Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Allografts: Tissues, cells, or organs transplanted between genetically different individuals of the same species.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Rats, Inbred WFTransplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Rats, Inbred LewBone Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing bones or bone tissue for future use.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Graft Enhancement, Immunologic: The induction of prolonged survival and growth of allografts of either tumors or normal tissues which would ordinarily be rejected. It may be induced passively by introducing graft-specific antibodies from previously immunized donors, which bind to the graft's surface antigens, masking them from recognition by T-cells; or actively by prior immunization of the recipient with graft antigens which evoke specific antibodies and form antigen-antibody complexes which bind to the antigen receptor sites of the T-cells and block their cytotoxic activity.Isoantibodies: Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Isoantigens: Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Rats, Inbred ACIMice, Inbred BALB CMice, Inbred C57BLImmunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Rats, Inbred BNTransplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lymphocyte Culture Test, Mixed: Measure of histocompatibility at the HL-A locus. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from two individuals are mixed together in tissue culture for several days. Lymphocytes from incompatible individuals will stimulate each other to proliferate significantly (measured by tritiated thymidine uptake) whereas those from compatible individuals will not. In the one-way MLC test, the lymphocytes from one of the individuals are inactivated (usually by treatment with MITOMYCIN or radiation) thereby allowing only the untreated remaining population of cells to proliferate in response to foreign histocompatibility antigens.Complement C4b: The large fragment formed when COMPLEMENT C4 is cleaved by COMPLEMENT C1S. The membrane-bound C4b binds COMPLEMENT C2A, a SERINE PROTEASE, to form C4b2a (CLASSICAL PATHWAY C3 CONVERTASE) and subsequent C4b2a3b (CLASSICAL PATHWAY C5 CONVERTASE).Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mice, Inbred C3HT-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Mice, Inbred CBASterilization: The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Histocompatibility Antigens: A group of antigens that includes both the major and minor histocompatibility antigens. The former are genetically determined by the major histocompatibility complex. They determine tissue type for transplantation and cause allograft rejections. The latter are systems of allelic alloantigens that can cause weak transplant rejection.Cyclosporins: A group of closely related cyclic undecapeptides from the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindocarpon lucidum. They have some antineoplastic and antifungal action and significant immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporins have been proposed as adjuvants in tissue and organ transplantation to suppress graft rejection.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Tissue Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing organs or tissue for future use.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Major Histocompatibility Complex: The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS, genes which control the structure of the IMMUNE RESPONSE-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS, HUMAN; the IMMUNE RESPONSE GENES which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Swine, Miniature: Genetically developed small pigs for use in biomedical research. There are several strains - Yucatan miniature, Sinclair miniature, and Minnesota miniature.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.CD40 Ligand: A membrane glycoprotein and differentiation antigen expressed on the surface of T-cells that binds to CD40 ANTIGENS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and induces their proliferation. Mutation of the gene for CD40 ligand is a cause of HYPER-IGM IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME, TYPE 1.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Immunoconjugates: Combinations of diagnostic or therapeutic substances linked with specific immune substances such as IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; or ANTIGENS. Often the diagnostic or therapeutic substance is a radionuclide. These conjugates are useful tools for specific targeting of DRUGS and RADIOISOTOPES in the CHEMOTHERAPY and RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY of certain cancers.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Mice, Inbred ALymphocyte Depletion: Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.Autografts: Transplant comprised of an individual's own tissue, transferred from one part of the body to another.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory: CD4-positive T cells that inhibit immunopathology or autoimmune disease in vivo. They inhibit the immune response by influencing the activity of other cell types. Regulatory T-cells include naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ cells, IL-10 secreting Tr1 cells, and Th3 cells.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Histocompatibility Antigens Class II: Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.Delayed Graft Function: General dysfunction of an organ occurring immediately following its transplantation. The term most frequently refers to renal dysfunction following KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Host vs Graft Reaction: The immune responses of a host to a graft. A specific response is GRAFT REJECTION.Adoptive Transfer: Form of passive immunization where previously sensitized immunologic agents (cells or serum) are transferred to non-immune recipients. When transfer of cells is used as a therapy for the treatment of neoplasms, it is called adoptive immunotherapy (IMMUNOTHERAPY, ADOPTIVE).Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Rats, Inbred F344Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Chimerism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Mice, Inbred DBAModels, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Endothelium, Corneal: Single layer of large flattened cells covering the surface of the cornea.Lymphocyte Transfusion: The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Composite Tissue Allografts: A graft consisting of multiple tissues, such as muscle, bone, nerve, vasculature, and skin, comprising a functional unit for reconstructive purposes.Radiation Chimera: An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Tissue Survival: The span of viability of a tissue or an organ.Raffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Hand Transplantation: The transference of a complete HAND, as a composite of many tissue types, from one individual to another.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Histocompatibility Antigens Class I: Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.Kidney Tubules: Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic: The demonstration of the cytotoxic effect on a target cell of a lymphocyte, a mediator released by a sensitized lymphocyte, an antibody, or complement.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Thymectomy: Surgical removal of the thymus gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).Complement C3d: A 302-amino-acid fragment in the alpha chain (672-1663) of C3b. It is generated when C3b is inactivated (iC3b) and its alpha chain is cleaved by COMPLEMENT FACTOR I into C3c, and C3dg (955-1303) in the presence COMPLEMENT FACTOR H. Serum proteases further degrade C3dg into C3d (1002-1303) and C3g (955-1001).Chemokine CXCL9: An INTEFERON-inducible CXC chemokine that is specific for the CXCR3 RECEPTOR.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Injections, Intralymphatic: Injections into the lymph nodes or the lymphatic system.Anterior Chamber: The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)Corneal Opacity: Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Femoral NeoplasmsFas Ligand Protein: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that was originally discovered on cells of the lymphoid-myeloid lineage, including activated T-LYMPHOCYTES and NATURAL KILLER CELLS. It plays an important role in immune homeostasis and cell-mediated toxicity by binding to the FAS RECEPTOR and triggering APOPTOSIS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic: Immunized T-lymphocytes which can directly destroy appropriate target cells. These cytotoxic lymphocytes may be generated in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), in vivo during a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction, or after immunization with an allograft, tumor cell or virally transformed or chemically modified target cell. The lytic phenomenon is sometimes referred to as cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). These CD8-positive cells are distinct from NATURAL KILLER CELLS and NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. There are two effector phenotypes: TC1 and TC2.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Forkhead Transcription Factors: A subclass of winged helix DNA-binding proteins that share homology with their founding member fork head protein, Drosophila.Ureteral Diseases: Pathological processes involving the URETERS.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.T-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.H-2 Antigens: The major group of transplantation antigens in the mouse.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.Kidney Cortex Necrosis: Death of cells in the KIDNEY CORTEX, a common final result of various renal injuries including HYPOXIA; ISCHEMIA; and drug toxicity.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Dithizone: Chelating agent used for heavy metal poisoning and assay. It causes diabetes.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Glutaral: One of the protein CROSS-LINKING REAGENTS that is used as a disinfectant for sterilization of heat-sensitive equipment and as a laboratory reagent, especially as a fixative.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Bowman Capsule: A double-walled epithelial capsule that is the bulbous closed proximal end of the kidney tubular system. It surrounds the cluster of convoluted capillaries of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and is continuous with the convoluted PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Graft vs Host Reaction: An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.CTLA-4 Antigen: An inhibitory T CELL receptor that is closely related to CD28 ANTIGEN. It has specificity for CD80 ANTIGEN and CD86 ANTIGEN and acts as a negative regulator of peripheral T cell function. CTLA-4 antigen is believed to play role in inducing PERIPHERAL TOLERANCE.Limb Salvage: An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Kidney Glomerulus: A cluster of convoluted capillaries beginning at each nephric tubule in the kidney and held together by connective tissue.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Freeze Drying: Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.Perforin: A calcium-dependent pore-forming protein synthesized in cytolytic LYMPHOCYTES and sequestered in secretory granules. Upon immunological reaction between a cytolytic lymphocyte and a target cell, perforin is released at the plasma membrane and polymerizes into transmembrane tubules (forming pores) which lead to death of a target cell.Kidney Tubular Necrosis, Acute: Acute kidney failure resulting from destruction of EPITHELIAL CELLS of the KIDNEY TUBULES. It is commonly attributed to exposure to toxic agents or renal ISCHEMIA following severe TRAUMA.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Cytotoxicity, Immunologic: The phenomenon of target cell destruction by immunologically active effector cells. It may be brought about directly by sensitized T-lymphocytes or by lymphoid or myeloid "killer" cells, or it may be mediated by cytotoxic antibody, cytotoxic factor released by lymphoid cells, or complement.Lymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Ethylene Oxide: A colorless and flammable gas at room temperature and pressure. Ethylene oxide is a bactericidal, fungicidal, and sporicidal disinfectant. It is effective against most micro-organisms, including viruses. It is used as a fumigant for foodstuffs and textiles and as an agent for the gaseous sterilization of heat-labile pharmaceutical and surgical materials. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p794)Receptors, CXCR3: CXCR receptors that are expressed on the surface of a number of cell types, including T-LYMPHOCYTES; NK CELLS; DENDRITIC CELLS; and a subset of B-LYMPHOCYTES. The receptors are activated by CHEMOKINE CXCL9; CHEMOKINE CXCL10; and CHEMOKINE CXCL11.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Chemokine CXCL10: A CXC chemokine that is induced by GAMMA-INTERFERON and is chemotactic for MONOCYTES and T-LYMPHOCYTES. It has specificity for the CXCR3 RECEPTOR.Integrin alpha Chains: The alpha subunits of integrin heterodimers (INTEGRINS), which mediate ligand specificity. There are approximately 18 different alpha chains, exhibiting great sequence diversity; several chains are also spliced into alternative isoforms. They possess a long extracellular portion (1200 amino acids) containing a MIDAS (metal ion-dependent adhesion site) motif, and seven 60-amino acid tandem repeats, the last 4 of which form EF HAND MOTIFS. The intracellular portion is short with the exception of INTEGRIN ALPHA4.Immunogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic basis of the immune response (IMMUNITY).Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Antigens, Differentiation: Antigens expressed primarily on the membranes of living cells during sequential stages of maturation and differentiation. As immunologic markers they have high organ and tissue specificity and are useful as probes in studies of normal cell development as well as neoplastic transformation.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Injections, Intraperitoneal: Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.Radiation: Emission or propagation of acoustic waves (SOUND), ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY waves (such as LIGHT; RADIO WAVES; GAMMA RAYS; or X-RAYS), or a stream of subatomic particles (such as ELECTRONS; NEUTRONS; PROTONS; or ALPHA PARTICLES).Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins: Proteins secreted from an organism which form membrane-spanning pores in target cells to destroy them. This is in contrast to PORINS and MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that function within the synthesizing organism and COMPLEMENT immune proteins. These pore forming cytotoxic proteins are a form of primitive cellular defense which are also found in human LYMPHOCYTES.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Receptors, Interleukin-2: Receptors present on activated T-LYMPHOCYTES and B-LYMPHOCYTES that are specific for INTERLEUKIN-2 and play an important role in LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION. They are heterotrimeric proteins consisting of the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR ALPHA SUBUNIT, the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR BETA SUBUNIT, and the INTERLEUKIN RECEPTOR COMMON GAMMA-CHAIN.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Cell Transplantation: Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.

Homograft banking in Singapore: two years of cardiovascular tissue banking in Southeast Asia. (1/86)

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Burnei's procedure in the treatment of long bone pseudarthrosis in patients having osteogenesis imperfecta or congenital pseudarthrosis of tibia - preliminary report. (2/86)

RATIONALE: given the recalcitrant behaviour of pseudarthrosis in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT), there is no ideal solution to treat such challenging deformities. The reconsideration of the already known principles, by using the modern technology, may generate new treatment methods. AIM: the present paper presents the preliminary results of an original reconstruction procedure used to treat large bone defects in paediatric orthopaedics. A case series study, the surgical technique, complications and illustrative cases are presented. METHODS AND RESULTS: 3 cases of pseudarthrosis in OI and 2 cases of CPT were operated by using this technique. The principles of the method are to create an optimal osteoconductive and osteoinductive environment by using a bone autograft, bone allograft and bone graft substitutes and to provide a good stabilisation of the bones. We operated 3 patients with OI and 2 patients with CPT. Four patients had multiple previous surgeries. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 28 months. Four of the five patients are able to ambulate independently at the moment this paper was written. DISCUSSION: we believe that the present technique could be a reliable alternative to other procedures, especially in cases of repeated failures.  (+info)

Matricellular proteins and matrix metalloproteinases mark the inflammatory and fibrotic response in human cardiac allograft rejection. (3/86)

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Aseptically processed and chemically sterilized BTB allografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective randomized study. (4/86)

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Pilot study of patient and caregiver out-of-pocket costs of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. (5/86)

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Effects of spleen status on early outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation. (6/86)

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Evaluation of safety and efficacy of radiation-sterilized bone allografts in reconstructive oral surgery. (7/86)

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Allografts with autogenous platelet-rich plasma for tibial defect reconstruction: a rabbit study. (8/86)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of autogenous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for fresh-frozen allografts in tibial defect reconstruction in rabbits. METHODS: 40 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent tibial defect reconstruction with autografts (n=12), allografts without PRP (n=12), or allografts with PRP (n=12) and were observed for 12, 16, and 24 weeks (4 for each period). Tibias of the remaining 4 rabbits were used as donor allografts, and the remaining allografts were procured from recipient rabbits. A 1.5- cm cortical segment of the tibia was osteotomised, and then fixed with a 9-hole mini-compression plate and 2 cerclage wires. Allografts were stripped off the periosteum and soft tissues and medullary contents, and then stored in a freezer at -80 masculineC. All allografts were deep frozen for at least 4 weeks before transplantation. 7 ml of whole blood was drawn to prepare 1 ml of PRP. The PRP was then mixed with 1.0 ml of human thrombin to form a platelet gel. The PRP gel was then packed into the medullary canal of the allograft and applied on the cortical surface before tibial defect reconstruction. Rabbits were sacrificed at 12, 16, and 24 weeks. The specimens were assessed for bone union at host-graft junctions and for bone resorption, new bone formation, callus encasement, and viable osteocyte counts. RESULTS: There were 4 specimens in each group at each observation period. Osteoid bridging the gap at host-graft junctions was noted in all specimens in the autograft and allograft-with-PRP groups at week 12 and in the allograft-without-PRP group at week 24. Bone union in allografts without PRP was delayed. All indices for biological incorporation (resorption index, new bone formation index, callus encasement index, and viable osteocyte count) were significantly greater in the autograft than allograft-without-PRP groups, except for the resorption index at week 24, whereas the differences were not significant between the autograft and allograft-with-PRP groups. The differences between the 2 allograft groups were usually not significant, except for the resorption index. CONCLUSION: PRP-augmented allografts behaved similarly to autografts for tibial defect reconstruction in rabbits. PRP increased bone union and bone resorption.  (+info)

*Banff Classification

The classification is expanded and updated every two years in meetings organized by the Banff Foundation for Allograft ... The Banff Classification is a schema for nomenclature and classification of renal allograft pathology, established in 1991 by ... 2010). "The evolution of the Banff classification schema for diagnosing renal allograft rejection and its implications for ... 1993). "International standardization of criteria for the histologic diagnosis of renal allograft rejection: the Banff working ...

*Allotransplantation

Unlike allografts, such grafts do not corporate into the body. As with many operations, allotransplantation also has some side ... Allograft diseases Medical grafting Surgery For ACL Tears (W. P. Longmire, J. National Cancer Institute 14, 669: The term ... An immune response against an allograft or xenograft is termed rejection. An allogenic bone marrow transplant can result in an ... Most human tissue and organ transplants are allografts. It is contrasted with autotransplantation (from one part of the body to ...

*Nerve allograft

Nerve allografts are prepared from donated human nerve tissue. An allograft contains many of the beneficial characteristics of ... Currently the only FDA approved nerve allograft is the Avance graft of AxoGen. A nerve allograft is used for the reconstruction ... Hence, allograft treatment does not seem to be a risk factor for this specific problem. Golden standard therapy for transected ... It has been shown that in allograft surgeries, post-operative neuropathic pain was present in some patients, but only if they ...

*Chronic allograft nephropathy

... , abbreviated CAN and also known as sclerosing/chronic allograft nephropathy, is the leading cause ... Sep 1999). "Chronic allograft nephropathy: An update". Kidney Int. 56 (3): 783-93. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1755.1999.00611.x. PMID ... Mar 2006). "Chronic allograft nephropathy: current concepts and future directions". Transplantation. 81 (5): 643-54. doi: ... Jul 2005). "Chronic renal allograft rejection: pathophysiologic considerations". Kidney Int. 68 (1): 1-13. doi:10.1111/j.1523- ...

*Allograft inflammatory factor 1

"Entrez Gene: AIF1 allograft inflammatory factor 1". Deininger MH, Meyermann R, Schluesener HJ (March 2002). "The allograft ... Allograft inflammatory factor 1 (AIF-1) also known as ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (IBA1) is a protein that in ... Allograft Inflammatory Factor 1 is found in activated macrophages. Activated macrophages are found in tissues with inflammation ... Autieri MV, Carbone C, Mu A (July 2000). "Expression of allograft inflammatory factor-1 is a marker of activated human vascular ...

*Banff Foundation for Allograft Pathology

Kim Solez is the Chair of the Banff Foundation for Allograft Pathology. The 2015 Banff Conference for Allograft Pathology was ... "Banff Conferences". Banff Foundation For Allograft Pathology. Retrieved 3 September 2015. "The Banff Conferences On Allograft ... The Banff Foundation for Allograft Pathology also known as the Banff Foundation for Transplant Pathology is a nonprofit Swiss ... Pathology Renal pathology "Banff Foundation For Allograft Pathology". Retrieved 3 September 2015. " ...

*Allograft inflammatory factor 1-like

... (AIF1L) is a protein that is encoded by the AIF1L gene in humans. AIF1L is an actin-binding ... "AIF1L allograft inflammatory factor 1 like [Homo sapiens (human)] - Gene - NCBI". www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 3 December ... ". "Aif1l - Allograft inflammatory factor 1-like - Mus musculus (Mouse) - Aif1l gene & protein". www.uniprot.org. Retrieved 3 ...

*Demineralized freeze dried bone allograft

... , referred to as DFDBA, is a bone graft material known for its de novo bone formation ...

*Knee

Osteochondral Autograft and Allografts. PLC Reconstruction In humans the knee refers to the joints between the femur, tibia and ...

*Skin grafting

... allograft). Xenogeneic: The donor and recipient are of different species (e.g., bovine cartilage; xenograft or heterograft). ...

*Hand transplantation

2008). "Hand Transplantation: The Innsbruck Experience". Transplantation of Composite Tissue Allografts. pp. 234-250. doi: ...

*Meniscus transplant

... if the allograft is sized radiographically by use of anteroposterior and lateral films and the allograft meniscal horns have ... The meniscus to be transplanted is taken from a cadaver, and, as such, is known as an allograft. Meniscal transplantation is ... Meniscal allograft processing, sterilization and storage procedures vary from center to center. Some surgeons, particularly in ... Some surgeons leave the allograft anchored to its bony attachments and fix these bone bridges or plugs into size matched slots ...

*Duffy antigen system

Segerer S, Böhmig GA, Exner M, Colin Y, Cartron JP, Kerjaschki D, Schlöndorff D, Regele H (2003). "When renal allografts turn ... Geleff S, Draganovici D, Jaksch P, Segerer S (July 2009). "The role of chemokine receptors in acute lung allograft rejection". ...

*Saddle nose

Autografts are preferred over allografts. Saddle deformity can also be corrected by synthetic implants of teflon or silicon, ...

*Venous ulcer

ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Snyder RJ (2005). "Treatment of nonhealing ulcers with allografts". Clin. Dermatol. 23 (4): 388-95. doi: ...

*Chronic wound

Though the allograft (skin transplanted from a member of the same species) is replaced by granulation tissue and is not ... On the most difficult chronic wounds, allografts may not work, requiring skin grafts from elsewhere on the patient, which can ... Snyder, Robert J. (2005). "Treatment of nonhealing ulcers with allografts". Clinics in Dermatology. 23 (4): 388-95. doi:10.1016 ...

*Lymphotoxin beta

Utans U, Quist WC, McManus BM, Wilson JE, Arceci RJ, Wallace AF, Russell ME (May 1996). "Allograft inflammatory factory-1. A ...

*Sean P. Pinney

His practice has a primary focus on the understanding and treatment of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, a condition affecting ... Anti-HLA antibodies are associated with restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention for cardiac allograft vasculopathy ... "Cardiac allograft vasculopathy: a review". Circulation. 96: 2069-77. doi:10.1161/01.cir.96.6.2069. PMID 9323100. C-Mail: A ...

*Papaverine

Giglia JS, Ollerenshaw JD, Dawson PE, Black KS, Abbott WM (November 2002). "Cryopreservation prevents arterial allograft ...

*AxoGen

Nerve allograft Graft Helps Nerves Regrow; More Patients Avoid Amputation Through Technique Based on Cadaver Implant December ...

*Socket preservation

Allograft - Block bone graft from cadaver. Alloplast - Synthetic biomaterials such as fibrin scaffolds, PLGA, synthetic ...

*Xenotransplantation

It is not uncommon for patients and physicians to use the term "allograft" imprecisely to refer to either allograft (human-to- ... Allograft Isograft Medical grafting Xenopregnancy Xenotransplantation. Definition by the World Health Organization Kress, J. M ... The graft was meant to be temporary, but unfortunately a suitable allograft replacement could not be found in time. ... The strength of cellular rejection in xenografts remains uncertain, however it is expected to be stronger than in allografts ...

*Alloimmunity

If there is IL-4, CD4+ T-lymphocytes become Th2 cells secreting IL-4 and IL-5. Then allograft tolerance is mostly observed. TGF ... 45(3):583-98 Fangmann J, Dalchau R, Fabre JW (1992), Rejection of skin allografts by indirect allorecognition of donor class I ... Allograft diseases Allotransplantation Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia Hemolytic disease of the newborn Cellular and ... Hyperacute and accelerated rejection is antibody-mediated immune response to the allograft. Recipient's blood already contains ...

*Plastic surgery

Allografts are taken from a donor of the same species. Xenografts are taken from a donor of a different species. Usually, good ...

*Limb-sparing techniques

This is accomplished through the use of Allografts and Autografts. Allografts are done by creating bone grafts from a donor ... Allografts are used to replace the bone that has been "resected" using arthroplasty techniques. Prosthesis is then used to ... support and strengthen the allografts. Alloprosthetic composites are flexible in that surgeons can adapt the implants for any ...
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Tingting Chen, Pei Zhang, Wenxia Fan, Fenghua Qian, Li Pei, Shuangnian Xu, Zhongmin Zou, Bing Ni, Yong Zhang].
Post-transplant, there is no ideal measure of predicting how immunosuppressed an individual recipient is. Fernandez-Ruiz et al. assessed complement (C3 and C4) levels at 0,1,6 months post-kidney transplant in 270 patients. Those with C3 hypocomplementemia at month 1 had greater incidences of overall infection, bacterial infection and fungal infection up to month 6 post-transplant. This […]. ...
Background. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) is associated with an increased risk of graft failure and severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to support in vivo normal hematopoiesis and to display potent immunosuppressive effects. We launched a multi-center clinical study to examine the safety and feasibility of co-transplantation of MSCs (from third party donors) and haploidentical HSCs into 35 children with severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Methods. A total of 35 children with SAA were enrolled in this multi-center study between January 2014 and December 2016. All patients met the criteria of HLA-mismatched with ⩾5/10 HLA-matched loci. The conditioning regimen for haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consisted of busulfan (Bu), cyclophosphamide and ATG. BM and peripheral blood CD34+ cells were infused intravenously ⩾5×108 cells/kg and ⩾2×106 cells/kg of recipient weight on day 01 ...
You searched for: Format Microfilm Remove constraint Format: Microfilm Publish Date 1986 Remove constraint Publish Date: 1986 Format Microfilm OR Map Remove constraint Format: Microfilm ,strong class=text-muted constraint-connector,OR,/strong, Map ...
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
Daily (except weedends) during the school year. Microfilm. Palo Alto, Calif.: BMI Library Microfilms, 1986- microfilm reels; 35 mm. Vol.1, no.1 (Feb 8, 1922 ...
X comapny is considering the pruchase of one of two microfilm cameras, R and S. Both should provide benefits over a 10-year period, and each requires an initial investment of $4,000. Management has constructed the table of.
Paper copies can be produced from public service copy microfilm only. If you need paper copy from a "master negative" microfilm (indicated in the catalog as *ZZ) and a public service copy reel is not available, a fee is charged to produce a new microfilm reel, which will remain the property of the Library ...
To survive throughout the life of an individual, hematopoietic stem cells (or HSC), which continuously give rise to all cellular blood components, must strictly regulate their behavioral choices. These choices include self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence or death. This essential regulation of stem cells is thought to be determined at least in part by the environment, or niche, in which these cells reside. The bone forming cells, osteoblasts, have been known to support and expand HSC in vitro and co-transplantation of osteoblasts with HSC can increase engraftment rate. Work in our laboratory and others first identified osteoblastic cells as a regulatory component in the HSC niche through genetic means. A number of molecules have since been implicated in HSC-osteoblastic interaction. In fact, it has recently become evident that osteoblasts can both stimulate and limit HSC expansion, promote quiescence, coordinate HSC mobilization and, when destroyed or mutated, initiate hematopoietic ...
Today, my lab results came in from the Alegent Creighton Clinic on West Broadway where I see a new physician who is just amazing! The results are just awesome! I am doing very well for a post-kidney transplant Cystinosis patient. Medically, I am doing good. I gained weight so I am working on loosing that.…
You searched for: Publish Date 1983 Remove constraint Publish Date: 1983 Topic Regulation Remove constraint Topic: Regulation Format Book OR Microfilm OR Map Remove constraint Format: Book ,strong class=text-muted constraint-connector,OR,/strong, Microfilm ,strong class=text-muted constraint-connector,OR,/strong, Map ...
Project Muse/ Johns Hopkins University Press ,http:\\museljhu.edu,. UMI (University Microfilm International) ,http:\\www.UMI.com,. Each publisher offers different features such as the number ...
The humeral head allograft is used for resurfacing cartilage defects in the shoulder with mature hyaline cartilage. Expanded uses include Biologic Shoulder Resurfacing when used in conjunction with Humeral Head allograft, as described by Dr Ruben Gobezie in Arthroscopy, November 2014. In other instances, Hemi-Condyle allografts have also been used to restore the cartilage surface of the humeral head.. Studies show that fresh osteochondral allografts transplanted with high chondrocyte viability have significant functional and clinical advantages. JRF Ortho is the largest provider of fresh osteochondral allografts offering viable biologic solutions for a range of challenging joint defects.. ...
Cartilage defects and bone malformation of the femoral trochlea can be especially challenging. As the largest provider of fresh osteochondral allografts, JRF Ortho is uniquely able to offer timely and viable osteochondral allograft solution for these challenging joint defects. The femoral trochlea allograft achieves resurfacing of cartilage defects with mature hyaline cartilage and bone and can be matched with a patella for bi-polar joint repairs.. Studies show that fresh osteochondral allografts transplanted with viable chondrocytes have significant functional and clinical advantages.. ...
Purpose: To develop a biodegradable, sustained-release, prednisolone acetate (PA)-loaded poly [d,l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone] (PLC) drug delivery system and to evaluate its biocompatibility, feasibility and release characteristics both in vitro and in vivo.. Methods: Blank and 40% PA-loaded PLC microfilms with thickness of 100µm and diameter of 2mm were developed and tested in vitro and in vivo. The degradation and drug release profiles of the microfilms were evaluated in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. We further implanted the microfilms to the subconjunctival space of the rats (n=51). All eyes were monitored using slit lamp bio-microscopy with Hackett McDonald ocular scoring system and anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Histological studies with Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirus red staining and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to evaluate and compare the presence of inflammatory and fibrotic reaction in blank and PA-loaded microfilm groups. PA concentrations in the ...
Banfić, Ljiljana and Vrkić Kirhmajer, Majda and Vojković, Marina and Strozzi, Maja and Šmalcelj, Anton and Lasić, Zoran (2008) Access site complications following cardiac catheterization assessed by duplex ultrasonography. Collegium antropologicum, 32 (2). pp. 385-390. ISSN 0350-6134 (Print) Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina and Furić Čunko, Vesna and Kes, Petar and Bubić-Filipi, Ljubica and Pasini, Josip and Hudolin, Tvrtko and Jurić, Ivana (2008) Outcome after renal transplantation in a "senior" program: the croatian experience. Transplantation proceedings, 40 (10). pp. 3418-3421. ISSN 0041-1345 (Print) Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina and Kes, Petar and Bubić-Filipi, Ljubica and Ćorić, Marijana (2008) An unusual case of forehead post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Kidney International, 73 (1). p. 136. ISSN 0085-2538 Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina and Kes, Petar and Jurić, Ivana and Brunetta-Gavranić, Bruna (2008) Octogenarians on hemodialysis: A prospective study. Archives of Gerontology and ...
Islet transplantation is a possible curative treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Currently the liver dominates as implantation site, despite the many challenges encountered at this site.. Acute hypoxia in islets transplanted to muscle and omentum, two possible alternative sites, was prevailing. However, it was rapidly reversed at both implantation sites, in contrast to when islets were transplanted intraportally. At the intramuscular site hypoxia was further relieved by co-transplantation of an oxygen carrier, polymerized hemoglobin, which also improved the functional outcome. The complement system was activated after islet transplantation to muscle, but did not hamper graft function.. Both mouse and human islets transplanted to omentum become well re-vascularized and have a functional blood flow and oxygenation comparable with that of endogenous islets. Animals transplanted with islets to the omentum had a superior graft function compared with animals receiving intraportal islet ...
|p|This paper investigated the effects of using Peezy devices versus traditional collection in sterile jugs on cellular and bacterial contamination of urine specimens from female post-kidney transplant patients.|/p|
Microfilm: Port Townsend Public Library, 1220 Lawrence St., Port Townsend, WA 98368, 360-385-3181. Microfilm and bound originals: Jefferson County Historical Society, 210 Madison St., Port Townsend, WA 98368, 360-385-1003 ...
Microfilm: Port Townsend Public Library, 1220 Lawrence St., Port Townsend, WA 98368, 360-385-3181. Microfilm and bound originals: Jefferson County Historical Society, 210 Madison St., Port Townsend, WA 98368, 360-385-1003 ...
Di University of Texas, otak koleksi ini disimpan dalam sebuah guci, diberi nomor seri, tetapi microfilm yang menyimpan rekam medis pemilik otak tersebut hilang. Fotografer Adam Voorhes menghabiskan waktu setahun untuk menggali informasi tentang otak itu dan sekitar 100 otak lain koleksi University of Texas, Austin ...
The Louisville Leader was an African-American newspaper published from 1917 to 1950 by I. Willis Cole in Louisville, Kentucky. This issue says Vol. 32. No. 7. but is actually Vol. 33. No. 10. Page one of this issue is duplicated in the microfilm ...
The Louisville Leader was an African-American newspaper published from 1917 to 1950 by I. Willis Cole in Louisville, Kentucky. Page five of this issue was duplicated on the microfilm, with the second page corrected to include a missing piece from ...
Visit Healthgrades for information on Dr. Lorrie Richardson-ONeal, MD Find Phone & Address information, medical practice history, affiliated hospitals and more.
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Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with aggressive malignancies including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). The high prevalence and the benign nature of latent EBV infection make its pathogenic role questionable. Although immunosuppression allows outgrowth of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes, its withdrawal fails to achieve a complete response, implying that other factors are involved in the development of EBV-related PTLD. To address this, we have developed a humanized mouse model of EBV infection. B lymphocyte depletion resulted in a significant survival benefit in infected mice, highlighting a pivotal role of infected B lymphocytes in disease pathogenesis. A secondary transfer lymphoproliferative disease model proved the tumorigenic potential of infected B lymphocytes and showed these cells are necessary and sufficient to form lymphoproliferative lesions in severely immunocompromised hosts. Our findings prove the causal relationship between EBV and PTLD and ...
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Microfilming of records. Local units of government may keep and preserve public records through the use of microfilm, providing the microfilm meets the applicable standards in Wis. Stats. 16.61(7). Retention periods and estimated costs and benefits of converting records between different media should be considered in deciding which records to microfilm. After verification, paper records converted to microfilm should be destroyed. The retention periods identified in this article apply to records in any media. [NOTE: When optical disk is expressly authorized in the statutes for local government use, this section should be revised to include its use ...
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Individuals desiring to use this material in their own research may do so. ========================================================================== Formatted by USGenWeb Census Project File Manager, Connie Burkett All of the above information must remain when copied or downloaded. ========================================================================== Census-Year 1870 State NEBRASKA County GAGE SCHEDULE 2.--Persons who DIED during the Year ending May 31, 1870 The 1870 Mortality census year begins June 1, 1869 and ends May 31, 1870 ---------------------Begin Actual Transcription---------------------------- =============================================================================================================================================== CENSUS YEAR: 1870 STATE: NE COUNTY: Gage MICROFILM#: T1128-3 DIVISION: T4-Tp6 NR5-6-7&8 East ENUMERATOR: Wm Blakely ...
The Centre dAccueil et de Recherche des Archives Nationales (CARAN) is divided into three rooms, the salle des inventaires, salle des microfilms and grande salle de lecture; materials are brought here for ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Optimizing Bone Defect Reconstruction - Balanced Cable Transport with Circular External Fixation. AU - Quinnan, Stephen. AU - Lawrie, Charles. PY - 2017/10/1. Y1 - 2017/10/1. N2 - Distraction osteogenesis has proven effective in the management of tibial bone loss from severe trauma and infection. Unfortunately, pain and scarring from wires and half pins dragging through the skin and the required prolonged time in the external fixator make treatment difficult. Cable bone transport has been shown to improve cosmesis and decrease pain during transport. However, the published methods have limitations in that they have poor control of transport segment alignment, do not allow for lengthening of the limb, and do not permit weight bearing during the treatment process. We describe a novel method of cable bone transport that addresses each of these limitations with excellent control of alignment including the transport segment, easy conversion to allow limb lengthening, and full weight ...
The earliest recorded discovery and exhibition of microphotography occurred in 1839 in a private Manchester, England lab. John Benjamin Dancer, a twenty year-old instrument maker and optician, installed a microscope lens onto a camera and succeeded in creating a microphotograph onto a daguerreotype (silver coated copper) plate at a reduction ratio of 160:1. Dancers microphotographs were considered novelties and of no great commercial value although he continued to make them for his friends, fellow scientists and to show at exhibitions.. Fast forward nearly a century to 1925. New York City banker George McCarthy was issued a patent for his Checkograph machine, designed to make micrographic copies of canceled checks for permanent storage by financial institutions. Mr. McCarthys invention was acquired by Eastman Kodaks Recordak division and signaled the birth of microfilm as a commercial entity. In the mid-to-late 1930s, several significant microfilm filming and publishing projects took place, ...
Prontosan is a unique surface active wound cleanser that is setting a NEW STANDARD to help reduce necrotic burden, control exudate and remove foreign materials that impede healing. -Prontosan Wound Irrigation Solution and Prontosan Wound Gel may be use
Do You Have Trigonomacrocephaly Tibial Defect Polydactyly? Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Trigonomacrocephaly Tibial Defect Polydactyly group. Find support forums, advice and chat with groups who share this life experience. A...
We encourage visitors to bring own their digital cameras for copying images from microfilm or microfiche Then you have your own digital record and can take the images home to clean them up on your imaging program! If the FHC camera is used, copies may be printed or files may be transferred to a jump drive using the XnView program found on the computer in the main office. Memory sticks/jump drives can be used to download information from the microfilm scanner. Patrons may bring their own laptops for note-taking or entering information into personal genealogical programs, with the disclaimer that the owner is responsible for the security of the device. Wireless internet is currently available in the building, though there may be days when availability is limited due to updating, etc. With the advent of online microfilm ordering, we have done away with transactions in the FHC. ...
Missouri Newspapers on Microfilm at the State Historical Society of Missouri - This catalog provides information regarding the newspapers on microfilm that are available from the State Historical Society of Missouri to the public on-site and through interlibrary loan. The Societys newspapers on microfilm offer information about the day-to-day lives of Missourians and the political, cultural, economic, and religious events that have influenced them. These Missouri newspapers document events and public opinion from the states rural environs to its largest metropolitan areas. Use the search box to search for a newspaper by name; scroll down to the map of MO to find newspapers by counties ...
Missouri Newspapers on Microfilm at the State Historical Society of Missouri - This catalog provides information regarding the newspapers on microfilm that are available from the State Historical Society of Missouri to the public on-site and through interlibrary loan. The Societys newspapers on microfilm offer information about the day-to-day lives of Missourians and the political, cultural, economic, and religious events that have influenced them. These Missouri newspapers document events and public opinion from the states rural environs to its largest metropolitan areas. Use the search box to search for a newspaper by name; scroll down to the map of MO to find newspapers by counties ...
The most recently funded projects span a broad range of topics and scientific areas, including development of a reparative patch for herniated discs, a software-based analysis process to generate a velocity map of atrial fibrillation, an improved cell production system for cancer immunotherapy, a storage and transportation device for fresh osteochondral allografts, novel methods for allograft bending and engineering allografts for knee repair, and software for analyzing core infarct volume in strokes ...
Third Class Cities The code establishes a commission form of government. Under this form, the mayor and four other members constitute the commission which is the governing body of the city. The mayor is one of the members of council and acts as president. Each council member is in charge of one of the five major departments. These officials and the controller and treasurer are elected at large by the voters for a four year term. Councilmanic terms overlap. Appointment of all other officers and employes is made by council. Twenty of the 53 third class cities operate under the commission form. From 1957 to 1972, cities could adopt two other forms of government by referendum under the Optional Third Class City Charter Law. The mayor council form has a five, seven or nine member council, elected at large for overlapping four year terms. A mayor, treasurer and a controller also are elected for a four year period. The mayor is the chief executive of the city and enforces the ordinances of council. The ...
Program To Continue Despite Boys Death," Times - News (Thunder Bay), 10 Jun 1983 Lakehead Board of Education ; Excursions ; Outdoor education ; Sibley Provincial Park ; Rodney Nesbitt ; Dr. Riley Moynes (Director of Education) Full text available in Newspaper clipping file File subject LF - Thunder Bay - Accidents Full text available on microfilm ...
Looking for microform? Find out information about microform. A miniature replica of data, such as microfiche or microfilm. In micrographics, a medium that contains microminiaturized images such as microfiche and... Explanation of microform
Williams, M. D., Walshaw, R., Bull, R. W., Padgett, G. A., & Schall, W. D. (1983). Effect of cyclosporin a on pancreatic-islet allografts in dla-mlc compatible dogs. Federation Proceedings, 42(4), 939-939 ...
Background: Hepatitis C (HCV) was difficult to treat post-kidney transplant prior to the direct acting antiviral (DAA) era. As such patients with advanced fibrosis and compensated cirrhosis due to HCV were considered ineligible to receive kidney transplant alone (KTA). We assessed the safety of KTA at our center in the DAA era in patients with advanced liver fibrosis (Metavir 3) or compensated cirrhosis due to chronic HCV. Methods: KTA patients transplanted in the DAA era (2014-present) with HCV viremia at transplant were reviewed. Baseline data included age, gender, race, BMI, liver fibrosis as assessed by fibroscan or biopsy, kidney donor HCV status, HCV genotype and prior HCV treatment. Compensated cirrhosis was defi ned as cirrhosis on biopsy but lack of portal hypertension (pHTN) by hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement. Outcome data included survival, liver and renal function one-year post transplant. Results: 24 viremic patients underwent KTA of whom 5 patients had compensated cirrhosis
Dr Patrick St Germain Weight Loss Reviews Transcribed by Janelle Penney From microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library, who are copyright holders of the microfilm. Transcription and notes. Back to work, and complaining: The City of Ottawa is seeking input on its new patio by-law, regulating restaurant and pub patios on city-regulated sidewalks and the so-chic "boulevards, covering issues such. Mar 27, 2010 · full 12 week push,pull,legs program!- build muscle & strength! - http://goo.gl/x8hel5 full 12 week muscle building 4 day split program: http://goo.gl/6alh84. Are you looking for reviews of the best adjustable dumbbells. PowerBlock Adjustable Dumbbells - The Most Versatile and Effective Workout Tool PowerBlocks have been around since 1993. They provide the best compact design for.. by: Kelly Baggett. One of the most frequent questions I get asked is the topic of training splits. When putting together non-personalized routine samples that can be.. These Bowflex SelectTech ...
Agricultural drip or spray irrigation equipment, irrigation control, irrigation pumps, valves, water filtration systems and irrigation solutions
Agricultural drip or spray irrigation equipment, irrigation control, irrigation pumps, valves, water filtration systems and irrigation solutions
Individuals desiring to use this material in their own research may do so. ========================================================================== Formatted by USGenWeb Census Project File Manager, Connie Burkett All of the above information must remain when copied or downloaded. ========================================================================== Census-Year 1870 State NEBRASKA County PLATTE SCHEDULE 2.--Persons who DIED during the Year ending May 31, 1870 The 1870 Mortality census year begins June 1, 1869 and ends May 31, 1870 ---------------------Begin Actual Transcription---------------------------- ===================================================================================================================================================================== CENSUS YEAR: 1870 STATE: NE COUNTY: Platte MICROFILM#: T1128-3 TWP/PRECINCT: the City of Columbus ENUMERATOR: Geo G Bucher ...
Genealogy Research The National Archives at San Francisco, located in our San Bruno facility, has extensive microfilm holdings of value for genealogy research, including:
Fire At Rainy River," The Daily Journal (Thunder Bay District), 6 Sep 1894 Long Sault Rapids ; Rainy River ; Gainsby Family ; Clara Gainsby ; Thomas Weston Full text available on microfilm ...
Original marriage records located in Family History Library microfilm, microfiche, or books. Transcribed from CD by Broderbund Software Inc ...
I recently read an article in the Wall Street Journal about a reporter, Cameron McWhirter, who shared finding that kind of discrepancy between his family lore and his DNA. He even goes so far as to say, "I am descended, at least partially, from liars." He makes the point, "many immigrants reinvented themselves when they arrived here (the United States)." This could be a nice way of saying they had a chance to invent a new legacy, not just re-invent it. His assessments were certainly interesting and worth reviewing. It helps us see how DNA testing can affect the way we look at our family stories and traditional research results.. McWhirter may be like some folks today who have never set foot inside a courthouse or scanned through microfilm, but instead relies heavily on internet research. Some of these modern genealogists never gave their family history a second thought until, like McWhirter, the death of parents started to inspire them to dig deeper. Due to the large volume of information ...
Toronto, Roman Catholic Marriages, 1859. From Ontario Archives microfilm MS248, reel 15 (vol. 66 Toronto marriages 1858-1867). All witnesses were from Toronto unless otherwise noted.. ...
Records of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia Relating to Slaves, 1851-1863. National Archives Microfilm Publication
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is a life-threatening complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate EBV-genome copy numbers based on a nested polymerase chain reaction and an end-point dilution was used. Applying this assay EBV load was prospectively screened weekly in 123 patients after transplantation. The results demonstrate that EBV reactivations with more than 1,000 EBV-genome copies measured in 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were observed in 31 patients (25.2%). Three patients developed lymphoproliferative disease with extremely high EBV-genome copies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (,100,000 copies/10(5) cells) and plasma. After combined antiviral and immune therapy two of three patients showed a dramatic decrease of EBV load and survived, while the third patient died of lymphoma. A subclinical EBV reactivation was observed in 24 cases (19.5%) with ...
The effects of a glutathione-containing intra-ocular irrigation solution, BSS Plus®, on retinal function and on the survival of ganglion cells in whole-mount retinal explants were studied. Evidence is provided that the perfused ex vivo bovine retina can serve as an alternative to in vivo animal testing. Isolated bovine retinas were prepared and perfused with an oxygen-saturated standard irrigation solution, and an electroretinogram was recorded to assess retinal function. After stable b-waves were detected, the isolated retinas were perfused with BSS Plus for 45 minutes. To investigate the effects of BSS Plus on photoreceptor function, 1mM aspartate was added to the irrigation solution in order to obtain a-waves, and the ERG trace was monitored for 75 minutes. For histological analysis, isolated whole retinal mounts were stored for 24 hours at 4°C, in the dark. The percentages of cell death in the retinal ganglion cell layer and in the outer and inner nuclear layers were estimated by using an ...
Indianapolis, IN 46204-2296. Questions should be directed to 317-232-0023 or toll free 1-866-683-0008.. Specific Information Required: Please list specific cities or towns (counties or townships), titles, months, days, and years. Be sure to include the name of the town or county needed, unless the name is included in the title of the paper. Unless specific reels are requested, we will choose the set of microfilm that comes closest to filling the request.. OCLC Searching and Verifying: Before requesting the titles that OCLC shows ISL as owning, please check the union listing for the title to verify that we have the issues which your patron needs. For many titles we have scattered dates.. Five Reel Limit: A library may have 5 reels of microfilm in its possession at any given time.. Six Week Loan: The due date for films is six weeks from the date sent. The due date for a loan cannot be extended, but film may be reordered after the original loan is returned. We will ship microfilm by first class ...
|p|This video details our technique of osteochondral allograft transplantation for the treatment of articular cartilage defects of the knee. The content includes the indications and contraindications of osteoarticular allograft transplantation, patient positioning, surgical technique, outcomes, and postoperative management.|/p|
Madderty was under the probate jurisdiction of the Commissary Court of Dunblane until 1823, and since then has been under the Sheriffs Court of Dunblane. Probate records for 1513- 1901 are indexed online at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk. You must register on the website but use of the index to probate records, called Wills & Testaments, is free. You may then purchase a copy of the document or, if the document is before 1823, it will be on microfilm at the Family History Library. To find the microfilm numbers, search in the library catalog for the Place-names of Perthshire and the subject of Probate records. Then click on the link to the records of the Commissariat of Dunblane ...
WELCOME COLLECTORS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD SELAMAT DATANG KOLEKTOR INDONESIA DAN ASIAN AT DR IWAN CYBERMUSEUM DI MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S. _____________________________________________________________________ SPACE UNTUK IKLAN SPONSOR _____________________________________________________________________ *ill 001 *ill 001 LOGO MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.*ill 001 THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA DALAM PROSES UNTUK…
Our Central File Room provides storage, maintenance, and access to key agency records, plus file retrievals for the public and agency staff, and arranges for copy service. We have a viewing area, microfilm and microfiche reader/printers, photocopiers, scanners with e-mail capabilities and a full-service customer request counter.
Caveat!!!: Please be advised that this compilation of data represents a transcription of data from a dry-process paper copy of an old, well-used microfilm projection of the original census sheet, which in turn was handwritten by enumerators, who were not always familiar with other ethnic names, accents, etc. They were also usually using quill style pens which occasionally skipped at critical times.. Every effort has been made to transcribe these data accurately; however, it must be recognized that numerous opportunities for error have been encountered along the way. Never accept this information as the final word without consulting the original document. This information is provided only as an aid to help speed your search for your relatives. Particularly difficult and suspect data have been indicated by ? question marks.. I am clear that there must be mistakes reflected and compounded in this list. If you become aware of them and provide me with the correct information, I will endeavor to ...
O.R. Solutions, Inc. - Scientific & Technical Instruments - O.R. Solutions, Inc. provides Automated Surgical Slush Systems and Intra-operative Irrigation Solution Warming Systems. O.R. Solutions systems address the critical needs of the surgical team by allowing them to know the temperature of irrigation fluids at the time they are administered to the patient. The companys products include: ORS-1075 Hush Slush® System, ORS-2000 Series Irrigation Solution Warming System and ORS-6000 Scope Cradle(TM).
Deliberate self-harm carries negative connotations for many healthcare professionals and members of the public; this is widely due to lack of knowledge and revulsion for the act itself (Kilroy-Findley, 2015; National Institute of Health and Care Excellence [NICE], 2004). NICE guidance (2004/2011) aimed to improve the understanding and treatment received by those who self-harm; however, there is evidence from a number of charities that this has not improved the experience for many service users (MIND, 2010).
Breaking Bread, Not Bones" resulted from a chance discovery of a report on a Franklin Dinner in a newspaper of the 1840s. Students should be reminded of the value of keeping an eye out for interesting subjects even as they pursue their primary objectives.. On his 1831 tour of America, the Frenchman Alexis de Tocqueville called newspapers "the only historical records in the United States," adding, "If one number is missing, it is as if the link of time was broken: present and past cannot be joined together again." He was right. Sadly for scholars, the newspaper record indeed is incomplete as many numbers and even entire runs have been lost over time. However, many old newspapers do exist for scholars to study, remaining in their original form, or on microfilm and microfiche, and increasingly, in digital formats. Focusing on the Antebellum Era, this research involved examining hundreds of items on microfilm in the North Carolina Collection of Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at ...
November 15, 2016-LeMaitre Vascular, Inc. announced that it has acquired the assets of Restore Flow Allografts, LLC for $14 million, of which $12 million was paid at closing, and $2 million is due on May 10, 2018, as well as potential earnout payments over the next 2 years based on the performance of the acquired business. Restore Flow Allografts derives revenue from human tissue preservation services, particularly the processing and cryopreservation of peripheral vascular veins and arteries. LeMaitre expects this acquisition to increase Q4 and full-year 2016 revenues by $550,000 and to reduce Q4 and full-year 2016 operating income by $200,000.. "We are pleased to add cryopreserved allografts to our widening range of biologic products, following our acquisitions of XenoSure in 2012, OmniFlow II in 2014, and ProCol in 2016. We believe vascular surgeons associate biologic implants with reduced infection. This acquisition provides a biologic solution for peripheral bypass to our growing United ...
Census records are very often difficult to read because of handwriting, microfilm quality, and spelling issues. Our early census takers were not as well educated as wed like them to have been, and even the people bearing the names often could not spell them with the same consistency we are accustomed to in this era. The census taker wrote what he believed he heard as well as he could. These have been transcribed for you to the very best or our abilities given the difficulties mentioned. Please be tolerant of what you would consider "mistakes." If you can recognize the names you are looking for, then it is a success. If not, then you may want to find a place where you can view the originals so that you can judge for yourselves. Excessive attention to outmoded spelling issues is the sign of a beginner in family research. Those of you who have been at this a while are well aware of the "spelling errors" in our early records and have learned to take them in your stride. If you want to tell us what ...
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CIHM Microfiche Series (IMonographs) ICIUIH Collection de microfiches (monographles) Canadian Institute for Historical Microraproductions / Institut Canadian da microraproductions historiquas Tactinical afid Bibliographic Nota* / Notat tachniquas at bibliofrapliicuas Tha Instituta hat attamptad to obtain tha batt oripnal copy availabia for filming. Faatura* of this copy whidi may ba biblioflraphically uniqua, which may altar any of tha imafat in tha raprodiwtion, or which may ti«nif icantly changa tha usual mathod of filming, ara chackad balow. LInttitut a microfilm^ la maillaur aaamplaira quil lui a M poniMa da ta procurer. Lat dMailt da cat amamplaira qui lont paut4tra uniqua* du point da «ua bibliographiqua, qui pauvant modif iar una imaga raproduita. ou qui pauvant axigar una modification dam la mMioda normala da f ilmaga tont indiqufa ci-datsout. G D Colourad covart/ Couvartura da coulaur Covart damagad/ Couvartura andommagic □ Coloured pagat/ Pagat da coulaur Pagat danu^/ PagM ...
Dr. Jazrawi, Dr. Zacchilli, and Dr. Tejwani perform a fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation for a large osteochondral defect of the talus via a medial malleolar osteotomy.
The Australian Joint Copying Project or AJCP is a collection of historical material relating to Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific dating from 1560 to 1984. The material has been drawn from records held in the United Kingdom and microfilmed.The microfilms in the collection are divided into two series:
Worked in Prof. Ian Hunters bio-instrumentation lab for the summer of 2009 designing mechanical experiments using SolidWorks, worked in the 20.309 lab for the summer of 2010 designing, testing, optimizing, and writing software for the ThorLabs optical trapping kit, and have been working in the Ribbeck lab since the start of the summer of 2011 characterizing and building protein microfilms. I have experience with SolidWorks, Labview, Matlab (lots and lots of Matlab ,.,) as well as instruments including a plate reader, a confocal microscope, QCM-D, and an optical trap. ...
New York: Columbia University Press, 2006. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International, 1997. On 30 May 2013, current Abdi Nasir Mahmoud Good, collected Verified to write an search to positive cowpea.
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U.S. 1930 Census, Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, population schedule, ED 13-31, sheets 10B-11A, house 181, family 274, family of J F Weiss [Joseph Weiss]; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=6224&enc=1 : accessed 8 Aug 2012); citing NARA microfilm T626, roll 2566.. ...
Brookes Print Anywhere service provides multifunctional devices (MFDs) in all Brookes site Libraries for users to print, scan or photocopy documents.. In addition, a microfiche/microfilm reader, and also scanners designed for working with images, are available at Headington Library. ...
Robinson, E; Golakai, V K.; and Schlesinger, M, "Studies on the mechanism of prolonged survival of allografts from tumor-bearing donors." (1968). Subject Strain Bibliography 1968. 363 ...

Experimental Approaches to Composite Tissue Allograft Transplants | SpringerLinkExperimental Approaches to Composite Tissue Allograft Transplants | SpringerLink

Ozer K, Oke R, Gurunluoglu R et al (2003) Induction of tolerance to hind limb allografts in rats receiving cyclosporine A and ... Siemionow M, Ozer K, Izycki D et al (2005) A new method of bone marrow transplantation leads to extension of skin allograft ... Composite tissue allografts (CTAs) consist of heterogeneous tissues derived from ectoderm and mesoderm, including skin, fat, ... Black KS, Hewitt CW, Fraser LA et al (1985) Composite tissue (limb) allografts in rats. II. Indefinite survival using low-dose ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-88-470-0374-3_7

Nerve allograft - WikipediaNerve allograft - Wikipedia

Nerve allografts are prepared from donated human nerve tissue. An allograft contains many of the beneficial characteristics of ... Currently the only FDA approved nerve allograft is the Avance graft of AxoGen. A nerve allograft is used for the reconstruction ... Hence, allograft treatment does not seem to be a risk factor for this specific problem. Golden standard therapy for transected ... It has been shown that in allograft surgeries, post-operative neuropathic pain was present in some patients, but only if they ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerve_allograft

Chronic allograft nephropathy - WikipediaChronic allograft nephropathy - Wikipedia

Chronic allograft nephropathy, abbreviated CAN and also known as sclerosing/chronic allograft nephropathy, is the leading cause ... Sep 1999). "Chronic allograft nephropathy: An update". Kidney Int. 56 (3): 783-93. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1755.1999.00611.x. PMID ... Mar 2006). "Chronic allograft nephropathy: current concepts and future directions". Transplantation. 81 (5): 643-54. doi: ... Jul 2005). "Chronic renal allograft rejection: pathophysiologic considerations". Kidney Int. 68 (1): 1-13. doi:10.1111/j.1523- ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_allograft_nephropathy

Pancreas allograft rejectionPancreas allograft rejection

... : analysis of concurrent renal allograft biopsies and posttherapy follow-up biopsies. ... Classification of acute cellular rejection in pancreas allograft. *Grading of antibody-mediated rejection in pancreas allograft ... pancreas allograft rejection remains a major clinical challenge and is the primary cause of death-censored pancreas allograft ... Pancreas allograft rejection. Authors. Tarek Alhamad, MD, MS, FACP, FASN. Tarek Alhamad, MD, MS, FACP, FASN ...
more infohttps://www.uptodate.com/contents/pancreas-allograft-rejection

Allografts in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions | SpringerLinkAllografts in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions | SpringerLink

... fresh-frozen allograft, and gamma-irradiated allograft. Arthroscopy 28:211-217CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Barbour SA, King W (2003) The safe and effective use of allograft tissue-an update. Am J Sports Med 31:791-797PubMedGoogle ... Singh R, Singh D (2012) Sterilization of bone allografts by microwave and gamma radiation. Int J Radiat Biol 88:661-666CrossRef ... Bullis DW, Paulos LE (1994) Reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament with allograft. Clin Sports Med 13:581-597PubMed ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-3-642-36569-0_111

Allografts in Total Knee Arthroplasty | SpringerLinkAllografts in Total Knee Arthroplasty | SpringerLink

Gross A.E. (1992) Allografts in Total Knee Arthroplasty. In: Older M.W.J. (eds) Bone Implant Grafting. Springer, London. * DOI ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4471-1934-0_20

Demineralized Allografts Market 2024Demineralized Allografts Market 2024

Growth in demineralized allograft market is greater due to anticipated surge in soft-tissue allografts. Bone grafts are ... Growth in demineralized allograft market is greater due to anticipated surge in soft-tissue allografts. Increasing demand for ... The demineralized allografts market can be segmented based on product type, end-users and geography. Based on key product types ... The demineralized allograft market is expected to grow at huge CAGR because of new technological innovations in grafting, and ...
more infohttp://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/demineralized-allografts-marke/release-761550.htm

Allografts - definition of Allografts by The Free DictionaryAllografts - definition of Allografts by The Free Dictionary

Allografts synonyms, Allografts pronunciation, Allografts translation, English dictionary definition of Allografts. n. A tissue ... allograft. (redirected from Allografts). Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.. Related to Allografts: autografts ... However, it is widely accepted that not all failed allografts need removal.. Early but not late allograft nephrectomy reduces ... Allografts - definition of Allografts by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Allografts ...
more infohttps://www.thefreedictionary.com/Allografts

Bone Allografts | FAQs | Infection Control | Division of Oral Health | CDCBone Allografts | FAQs | Infection Control | Division of Oral Health | CDC

What is the risk of disease transmission with bone allografts? Freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) and demineralized freeze- ... Holtzclaw D, Toscano, N, Eisenlohr L, Callan D . The Safety of Bone Allografts Used in Dentistry: A Review. JADA September 2008 ... Donor selection, testing, and inactivation of the HIV virus in freeze-dried bone allografts. Pract Periodontics Aesthet Dent ... Although four cases HIV infection were linked to procedures using fresh-frozen bone allografts, these cases involved surgeries ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faqs/bone-allografts.html

Arthrex - Tendon AllograftsArthrex - Tendon Allografts

The use of allografts reduces OR time and eliminates the risk of donor site morbidity. ... Use of allograft tendons for primary and revision ACL and PCL repair has gained greater acceptance among surgeons. ... The use of allografts reduces OR time and eliminates the risk of donor site morbidity. Other uses of allograft tendons are for ... Use of allograft tendons for primary and revision ACL and PCL repair has gained greater acceptance among surgeons. ...
more infohttps://www.arthrex.com/orthobiologics/tendon-allografts

Arthrex - Tendon AllograftsArthrex - Tendon Allografts

Use of allograft tendons for primary and revision repair has gained greater acceptance among surgeons. The use of allografts ... Arthrex Meniscal Allograft Arthroplasty for Treatment of CMC Arthritis of the Thumb ...
more infohttps://www.arthrex.com/hand-wrist/tendon-allografts

Osteochondral Allografts | CONMEDOsteochondral Allografts | CONMED

MOPS allografts had a revision rate of only 2%, while the SOC allograft revision rate was 11.5%1. Additionally, MOPS allografts ... MOPS allografts maintained 98.8% viable cell density at 40 to 55 days, compared to Standard of Care (SOC) allografts, which ... Osteochondral Allografts Product Overview. Available exclusively from CONMED through MTF Biologics, osteochondral allografts ... MOPS allografts maintained 98.8% viable cell density at 40 to 55 days1 - giving surgeons and their patients significantly more ...
more infohttps://www.conmed.com/ja/products/orthopedics/foot-and-ankle/allografts-and-biologics/osteochondral-allografts

HTO Wedge AllograftsHTO Wedge Allografts

Allograft is routinely used to fill the space created from correcting the mechanical axis since autografts add extra time to ...
more infohttp://www.conmed.com/medical-specialties/orthopedics/mtf-allografts-and-biologics/meniscus/hto-wedge-allografts

Meniscal allograft transplantation : MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaMeniscal allograft transplantation : MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Meniscal allograft transplantation is surgery in which a meniscus -- a c-shaped cartilage in the knee -- is placed into your ... Meniscal allograft transplantation is surgery in which a meniscus -- a c-shaped cartilage in the knee -- is placed into your ... Meniscus allograft transplantation is a difficult surgery, and the recovery is hard. But for people who are missing the ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007209.htm

Early pancreas allograft thrombosis.  - PubMed - NCBIEarly pancreas allograft thrombosis. - PubMed - NCBI

Early pancreas allograft thrombosis.. Ramessur Chandran S1, Kanellis J, Polkinghorne KR, Saunder AC, Mulley WR. ... We retrospectively reviewed the records of the 118 patients who received a pancreatic allograft at our center between October ... To determine factors associated with early pancreatic allograft thrombosis (EPAT). Thrombosis is the leading non-immunological ... cause of early pancreatic allograft failure. Multiple risk factors have been postulated. We hypothesized that recipient ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23495654?dopt=Abstract

Allograft in fracture repairAllograft in fracture repair

Is the unlisted code appropriate? Does the allograft fall under the description of internal fixation?. Ive been all over the ...
more infohttps://www.aapc.com/memberarea/forums/41082-allograft-fracture-repair.html

Allosensitization of islet allograft recipients.  - PubMed - NCBIAllosensitization of islet allograft recipients. - PubMed - NCBI

Allosensitization of islet allograft recipients.. Cardani R1, Pileggi A, Ricordi C, Gomez C, Baidal DA, Ponte GG, Mineo D, ... We performed a retrospective analysis of PRA status in 66 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus recipient of islet allografts ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18091517?dopt=Abstract

nerve repair with allograft nervenerve repair with allograft nerve

One of our surgeons did a nerve repair using an allograft nerve and I cannot find a repair code that corresponds with this ... 64910 states repair with synthetic conduit or vein allograft, but it was a nerve allograft, not a vein allograft. I am ... One of our surgeons did a nerve repair using an allograft nerve and I cannot find a repair code that corresponds with this ...
more infohttps://www.aapc.com/memberarea/forums/67273-nerve-repair-allograft-nerve.html

Immunological Aspect on Late Allograft DysfunctionImmunological Aspect on Late Allograft Dysfunction

... Guest Editors: Qiquan Sun, Akinlolu O. Ojo, and Xian C. Li *Immunological ... Latent Abnormal Pathology Affects Long-Term Graft Function in Elder Living Renal Allograft Recipients, Linlin Ma, Lei Zhang, Yu ... Molecular Profiling of Acute and Chronic Rejections of Renal Allografts, Hřibová Petra, Honsová Eva, Brabcová Irena, Hrubá ... Aspect on Late Allograft Dysfunction, Qiquan Sun, Akinlolu O. Ojo, and Xian C. Li Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 625031, 2 ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/jir/si/108390/

Patent US6554863 - Intervertebral allograft spacer - Google PatentsPatent US6554863 - Intervertebral allograft spacer - Google Patents

However, significant shaping and sizing of the allograft is not possible due to the nature of the allograft. Even if extensive ... Although the osteoconductive nature of the allograft provides a biological interlocking between the allograft and the vertebrae ... Allografts are sections of bone taken from a long bone of a donor. A cross section of the bone is taken and processed using ... Bone allograft material and method. US5141510. 29 May 1989. 25 Aug 1992. Shigehide Takagi. Structure of artificial bone ...
more infohttp://www.google.ca/patents/US6554863

Tympano-Ossicular Allografts and HIV TransmissionTympano-Ossicular Allografts and HIV Transmission

Conclusions: These results suggest that the preservation technique for tympano-ossicular allografts is safe with regard to HIV- ... Objective: To evaluate the potential risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by tympano-ossicular allografts by ... Processing: The treatment group was processed with standard techniques (formaldehyde) for tympano-ossicular allograft ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/ajoto/199811000/00000455-199811000-00004

Molecular Profiling of Acute and Chronic Rejections of Renal AllograftsMolecular Profiling of Acute and Chronic Rejections of Renal Allografts

... differential diagnosis of chronic allograft injury and elimination of chronic allograft nephropathy ("CAN")," The American ... Molecular Profiling of Acute and Chronic Rejections of Renal Allografts. Hřibová Petra,1 Honsová Eva,2 Brabcová Irena,1 Hrubá ... L. C. Racusen, K. Solez, R. B. Colvin et al., "The Banff 97 working classification of renal allograft pathology," Kidney ... K. Solez, R. B. Colvin, L. C. Racusen et al., "Banff 07 classification of renal allograft pathology: updates and future ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/jir/2013/509259/ref/

Histomorphological Assessment of Phlebitis in Renal AllograftsHistomorphological Assessment of Phlebitis in Renal Allografts

Isolated renal allograft mucormycosis. Pradhan, Aditya A.; Gadela, S. R.; Kumar, R. S. V. // Indian Journal of Urology;Dec2006 ... Improved Allograft Assessment with New Scoring Schema. // Kidney;Nov/Dec99, Vol. 8 Issue 6, p255 Describes a refined ... Blood cyclosporin concentrations and renal allograft dysfunction. Holt, D.W.; Marsden, J.T.; Johnston, A.; Bewick, M.; Taube, D ... Renal mass as a determinant of late allograft outcome: Insights from experimental studies in rats. Mackenzie, Harald S.; Azuma ...
more infohttp://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/25576050/histomorphological-assessment-phlebitis-renal-allografts

allograft facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about allograftallograft facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about allograft

Make research projects and school reports about allograft easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... allograft A graft of tissue from a donor of one genotype to a host of a different genotype but of the same species. If the ... allograft (homograft) A graft of tissue from a donor of one genotype to a host of a different genotype but of the same species ... allograft (al-oh-grahft) n. a living tissue or organ graft between two members of the same species. Unless the graft is from an ...
more infohttps://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/divisions-diagnostics-and-procedures/medicine/allograft

Identification of Regulatory T Cells in Tolerated Allografts | JEMIdentification of Regulatory T Cells in Tolerated Allografts | JEM

The functional relevance of passenger leukocytes and microchimerism for heart allograft acceptance in the rat. Nat. Med. 5:1292 ... Identification of Regulatory T Cells in Tolerated Allografts. Luis Graca, Stephen P. Cobbold, Herman Waldmann ... regulatory cells from tolerated allografts have expanded to evoke regulatory function equivalent to 106 CD4+CD25+ cells from a ... as they can prevent nontolerant lymphocytes from rejecting fresh skin allografts, without hindrance of rejection of third party ...
more infohttp://jem.rupress.org/content/195/12/1641?ijkey=a50772780f45311681185387cbf873d24416518f&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
  • Inceoglu S, Siemionow M, Chick L et al (1994) The effect of combined immunosuppression with systemic low-dose cyclosporin and topical fluocinolone acetonide on the survival of rat hind-limb allografts. (springer.com)
  • Black KS, Hewitt CW, Fraser LA et al (1985) Composite tissue (limb) allografts in rats. (springer.com)
  • It has been shown that in allograft surgeries, post-operative neuropathic pain was present in some patients, but only if they suffered from this condition pre-operatively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alachua, FL), a processor of precision-tooled orthopedic allografts , announced that it has signed an exclusive license and distribution services agreement with the Stryker Endoscopy division of Stryker Corporation (Kalamazoo, MI) to supply human allograft tissue for sports medicine surgeries. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Age of more than 30 years at time of surgery and having two or more previous surgeries for the operated knee were associated with allograft failure. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In particular, composite allografts consisting of cortical side plates for strength and a cancellous core for enhanced fusion have been successfully used in ACDF cases [1, (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Allografts comprise the tissues, cells and/or proteins that are utilized for implantation, infusion or transplant from donor to the recipient with different genetic makeup of the same species. (sbwire.com)
  • Multiligament reconstructions require an important quantity of grafts and often determine the need for cadaver allografts during the surgical repair procedures. (springer.com)
  • Therefore, allografts were introduced in the market for overcoming the disadvantages associated with autologous grafts. (sbwire.com)
  • Importantly, all MOPS allografts evaluated in the study had higher than the desired minimum essential viability level of 70%, while only 27% of SOC grafts evaluated exceeded the desired level at the time of implantation 1 . (conmed.com)
  • Allografts possess both osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties, and hence serve as a worthy substitute for autografts. (sbwire.com)
  • Demineralized allografts are readily available world over and are very popular substitutes of the bone autografts. (sbwire.com)
  • Curran AR, Adams DJ, Gill JL, Steiner ME, Scheller AD (2004) The biomechanical effects of low-dose irradiation on bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts. (springer.com)
  • AlloSource, Centennial, CO, one of the nation's largest non-profit providers of skin, bone and soft tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures, and the world's largest processor of cellular bone allografts , has been awarded a patent for its proprietary tissue cleaning and disinfecting system called AlloTrue. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • What is the risk of disease transmission with bone allografts? (cdc.gov)
  • Freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) materials are widely used in periodontal therapy, and there are no reports of disease transmission during the 30-year history of using FDBA. (cdc.gov)
  • American Academy of Periodontology Position Paper: Tissue banking of bone allografts used in periodontal regeneration, J Periodontol 2001;72:834-838. (cdc.gov)
  • Holtzclaw D, Toscano, N, Eisenlohr L, Callan D . The Safety of Bone Allografts Used in Dentistry: A Review. (cdc.gov)
  • HIV inactivation in a bone allograft. (cdc.gov)
  • The allograft is prepared by treating a section of cadaver bone to remove all soft tissue, then texturing the bone surface to produce a pattern of. (google.com)
  • The allograft is prepared by treating a section of cadaver bone to remove all soft tissue, then texturing the bone surface to produce a pattern of holes of selected size, density, and depth, and finally demineralizing the bone section to leave a rigid, insoluble collagen scaffold suitable for osteoinduction upon implantation. (google.com)
  • To determine factors associated with early pancreatic allograft thrombosis (EPAT). (nih.gov)
  • Thrombosis is the leading non-immunological cause of early pancreatic allograft failure. (nih.gov)
  • We performed a retrospective analysis of PRA status in 66 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus recipient of islet allografts between 1985 and 2006. (nih.gov)
  • This pathway illustrates molecular interactions involved in the fundamental adaptive immune response for allograft destruction. (wikipathways.org)
  • Use of allograft tendons for primary and revision ACL and PCL repair has gained greater acceptance among surgeons. (arthrex.com)
  • MOPS allografts had a revision rate of only 2%, while the SOC allograft revision rate was 11.5% 1 . (conmed.com)
  • Further surgery was required in 52 knees (26%), of which 16 (8%) were considered failures, as defined by removal or revision of the allograft. (prweb.com)
  • Other uses of allograft tendons are for the medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), elbow ligament repair, and for lateral ankle stabilization procedures. (arthrex.com)
  • Objective: To evaluate the potential risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by tympano-ossicular allografts by studying the efficacy of standard preservation techniques to eliminate the presence of proviral HIV-I DNA fragments in contaminated ossicles. (ovid.com)
  • Orthopedic community's continuous research on materials providing better osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity and osteogenesis, and improved accessibility to the latest generation allografts in emerging economics would further contribute toward this market growth in the near future. (sbwire.com)
  • Experimental studies of renal mass augmentation were conducted in the Fisherâ†'Lewis rat model of late renal allograft failure to assess the injury attribulable to inadequate nephron supply in single allografts. (ebscohost.com)
  • Moreover, PM significantly ameliorated tubular accumulation of pentosidine, compared to untreated allografts (2. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • and an analysis of the mean decrease in hematocrit for allografts vs native kidneys, for all eligible patients (n = 66), revealed a significantly lower mean decrease in the hematocrit (P = 0. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • MOPS allografts maintained 98.8% viable cell density at 40 to 55 days 1 - giving surgeons and their patients significantly more time to schedule the surgery. (conmed.com)
  • Examines the implications of oral cyclosporin intake among renal allograft patients. (ebscohost.com)