oil for everyday use by the whole family. Alpha Linolenic acid (ALA - Omega 3) contributes towards the maintenance of normal cholesterol levels. Contains gamma linolenic acid (GLA) , small amount of omega-9, a broad range of nutrients including vitamin E (full spectrum of tocopherols and tocotrienols) and carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta carotene and lutein). Pleasant tasting. Can be drissled over the top of cooked foods, added to soups or as a dressing for raw salads. Cold-pressed and bottled in amber glass bottles under a blanket of nitrogen to protect the oil from air and light. Grown to Soil Asscoiation organic standards.
Jual Suplemen NATURES HEALTH OMEGA 3-6-9 45s Rp.179.740,00 per BTL Seperti tubuh membutuhkan bermacam vitamin & mineral, demikian juga 3 macam bentuk Omega (Essential Fatty Acids / EFA) yang sangat diperlukan untuk be... murah via apotek online medicastore seluruh Indonesia, kandungan Komposisi: Omega 3 (Alpha Linolenic Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid ) dan Eicosapetaenoic Acid EPA), Omega 6 (Linoleic Acid ) dan (Gamma-Lenoleic Acid) , Omega 9 (Oleic Acid (OA)).
Heart-Friendly Flax by Luke Huber, N.D. Flax is the best source of the omega-3 fatty acid alpha linolenic acid (ALA) in nature. It is also a great source of dietary fiber and lignans (plant hormones). A growing body of research shows clearly that flaxseed is a beneficial dietary supplement for people who want to reduce their risk of heart attack, atherosclerosis, and maintain a healthy level of blood cholesterol. CHOLESTEROL Cholesterol has received more attention than any other heart disease-related risk factor. High bad LDL and total cholesterol levels are considered to be key risk factors for atherosclerosis. Flaxseed contains significant quantities of fiber, which has been reported to help lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Milled flaxseed actually has higher dietary fiber levels than that of oat bran, while also containing the important omega-3 fatty acid, ALA, both key elements in heart health. Several studies have demonstrated the benefits of milled flax. Researchers at the
... is a plant source of omega-3 fatty acids and melatonin, and it has the highest content of alpha linolenic acid (ALA) of any wild plant that can be eaten. Each 100 gms. of purslane contains 300-400 mg. of ALA, 12.2 mg. alpha tocopherol from of vitamin E, 26.6 mg. of ascorbic acid, 1.9 mg. […]. View Post ...
Perilla oil 500mg ✔ rich in omega-3 fatty acids ✔ alpha-linolenic acid ✔ purely plant-based ✔ suitable for vegans ✔ Order now online at Fairvital!
Introduction:Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are useful in reducing deleterious effects of ischemia-reperfusion (IR). This study was designed to compare the effects of treatment with flaxseed oil, rich in linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, and fish oil containing long PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, on IR injury in the rat kidney. Methods:As an experimental study, 32 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, each 8 rats: Sham, ischemia-reperfusion (IR), flaxseed oil (FLO), and fish oil (FO). Correspondingly, experimental groups were administered saline and flaxseed or fish oil at doses of 0.4 g/kg, through gavage. After 4 weeks, the rats underwent right nephrectomy and 45-min clamping of the left renal arteries followed by 24 h reperfusion. Renal function was assessed by measuring serum creatinine (Cr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels.The oxidative stress and serum aspartate aminotranferase (AST) activitywere measured. Each kidney was sectioned ...
Simvastatin decreased serum total fatty acid concentration by 13.0% and the concentrations of several fatty acids, including alpha-linolenic, eicosatetraenoic (C20:4 n-3), and docosahexaenoic (C22:6 n-3) acid. It decreased the proportion of myristic acid (C14:0) from total fatty acids by 11.5%, and that of palmitic, linoleic (C18:2 n-6) and alpha-linolenic acid by 2.0%, 5.3%, and 6.8%, respectively. The proportions of gamma-linolenic (C18:3 n-6), dihomo-gamma-linolenic (C20:3 n-6), and arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) from total fatty acids in serum were increased by 11.1%, 4.2%, and 14.2%, respectively. The effects of dietary treatment and simvastatin on the proportions of serum fatty acids were independent and additive ...
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Whether dietary omega-3 (or n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids are causally related to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major, unresolved question in preventive cardiology. Essential n-3 fatty acids are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5,n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6,n-3) on one hand, and their parent compound alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; C18:3, n-3) on the other hand. The intake of n-3 fatty acids is below recommended levels in most Western populations. The Alpha Omega Trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effect of low-dose supplementation of ALA and EPA-DHA on coronary mortality. A total of 4000 Dutch men and women aged 60-80 years who had a myocardial infarction in the past 10 years are randomly allocated to 2 g/d of ALA, 400 mg/d of EPA-DHA, 2 g/d ALA + 400 mg/d EPADHA, or placebo, for 3 years. Increased intake of n-3 fatty acids is achieved through daily use of 20 g of margarine on bread. ...
"Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid". Retrieved 4 February 2014. Montgomery P, Richardson AJ (2008). Montgomery ... Fish oils contain the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), precursors of certain ... Algae Docosahexaenoic acid Eicosapentaenoic acid Krill oil Lovaza Shark liver oil Moghadasian, Mohammed H. (2008). "Advances in ... Heinze, VM; Actis, AB (February 2012). "Dietary conjugated linoleic acid and long-chain n-3 fatty acids in mammary and prostate ...
"Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid". Mayo Clinic. 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017. "Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Health ... The carbon atom closest to the carboxyl group is the alpha carbon, the next carbon is the beta carbon and so on. In fatty acids ... Omega-3 fatty acids have a double bond three carbons away from the methyl carbon, whereas omega-6 fatty acids have a double ... The illustration below shows the omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid. While it is the nutritional aspects of polyunsaturated fats ...
National Institute of Health (2005-08-01). "Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid". Archived from the original on ... Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), 8Z, 11Z,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid is an ω-6 fatty acid with three cis double bonds, each ... di-homo-γ-linolenic acid viz., 8,9-epoxy-eicosadienoic acid (8,9-EpEDE), 11,12-EpEDE, and 14,15-EpEDE; and d) adrenic acid viz ... and epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids as well as the metabolism of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid to prostanoids and mead acid to 5(S)- ...
"Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid: MedlinePlus Supplements". Archived from the original on 8 February 2006. ... These fatty acids can also lower blood sugar levels. They are also a good source of vitamin D, calcium, vitamin B12, and ... Sardines are also a natural source of marine omega-3 fatty acids, which may reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. ... Recent studies suggest that regular consumption of omega-3 fatty acids reduces the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease ...
"Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid: MedlinePlus Supplements". Retrieved 2010-01-22. Fish oil supplements may ... These fatty acids may also help lower blood sugar levels a small amount. They are also a good source of vitamin D, calcium, and ... Sardines are also a natural source of marine omega-3 fatty acids, which reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Recent ... November 2002). "Fish Consumption, Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Cardiovascular Disease". Circulation. 106 (21): 2747-2757 ...
Isotopic labeling has indicated that nonadienal is formed from alpha-linolenic acid. Such reactions are typically catalyzed by ... "Linoleic and linolenic acid as precursors of the cucumber flavor". Lipids. 6 (5): 351-352. doi:10.1007/BF02531828. ...
... eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and alpha-linolenic acid; and the omega-9 fatty acid, mead acid. Certain types of ... arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, and adrenic acid; the omega-3 fatty acids, ... ALOX15 actually prefers linoleic acid over arachidonic acid, metabolizing linoleic acid to 12-hydroperoxyoctadecaenoic acid (13 ... polyunsaturated fatty acids such as the Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and HODEs (i.e. hydroxyoctadecaenoic acids). ...
"MedlinePlus Herbs and Supplements: Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid". Archived from the original on May 18, ... Folic acid might also be counter-productive for patients taking 6-MP and related drugs that inhibit all cell division. It is ... It works by inhibiting folic acid, which is necessary for DNA replication and, therefore, cell division. TNF is a protein that ... The anti-inflammatory action in all these drugs is produced by 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), the active ingredient in ...
Most oxylipins in the body are derived from linoleic acid or alpha-linolenic acid. Linoleic acid oxylipins are usually present ... despite the fact that alpha-linolenic acid is more readily metabolized to oxylipin. Linoleic acid oxylipins can be anti- ... Lowering dietary linoleic acid results in fewer linoleic acid oxylipins in humans. From 1955 to 2005 the linoleic acid content ... The omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-derived and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-derived oxylipins are anti-inflammatory and ...
... alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid. Kiwifruit pulp contains carotenoids, such as provitamin A beta-carotene, lutein, ... "Seed Oil Fatty Acids - Gesundheitsratgeber: Mit Expertentipps die Gesundheit fördern". jameda.de. Kim M, Kim SC, Song KJ, Kim ...
Purslane contains more omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic acid in particular) than any other leafy vegetable plant. Studies ... malic acid, citric acid, glutamic acid, asparagic acid, nicotinic acid, alanine, glucose, fructose, and sucrose. Betacyanins ... 100 grams of fresh purslane leaves contain 300 to 400 mg of alpha-linolenic acid. One cup (250 ml) of cooked leaves contains 90 ... The sour taste is due to oxalic and malic acid, the latter of which is produced through the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) ...
A precursor of jasmolone could be alpha-linolenic acid with a 12-oxophytodienoic acid intermediate. The chain shortening could ... 12-oxophytodienoic acid is also used in the production of jasmonic acid. Jasmonic acid is used in the production of secondary ... α-linolenic acid. Lipooxygenase specifically binds to polyunsaturated fatty acids that have a cis,cis-1,4- pentadiene present. ... α-linolenic acid undergoes a radical oxidation with O2 and lipoxygenase to form a peroxide. Lipoxygenase is an iron-containing ...
Omega-3 fatty acids that support brain development and function are alpha-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ... Alpha-linolenic acid can be acquired from oils and seeds. Omega-6 fatty acids are also needed in feline cognition diets. The ... and Rapoport SI (2000). "Nutritional deprivation of alpha-linolenic acid decreases but does not abolish turnover and ... 2006). "Metabolic basis for the essential nature of fatty acids and the unique dietary fatty acid requirement of cats". Journal ...
... seed oil contains fatty acids, such as oleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. Canned pumpkin is often recommended by ... alpha and beta carotene, all of which are provitamin A compounds converted to vitamin A in the body. All pumpkins are winter ...
The fungus also contains various fatty acids, notably myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, alpha-linolenic, and linoeic acid. ...
linolenic, alpha-linolenic, oleic and palmitic acids are present in seeds.[6] ...
2009). "Bioavailability of alpha-linolenic acid from flaxseed diets as a function of the age of the subject". European Journal ... "Suppression of Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy by Conjugated Linoleic Acid". Journal of Biological Chemistry. American Society for ...
... phospholipase C will cause the release of alpha-linolenic acid for JA synthesis. In the first step, alpha-linolenic acid is ... JA is synthesized from alpha-linolenic acid, which can be released from the plasma membrane by certain lipase enzymes. For ... This undergoes reduction and three rounds of beta oxidation to form jasmonic acid. Jasmonic Acid Synthesis Peter J Davies. ... ISBN 978-0-7923-2985-5. Hans Weber (2002). "Fatty acid-derived signals in plants". Trends in Plant Science. 7 (5): 217-224. doi ...
... seed oil is rich in vitamin E and unsaturated fatty acids, including alpha-linolenic acid and gamma-linolenic acid ... Traitler, H; Winter, H; Richli, U; Ingenbleek, Y (1984). "Characterization of gamma-linolenic acid in Ribes seed". Lipids. 19 ( ... It can be made into jams and jellies which set readily because of the fruit's high content of pectin and acid. For culinary use ...
... stearidonic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. Tisochrysis lutea contains betain lipids and phospholipids. The haptophytes were ... They contain a large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), ... total lipid content and fatty acid composition of recently isolated tropical microalgae Isochrysis sp., Nitzschia closterium, ...
... octadecatrienoic acids from alpha-linolenic acid". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 270 (33): 19330-6. doi:10.1074/jbc. ... Z-octadecadienoic acid, 10-hydroxy-8E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid, and 12-hydroxy-9Z-13-E-octadecadienoic acid.[19] 4- ... linoleic acid, over arachidonic acid, converting it to 13-hydroperoxy-9Z,11E-octadecadienoic acid (13-HpODE).[1][2] The enzyme ... E-octadecadienoic acid, 9-hydroxy-10E,12-Z-octadecadienoic acid, and 11-hydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecaenoic acid while singlet oxygen ...
Omega-3 fatty acids that support brain development and function are alpha-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ... Alpha-linolenic acid, was recommended at 0.02% on a dry matter basis and 0.05g per 1000 kcal ME per day. Omega-6 fatty acids ... Alpha-linolenic acid can be acquired from oils and seeds. In kittens and juvenile felines, omega-3 fatty acids are very ... and Rapoport SI (2000). "Nutritional deprivation of alpha-linolenic acid decreases but does not abolish turnover and ...
Cunnane SC, Ganguli S, Menard C, Liede AC, Hamadeh MJ, Chen ZY, Wolever TM, Jenkins DJ (1993). "High alpha-linolenic acid ... oleic acid), and 6% omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic acid); the seeds contain 9% saturated fat, including 5% as palmitic acid.[31] ... As a percentage of total fat, flaxseeds contain 54% omega-3 fatty acids (mostly ALA), 18% omega-9 fatty acids ( ... Three natural phenolic glucosides, secoisolariciresinol diglucoside, p-coumaric acid glucoside, and ferulic acid glucoside, can ...
... alpha-linolenic acid". Mayo Clinic. 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.. *^ a b c "Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Health: Fact Sheet for ... Chemical structure of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega−3 fatty acid. ... Omega-3 fatty acids have a double bond three carbons away from the methyl carbon, whereas omega-6 fatty acids have a double ... The illustration below shows the omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid. While it is the nutritional aspects of polyunsaturated fats ...
"Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid". Mayo Clinic. 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.. ... Chemical structure of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega−3 fatty acid. ... Omega-3 fatty acids have a double bond three carbons away from the methyl carbon, whereas omega-6 fatty acids have a double ... The illustration below shows the omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid. While it is the nutritional aspects of polyunsaturated fats ...
Alpha-Lipoic acid. *Ambrisentan. *AMI-193. *Amlodipine besylate. *Antimycotics. *Artemisinin. *Aurothioglucose. *Bile acids ...
α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432) is a ω−3 fatty acid (CHEBI:25681) α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432) is a linolenic acid (CHEBI: ... α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432) is conjugate acid of α-linolenate (CHEBI:32387) α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432) is conjugate acid ... α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432). (R)-2-hydroperoxy-α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:76236) has functional parent α-linolenic acid (CHEBI: ... α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432). linolenic acid anilide (CHEBI:53751) has functional parent α-linolenic acid (CHEBI:27432). ...
... fatty acid. It is an isomer of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a polyunsaturated n−6 (omega-6) fatty acid. α-Linolenic acid was ... α-Linolenic acid (ALA) is an n−3 fatty acid. It is one of two essential fatty acids (the other being linoleic acid), so called ... "Conversion of $\alpha$-linolenic acid to longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human adults". Ramon, JM; Bou, R; Romea, S ... Burdge, GC; Calder, PC (2005). "Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human adults ...
... user ratings and products that contain Alpha-Linolenic Acid ... Learn more about Alpha-Linolenic Acid uses, effectiveness, ... Alpha-linolenic acid may not have the same benefits as EPA and DHA.. How does it work?. Alpha-linolenic acid is thought to ... Some people use alpha-linolenic acid to prevent cancer. Ironically, alpha-linolenic acid may actually raise some mens risk of ... The source of alpha-linolenic acid seems to be important. Alpha-linolenic acid from dairy and meat sources has been positively ...
Physiological compartmental analysis of alpha-linolenic acid metabolism in adult humans.. Pawlosky RJ1, Hibbeln JR, Novotny JA ... A physiological compartmental model of alpha-linolenic acid metabolism was derived from the plasma concentration-time curves ... 5n-3 indicates that the biosynthesis of long-chain n-3 PUFA from alpha-linolenic acid is limited in healthy individuals. In ... the n-3 fatty acids in good accordance with the measured steady state concentrations and also predicted dietary linolenic acid ...
... is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that is derived from plants, and it is similar to those found in fish oil. It is found in high ... alpha-linolenic acid needs to be converted in the body into the omega-3s eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, or EPA ... Alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA, is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that is derived from plants, and it is similar to those found in ... The University of Maryland Medical Center: Alpha-linolenic Acid * British Journal of Nutrition: Omega-3 Fatty Acids and ...
Other: Alpha-linolenic acid Exposure to dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) will be assessed using a detailed food ... Background: The plant-derived omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3-n-3) may reduce the risk of atherosclerotic ... Alpha-linolenic Acid and the Risk of ASCVD. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study ... Bork CS, Venø SK, Lundbye-Christensen S, Jakobsen MU, Tjønneland A, Schmidt EB, Overvad K. Dietary Intake of α-Linolenic Acid ...
Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids can be divided into alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; C18:3n-3) from plant origin, and eicosapentaenoic acid ... For alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is the omega-3 fatty acid from plants, the relation to cardiovascular health is less ... Wang C, Harris WS, Chung M, et al.: n-3 Fatty acids from fish or fish-oil supplements, but not alpha-linolenic acid, benefit ... Egert S, Kannenberg F, Somoza V, et al.: Dietary alpha-linolenic acid, EPA, and DHA have differential effects on LDL fatty acid ...
Alpha-Linolenic Acid*Casein*Dextrins*Lactose*L-Carnitine*Linoleic Acid (Vegetable Fat)*Moisture*Multiminerals*Multivitamins* ... Alpha-Linolenic Acid 0.37 g; Casein 4.5 g; Dextrins 25.2 g; Lactose 33.7 g; L-Carnitine; Linoleic Acid (Vegetable Fat) 3.7 g; ...
Dietary chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) rich in alpha-linolenic acid improves adiposity and normalises ... rich in alpha-linolenic acid and fibre upon dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance (IR), induced by intake of a sucrose-rich ( ...
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2013 Jan;88(1):139-46. doi: 10.1016/j.plefa.2012.04.003. Epub 2012 Apr 17. ... Docosahexaenoic acid synthesis from alpha-linolenic acid is inhibited by diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids.. Gibson RA1 ... α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) to the long-chain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) ... total fatty acids) at dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) above 3 en%. We conclude it is possible to ...
Alpha-Linolenic Acid*Beta-Carotene*Calcium*Carbohydrates*Carbon Black*Chloride*Choline*Copper*Cytidine Monophosphate*Fat*Folic ... Powder for Suspension; Oral; Adenosine Monophosphate 3.7 mg; Alpha-Linolenic Acid 485 mg; Beta-Carotene 310 mcg; Calcium 385 mg ... Folic Acid 80 mcg; Guanosine Monophosphate 2.6 mg; Inosine Monophosphate 1.6 mg; Iodine 54 mcg; Iron 6 mg; Linoleic Acid 3.4 g ... Linoleic Acid*Magnesium*Manganese*Phosphorus*Potassium*Protein*Sodium*Taurine*Uridine Monophosphate*Vitamin A (Retinol)*Vitamin ...
... a promising therapeutic opportunity by integrating a nutritional-based approach focusing on omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid as ... Western modern diets are deficient in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are essential for brain health. Such ... Alpha-linolenic acid: A promising nutraceutical for the prevention of stroke Carine Nguemeni Elsa Gouix Miled Bourourou 1 ... Alpha-linolenic acid: A promising nutraceutical for the prevention of stroke. PharmaNutrition, Elsevier, 2013, 1 (1), pp.1-8. ⟨ ...
PubMed journal article Adipose tissue alpha-linolenic acid and nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in Costa Ric were found in ... between alpha-linolenic acid and nonfatal acute MI suggests that consumption of vegetable oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid ... between alpha-linolenic acid and nonfatal acute MI suggests that consumption of vegetable oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid ... Alpha-linolenic acid may protect against cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between adipose tissue alpha- ...
Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid. Fatty acid elongase. FADS2. Arachidonic acid. Linoleic acid. gamma-Linolenic acid. FADS1. ... Fatty acid elongase. Protein. Q61527727 (Wikidata) Linoleic acid. Metabolite. CHEBI:6479 (ChEBI) gamma-Linolenic acid. ... Metabolism of alpha-linolenic acid (Homo sapiens). From WikiPathways. Revision as of 10:30, 6 May 2019 by Chris (Talk , ... Arachidonic acid. Metabolite. CHEBI:2799 (ChEBI) Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid. Metabolite. Q415398 (Wikidata) FADS1. GeneProduct ...
Arachidonic acid. FADS1. alpha-Linolenic acid. eicosapentaenoic acid. docosahexaenoic acids. Elongase. FADS2. FADS2. FADS1. ... Linoleic acid. gamma-Linolenic acid. Dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid. 15-HEPE. Arachidonic acid 5-hydroperoxide. 12-HPEPE. 15-HETE ... Metabolism of alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid to their respective acids. Both of these processes are catalyzed primarily ... alpha-Linolenic acid. Metabolite. CHEBI:27432 (ChEBI) docosahexaenoic acids. Metabolite. CHEBI:36005 (ChEBI) eicosapentaenoic ...
... is the most commo n omega-3 fatty acid i n the Wester n diet. The relatio n of dietary i ntake of ALA to prostate ca ncer risk ... Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the most common omega-3 fatty acid in the Western diet. The relation of dietary intake of ALA to ... Attar-Bashi, NM, Frauman, AG, Sinclair, AJ 2004Alpha-linolenic acid and the risk of prostate cancer. What is the evidence?J ... De Stefani, E, Deneo-Pellegrini, H, Boffetta, P, Ronco, A, Mendilaharsu, M 2000Alpha-linolenic acid and risk of prostate cancer ...
alpha-Linolenic acid. Description. alpha-Linolenic acid (ALA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). It is a member of the ... Short-term supplementation of low-dose gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), or GLA plus ALA does not augment ... including those involved with fatty acid metabolism and inflammation. alpha-Linolenic acid and other omega-3 fatty acids may ... Omega-3 fatty acids like alpha-linolenic acid are important structural components of cell membranes. When incorporated into ...
Here, we analyzed the impact of dietary omega-3 alpha-linolenic fatty acid from linseed oil on skeletal muscle telomere biology ... Linseed-oil-supplemented animals showed an increased level of alpha-linolenic acid in skeletal muscles compared to control ... Our results suggest that omega-3 linolenic acid counteracts the elevation of TRF1 levels, which increase with age and due to ... Recent studies have reported the role of these fatty acids in the aging process, explicitly impacting telomere biology. The ...
Possible Interactions with: Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA). ALA; Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA). If you are being treated with any of ... you should not use alpha-linolenic acid without first talking to your health care provider. ... Cholesterol-lowering Medications -- Increasing the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in your diet may help a group of cholesterol- ... Blood-thinning Medications -- Omega-3 fatty acids may increase the blood-thinning effects of warfarin (Coumadin), aspirin, or ...
Effect of dietary alpha-linolenic acid and its ratio to linoleic acid on platelet and plasma fatty acids and thrombogenesis. ... Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the main omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in terrestrial plants, is an important fatty acid ... Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid to longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human adults. Reprod. Nutr. Dev. 2005;45(5): ... The conversion of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) to longer chain and more desaturated omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 ...
... formation from alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) involves peroxisomal oxidation of 24:6n-3 to DHA. The aim of the study was to ... determine whether conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) would enhance conversion of ALA to DHA in humans on an ALA-supplemented diet. ... A rate-limiting step in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ... alpha-Linolenic Acid / metabolism * alpha-Linolenic Acid / ... Failure of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation to Enhance Biosynthesis of Docosahexaenoic Acid From Alpha-Linolenic Acid ...
... alpha-linolenic acid-rich TG (ALATG) or 10% TG + 4% alpha-linolenic acid-rich diacylglycerol (ALADG) for a period of 1 month. ... 0/Diglycerides; 0/Triglycerides; 0/fatty acid oxidation complex; 463-40-1/alpha-Linolenic Acid; 57-88-5/Cholesterol; EC 1.1. ... Supplementation with alpha-linolenic acid-rich diacylglycerol suppresses fatty liver formation accompanied by an up-regulation ... 12943199 - Retinoic acid metabolism inhibition by 3-azolylmethyl-1h-indoles and 2, 3 or 5-(alpha-a.... ...
... alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and linoleic acid (LA). Oleic acid (OA) and dexamethasone (DM) served ... LA, ALA, Gamma linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3 n-6) and Oleic acid (OA; omega 9; 18:1 n-9) were obtained as greater than 99% pure ... Nir Erdinest, Or Shmueli, Yoni Grossman, Haim Ovadia, Abraham Solomon; Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Alpha Linolenic Acid on ... Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Alpha Linolenic Acid on Human Corneal Epithelial Cells ...
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5 n-3), n-3 fatty acids, Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3 n-3), Polyunsaturated fatty acids ( ... Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid. Also listed as: Fish oil, Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3), ... and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Omega-3 fatty acids should not be confused with omega-6 fatty acids. ... Table of Contents , Herbs & Supplements , Omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil, alpha-linolenic acid ...
Dissertation: ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID Postprandial Lipid Metabolism and Enzymatic Interesterification of Triacylgylcerols. ... Postprandial effects of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in men and women are poorly characterized. A new ALA-rich oil was produced ... ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID Postprandial Lipid Metabolism and Enzymatic Interesterification of Triacylgylcerols. Author: Julia ... alpha-linolenic acid; postprandial lipemia; Lipozyme TL IM; interesterification; ...
  • ALA and oleic acid levels were significantly increased in plasma after ALA-rich oil and olive oil meals, respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We hypothesized that the postprandial lipid response might be attenuated by a preferential oxidation of ALA compared to other long chain dietary fatty acids. (dissertations.se)
  • We therefore studied the postprandial lipid response of women to an ALA-rich oil in comparison with olive oil and butter, and characterized the fatty acid composition of total lipids, TAGs, and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) in plasma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The ALA-rich oil significantly affected different plasma lipid fractions and improved the ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids several hours postprandially. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Systemic polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were shown to improve the symptoms of dry eye syndrome due to their anti-inflammatory effects. (arvojournals.org)
  • The specific members of this group are called polyunsaturated fatty acids, or PUFAs. (whfoods.com)
  • Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. (nih.gov)
  • In industrialized countries, greater part of the consumed trans fatty acids, in USA about 80 percent of the total, are produced industrially, in varying amounts, during partial hydrogenation of edible oils containing unsaturated fatty acids (see below). (tuscany-diet.net)
  • In these sources trans fatty acids are present in small amounts. (tuscany-diet.net)
  • During this process trans fatty acids with more than one double bond are formed in small amounts. (tuscany-diet.net)
  • 9 However, soybean oil is usually partially hydrogenated to produce margarines and vegetable shortenings, with lower α-linolenic acid concentrations and a high content of trans fatty acids, which are positively associated with CHD. (ahajournals.org)
  • These inconsistencies could be partially explained by the fact that dietary sources of α-linolenic and trans fatty acids usually overlap, but these nutrients have opposite effects on MI. (ahajournals.org)
  • In ideal sn-1,3-specific lipase-catalyzed interesterification, the fatty acid composition in the sn-2 position remains constant. (dissertations.se)
  • Enzymatic interesterification could be used as a method of designing dietary oils with new properties regarding fatty acid composition, susceptibility to oxidation and effects on blood lipids. (dissertations.se)
  • Table 1 Formulation and fatty acid composition of the experimental diets. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. (nih.gov)
  • In addition, our findings suggest that both acylglycerol structure (that is, the structural difference between TG and DG) and fatty-acid species affect the nutritional behaviour of dietary lipids. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Alpha-tocopherol, lipids and lipoproteins in knee-joint synovial fluid and serum from patients with inflammatory joint disease. (semanticscholar.org)
  • It is a building block or proteins, participates in the citric acid and urea cycles, and is a neurotransmitter. (tabers.com)
  • Pigs supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids had lower levels of the TRF1 shelterin protein, which is known to protect telomeric sequences. (mdpi.com)