Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Licensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Licensure, Pharmacy: The granting of a license to practice pharmacy.Automobile Driver Examination: Government required written and driving test given to individuals prior to obtaining an operator's license.Licensure, Hospital: The granting of a license to a hospital.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Specialty Boards: Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Licensure, Nursing: The granting of a license to practice the profession of nursing.Endodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).United StatesAccidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Motorcycles: Two-wheeled, engine-driven vehicles.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.FloridaPhysician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Legislation, Pharmacy: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of pharmacy, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Remedial Teaching: Specialized instruction for students deviating from the expected norm.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Physician Impairment: The physician's inability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to the patient due to the physician's disability. Common causes include alcohol and drug abuse, mental illness, physical disability, and senility.Physicians' Offices: The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Physician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Prosthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Employee Discipline: Regulations or conditions imposed on employees by management in order to correct or prevent behaviors which are counterproductive to the organization.Periodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Foreign Professional Personnel: Persons who have acquired academic or specialized training in countries other than that in which they are working. The concept excludes physicians for which FOREIGN MEDICAL GRADUATES is the likely heading.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Chickenpox: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed. Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Northwestern United States: The geographic area of the northwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Pneumococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Workflow: Description of pattern of recurrent functions or procedures frequently found in organizational processes, such as notification, decision, and action.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.New Brunswick: A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NOVA SCOTIA; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Fredericton. It was named in honor of King George III, of the House of Hanover, also called Brunswick. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p828 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.New YorkConnecticutProfessional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Group Purchasing: A shared service which combines the purchasing power of individual organizations or facilities in order to obtain lower prices for equipment and supplies. (From Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Libraries: Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Meningococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Software Design: Specifications and instructions applied to the software.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Computing Methodologies: Computer-assisted analysis and processing of problems in a particular area.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Polysorbates: Sorbitan mono-9-octadecanoate poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) derivatives; complex mixtures of polyoxyethylene ethers used as emulsifiers or dispersing agents in pharmaceuticals.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.WisconsinObstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Vaccines, Conjugate: Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection.Rotavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.Pneumococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines: Combined vaccines consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and an acellular form of PERTUSSIS VACCINE. At least five different purified antigens of B. pertussis have been used in various combinations in these vaccines.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Physician Self-Referral: Referral by physicians to testing or treatment facilities in which they have financial interest. The practice is regulated by the Ethics in Patient Referrals Act of 1989.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Immunization, Secondary: Any immunization following a primary immunization and involving exposure to the same or a closely related antigen.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated: A suspension of formalin-inactivated poliovirus grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture and used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Hospital-Physician Relations: Includes relationships between hospitals, their governing boards, and administrators in regard to physicians, whether or not the physicians are members of the medical staff or have medical staff privileges.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Occupational Health Physicians: Physicians employed in a company or corporate setting that is generally not in the health care industry.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Data Compression: Information application based on a variety of coding methods to minimize the amount of data to be stored, retrieved, or transmitted. Data compression can be applied to various forms of data, such as images and signals. It is used to reduce costs and increase efficiency in the maintenance of large volumes of data.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Osteopathic Physicians: Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.Hypermedia: Computerized compilations of information units (text, sound, graphics, and/or video) interconnected by logical nonlinear linkages that enable users to follow optimal paths through the material and also the systems used to create and display this information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing: Techniques of nucleotide sequence analysis that increase the range, complexity, sensitivity, and accuracy of results by greatly increasing the scale of operations and thus the number of nucleotides, and the number of copies of each nucleotide sequenced. The sequencing may be done by analysis of the synthesis or ligation products, hybridization to preexisting sequences, etc.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Vaccines, Inactivated: Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.New HampshireHealth Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Drugs, Investigational: Drugs which have received FDA approval for human testing but have yet to be approved for commercial marketing. This includes drugs used for treatment while they still are undergoing clinical trials (Treatment IND). The main heading includes drugs under investigation in foreign countries.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Consumer Product SafetyReproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Great BritainCalifornia
Ultimately, LB88, or the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact and the Nurse Licensure Compact, passed on a vote of 49-0-0. " ... Wives and husbands of active military are permitted to get a temporary state license for professions including medical doctors ... The bill also allows audiologists to sell hearing aids without requiring an additional license. Blood said LB88 was a priority ... "Nebraska Legislature advances bill to give qualified military spouses temporary health care licenses". Omaha World-Herald'. ...
Be licensed in good standing in a home state as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), Advanced EMT (AEMT), a Paramedic, or a ... level in between EMT and Paramedic Must be at least 18 years of age Must practice under the supervision of a physician medical ... The Recognition of EMS Personnel Licensure Interstate CompAct, also known as "REPLICA", is an interstate compact that extends a ... Council passed a Final Advisory in support of the Recognition of Emergency Medical Services Personnel Licensure Interstate ...
... legislation in the State as well as a medical practice act which gave KSBH the authority to examine and license physicians, ... McCormack, J. N. (1905) "What Remains to be Done in Medical Licensure." State Board Journal of America 1.2:42-45. McCormack, J ... He also broached the subject of interstate reciprocity but was not able to lead the membership to consensus. In 1902 ... Medical Licensing and Discipline in America: a History of the Federation of State Medical Boards. Federation of State Medical ...
... in the development of an interstate medical license compact to facilitate the ability of physicians to practice medicine across ... Charting Dynamism in Medical Education, Licensure and Regulation. Journal of Medical Licensure and Discipline. 95(3):5-8. 2009 ... "Maintenance of Licensure" (MOL) that recommends that all U.S. physicians, as a condition of licensure renewal, "should provide ... "Every medical student should have this book." Chaudhry's book, Medical Licensing and Discipline in America, co-written with ...
... the States Nevada State Council for Interstate Juvenile Supervision Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission Interstate ... State Board of Pharmacy State Board of Physical Therapy Examiners State Board of Podiatry Private Investigators Licensing Board ... Design and Residential Design Board of Athletic Trainers State Barbers Health and Sanitation Board Chiropractic Physicians ... Audiology and Hearing Aid Dispensing Board Nevada State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners California-Nevada Interstate ...
... like medical images, biosignals etc.) and then transmitting this data to a doctor or medical specialist at a convenient time ... Restrictive licensure laws in the United States require a practitioner to obtain a full license to deliver telemedicine care ... A number of states require practitioners who seek compensation to frequently deliver interstate care to acquire a full license ... State medical licensing boards have sometimes opposed telemedicine; for example, in 2012 electronic consultations were illegal ...
... doctors requested an investigation by the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure to determine whether Fletcher's medical license ... Eventually, four slogans were chosen to be voted on online as well as at interstate travel centers. In December 2004, "Kentucky ... On January 13, 2005, the Board of Medical Licensure found that Fletcher was acting in his capacity as governor, not as a doctor ... Kentucky requires doctors to follow the guidelines of the American Medical Association, which forbid doctors from participating ...
CBER may deny licensure or suspend or cancel a current license if a manufacturer does not comply with requirements. Unlicensed ... Section 351 of the Public Health Service Act requires licensure of biological products that travel in interstate commerce in ... The current Director of CBER is Dr. Karen Midthun, M.D. CBER is responsible for assuring the safety, purity, potency, and ... Live biotherapeutics (probiotics). Some medical devices, specifically test kits for HIV, tests used to screen blood donations, ...
In many countries, interstate and intercountry practice of telenursing is forbidden (the attending nurse must have a license ... As a field, it is part of telehealth and telemedicine, and has many points of contacts with other medical and non-medical ... Telephone triage takes place in settings as diverse as emergency rooms, ambulance services, large call centers, physician ... The Nurse Licensure Compact helps resolve some of these jurisdiction issues. Legal issues such as accountability and ...
Doctor of Dental Science (DDSc) Doctor of Medical Science (DMSc) Doctor of Dentistry (DDent) Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) In some ... Council of Interstate Testing Agencies (CITA) are the five regional testing agencies that administer licensing examinations. ... of Dental Surgery and Doctor of Dental Medicine are terminal professional doctorates which qualify a professional for licensure ... Mymensingh Medical College Dental Unit, Mymensingh. MAG Osmani Medical College Dental Unit, Sylhet. Sher e Bangla Medical ...
... to allow the licensure of more than 25 Vietnamese doctors who had allegedly been unfairly denied the right to practice after ... the Medical Board, the Contractors State Licensing Board. She helped draft and CPIL co-sponsored the state legislation to ... He supervised the ICC project of 7 law students, resulting in a jointly authored book, ''The Interstate Commerce Omission'' ( ... As Medical Board Enforcement Monitor, Professor D'Angelo Fellmeth audited the "diversion" program of the Medical Board-allowing ...
Capitated payments to physicians and pre-paid physician fees are to be considered medical expenses under the medical expense ... Each individual must be a licensed physician who practices in the same field as the condition of the individual appealing the ... Section 301 allows for the creation of interstate cooperatives between state governments, including the District of Columbia (D ... HHS Secretary and states from requiring any health care provider to participate in any health plan as a condition of licensure ...
... a physician's statement is required if a minor is driving for medical purposes; a "Verification of Need" affidavit must be ... According to federal law, the minimum age to operate a commercial vehicle in interstate transit is 21; as a result the minimum ... For example, in California, minors may not transport people under age 20 for the first 365 days of licensure unless said ... "TxDPS - Driver License Medical Revocation". www.dps.texas.gov.. *^ a b c "COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE PROGRAM". Idaho Transport ...
The Interstate Highway System is officially known as the 'Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense ... and which his doctor diagnosed as life-threatening. The doctor insisted that the leg be amputated but Dwight refused to allow ... He also learned to fly, making a solo flight over the Philippines in 1937 and obtained his private pilot's license in 1939 at ... On the morning of March 28, 1969, Eisenhower died in Washington, D.C., of congestive heart failure at Walter Reed Army Medical ...
... altering the licensing and regulation of abortion clinics, and requiring that a doctor save the fetal tissue when performing an ... He donated $100,000 from his inauguration fundraising effort to a Richmond non-profit that provides medical and mental health ... "SB 839: Abortion clinics; regulation and licensure". January 10, 2005. "SB 315. Abortion; preservation of fetal tissue when ... claiming that it exceeded the Federal government's power under the interstate commerce clause of the Constitution. After a ...
In the U.S., laws related to mobile-phone use, safety belts, speed limits, age of licensure, and license renewal are the ... FMCSA Medical Program: This initiative aims to ensure that the physical qualifications of drivers reflect current clinical ... for registered intrastate and interstate motor carriers operating in the United States. Passage of the North American Free ... statement from the joint Task Force of the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Occupational and ...
There are 18 states currently ready to accept physician applications to participate in the IMLC, which is great news for locum ... tenens physicians. Is your state part of the compact? Weve got all the details. ... The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC) is officially accepting applications. ... the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC) will speed up and streamline the licensing process for physicians to practice ...
Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. More than 5,000 physicians have now received licenses under the IMLC, July 2019). Based ... Licensure through the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, to which about 30 states and territories belong, waives due-process ... The more state licenses that a physician has, the worse the domino effect. In some states, such as New York and Florida, the ... Patients whose medical care is provided by public funds have no constitutional right to whatever care [their physicians] using ...
New Compact License Regulation. Minnesotas Legislature unanimously passed the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact; it was ... It is an expedited licensure process for eligible physicians that improves license portability and increases patient access to ... Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Press Release - 1 Year Anniversary - 4-4-2018. ... American Medical Association (AMA) Minnesota Medical Association (MMA) Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) Office of ...
Legislators should also consider making North Carolina part of The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, sponsored by the ... sponsored by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB). Through this compact, physicians can become licensed to practice ... Legislators should also consider making North Carolina part of The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, ... Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB). Through this compact, physicians can become licensed to practice medicine (inclusive ...
The Interstate Medical Licensure Commission. CSG-NCIC worked with the Federation of State Medical Boards, state medical boards ... The compact creates an expedited licensing process for doctors wishing to practice in multiple states. ... Health Care LicensingPolicy Area›Interstate Compacts›Ongoing Projects›Medical Licensing CompactPolicy Area›Interstate Compacts› ... Eleven states passed the IMLC legislation in 2015, creating the threshold to enact the Interstate Medical Licensure Commission ...
In July of 2015 we noted that nine states had enacted laws to join the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. We described this ... cooperative program intended to allow physicians to obtain expedited licenses to practice in multiple states. This would ... We have followed (here and here) the adoption of the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact ("IMLC") by various states and the ... New Developments in the Implementation of the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC) Blog ...
... while they would also agree to share information and processes essential to the licensing and regulation of physicians who ... The FSMBs proposed interstate compact system would allow participating state medical boards to retain their licensing and ... FSMB Interstate Medical Licensure Compact The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) proposed interstate compact system ... The FSMBs "Interstate Medical Licensure Compact" will allow physicians greater flexibility in practicing across state lines, ...
Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. Beginning in 2013, the Federation of State and Territorial Medical Boards (FSBM) embarked ... Under these provisions, a physician who has a full and unrestricted license to practice medicine in a state that is a member to ... In 2014, FSBM released model legislative language for states to enter into an Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. ... In 2015, we saw innovative efforts around tobacco control, data sharing, medical licensure, and antibiotic stewardship that can ...
End State Licensing of Physicians Eliminating licensing of medical professionals would remove one formidable barrier to ... Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Wont Help With a relatively large medically underserved population, Mississippi is a ... Can Telemedicine Boost Medi‐​Cal Access? If California doctors wont take Medi‐​Cal patients, why not let out‐​of‐​state ... State medical‐​licensing barriers protect local MDs and deny patients access to remote‐​care physicians. ...
Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. Interstate medical licensure compact. Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Web site. ... in the Tricare system to receive telemedicine services from physicians who are licensed in the state in which the physician ... The Veterans E-Health and Telemedicine Support Act of 2015 would create an interstate medical license similar to a drivers ... This is streamlined somewhat by states participating in the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. This multi-state compact aims ...
Cross-state Licensing Expands The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC), designed to expedite state medical licensure for ... The physicians then select the states in which they wish to hold a medical license. ... Upon receipt of the physicians information and fees, the state medical boards will grant the additional licenses. ... The IMLC estimates that 80 percent of physicians meet the interstate licensure criteria. ...
Support License Portability for PAs Federal Grant Awarded to Expand Interstate Medical Licensure Compact; Support License ... FSMB Statement on Supporting States in Verifying Licenses for Physicians Responding to COVID-19 Virus FSMB Statement on ... Federal Grant Awarded to Expand Interstate Medical Licensure Compact; ... U.S. Healthcare Licensing and Regulatory Organizations Issue Joint Statement on COVID-19 Pandemic U.S. Healthcare Licensing and ...
Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, which makes it easier for physicians based elsewhere to become licensed to provide ... Physicians and nurse practitioners must be licensed in Wisconsin to diagnose and treat a patient in the state. But this year ... The service she used enables anyone to get medical care for simple conditions from a doctor or a nurse practitioner by ... Virtual doctor visits offer patients a convenient, low-cost option. Guy Boulton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Published 7:00 a.m ...
These ideas include giving nurses the power to make more decisions and joining the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, a ... group of states that have agreed to share licensing for physicians so its easier for doctors to move between different states ... and a dearth of doctors means each physician must treat far more patients than one working in a city. ... "Rural residencies for physicians are something that needs to be funded," said Kathleen Quinn, associate dean for Rural Health ...
The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission has introduced a rule that would allow clinicians to acquire expedited ... "Its not a substitute for getting a license in each state, but it is an expedited way to obtain licensing in states that are ... Instead, Brem works with the original physician, who will contact Penn through an online portal. The physician will send Brem ... The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission has introduced a rule that would allow clinicians to acquire expedited ...
The Federation of State Medical Boards has developed an Interstate Medical Licensure Compact ("Compact") that would facilitate ... physician assistants, and medical assistants and, as needed, supervised and/or owned by a licensed physician. An employer- ... Licensure: State licensure laws are a major stumbling block to the interstate practice of telemedicine. With limited exceptions ... 7] Illinois and California are examples of states that require physician ownership of medical practices, with physician ...
... and for participating in the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, which helps doctors get licensed to treat patients in other ... States scored higher for requiring fewer continuing medical education units, which are typically necessary for doctors to ... "Minnesota doctors are forced to spend more time on administrative tasks than doctors in other states." ... "I am more concerned about consumers rather than doctors. Maryland comes out poorly whether youre the doctor or the consumer." ...
Ultimately, LB88, or the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact and the Nurse Licensure Compact, passed on a vote of 49-0-0. " ... Wives and husbands of active military are permitted to get a temporary state license for professions including medical doctors ... The bill also allows audiologists to sell hearing aids without requiring an additional license. Blood said LB88 was a priority ... "Nebraska Legislature advances bill to give qualified military spouses temporary health care licenses". Omaha World-Herald. ...
The physician has to establish a state of "principal license" and then may apply to the "Interstate Commission" to receive a ... Federation of State Medical Boards creating an interstate "compact" that would reduce barriers by providing an "expedited ... The hundreds of dollars per year paid to each state to maintain licensure dont appear to be one of the barriers that is being ... saying that physician assistant and emergency physician who treated her should have provided her with a complete differential ...
It establishes the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission and authorizes the Mayor to join the Interstate Medical ... this bill establishes eligibility requirements for physicians to receive or renew an expedited medical license to practice ... B22-0177: Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Approval Act of 2017 (Official Law effective Jun 5, 2018). BILL SUMMARY - As ... The Medical Society represents the physicians and patients of the District of Columbia in discussions with the City Council, ...
Senator Joseph Vitale (D) introduced SB 3821 to enter New Jersey into the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. A license ... Cardin (third from right). Dr. Koo and LAC member Dr. Robert Bass (far left) met with Dr. Cassidy. Past Holtgrewe Scholar Dr. C ... AB 5665 is the companion bill to SB 3821 to enter New Jersey into the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. ... Specifically, SB 3821 requires a physician, to qualify for licensure, to be a graduate of an accredited medical school, have ...
19 states have passed laws to join the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, which allows physicians to obtain a license to ... Licensing issues. One area where a single standard has emerged is in licensing physicians to practice in multiple jurisdictions ... Each states medical board retains its disciplinary authority, but agrees to share information essential to licensing, creating ... Physicians are ready. Research from HIMSS Analytics finds adoption of telemedicine services across all practice types surged to ...
Medical Direction - Application for Temporary Non-Disciplinary Physician License - Application for Physician Licensure in ... Another State Via Interstate Compact - Post-Graduates-Supervision and Permitted Activities - Board Meetings - Medical Schools ... Application for Physician Assistant License - Supervision of Physician Assistant - Chart Review - Continuing Education and ... License Requirement - Application for a Telemedicine License - Fees - Failure to Submit Fees - Issuance of a Telemedicine ...
With an eager, legally licensed physician standing in front of you, how do you decide the scope of care that the physician will ... Licensing and Interstate Credentialing. During a catastrophic health event, the need for staff may go far beyond what is ... Good Samaritan Laws in some jurisdictions may explicitly recognize out-of-state licensure in specific circumstances, such as ... While the medical care and emergency response systems-hospitals, physicians, pharmacists, emergency medical technicians (EMTs)- ...
Eligible physician can qualify to practice medicine across state lines within the Compact if you meet agreed-upon eligibility ... After issuing a license to a physician holding a letter of qualification, the issuing medical board may ask for additional, ... The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact offers a voluntary, expedited pathway to licensure for qualified physicians who wish ... After issuing a license to a physician holding an LOQ, the issuing state medical board may ask for additional, ancillary ...
  • Several factors-including changing demographics, the need for better and faster access to medical care in rural and underserved areas, the passage of the Affordable Care Act, and the rise of telemedicine-have created unprecedented demand for health care services. (csg.org)
  • Patients whose medical care is provided by public funds have no constitutional right to whatever care [their physicians] using the "highest standards of medical practice" … may "judge necessary" … or to obtain that care "from a physician *** of their choice" [emphasis added]. (aapsonline.org)
  • I've written before about the homegrown startup RelyMD and how its board-certified emergency physicians connect with patients through phone, computer, or tablet to address non-urgent acute incidents - all for a $50 flat fee. (forbes.com)
  • If California doctors won't take Medi‐​Cal patients, why not let out‐​of‐​state physicians provide services? (cato.org)
  • State medical‐​licensing barriers protect local MDs and deny patients access to remote‐​care physicians. (cato.org)
  • Virtual doctor visits offer patients a convenient, low-cost option Aurora and Froedtert Health now offer virtual visits for less than $50. (jsonline.com)
  • And they could improve access to care by freeing physicians to spend more time with patients who have complex health conditions. (jsonline.com)
  • With no major academic medical centers close to home, these patients often must either endure lengthy travel or forgo treatment at a tier one center. (healio.com)
  • For these patients, telemedicine can serve as a lifeline to the care they need, according to Jennie Crews, MD, MMM, medical director of Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Network. (healio.com)
  • It is a population that is statistically older and less wealthy than those of urban areas, and a dearth of doctors means each physician must treat far more patients than one working in a city. (columbiamissourian.com)
  • Scores were weighted 70 percent for "Opportunity and Competition," as determined by physicians' average starting salary and annual wage, hospital and provider shortages, and percentage of insured and elderly patients, according to the March 27 study. (heartland.org)
  • The Medical Society represents the physicians and patients of the District of Columbia in discussions with the City Council, the DC Departments of Health and Behavioral Health, the DC Boards of Medicine and Pharmacy, plus other members of the medical community. (msdc.org)
  • The AUA delegation met with Senators, Representatives, and congressional staff to discuss issues impacting urologists and their patients: reforming U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, improving network adequacy, reforming medical liability, improving the workforce shortage and GME, addressing surprise billing, as well as fixing step therapy protocols and prior authorization policies. (maaua.org)
  • Is it OK for doctors to hug their patients? (modernmedicine.com)
  • All out-of-state health care practitioners intending to provide telemedicine services, to patients geographically situated in the state of Alaska, must first obtain a valid medical license, from the Alabama Medical Board, prior to commencing service - however, physician-to-physician (P2P) exemptions apply. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • Although patients may not see a marijuana doctor online for the initial visit, patients may choose to use medical marijuana telemedicine services online for all follow-up visits. (marijuanadoctors.com)
  • The medical literature regarding criminal conduct by physicians deals largely with physicians who engage in sex with patients, whether consensual or not. (citizen.org)
  • Telemedicine is the use of electronic telecommunication technology to provide healthcare services to patients, and it is becoming central to the medical landscape. (americanmedspa.org)
  • Some issues that still need to be sorted out include the question of whether a doctor can conduct initial exams on patients in states other than the one(s) in which he or she is licensed to practice. (americanmedspa.org)
  • A 1984 Harvard study of more than 30000 records from 51 randomly selected hospitals in New York found that adverse medical events occur in the more than 3.7% of patients admitted and that more than a quarter of these were due to medical negligence. (medical-coder-certification.com)
  • COVID-19 has spurred a dramatic growth in telemedicine use for two reasons 1) doctors still provide care to patients for chronic diseases, pregnancy, and mental health-but requiring office visits put patients at additional risks and 2) to keep coronavirus patients who do not need hospital care at home to prevent the spread of the disease. (allnurses.com)
  • In other words, federal policy does not outright forbid medical providers from evaluating their patients using an online technology - but it doesn't outright allow it, either. (evisit.com)
  • Most patients would much rather visit their own doctors - whether those visits occur in-person or online. (evisit.com)
  • Telemedicine-the use of technology to deliver care at a distance-is rapidly growing and can potentially expand access for patients, enhance patient-physician collaboration, improve health outcomes, and reduce medical costs. (cdc.gov)
  • The positions put forward by the American College of Physicians highlight a meaningful approach to telemedicine policies and regulations that will have lasting positive effects for patients and physicians. (cdc.gov)
  • Due to concerns that physicians may prescribe medications for patients they may not know well, some states have imposed some restrictions on e-prescribing certain compounds, especially Schedule II drugs. (onyxmd.com)
  • License Portability I know it is a selfish thought, but every time I sit down in an airplane seat, I hope and pray that the person sitting next to me is forum continued on page 3 continued on page 2 Sex with Patients? (ncdcr.gov)
  • Over 1200 members offer psychiatric treatment in general medical hospitals, primary care, and outpatient medical settings for patients with comorbid medical conditions. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • Many patients or their referring physicians often find it difficult or impossible to obtain competent and timely psychiatric care or consultation. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • The statute says the out-of-state doctor must not solicit or take on patients in his own name, and must not open his own office - provisions Dr. Wright followed to the letter. (faim.org)
  • Today, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are announcing that payment is available to physicians and health care providers to counsel patients, at the time of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) testing, about the importance of self-isolation after they are tested and prior to the onset of symptoms. (gaoe.org)
  • Rising numbers of COVID-19 patients in U.S. hot spots could strain availability of critical care physicians and nurses, giving non-hospital providers "an instrumental role in the pandemic response," according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. (gaoe.org)
  • While the number of second-line physicians far exceeds the number of intensivists in the U.S., it's unclear how many second-line providers could feasibly be redeployed to the intensive care unit setting for COVID-19 patients. (gaoe.org)
  • What Happens When Physicians Become Patients? (alabamamedicine.org)
  • Physicians are unwavering in their dedication to their patients and the art of medicine…sometimes sacrificing the one thing they have that can keep them moving along in the profession. (alabamamedicine.org)
  • So, what happens when physicians become patients? (alabamamedicine.org)
  • By keeping our physicians well, we keep our patients safe. (alabamamedicine.org)
  • You may recall that last May, the Senate Appropriations Committee criticized the FDA for ignoring doctors, patients, and compounding pharmacists by issuing proposed new rules on compounding without sufficiently consulting stakeholders. (anh-usa.org)
  • The National Safety Transportation Board would like to remind you to routinely discuss with your patients the effect their diagnosed medical conditions or recommended drugs may have on their ability to safely operate a vehicle in any mode of transportation. (k3systems.com)
  • 1,With federal law currently preventing state- and local-level action against these predatory HAA billing practices, EM physicians must engage in policy reform and other efforts to protect our patients within the helicopter aeromedical transport system. (epmonthly.com)
  • Early in the pandemics some physicians in Italy came up with a strict criterion to allocate ventilators and ICU beds for patients who are less than 80 years of age and not having comorbidities such as advanced dementia [ 3 ]. (iospress.com)
  • Virtual visits also hold the potential of lowering costs by lessening unnecessary visits to doctors' offices, urgent care clinics and emergency departments. (jsonline.com)
  • According to a national survey of more than 3,500 emergency department (ED) physicians. (hcpro.com)
  • How do the medical system, public health system, and emergency management system provide care to those who need it with limited resources and staff? (nap.edu)
  • American Ambulance Association Association of Air Medical Services Association of Critical Care Transport Council Of State Governments International Association of Fire Chiefs National Association of EMS Educators National Association of EMS Physicians National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians National Association of State EMS Officials National EMS Management Association National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians National Volunteer Fire Council "Colorado HOUSE BILL 15-1015" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Other requirements for REPLICA member states include that the state utilize the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) exam for initial licensure, that the EMS personnel be under the supervision of a physician medical director in their home state, and that a criminal background check of all applicants be conducted for initial licensure, compliant with the requirements of the Federal Bureau of Investigations . (telehealthresourcecenter.org)
  • Emergency medical care and transportation services. (wa.gov)
  • Relating to the authority of a peace officer to apprehend a person for emergency detention and the authority of certain facilities and physicians to temporarily detain a person with mental illness. (texastribune.org)
  • When making the decision to transport a critically ill patient by helicopter air ambulance (HAA), the emergency medicine physician must now face the perverse prospect of saving the patient's life only to devastate that patient's financial well-being. (epmonthly.com)
  • Minnesota Statute § 214.075 requires that all new applicants for licensure must complete a fingerprint-based criminal background check (CBC). (mn.gov)
  • 4. Reviewing the credentials and the abilities of applicants whose professional records or physical or mental capabilities may not meet the requirements for licensure or registration as prescribed in article 2 of this chapter in order for the board to make a final determination as to whether the applicant meets the requirements for licensure pursuant to this chapter. (azleg.gov)
  • A. The primary duty of the board is to protect the public from unlawful, incompetent, unqualified, impaired or unprofessional practitioners of allopathic medicine through licensure, regulation and rehabilitation of the profession in this state. (azleg.gov)
  • 8. Adopting rules regarding the regulation and the qualifications of doctors of medicine. (azleg.gov)
  • In 2015, TelaDoc filed an antitrust lawsuit against the Texas Medical Board in response to a regulation requiring a patient be at an established medical site in order to establish a relationship over telemedicine. (phi.org)
  • Congress amended the VSTA in the Food Security Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-198, Title XVII, Sec.1768) to (1) authorize USDA regulate intrastate, as well as interstate, movement of biological products, (2) broaden the Secretary's authority to issue regulations, (3) enhance enforcement powers, and (4) recognize a congressional view that regulation is "necessary to prevent and eliminate burdens on commerce and to effectively regulate commerce. (everycrsreport.com)
  • The inability of health care consumers to monitor product quality leads to regulation, such as the licensing of physicians, dentists and nurses. (blogspot.com)
  • However, significant numbers of anesthesiologists and pulmonologists may primarily practice in non-hospital settings such as ambulatory surgery centers and outpatient physician offices, and may have little experience providing ICU-level care. (gaoe.org)
  • Two facilities, Gynemed Surgical Center in Baltimore and Femi-care Surgery Center in Owings Mills, are licensed as "Ambulatory Surgical Centers" instead of "Surgical Abortion Facilities. (operationrescue.org)
  • This last requirement may seem like nothing more than an insulting joke, because it was MQAC itself that concealed the fact that the applicant's license had been revoked in another state! (faim.org)
  • The thrust of these decisions is that USDA has primary regulatory authority over finished products physically moving in interstate commerce, but all other products, such as those made and sold within a single State, are subject only to Food and Drug Administration jurisdiction. (everycrsreport.com)
  • These "intrastate" products are not subject to USDA licensure, and FDA has, so far, not asserted its authority over them in a comprehensive manner. (everycrsreport.com)
  • Thus, you'll need to make sure you seek the services of a physician who meets that requirement. (evisit.com)
  • Repeals the requirement for a sanitation certificate to be issued for county business licenses for the operation of a lodging or tenement house, group home, group residence, group living arrangement, hotel, or boarding house. (hawaii.gov)
  • 1 Thanks to medical and technological advances, many service members have survived wounds, illnesses, and disabilities that might previously have proved fatal, although they sometimes return with life-altering consequences. (ncfr.org)
  • They can also be a major advantage for those who want to keep their medical conditions as private as possible, which drives them to search out these occult causes cannot agree amongst themselves. (alsponline.org)
  • The invention of the telephone allowed for physicians to begin resolving patient consults at a distance , saving them from making unnecessary house visits. (forbes.com)
  • Technology that gathers and electronically transmits patient data to the physician for evaluation holds promise for saving both patient and providers substantial dollars. (nursingworld.org)
  • Out of necessity, insurance providers, including Medicare, have begun to reimburse doctors for telehealth at similar rates to in-patient visits. (allnurses.com)
  • Furthermore, the patient interaction must be via real-time audio-video technology, and the patient must be in a medical professional shortage area. (onyxmd.com)
  • 2 Another reported its usefulness in bridging the gap between public sector and academic psychiatry by showing improved patient services at a state mental hospital as a result of increased academic medical center specialist availability through telemedicine in addition to enhanced research and administrative collaboration between the 2 facilities. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • Unfortunately, Washington has a clear pattern of bias against and malicious treatment of integrative physicians - even without a patient complaint of harm or other allegation of harm. (faim.org)
  • This 1-doctor practice serves a predominantly FFS patient base and stable referral base of approximately 30 doctors. (tda.org)
  • Doctors must give descriptive information about the procedure, medical risks, available medical assistance and child-support rights to the patient before he or she can perform an abortion. (ark.org)
  • Instead, these violations were found at licensed surgical abortion facilities in Maryland - some repeatedly with no guarantee that all affecting patient safety have yet been corrected. (operationrescue.org)
  • At the initial hearing, at least four MQAC staff members admitted that they knew from the beginning that the doctor's out-of-state license had been revoked and that he could therefore not be licensed in Washington, but they never put that information on the MQAC website (which continued to describe the physician's Washington license as "pending") or told Dr. Wright about it. (faim.org)
  • The next day, a physician's order was issued directing nurses to ask that Dr. Marano be contacted to see Charles regarding his symptoms. (justia.com)
  • People who are using these services are using them for conditions that are relatively straightforward," said Andy Anderson, Aurora's chief medical officer. (jsonline.com)
  • But depending on the urgency of your medical situation - and the tool you use to seek telehealth services - you may not always receive your evaluation and prescription from your usual physician. (evisit.com)
  • It is critical that the scope of telemedicine is clearly defined so that insurers and payers are reimbursing physicians for appropriate services. (onyxmd.com)