Leviviridae: A family of bacteriophages that infects enterobacteria, CAULOBACTER, and PSEUDOMONAS. The genome consists of linear, positive-sense single-stranded RNA.Allolevivirus: A bacteriophage genus of the family LEVIVIRIDAE, whose viruses contain the longer version of the genome and have no separate cell lysis gene.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Q beta Replicase: An enzyme that catalyzes the replication of the RNA of coliphage Q beta. EC 2.7.7.-.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Indigo Carmine: Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.BooksClassification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Vanilla: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that is the source of the familiar flavoring used in foods and medicines (FLAVORING AGENTS).Paeonia: A plant genus of the family Paeoniaceae, order Dilleniales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. These perennial herbs are up to 2 m (6') tall. Leaves are alternate and are divided into three lobes, each lobe being further divided into three smaller lobes. The large flowers are symmetrical, bisexual, have 5 sepals, 5 petals (sometimes 10), and many stamens.Caudovirales: An order comprising three families of tailed bacteriophages: MYOVIRIDAE; PODOVIRIDAE; and SIPHOVIRIDAE.Acinetobacter baumannii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, commonly found in the clinical laboratory, and frequently resistant to common antibiotics.Acinetobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACINETOBACTER.Evodia: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE which is used in Chinese medicine (DRUGS, CHINESE HERBAL). Evodiamine and other quinazoline alkaloids (QUINAZOLINES) are obtained from the fruit of E. ruticarpa.Databases, Nucleic Acid: Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.Lanatosides: Glycosides from DIGITALIS lanata leaf. Lanatoside C has actions similar to DIGOXIN. Mixtures of lanatosides A, B, and C have also been used. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p670)Cryoelectron Microscopy: Electron microscopy involving rapid freezing of the samples. The imaging of frozen-hydrated molecules and organelles permits the best possible resolution closest to the living state, free of chemical fixatives or stains.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Ribosomes: Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Levivirus: A bacteriophage genus of the family LEVIVIRIDAE, whose viruses contain the short version of the genome and have a separate gene for cell lysis.RNA Phages: Bacteriophages whose genetic material is RNA, which is single-stranded in all except the Pseudomonas phage phi 6 (BACTERIOPHAGE PHI 6). All RNA phages infect their host bacteria via the host's surface pili. Some frequently encountered RNA phages are: BF23, F2, R17, fr, PhiCb5, PhiCb12r, PhiCb8r, PhiCb23r, 7s, PP7, Q beta phage, MS2 phage, and BACTERIOPHAGE PHI 6.BaltimoreCaulobacter crescentus: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that consist of slender vibroid cells.Caulobacter: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod- or vibroid-shaped or fusiform bacteria that commonly produce a stalk. They are found in fresh water and soil and divide by binary transverse fission.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2: An E3 UBIQUITIN LIGASE that interacts with and inhibits TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53. Its ability to ubiquitinate p53 is regulated by TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.GermanyBacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Leukemia, Plasma Cell: A rare, aggressive variant of MULTIPLE MYELOMA characterized by the circulation of excessive PLASMA CELLS in the peripheral blood. It can be a primary manifestation of multiple myeloma or develop as a terminal complication during the disease.Immunologic Memory: The altered state of immunologic responsiveness resulting from initial contact with antigen, which enables the individual to produce antibodies more rapidly and in greater quantity in response to secondary antigenic stimulus.Triacetoneamine-N-Oxyl: Cyclic N-oxide radical functioning as a spin label and radiation-sensitizing agent.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)B-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of B-lymphocytes based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Bacteriophages: Viruses whose hosts are bacterial cells.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Biological Therapy: Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Bacteriophage T4: Virulent bacteriophage and type species of the genus T4-like phages, in the family MYOVIRIDAE. It infects E. coli and is the best known of the T-even phages. Its virion contains linear double-stranded DNA, terminally redundant and circularly permuted.Pseudomonas Phages: Viruses whose host is Pseudomonas. A frequently encountered Pseudomonas phage is BACTERIOPHAGE PHI 6.

Spontaneous rearrangements in RNA sequences. (1/58)

The ability of RNAs to spontaneously rearrange their sequences under physiological conditions is demonstrated using the molecular colony technique, which allows single RNA molecules to be detected provided that they are amplifiable by the replicase of bacteriophage Qbeta. The rearrangements are Mg2+-dependent, sequence-non-specific, and occur both in trans and in cis at a rate of 10(-9) h(-1) per site. The results suggest that the mechanism of spontaneous RNA rearrangements differs from the transesterification reactions earlier observed in the presence of Qbeta replicase, and have a number of biologically important implications.  (+info)

CCA initiation boxes without unique promoter elements support in vitro transcription by three viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. (2/58)

It has previously been observed that the only specific requirement for transcriptional initiation on viral RNA in vitro by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of turnip yellow mosaic virus is the CCA at the 3' end of the genome. We now compare the abilities of this RdRp, turnip crinkle virus RdRp, and Qbeta replicase, an enzyme capable of supporting the complete viral replication cycle in vitro, to transcribe RNA templates containing multiple CCA boxes but lacking specific viral sequences. Each enzyme is able to initiate transcription from several CCA boxes within these RNAs, and no special reaction conditions are required for these activities. The transcriptional yields produced from templates comprised of multiple CCA or CCCA repeats relative to templates derived from native viral RNA sequences vary between 2:1 and 0.1:1 for the different RdRps. Control of initiation by such redundant sequences presents a challenge to the specificity of viral transcription and replication. We identify 3'-preferential initiation and sensitivity to structural presentation as two specificity mechanisms that can limit initiation among potential CCA initiation sites. These two specificity mechanisms are used to different degrees by the three RdRps. The finding that three viral RdRps representing two of the three supergroups within the positive-strand RNA viral RdRp phylogeny support substantial transcription in the absence of unique promoters suggests that this phenomenon may be common among positive-strand viruses. A framework is presented arguing that replication of viral RNA in the absence of unique promoter elements is feasible.  (+info)

Mutilation of RNA phage Qbeta virus-like particles: from icosahedrons to rods. (3/58)

Icosahedral virus-like particles (VLPs) of RNA phage Qbeta are stabilized by four disulfide bonds of cysteine residues 74 and 80 within the loop between beta-strands F and G (FG loop) of the monomeric subunits, which determine the five-fold and quasi-six-fold symmetry contacts of the VLPs. In order to reduce the stability of Qbeta VLPs, we mutationally converted the amino acid stretch 76-ANGSCD-81 within the FG loop into the 76-VGGVEL-81 sequence. It led to production in Escherichia coli cells of aberrant rod-like Qbeta VLPs, along with normal icosahedral capsids. The length of the rod-like particles exceeded 4-30 times the diameter of icosahedral Qbeta VLPs.  (+info)

A protein antibiotic in the phage Qbeta virion: diversity in lysis targets. (4/58)

A(2), a capsid protein of RNA phage Qbeta, is also responsible for host lysis. A(2) blocked synthesis of murein precursors in vivo by inhibiting MurA, the catalyst of the committed step of murein biosynthesis. An A(2)-resistance mutation mapped to an exposed surface near the substrate-binding cleft of MurA. Moreover, purified Qbeta virions inhibited wild-type MurA, but not the mutant MurA, in vitro. Thus, the two small phages characterized for their lysis strategy, Qbeta and the small DNA phage phiX174, effect host lysis by targeting different enzymes in the multistep, universally conserved pathway of cell wall biosynthesis.  (+info)

Functional replacement of the Escherichia coli hfq gene by the homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (5/58)

The 102 aa Hfq protein of Escherichia coli (Hfq(Ec)) was first described as a host factor required for phage Qbeta replication. More recently, Hfq was shown to affect the stability of several E. coli mRNAs, including ompA mRNA, where it interferes with ribosome binding, which in turn results in rapid degradation of the transcript. In contrast, Hfq is also required for efficient translation of the E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium rpoS gene, encoding the stationary sigma factor. In this study, the authors have isolated and characterized the Hfq homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Hfq(Pa)), which consists of only 82 aa. The 68 N-terminal amino acids of Hfq(Pa) show 92% identity with Hfq(Ec). Hfq(Pa) was shown to functionally replace Hfq(Ec) in terms of its requirement for phage Qbeta replication and for rpoS expression. In addition, Hfq(Pa) exerted the same negative effect on E. coli ompA mRNA expression. As judged by proteome analysis, the expression of either the plasmid-borne hfq(Pa) or the hfq(Ec) gene in an E. coli Hfq(-) RpoS(-) strain revealed no gross difference in the protein profile. Both Hfq(Ec) and Hfq(Pa) affected the synthesis of approximately 26 RpoS-independent E. coli gene products. These studies showed that the functional domain of Hfq resides within its N-terminal domain. The observation that a C-terminally truncated Hfq(Ec) lacking the last 27 aa [Hfq(Ec(75))] can also functionally replace the full-length E. coli protein lends further support to this notion.  (+info)

The lysis function of RNA bacteriophage Qbeta is mediated by the maturation (A2) protein. (6/58)

Complete or partial cDNA sequences of the RNA bacteriophage Qbeta were cloned in plasmids under the control of the lambdaP(L) promoter to allow regulated expression in Escherichia coli harbouring the gene for the temperature-sensitive lambdaCI857 repressor. Induction of the complete Qbeta sequence leads to a 100-fold increase in phage production, accompanied by cell lysis. Induction of the 5'-terminal sequence containing the intact maturation protein (A2) cistron also causes cell lysis. Alterations of the A2 cistron, leading to proteins either devoid of approximately 20% of the C-terminal region or of six internal amino acids, abolish the lysis function. Expression of other cistrons in addition to the A2 cistron does not enhance host lysis. Thus, in Qbeta, the A2 protein, in addition to its functions as maturation protein, appears to trigger cell lysis. This contrasts with the situation in the distantly related group I RNA phages such as f2 and MS2 where a small lysis polypeptide is coded for by a region overlapping the end of the coat gene and the beginning of the replicase gene.  (+info)

Evolution of bacteriophage in continuous culture: a model system to test antiviral gene therapies for the emergence of phage escape mutants. (7/58)

The emergence of viral escape mutants is usually a highly undesirable phenomenon. This phenomenon is frequently observed in antiviral drug applications for the treatment of viral infections and can undermine long-term therapeutic success. Here, we propose a strategy for evaluating a given antiviral approach in terms of its potential to provoke the appearance of resistant virus mutants. By use of Q beta RNA phage as a model system, the effect of an antiviral gene therapy, i.e., a virus-specific repressor protein expressed by a recombinant Escherichia coli host, was studied over the course of more than 100 generations. In 13 experiments carried out in parallel, 12 phage populations became resistant and 1 became extinct. Sequence analysis revealed that only two distinct phage mutants emerged in the 12 surviving phage populations. For both escape mutants, sequence variations located in the repressor binding site of the viral genomic RNA, which decrease affinity for the repressor protein, conferred resistance to translational repression. The results clearly suggest the feasibility of the proposed strategy for the evaluation of antiviral approaches in terms of their potential to allow resistant mutants to appear. In addition, the strategy proved to be a valuable tool for observing virus-specific molecular targets under the impact of antiviral drugs.  (+info)

Qbeta replicase discriminates between legitimate and illegitimate templates by having different mechanisms of initiation. (8/58)

Qbeta replicase (RNA-directed RNA polymerase of bacteriophage Qbeta) exponentially amplifies certain RNAs (RQ RNAs) in vitro. Here we characterize template properties of the 5' and 3' fragments obtained by cleaving one of such RNAs at an internal site. We unexpectedly found that, besides the 3' fragment, Qbeta replicase can copy the 5' fragment and a number of its variants, although they lack the initiator region of RQ RNA. This copying can occur as a 3'-terminal elongation or through de novo initiation. In contradistinction to RQ RNA and its 3' fragment, initiation on these templates occurs without regard to the 3'-terminal or internal oligo(C) clusters, is GTP-independent, and does not result in a stable replicative complex capable of elongation in the presence of aurintricarboxylic acid. The results suggest that, although Qbeta replicase can initiate and elongate on a variety of RNAs, only some of them are recognized as legitimate templates. GTP-dependent initiation on a legitimate template drives the enzyme to a "closed" conformation that may be important for keeping the template and the complementary nascent strand unannealed, without which the exponential replication is impossible. Triggering the GTP-dependent conformational transition at the initiation step could serve as a discriminative feature of legitimate templates providing for the high template specificity of Qbeta replicase.  (+info)

Development of Recombinant Vaccine against A(H1N1) 2009 Influenza Based on Virus-like Nanoparticles Carrying the Extracellular Domain of M2 Protein
Page contains details about virus-like nanoparticles . It has composition images, properties, Characterization methods, synthesis, applications and reference articles : nano.nature.com
chains in the Genus database with same CATH superfamily 2LXP C; 4TU4 A; 5CUB A; 4BW4 A; 2YQL A; 4QYL A; 4FIP A; 5FE4 A; 2E7O A; 2RFJ A; 4QSS A; 5LVR A; 2C2V S; 5E74 A; 5HLS A; 5C85 A; 2I8N A; 5FE9 A; 5KU3 A; 4O71 A; 5FH7 A; 1WEQ A; 5B79 A; 2IDA A; 1VD4 A; 4PPE A; 2YT5 A; 5ENJ A; 5HEN A; 4UIY A; 4QNS A; 5IGM A; 4O7A A; 5CQ4 A; 2LV9 A; 5CUC A; 5ENC A; 2MIQ A; 2PNX A; 3U5J A; 5FB1 A; 5HQ5 A; 5HM0 A; 5I7X A; 3ZYQ A; 2EGP A; 5EWD A; 4X2I A; 2YQD A; 3GV4 A; 5HQ6 A; 5LUU A; 2E6R A; 4A9F A; 5HEM A; 1T1H A; 4MSX A; 4N3W A; 3N9P A; 4TT6 A; 5C8G A; 5A82 A; 2KR4 A; 3N9M A; 1E4U A; 3S92 A; 1WEE A; 5IGN A; 5FE8 A; 5J0D A; 5K29 A; 4NR6 A; 4L7X A; 4LLB A; 4A9H A; 3D7C A; 5I83 A; 2YUR A; 4A4B A; 5ETB A; 2VJF A; 2WP1 A; 4A9N A; 3I2D A; 5TAB A; 4IOQ A; 5H1V A; 5G4R A; 4YYK A; 5KTU A; 4MEP A; 5E73 A; 4CLB A; 5A5P A; 4TKP B; 2LN0 A; 3FKM X; 2FSA A; 2CT2 A; 4QSQ A; 2YW8 A; 2VPB A; 5IBN A; 2L0B A; 5DKH A; 3U5M A; 2CKL A; 4HBW A; 1F68 A; 5CFW A; 2YW5 A; 4UYF B; 4YY6 A; 3ZYU A; 4UYF A; 4CUU A; 3MUK A; 4NR5 A; 1WEW A; ...
Allolevivirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Leviviridae. Enterobacteria serve as natural hosts. There are currently only two species in this genus including the type species Enterobacteria phage Qbeta. Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Leviviridae Genus: Allolevivirus Enterobacteria phage FI Enterobacteria phage Qbeta Viruses in Allolevivirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral and Spherical geometries, and T=3 symmetry. The diameter is around 26 nm. Genomes are linear and non-segmented, around 4kb in length. The genome codes for 4 proteins. Entry into the host cell is achieved by adsorption into the host cell. Replication follows the positive stranded RNA virus replication model. Positive stranded rna virus transcription is the method of transcription. Translation takes place by suppression of termination. The virus exits the host cell by bacteria lysis. Enterobacteria serve as the natural host. "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015. ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". ...
In the present study, we describe a therapy for cat allergy based on immunization with the recombinant cat allergen Fel d1 displayed on VLPs derived from the bacteriophage Qβ (Qβ-Fel d1). The therapy is characterized by three key features: (a) Qβ-Fel d1 is highly immunogenic and a single vaccination is sufficient for therapy; (b) Qβ-Fel d1 is essentially nonreactogenic; and (c) the effector mechanism of the therapy is based upon the induction of allergen-specific IgGs.. Qβ-VLPs consist of 180 subunits of a 14-kD coat protein. These VLPs elicit strong B cell responses as a result of their highly organized and repetitive structures (Jegerlehner et al., 2002a,b). This feature can be exploited to enhance the immunogenicity of self- and foreign antigens. Chemical coupling of antigens via a cysteine to surface lysine residues on the VLP renders these antigens equally repetitive and consequently immunogenic. Moreover, host cell RNA, a ligand for TLR3 and TLR7 (Kanzler et al., 2007), is ...
JPT Peptide Technologies is a DIN ISO 9001:2015 certified and GCLP compliant integrated provider of innovative peptide based catalog products and custom services.
... , Wilson, K. J., Reiser, J., Weissmann, C. Revised amino-acid sequence of qbeta coat protein between positions 1 and 60 Journal of Biological Chemistry 1977 252:990-993 PMID:838709 ...
Isolate DNA from soil. NucleoSpin Soil DNA purification kit removes humic acid & PCR inhibitors from soil samples. Superior performance & great value.
Miranda Castro QSS: Pathology Set - Pathology Set: $215 (save $10). Price includes 357 Pathology Cards, 6 CDs and study guidelines. And shipping: use FREESHIP40 on checkout. The Quick Study System by Gwynn Cadwallader is a beautiful learning tool specifically created to help homeopathic students, study groups and homeopaths prepare for the certification examination of the Council for
Creative Biostructure now can provide custom Mempro™ Acyl CoA binding protein (ACBP) production service based on virus-like particles.
Rich graphical models for real-world scene understanding encode the shape and pose of objects via high-dimensional, continuous variables. We describe a particle-based max-product inference algorithm which maintains a diverse set of posterior mode hypotheses, and is robust to initialization. At each iteration, the set of particle hypotheses is augmented via stochastic proposals, and then reduced via an optimization algorithm that minimizes distortions in max-product messages. Our particle selection metric is submodular, and thus efficient greedy algorithms have rigorous optimality guarantees. By avoiding the stochastic resampling steps underlying standard particle filters, we also avoid common degeneracies where particles collapse onto a single hypothesis. Our approach significantly outperforms previous particle-based algorithms in the estimation of human pose from images and videos, and the prediction of protein side-chain conformations ...
1. AAN QSS Init. Treatment PD (Jan 2002) Miyasaki JM, Martin W, Suchowersky O, Weiner WJ, Lang AE. Practice parameter: initiation of treatment for Parkinsons disease: an evidence-based review: Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology 2002 Jan 8; 58(1):11-7. 2. AAN QSS PD Diag. (April 2006) Suchowersky O, Reich S, Perlmutter J, Zesiewicz T, Gronseth G, Weiner WJ, Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Practice parameter: diagnosis and prognosis of new onset Parkinson disease (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology 2006 Apr 11; 66(7):968-75. 3. AAN QSS PD Dyskin (April 2006) Pahwa R, Factor SA, Lyons KE, Ondo WF, Gronseth G, Bronte-Stewart H, Hallet M, Miyasaki J, Stevens J, and Weiner WJ. Practice Parameter: Treatment of Parkinsons disease with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia (an evidence-based review): Report of the quality ...
Simplified Particle Input ConnEction Specification (SPICES) is a particle-based molecular structure representation derived from straightforward simplifications of the atom-based SMILES line notation. It aims at supporting tedious and error-prone molecular structure definitions for particle-based mesoscopic simulation techniques like Dissipative Particle Dynamics by allowing for an interplay of different molecular encoding levels that range from topological line notations and corresponding particle-graph visualizations to 3D structures with support of their spatial mapping into a simulation box. An open Java library for SPICES structure handling and mesoscopic simulation support in combination with an open Java Graphical User Interface viewer application for visual topological inspection of SPICES definitions are provided.
Mesothelin is found in other cancers for several years," said Yao, also a researcher in the Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center at BCM. "However, we didnt know the role it played in pancreatic cancer:" until she and her colleagues reported in this article. In fact, they found very high levels of mesothelin in 18 of 21 samples of patients pancreatic tissues compared to amounts found in nearby normal tissues. In studies of this protein in the lab, pancreatic cancer cell lines that produced high levels of mesothelin grew faster and spread more than those in which mesothelin levels were lower. Pancreatic cancer cells grew and spread faster in mice whose tumors expressed high levels of mesothelin than in those whose cancer did not, said the researchers, who conducted the studies in an immune deficient mouse. ...
Viral Biorealm Family}} ==Baltimore Classification== Leviviridae; Levivirus ==Higher Order Categories== Family: Leviviridae Genus: Levivirus Species: Enterobacteria phage BZ13, Enterobacteria phage MS2[4] ==Description and Significance== ssRNA positive-strand viruses, no DNA stage Levivirus is one of two known genera of the family Leviviridae, with Allolevivirus being the other. It replicates in only three bacteria genera: Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Caulobacter. The virus attaches to the pili, sometimes the virion receptor site, and transiently exposes viral RNA while penetrating the cell [2]. The family Leviviridae is found to have one of the fastest known mutation rates, at 10-3 bp/replication, but also one of the smallest genomes at 4,268 nt which code for 4 protein subunits [3]. The distinguishing factor of levivirus is a cell-lysis protein coded within its genome, something that is absent in allelovirus. In 1976 the species Enterobacteria phage MS2 became the first organism ever to have ...
Talking to the Misinformed: How Politicians Communicate with Constituents Who Lack Accurate Information.". "Party Polarization in Factual Beliefs: Evidence from Government Officials and the Mass Public" (with Nathan Lee and Brendan Nyhan).. "Evaluating New Approaches to Promoting Vaccination: A Field Experiment on Parents in Vermont" (with Bridget Ahrens, Christine Finley, Shari Levine, and Brendan Nyhan).. "Combating Conspiracy Theories about Disease Epidemics: An Experiment on Zika in Brazil" (with Victoria Chi and Brendan Nyhan).. "Misperceptions, Corrections, and the Structure of Political Opinions" (with Caitlin Davies).. "Decider in Chief? Public Misperceptions about Presidential Power" (with Scott Clifford and Brendan Nyhan).. "Factual (In)accuracy and Partisan Selective Exposure" (with students in my QSS 30.08 seminar).. ...
Novavax is developing vaccines based on virus-like particle (VLP) technology developed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) in Worcester.
A crack in a high mineral-content material, like bone or a synthetic mineral/polymeric composite, generates ion gradients which can be utilized for active targeting and repair. Employing is technique, an active self-propelled particle-based detection, delivery, and repair strategy for cracks is designed by utilizing the damaged matrix itself as both the trigger and the fuel.
Gene expression is typically regulated by gene regulatory proteins that bind to the DNA. Experiments have shown that these proteins find their DNA target site via a combination of 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm and 1D diffusion along the DNA. This stochastic transport sets a fundamental limit on the precision of gene regulation. We derive this limit analytically and show by particle-based GFRD simulations that our expression is highly accurate under biologically relevant conditions ...
To determine the prevalence of parvovirus 4 infection and its clinical and sociodemographic correlations in Finland, we used virus-like particle-based serodiagnostic procedures (immunoglobulin [Ig] G, IgM, and IgG avidity) and PCR. We found 2 persons with parvovirus 4 primary infection who had mild or asymptomatic clinical features among hepatitis C virus-infected injection drug users.
This thesis outlines adaptivity schemes for particle-based methods for the simulation of nearly incompressible fluid flows. As with the remeshing schemes used in mesh and grid-based methods, there is a need to use localized refinement in particle methods to reduce computational costs. Various forms of particle refinement have been proposed for particle-based methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). However, none of the techniques that exist currently are able to retain the original degree of randomness among particles. Existing methods reinitialize particle positions on a regular grid. Using such a method for region localized refinement can lead to discontinuities at the interfaces between refined and unrefined particle domains. In turn, this can produce inaccurate results or solution divergence. This thesis outlines the development of new localized refinement algorithms that are capable of retaining the initial randomness of the particles, thus eliminating transition zone ...
The presence of obstacles modifies the way in which particles diffuse. In cells it is observed that the mean-square displacement of biomolecules scales as a power law with exponent smaller than one. This behavior, called anomalous diffusion, is due to the presence of macromolecules playing the role of obstacles. We discuss the effect of fixed macroscopic obstacles on the time needed by particles to cross a strip and we consider both a diffusive and a ballistic regime. We find that in some regimes this residence time is not monotonic with respect to the size and the location of the obstacles. We discuss our results for particles performing random walks on a two dimensional strip considering also the effect of an exclusion rule. Results obtained in collaboration with A. Ciallella (Rome), O. Krehel (Eindhoven), A. Muntean (Karlstadt), R. van Santen (Eindhoven), and A. Sengar (Eindhoven) will be discussed.. ...
Dynamic multidimensional modeling of structure and activity in multispecies biofilm systems - a particle-based approach Electronic version of a poster presented at the Biocomplexity VI workshop (May 12-16, 2004, University of Indiana, Bloomington). This version contains several videos of simulations carried out with our biofilm modelling framework ...
A new type of imaging that does not require a lens and uses reconfigurable particle-based masks to take multiple shots of an object is being developed by resear
The gene that encodes the SERTs is SLC6A4. The promoter region of SLC6A4 has two well-known polymorphisms aptly named "short" and "long" corresponding to the number of repeats in the 5-HTT-linked polymorphic region (HTTLPR). The short variation of this promoter leads to less transcription of the SERT gene SLC6A4.[2] Further, studies have found that the short allele of HTTLPR is associated with changes in the brain structure such as reduced grey matter in the perigeniculate region surrounding Cg25 and in the amygdala, areas important for emotional processing and mood regulation.[3] Massive genetic analysis of autistic patients reveals that the S allele is present significantly more in patients with Autism than without.[4] Since the presence of the short-HTTLPR promoter results in fewer SERTs being produced, and SERTs function by reuptaking and thus limiting serotonin-induced signal transduction, it is not unexpected that over 30% of autistic individuals, who more commonly have the short-HTTLPR ...
The Obama administration says it is concerned that some states are restricting access by low-income people to costly, revolutionary drugs for a liver-wasting disease called hepatitis C.
The RNA world hypothesis is supported by RNAs ability to store, transmit, and duplicate genetic information, as DNA does. RNA can act as a ribozyme, a special type of enzyme. Because it can perform the tasks of both DNA and enzymes, RNA is believed to have once been capable of supporting independent life forms.[15] Some viruses use RNA as their genetic material, rather than DNA.[45] Further, while nucleotides were not found in experiments based on Miller-Urey experiment, their formation in prebiotically plausible conditions was reported in 2009;[22] the purine base known as adenine is merely a pentamer of hydrogen cyanide. Experiments with basic ribozymes, like Bacteriophage Qβ RNA, have shown that simple self-replicating RNA structures can withstand even strong selective pressures (e.g., opposite-chirality chain terminators).[46] Since there were no known chemical pathways for the abiogenic synthesis of nucleotides from pyrimidine nucleobases cytosine and uracil under prebiotic conditions, it ...
In Western nations, the Recovery approach has become a widely accepted philosophy and treatment concept in mental health. Yet, community understanding of the Recovery approach remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate (i) peoples awareness of the principles underpinning the Recovery approach in mental health, and (ii) the treatment approaches people consider most important, and whether these align with the Recovery approach. To achieve these aims, a random sample of 1217 Australian adults participated in the National Social Survey (QSS) via telephone interview. Peoples experience with mental health services, the importance they place on various treatment approaches, and their awareness of principles underpinning the Recovery approach were assessed. Analyses were conducted using descriptive statistics. Most participants (94%) agreed that regardless of the severity of symptoms experienced and/or the mental illness diagnosis, being diagnosed with a mental illness means there is ...
Why would they need lysogeny-or even, how could they lysogenize? I cant speak for them all, but MS2 is a (+)-stranded ssRNA phage. On infection, the RNA can be directly translated into proteins that replicate the phage RNA and direct the synthesis of any capsid proteins required to form new phage particles. The replicase enzyme makes copies of both plus and minus strands, though the latter are only used as a template to make more (+) strand for both translation and packaging into phage. To lysogenize, there needs to be a DNA phase to the replication cycle and there isnt any such phase for MS2 ...
Analysis and computational tools and modeling capability for high-temperature electrolysis, low-temperature electrolysis, photoelectrochemical, and solar thermochemical technologies at Sandia National Laboratories
Assume a particle-based fundamental physics. Then the non-living things in the universe outnumber the living by many orders of magnitude. But here is a striking fact given a restricted compositionality like van Inwagens, Toners or mine on which all there are is in the universe are particles and organisms: the number of kinds of living things outnumbers the number of kinds of non-living things by several orders of magnitude. The number of kinds of particles is of the order of 100, but there are millions of biological species (they may not all correspond to metaphysical species, of course).. Counting by individuals, living things are exceptional. But counting by kinds, physical things are exceptional. Only a tiny portion of the universe is occupied by life. But on the other hand, only a tiny portion of the space of kinds of entities is occupied by non-life.. I am not sure what to make of these observations. Maybe it is gives some credence to an Aristotelian rather than Humean way of seeing the ...
Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from solid tumors and found at extremely low frequencies in the blood of patients in most cancers. A subset of these cells can seed and give rise to metastases, which is the primary cause of cancer-related mortality. Isolation and characterization of these cells from blood as a liquid biopsy can be a sensitive, non-invasive method for early detection, disease monitoring and therapy selection. CTCs can be found even at early disease stages in preclinical models and patients. There is increasing evidence that clusters of CTCs in blood are associated with higher metastatic potential; however, efficient isolation and interrogation of these rare clusters is challenging. In this study, we utilize an in-line rare cell enrichment platform developed by Becton Dickinson (BD), coupled with the BD FACSTM Influx cell sorter to rapidly isolate both single cells and clusters from blood. This platform utilizes magnetic particle-based depletion of unwanted leukocytes and ...
MCell (Monte Carlo Cell) is a program for simulating spatially resolved cell models using particle-based Monte Carlo algorithms. Biological processes at the cell level take place in small and often...
We have recently developed a simulation approach to calculate the equilibrium phase diagram of particle-based microphase formers. Here, this approach is used to calculate the phase behavior of the square-well-linear model for different strengths and ranges of the linear long--range repulsive component. The results are compared with various theoretical predictions for microphase formation. The analysis further allows us to better understand the mechanism for microphase formation in colloidal suspensions. ... [Read More] ...
We employ a spectrum of theoretical and numerical methods such as particle-based computer simulations, classical density functional theory, Langevin- and Fokker-Planck equations, continuum equations, and coarse-graining strategies. ...
VV B337 Title: Relationships between several particle-based stochastic reaction-diffusion models. Abstract: Particle-based stochastic reaction-diffusion models have recently been used to study a number of problems in cell biology. These methods are of interest when both noise in the chemical reaction process and the explicit motion of molecules are important. Several different mathematical models have been used, some spatially-continuous and others lattice-based. In the former molecules usually move by Brownian Motion, and may react when approaching each other. For the latter molecules undergo continuous time random-walks, and usually react with fixed probabilities per unit time when located at the same lattice site. As motivation, we will begin with a brief discussion of the types of biological problems we are studying and how we have used stochastic reaction-diffusion models to gain insight into these systems. We will then introduce several of the stochastic reaction-diffusion models, ...
Provide an easy-to-use program for modeling particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in cells Provides an expandable Java library for particle reaction-diffusion simulations
from Genetic Engineering News by Michael Tackett, Graeme Doran, Daniel Pregibon Particle-Based Approach Profiles Up to 68 miRNAs from Plasma, Serum, and Exosomes MicroRNA (miRNA) profiling has tremendous potential for the diagnosis and prognosis of a broad range of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disorders,
My late 2013 13 rMBP has a really annoying mura in the lower right quadrant of the display. The original display was replaced under warranty when the...
Recently, Ge et. al. reported on an investigation of electric-field responsive nanoparticles for drug release. In their study, the authors utilized emulsion polymerization methods to encapsulate drug compounds in conductive polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles that are suspended in a hydrogel. The temperature sensitive hydrogel, which is a liquid at low temperature, and can be tailored to become a gel at body temperature, is used to localize the PPy nanoparticles after they are subcutaneously injected at the point of interest. The hydrogel further provides a biodegradable and biocompatible matrix for the conductive nanoparticles. The nanoparticles provide additional features including increased surface area for high drug loading, along with the small size (50-100 nm) that enables ease of passage and excretion through the circulatory system. Flourescein and daunorubicin compounds were selected to be loaded into PPy nanoparticle during synthesis, which after polymerization were completely encapsulated. ...
Assistant Professor. research • biography • lab members • publications • data and analysis tools. Biography:. Dennis Ko received a B.S. from Cornell University in 1997. His research career began in the lab of Dr. Jeffrey W. Roberts at Cornell University. Using a genetic screen of the bacterial initiation factor σ70 followed by biochemical characterization, he identified a surface on the protein important for transcriptional regulation by the phage Q protein and revealed a novel role for a sigma factor beyond transcription initiation.. His training continued from 1997-2005 in the MSTP at Stanford University. He completed both MD and PhD degrees but clearly saw that his future was in research aimed at understanding the biology of disease. His thesis project was carried out in the laboratory of Dr. Matthew P. Scott. Using a combination of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics and animal models, he pioneered a new subject in the lab examining how genetic alterations lead to the ...
Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles
Allolevivirus Enterobacteria phage FI Enterobacteria phage Qbeta Genus: Levivirus Enterobacteria phage BZ13 Enterobacteria ...
Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Leviviridae Genus: Allolevivirus Enterobacteria phage FI Enterobacteria phage Qbeta ...
... allolevivirus MeSH B04.123.205.600.500 --- levivirus MeSH B04.123.205.891 --- t-phages MeSH B04.123.205.891.100 --- ... allolevivirus MeSH B04.123.691.600.500 --- levivirus MeSH B04.123.706.070 --- bacteriophage p22 MeSH B04.123.900.150 --- ... allolevivirus MeSH B04.820.410.500 --- levivirus MeSH B04.820.455.149 --- bornaviridae MeSH B04.820.455.149.135 --- borna ... allolevivirus MeSH B04.123.450.500 --- levivirus MeSH B04.123.470.500 --- microvirus MeSH B04.123.470.500.320 --- bacteriophage ...
Ahjdlikevirus Alfamovirus Allexivirus Allolevivirus Alphabaculovirus Alphacarmotetravirus Alphacoronavirus Alphaentomopoxvirus ...
... is a genus of viruses, in the family Leviviridae. Enterobacteria serve as natural hosts. There are currently only ... Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Leviviridae Genus: Allolevivirus Enterobacteria phage FI Enterobacteria phage Qbeta ... Viruses in Allolevivirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral and Spherical geometries, and T=3 symmetry. The diameter is around ...
Talk:Allolevivirus. *Talk:Alphabaculovirus. *Talk:Alphaentomopoxvirus. *Talk:Alphaflexiviridae. *Talk:Alphafusellovirus. *Talk: ...
Genus Allolevivirus, mit Species Escherichia virus Qbeta. *Genus Levivirus, mit Species Escherichia virus MS2 ...
Allolevivirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Leviviridae. Enterobacteria serve as natural hosts. There are currently only ... Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Leviviridae Genus: Allolevivirus Enterobacteria phage FI Enterobacteria phage Qbeta ... Viruses in Allolevivirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral and Spherical geometries, and T=3 symmetry. The diameter is around ...
Allolevivirus. Family. Luteoviridae. Genus. Luteovirus. Genus. Polerovirus. Genus. Enamovirus. Family. Narnaviridae. Genus. ...
The Leviviridae are a family of small single-stranded RNA viruses currently separated into two genera; Allolevivirus and ...
Allolevivirus. enterobacteria phage Q-B. Bacteria. Luteovirus:. barley yellow dwarf virus. Plants. ...
Allolevivirus subgroup III. › Bacteriophage Q beta. › Bacteriophage Qbeta. › Enterobacteria allolevivirus I. › Enterobacteria ...
Notes on Genus: Allolevivirus. icosahedra. Type member: Enterobacteria phage Qb. Contents. Members of this Genus. General ...
2016) Asymmetric cryo-EM structure of the canonical Allolevivirus Qβ reveals a single maturation protein and the genomic ssRNA ...
Genus Allolevivirus. Type species Enterobacteria phage Qbeta. Distinguishing features. Alloleviviruses contain the longer ... List of other related viruses which may be members of the genus Allolevivirus but have not been approved as species. None ... Generally, the replicases from leviviruses poorly replicate allolevivirus RNA and vice versa. ... Antigenic specificity is distinct from that of members of the genus Allolevivirus. ...
Allolevivirus Enterobacteria phage FI Enterobacteria phage Qbeta Genus: Levivirus Enterobacteria phage BZ13 Enterobacteria ...
Asymmetric cryo-EM structure of the canonical Allolevivirus Qβ reveals a single maturation protein and the genomic ssRNA in ...
ALLOLEVIVIRUS). Its cellular function may be to regulate mRNA stability and processing in that it binds tightly to poly(A) RNA ...
... with Allolevivirus being the other. It replicates in only three bacteria genera: Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Caulobacter. The ...
Talk:Allolevivirus. *Talk:Alphabaculovirus. *Talk:Alphaentomopoxvirus. *Talk:Alphaflexiviridae. *Talk:Alphafusellovirus. *Talk: ...
Allolevivirus , Protein Stability , Capsid - metabolism , CHO Cells , Luminescent Proteins - metabolism , fluorescent proteins ... Allolevivirus - genetics , Light , Capsid Proteins - chemistry , Protein Engineering , Protein Structure, Quaternary , ...
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification , Methylene Blue - metabolism , Coloring Agents , Allolevivirus - physiology , ... Spectrometry, Fluorescence , Methylene Blue - pharmacology , Pyronine - metabolism , Allolevivirus - radiation effects , ...
Figure 2 General genetic map of a representative levivirus - Enterobacteria phage MS2 (MS2) - and an allolevivirus - ...
Genus Allolevivirus, mit Species Escherichia virus Qbeta. *Genus Levivirus, mit Species Escherichia virus MS2 ...
Allolevivirus. *Levivirus. Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more specific than "Levivirus". ...
This stem-loop-structure is well known and defined in Qβ (Allolevivirus).. ... Levivirus and Allolevivirus) are ssRNA positive-strand viruses. The replication cycle includes no DNA stage. The virions are ...
Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles
Allolevivirus, Animals, Antibodies, Viral, Antibody Formation, Antigens, B-Lymphocytes, Capsid, Capsid Proteins, Epitopes, ...
Asymmetric cryo-EM structure of the canonical Allolevivirus Qbeta reveals a single maturation protein and the genomic ssRNA in ...
The change in genome size of the Allolevivirus ancestor may have catalyzed subsequent changes that led to their current genome ... and gene expression are shown with a high probability to have changed along the lineage leading to the Allolevivirus through ... the coliphage species are a monophyletic group consisting of two clades representing the genera Levivirus and Allolevivirus. ...
This family comprises allolevivirus and levivirus genus having no separate gene for cell lysis and a separate gene for cell ...
Allolevivirus B4.123.450.50 alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin D12.644.822.750.30 D12.776.645.750.30 alpha 1-Antitrypsin D12.644.822.750. ...
  • Asymmetric cryo-EM structure of the canonical Allolevivirus Qβ reveals a single maturation protein and the genomic ssRNA in situ. (tamu.edu)
  • An integration host factor that was originally identified as a bacterial protein required for the integration of bacteriophage Q beta (ALLOLEVIVIRUS). (umassmed.edu)