Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Allografts: Tissues, cells, or organs transplanted between genetically different individuals of the same species.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Rats, Inbred WFTransplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Rats, Inbred LewBone Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing bones or bone tissue for future use.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Graft Enhancement, Immunologic: The induction of prolonged survival and growth of allografts of either tumors or normal tissues which would ordinarily be rejected. It may be induced passively by introducing graft-specific antibodies from previously immunized donors, which bind to the graft's surface antigens, masking them from recognition by T-cells; or actively by prior immunization of the recipient with graft antigens which evoke specific antibodies and form antigen-antibody complexes which bind to the antigen receptor sites of the T-cells and block their cytotoxic activity.Isoantibodies: Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Isoantigens: Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Rats, Inbred ACIMice, Inbred BALB CMice, Inbred C57BLImmunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Rats, Inbred BNTransplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lymphocyte Culture Test, Mixed: Measure of histocompatibility at the HL-A locus. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from two individuals are mixed together in tissue culture for several days. Lymphocytes from incompatible individuals will stimulate each other to proliferate significantly (measured by tritiated thymidine uptake) whereas those from compatible individuals will not. In the one-way MLC test, the lymphocytes from one of the individuals are inactivated (usually by treatment with MITOMYCIN or radiation) thereby allowing only the untreated remaining population of cells to proliferate in response to foreign histocompatibility antigens.Complement C4b: The large fragment formed when COMPLEMENT C4 is cleaved by COMPLEMENT C1S. The membrane-bound C4b binds COMPLEMENT C2A, a SERINE PROTEASE, to form C4b2a (CLASSICAL PATHWAY C3 CONVERTASE) and subsequent C4b2a3b (CLASSICAL PATHWAY C5 CONVERTASE).Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mice, Inbred C3HT-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Mice, Inbred CBASterilization: The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Histocompatibility Antigens: A group of antigens that includes both the major and minor histocompatibility antigens. The former are genetically determined by the major histocompatibility complex. They determine tissue type for transplantation and cause allograft rejections. The latter are systems of allelic alloantigens that can cause weak transplant rejection.Cyclosporins: A group of closely related cyclic undecapeptides from the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindocarpon lucidum. They have some antineoplastic and antifungal action and significant immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporins have been proposed as adjuvants in tissue and organ transplantation to suppress graft rejection.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Tissue Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing organs or tissue for future use.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Major Histocompatibility Complex: The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS, genes which control the structure of the IMMUNE RESPONSE-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS, HUMAN; the IMMUNE RESPONSE GENES which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Swine, Miniature: Genetically developed small pigs for use in biomedical research. There are several strains - Yucatan miniature, Sinclair miniature, and Minnesota miniature.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.CD40 Ligand: A membrane glycoprotein and differentiation antigen expressed on the surface of T-cells that binds to CD40 ANTIGENS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and induces their proliferation. Mutation of the gene for CD40 ligand is a cause of HYPER-IGM IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME, TYPE 1.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Immunoconjugates: Combinations of diagnostic or therapeutic substances linked with specific immune substances such as IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; or ANTIGENS. Often the diagnostic or therapeutic substance is a radionuclide. These conjugates are useful tools for specific targeting of DRUGS and RADIOISOTOPES in the CHEMOTHERAPY and RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY of certain cancers.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Mice, Inbred ALymphocyte Depletion: Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.Autografts: Transplant comprised of an individual's own tissue, transferred from one part of the body to another.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory: CD4-positive T cells that inhibit immunopathology or autoimmune disease in vivo. They inhibit the immune response by influencing the activity of other cell types. Regulatory T-cells include naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ cells, IL-10 secreting Tr1 cells, and Th3 cells.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Histocompatibility Antigens Class II: Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.Delayed Graft Function: General dysfunction of an organ occurring immediately following its transplantation. The term most frequently refers to renal dysfunction following KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Host vs Graft Reaction: The immune responses of a host to a graft. A specific response is GRAFT REJECTION.Adoptive Transfer: Form of passive immunization where previously sensitized immunologic agents (cells or serum) are transferred to non-immune recipients. When transfer of cells is used as a therapy for the treatment of neoplasms, it is called adoptive immunotherapy (IMMUNOTHERAPY, ADOPTIVE).Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Rats, Inbred F344Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Chimerism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Mice, Inbred DBAModels, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Endothelium, Corneal: Single layer of large flattened cells covering the surface of the cornea.Lymphocyte Transfusion: The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Composite Tissue Allografts: A graft consisting of multiple tissues, such as muscle, bone, nerve, vasculature, and skin, comprising a functional unit for reconstructive purposes.Radiation Chimera: An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Tissue Survival: The span of viability of a tissue or an organ.Raffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Hand Transplantation: The transference of a complete HAND, as a composite of many tissue types, from one individual to another.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Histocompatibility Antigens Class I: Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.Kidney Tubules: Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic: The demonstration of the cytotoxic effect on a target cell of a lymphocyte, a mediator released by a sensitized lymphocyte, an antibody, or complement.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Thymectomy: Surgical removal of the thymus gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).Complement C3d: A 302-amino-acid fragment in the alpha chain (672-1663) of C3b. It is generated when C3b is inactivated (iC3b) and its alpha chain is cleaved by COMPLEMENT FACTOR I into C3c, and C3dg (955-1303) in the presence COMPLEMENT FACTOR H. Serum proteases further degrade C3dg into C3d (1002-1303) and C3g (955-1001).Chemokine CXCL9: An INTEFERON-inducible CXC chemokine that is specific for the CXCR3 RECEPTOR.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Injections, Intralymphatic: Injections into the lymph nodes or the lymphatic system.Anterior Chamber: The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)Corneal Opacity: Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Femoral NeoplasmsFas Ligand Protein: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that was originally discovered on cells of the lymphoid-myeloid lineage, including activated T-LYMPHOCYTES and NATURAL KILLER CELLS. It plays an important role in immune homeostasis and cell-mediated toxicity by binding to the FAS RECEPTOR and triggering APOPTOSIS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic: Immunized T-lymphocytes which can directly destroy appropriate target cells. These cytotoxic lymphocytes may be generated in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), in vivo during a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction, or after immunization with an allograft, tumor cell or virally transformed or chemically modified target cell. The lytic phenomenon is sometimes referred to as cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). These CD8-positive cells are distinct from NATURAL KILLER CELLS and NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. There are two effector phenotypes: TC1 and TC2.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Forkhead Transcription Factors: A subclass of winged helix DNA-binding proteins that share homology with their founding member fork head protein, Drosophila.Ureteral Diseases: Pathological processes involving the URETERS.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.T-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.H-2 Antigens: The major group of transplantation antigens in the mouse.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.Kidney Cortex Necrosis: Death of cells in the KIDNEY CORTEX, a common final result of various renal injuries including HYPOXIA; ISCHEMIA; and drug toxicity.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Dithizone: Chelating agent used for heavy metal poisoning and assay. It causes diabetes.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Glutaral: One of the protein CROSS-LINKING REAGENTS that is used as a disinfectant for sterilization of heat-sensitive equipment and as a laboratory reagent, especially as a fixative.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Bowman Capsule: A double-walled epithelial capsule that is the bulbous closed proximal end of the kidney tubular system. It surrounds the cluster of convoluted capillaries of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and is continuous with the convoluted PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Graft vs Host Reaction: An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.CTLA-4 Antigen: An inhibitory T CELL receptor that is closely related to CD28 ANTIGEN. It has specificity for CD80 ANTIGEN and CD86 ANTIGEN and acts as a negative regulator of peripheral T cell function. CTLA-4 antigen is believed to play role in inducing PERIPHERAL TOLERANCE.Limb Salvage: An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Kidney Glomerulus: A cluster of convoluted capillaries beginning at each nephric tubule in the kidney and held together by connective tissue.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Freeze Drying: Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.Perforin: A calcium-dependent pore-forming protein synthesized in cytolytic LYMPHOCYTES and sequestered in secretory granules. Upon immunological reaction between a cytolytic lymphocyte and a target cell, perforin is released at the plasma membrane and polymerizes into transmembrane tubules (forming pores) which lead to death of a target cell.Kidney Tubular Necrosis, Acute: Acute kidney failure resulting from destruction of EPITHELIAL CELLS of the KIDNEY TUBULES. It is commonly attributed to exposure to toxic agents or renal ISCHEMIA following severe TRAUMA.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Cytotoxicity, Immunologic: The phenomenon of target cell destruction by immunologically active effector cells. It may be brought about directly by sensitized T-lymphocytes or by lymphoid or myeloid "killer" cells, or it may be mediated by cytotoxic antibody, cytotoxic factor released by lymphoid cells, or complement.Lymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Ethylene Oxide: A colorless and flammable gas at room temperature and pressure. Ethylene oxide is a bactericidal, fungicidal, and sporicidal disinfectant. It is effective against most micro-organisms, including viruses. It is used as a fumigant for foodstuffs and textiles and as an agent for the gaseous sterilization of heat-labile pharmaceutical and surgical materials. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p794)Receptors, CXCR3: CXCR receptors that are expressed on the surface of a number of cell types, including T-LYMPHOCYTES; NK CELLS; DENDRITIC CELLS; and a subset of B-LYMPHOCYTES. The receptors are activated by CHEMOKINE CXCL9; CHEMOKINE CXCL10; and CHEMOKINE CXCL11.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Chemokine CXCL10: A CXC chemokine that is induced by GAMMA-INTERFERON and is chemotactic for MONOCYTES and T-LYMPHOCYTES. It has specificity for the CXCR3 RECEPTOR.Integrin alpha Chains: The alpha subunits of integrin heterodimers (INTEGRINS), which mediate ligand specificity. There are approximately 18 different alpha chains, exhibiting great sequence diversity; several chains are also spliced into alternative isoforms. They possess a long extracellular portion (1200 amino acids) containing a MIDAS (metal ion-dependent adhesion site) motif, and seven 60-amino acid tandem repeats, the last 4 of which form EF HAND MOTIFS. The intracellular portion is short with the exception of INTEGRIN ALPHA4.Immunogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic basis of the immune response (IMMUNITY).Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Antigens, Differentiation: Antigens expressed primarily on the membranes of living cells during sequential stages of maturation and differentiation. As immunologic markers they have high organ and tissue specificity and are useful as probes in studies of normal cell development as well as neoplastic transformation.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Injections, Intraperitoneal: Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.Radiation: Emission or propagation of acoustic waves (SOUND), ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY waves (such as LIGHT; RADIO WAVES; GAMMA RAYS; or X-RAYS), or a stream of subatomic particles (such as ELECTRONS; NEUTRONS; PROTONS; or ALPHA PARTICLES).Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins: Proteins secreted from an organism which form membrane-spanning pores in target cells to destroy them. This is in contrast to PORINS and MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that function within the synthesizing organism and COMPLEMENT immune proteins. These pore forming cytotoxic proteins are a form of primitive cellular defense which are also found in human LYMPHOCYTES.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Receptors, Interleukin-2: Receptors present on activated T-LYMPHOCYTES and B-LYMPHOCYTES that are specific for INTERLEUKIN-2 and play an important role in LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION. They are heterotrimeric proteins consisting of the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR ALPHA SUBUNIT, the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR BETA SUBUNIT, and the INTERLEUKIN RECEPTOR COMMON GAMMA-CHAIN.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Cell Transplantation: Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.

Homograft banking in Singapore: two years of cardiovascular tissue banking in Southeast Asia. (1/86)

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Burnei's procedure in the treatment of long bone pseudarthrosis in patients having osteogenesis imperfecta or congenital pseudarthrosis of tibia - preliminary report. (2/86)

RATIONALE: given the recalcitrant behaviour of pseudarthrosis in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT), there is no ideal solution to treat such challenging deformities. The reconsideration of the already known principles, by using the modern technology, may generate new treatment methods. AIM: the present paper presents the preliminary results of an original reconstruction procedure used to treat large bone defects in paediatric orthopaedics. A case series study, the surgical technique, complications and illustrative cases are presented. METHODS AND RESULTS: 3 cases of pseudarthrosis in OI and 2 cases of CPT were operated by using this technique. The principles of the method are to create an optimal osteoconductive and osteoinductive environment by using a bone autograft, bone allograft and bone graft substitutes and to provide a good stabilisation of the bones. We operated 3 patients with OI and 2 patients with CPT. Four patients had multiple previous surgeries. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 28 months. Four of the five patients are able to ambulate independently at the moment this paper was written. DISCUSSION: we believe that the present technique could be a reliable alternative to other procedures, especially in cases of repeated failures.  (+info)

Matricellular proteins and matrix metalloproteinases mark the inflammatory and fibrotic response in human cardiac allograft rejection. (3/86)

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Aseptically processed and chemically sterilized BTB allografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective randomized study. (4/86)

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Pilot study of patient and caregiver out-of-pocket costs of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. (5/86)

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Effects of spleen status on early outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation. (6/86)

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Evaluation of safety and efficacy of radiation-sterilized bone allografts in reconstructive oral surgery. (7/86)

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Allografts with autogenous platelet-rich plasma for tibial defect reconstruction: a rabbit study. (8/86)

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of autogenous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for fresh-frozen allografts in tibial defect reconstruction in rabbits. METHODS: 40 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent tibial defect reconstruction with autografts (n=12), allografts without PRP (n=12), or allografts with PRP (n=12) and were observed for 12, 16, and 24 weeks (4 for each period). Tibias of the remaining 4 rabbits were used as donor allografts, and the remaining allografts were procured from recipient rabbits. A 1.5- cm cortical segment of the tibia was osteotomised, and then fixed with a 9-hole mini-compression plate and 2 cerclage wires. Allografts were stripped off the periosteum and soft tissues and medullary contents, and then stored in a freezer at -80 masculineC. All allografts were deep frozen for at least 4 weeks before transplantation. 7 ml of whole blood was drawn to prepare 1 ml of PRP. The PRP was then mixed with 1.0 ml of human thrombin to form a platelet gel. The PRP gel was then packed into the medullary canal of the allograft and applied on the cortical surface before tibial defect reconstruction. Rabbits were sacrificed at 12, 16, and 24 weeks. The specimens were assessed for bone union at host-graft junctions and for bone resorption, new bone formation, callus encasement, and viable osteocyte counts. RESULTS: There were 4 specimens in each group at each observation period. Osteoid bridging the gap at host-graft junctions was noted in all specimens in the autograft and allograft-with-PRP groups at week 12 and in the allograft-without-PRP group at week 24. Bone union in allografts without PRP was delayed. All indices for biological incorporation (resorption index, new bone formation index, callus encasement index, and viable osteocyte count) were significantly greater in the autograft than allograft-without-PRP groups, except for the resorption index at week 24, whereas the differences were not significant between the autograft and allograft-with-PRP groups. The differences between the 2 allograft groups were usually not significant, except for the resorption index. CONCLUSION: PRP-augmented allografts behaved similarly to autografts for tibial defect reconstruction in rabbits. PRP increased bone union and bone resorption.  (+info)

  • Currently the only FDA approved nerve allograft is the Avance graft of AxoGen. (wikipedia.org)
  • allograft ( homograft ) A graft of tissue from a donor of one genotype to a host of a different genotype but of the same species. (encyclopedia.com)
  • allograft ( al -oh-grahft) n. a living tissue or organ graft between two members of the same species. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Due to the nature of this very desirable tissue and limited availability, MTF Biologics offers graft matching services specifically designed to provide orthopedic surgeons with the best possible anatomically matched allografts to meet each individual patient's unique needs. (conmed.com)
  • Poor experiences with these nontissue substitutes led surgeons to choose other graft materials, including allografts. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, depending on where the surgery is done, structural allograft may not be as readily available as synthetic cages and bone graft extenders. (spineuniverse.com)
  • The age of an allograft, the age of the donor and whether or not the graft was irradiated had no clinically relevant effects on the bioavailability of growth factors for an allograft fusion, according to study data. (healio.com)
  • Renal allograft thrombosis is the leading cause of graft failure in pediatric transplant recipients in the early post-transplant period. (eurekaselect.com)
  • An allograft contains many of the beneficial characteristics of nerve autograft, such as three-dimensional microstructural scaffolding and protein components inherent to nerve tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 2014 guideline on the management of ACL injuries formulated by the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recommended that practitioners use either autograft or appropriately processed allograft tissue in patients undergoing ACL reconstructions, on the grounds that the measured outcomes are similar, though with the caveat that these results may not be generalizable to all allografts or all patients (eg, young or highly active patients). (medscape.com)
  • One study showed improved long-term outcomes with autograft over allograft as well as with not smoking and with normal body mass index. (medscape.com)
  • The surgeon has a choice between an allograft, which comes from tissue donors, and an autograft, which is typically a tendon taken from another part of the patient's body and repurposed for the ACL. (biospace.com)
  • For the first time, surgeons can have an allograft with strength qualities equivalent to an autograft that is also truly sterile. (biospace.com)
  • Patients who have received a structrual allograft or vascularized fibular autograft surgery to reconstruct their tibia, femur, ulna/radius or humerus for treatment of a bone tumor. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of this study is to investigate quantitative vascular cone beam CT(CBCT) in a clinical pilot of patients that have received a structural allograft for bone cancer or a vascularized structural autograft for bone cancer or traumatic injury. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients will have received an structural allograft or vascularized autograft for the treatment of bone cancer. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In rheumatoid patients, allograft may have better quality than iliac crest autograft. (eatonhand.com)
  • Using allograft tissue rather than an autograft eliminates a second surgical site, allowing the recipient to avoid additional pain, risk and a possibly longer hospital stay. (businesswire.com)
  • In addition, in some cases, it is not possible to obtain an autograft, so allografts are a natural solution. (businesswire.com)
  • AlloSource, Centennial, CO, one of the nation's largest non-profit providers of skin, bone and soft tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures, and the world's largest processor of cellular bone allografts , has been awarded a patent for its proprietary tissue cleaning and disinfecting system called AlloTrue. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Growth in demineralized allograft market is greater due to anticipated surge in soft-tissue allografts. (sbwire.com)
  • About AlloSource AlloSource is one of the largest nonprofit cellular and tissue networks in the country, offering more than 200 types of precise cartilage, cellular, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts to advance patient healing. (medindia.net)
  • ROUND ROCK, Texas , May 8, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Parametrics Medical, LLC, a private tissue bank specializing in providing the most diverse supply of allografts available in the market, announces its release of their Coll-e-Strong line of soft tissue allografts. (biospace.com)
  • developing and marketing regenerative and therapeutic biologics utilizing human placental tissue allografts and patent-protected processes for multiple sectors of healthcare, announced today that the latest peer-reviewed scientific and clinical review article of the MiMedx dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane ("dHACM") allografts has been electronically published in the journal Techniques In Orthopaedics . (medindia.net)
  • Qyresearchreports include new market research report Global Demineralized Allografts Market Research Report 2017 to its huge collection of research reports. (openpr.com)
  • This report on the global Demineralized Allografts market has been developed by a selected group of professional market research analysts, with a solitary goal to present the existing scenario of the market for Demineralized Allografts and shed light on its growth prospects. (openpr.com)
  • The report presents extensive assessment of the crucial factors that may influence the demand in the global Demineralized Allografts market, studies the challenges or pitfalls, and make a note of the latest trends, which the existing players must take into consideration in order to keep up in the market competition. (openpr.com)
  • The segmentation of the global demineralized allografts market based on geography include regions such as North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and the Middle East & Africa. (sbwire.com)
  • Use of allograft tendons for primary and revision repair has gained greater acceptance among surgeons. (arthrex.com)
  • Other uses of allograft tendons are for the medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), elbow ligament repair, and for lateral ankle stabilization procedures. (arthrex.com)
  • ALACHUA, Fla.--( BUSINESS WIRE )-- RTI Biologics Inc. (RTI) (Nasdaq: RTIX), a leading provider of orthopedic and other biologic implants, recently donated 35 bone allograft implants to Lemoyne, Pa. (businesswire.com)
  • MTF Biologics has added Leneva™ - Allograft Adipose Matrix to its line of premier, innovative and effective wound care solutions. (businesswire.com)
  • EDISON, N.J.--( BUSINESS WIRE )-- MTF Biologics , a global nonprofit organization dedicated to saving and healing lives through organ and tissue donation, is introducing Leneva™ - Allograft Adipose Matrix and SomaGen™ Meshed - Allograft Dermal Matrix to its line of premier, innovative and effective wound care solutions. (businesswire.com)
  • Standard size bone defects in the femur and the tibia of experimental animals were filled with freeze-dried cortical bone allografts with particle sizes of 1-2mm, 800-500μm, 500-300μm, 300-90μm, 250-125μm, 125-106μm, 106 to 75μm and 75-25μm. (psu.edu)
  • Regenerative medicine company R3 Stem Cell is now offering amniotic membrane allograft for eye care treatment. (prweb.com)
  • and an analysis of the mean decrease in hematocrit for allografts vs native kidneys, for all eligible patients (n = 66), revealed a significantly lower mean decrease in the hematocrit (P = 0. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We retrospectively reviewed the records of the 118 patients who received a pancreatic allograft at our center between October 1992 and January 2010. (nih.gov)
  • It has been shown that in allograft surgeries, post-operative neuropathic pain was present in some patients, but only if they suffered from this condition pre-operatively. (wikipedia.org)
  • We performed a retrospective analysis of PRA status in 66 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus recipient of islet allografts between 1985 and 2006. (nih.gov)
  • MOPS allografts maintained 98.8% viable cell density at 40 to 55 days 1 - giving surgeons and their patients significantly more time to schedule the surgery. (conmed.com)
  • Examines the implications of oral cyclosporin intake among renal allograft patients. (ebscohost.com)
  • Assesses the influence of urinary tract infection on renal function in patients with renal allografts. (ebscohost.com)
  • Research is an important part of allograft development and the cellular validation from this study tells a story about AlloStem and its ability to help heal patients," said AlloSource's Vice President of Strategy, Development and Growth, Peter Stevens , PhD. "We look forward to our continued work with Dr. Ehrhart and CSU to maximize the gift of tissue donation. (medindia.net)
  • The rate of nonunion in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was higher in cases using synthetic intervertebral cages than in cases using structural allograft in a retrospective review of data from more than 6,100 patients. (spineuniverse.com)
  • Dr. Lee and colleagues analyzed outcomes from 6,130 patients who underwent ACDF with structural allograft (n=4,063) or intervertebral cage (n=2,067) and anterior plating between 2007 and 2016 using data from a single nationwide health insurance company. (spineuniverse.com)
  • Development of a minimally invasive, longitudinal outcome measure to quantify intramedullary vascular volume and cortical bone volume of structural allografts in patients is required to translate 'revitalizing' structural allograft in clinical trials. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Our central hypothesis is that a loss-of-function P2X7R mutation identifies a group of cardiac transplanted patients at high risk for CAV and cardiac allograft loss because of a compensatory overexpression of P2X1R/P2X4R, which induces a disregulation of T-bet/ROR-g, ultimately leading to the abnormal generation of Th1/Th17 cells. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In patients undergoing long bone resection for osteosarcoma the use of bone allografts is a treatment option. (medigraphic.com)
  • A retrospective, observational, longitudinal study was conducted to obtain clinical and radiologic data of the sample composed of a group of 15 patients with a diagnosis of limb osteosarcoma treated at our hospital with structural bone allografts. (medigraphic.com)
  • Functionality and osteointegration in patients undergoing conservative surgery with bone allografts are excellent in most cases, and this is the technique of choice for the treatment of long bone osteosarcomas. (medigraphic.com)
  • Recipients of a renal allograft, Male and female patients age 18 to 60 years of age. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • ASCVD is likely to be an important factor in premature allograft loss in renal transplant patients both by contributing to the pathogenesis of CAN and leading to death from CVD. (uninet.edu)
  • Patients undergoing repair of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears through a mini-open approach with the use of human dermal tissue matrix allograft would demonstrate an improvement in pain, range of motion, strength, and subjective functional outcomes. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • We performed a prospective observational study of 24 patients who underwent interposition repair of massive rotator cuff tears using human dermal allograft. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Of the patients who healed at both sites, 1 had a fracture through the allograft, 1 had backing out of a locking screw that required removal, and 1 required a manipulation under anesthesia of the knee. (healio.com)
  • The Wills Eye Hospital Glaucoma Research Center retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 165 patients who underwent glaucoma tube shunt procedures using sterile gamma-irradiated cornea allograft (VisionGraft) between December 2012 and November 2013. (dovepress.com)
  • With respect to the primary outcomes, Kharfan-Dabaja et al found no significant difference in OS in post-allograft-relapsed AML patients who then received either allo-HCT2 or DLI at 2 years or 5 years ( P = .86). (cancernetwork.com)
  • According to Timothy Mead, M.D., global consultant for CURE International, the allografts will be used to treat physically disabled, economically-disadvantaged patients at CURE's 30-bed orthopedic/pediatric teaching hospital. (businesswire.com)
  • In summary, the incidence of BKVN in pediatric kidney allograft recipients was similar to findings in previous reports, but was higher in patients with underlying Alport syndrome. (mdpi.com)
  • These data will be used to devise a power calculation for a definitive clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of the revitalizing allograft. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • dHACM allografts have been shown in randomized clinical trials to be effective therapies to enhance healing, and have demonstrated the ability to recruit the migration of stem cells to the site of injury in vitro and in vivo . (medindia.net)
  • More recently, talented investigators, including Drs. Yankah, Yacoub, and others, have been developing information concerning the immunological aspects of the use of allografts, as well as their clinical use. (worldcat.org)
  • To investigate the clinical outcomes of tube shunt coverage using sterile gamma-irradiated cornea allograft. (dovepress.com)
  • Donor selection, testing, and inactivation of the HIV virus in freeze-dried bone allografts. (cdc.gov)
  • Allografts comprise the tissues, cells and/or proteins that are utilized for implantation, infusion or transplant from donor to the recipient with different genetic makeup of the same species. (sbwire.com)
  • The use of allografts reduces OR time and eliminates the risk of donor site morbidity. (arthrex.com)
  • Untreated allografts (using a nerve from a donor) have also been used. (nice.org.uk)
  • CD8+ stimulated T cells lead to apoptosis of the allograft donor cells whereas CD4+ T cells differentiate into TH1, TH2, T17, and Treg cells. (wikipathways.org)
  • With post-allograft-relapsed AML, the calculus to administer either allo-HCT2 or DLI is multifactorial and includes donor availability, remission status, presence of disabling comorbidities, and the center or physician preference. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Alachua, FL), a processor of precision-tooled orthopedic allografts , announced that it has signed an exclusive license and distribution services agreement with the Stryker Endoscopy division of Stryker Corporation (Kalamazoo, MI) to supply human allograft tissue for sports medicine surgeries. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Orthopedic community's continuous research on materials providing better osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity and osteogenesis, and improved accessibility to the latest generation allografts in emerging economics would further contribute toward this market growth in the near future. (sbwire.com)
  • For more than 20 years, AlloSource's products have bridged the proven science of allografts with the advanced technology of cells, offering life-saving and life-enhancing possibilities in spine, sports medicine, foot and ankle, orthopedic, reconstructive, trauma and wound care procedures. (medindia.net)
  • Parametrics Medical serves the orthopedic community by providing the most diverse supply of allograft tissue coupled with the industry's best customer service. (biospace.com)
  • Espinosa CV: Bone allografts in orthopedic surgery. (medigraphic.com)
  • Over 226 growth factors and bioactive proteins have been identified to date in dHACM allografts, and these collective proteins have been shown to regulate activity of a variety of cell types, including stem cells that are critical for orthopedic repair. (medindia.net)
  • In addition to an established history in promoting healing of chronic wounds, amniotic membrane allografts have recently been used in various orthopedic applications to reduce pain, prevent scar tissue formation, and promote healing. (medindia.net)
  • MiMedx PURION Processed dHACM (EpiFix and AmnioFix ) allografts have been used in various orthopedic applications, including tendon and ligament repair, treatment of cartilage and joint space disorders, and spine procedures. (medindia.net)
  • Parker H. Petit , Chairman and CEO, stated, "The outcomes that physicians have reported they are achieving when utilizing our dHACM allografts in orthopedic procedures are very impressive. (medindia.net)
  • It may be noted that the interpretation of renal transplant lesions on renal allograft biopsies in earlier Banff schemas was based predominantly on light microscopy (LM) and the tinctorial stains. (omicsonline.org)
  • The transplant is called an allograft, allogeneic transplant, or homograft. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study not only provides new insights into the nature of lung allografts as a primary site where T and B cell priming and immune regulation can occur, but also introduces the mouse orthotopic lung transplant as a model for studying the immunobiology of AMR. (jci.org)
  • The time is not far away when a combination of morphological changes on renal allograft biopsies with the molecular markers will be a feasible option to arrive at the most precise diagnosis of the transplant lesions. (omicsonline.org)
  • EDISON, N.J., Nov. 16, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- The largest natural allograft available on the market today for hernia and abdominal wall repair has been announced by The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF), the nation's leading provider of allograft tissue. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Gross A.E. (1992) Allografts in Total Knee Arthroplasty. (springer.com)
  • This case demonstrate the use of fresh frozen femoral head allograft, plate fixation augmented with cerclage in a salvage procedure for failed wrist arthroplasty for rheumatoid arthritis. (eatonhand.com)
  • She was treated with wrist arthodesis, using a sculpted fresh frozen femoral head allograft and a cerclage reinforced plate and screw fixation. (eatonhand.com)
  • Lee WP, Yaremchuk MJ, Pan YC et al (1991) Relative antigenicity of components of a vascularized limb allograft. (springer.com)
  • To determine whether there were any extra-lymphoid sites that might harbor regulatory T cells we sought their presence in tolerated skin allografts and in normal skin. (rupress.org)
  • As the world's largest processor of cellular bone allografts, fresh cartilage tissue for joint repair and skin allografts to help heal severe burns, AlloSource delivers unparalleled expertise and service to its growing network of surgeons, partners, and the country's most reputable organ procurement organizations. (medindia.net)
  • Nerve allografts are prepared from donated human nerve tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since a couple of decades processed nerve allografts has been used to restore nerve continuity. (wikipedia.org)
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JCI -
Volume 78, Issue 4
JCI - Volume 78, Issue 4 (jci.org)
Effects of statins in patients with chronic kidney disease: meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomised controlled trials |...
Effects of statins in patients with chronic kidney disease: meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomised controlled trials |... (bmj.com)
July 2001 - Volume 83 - Issue 7 : JBJS
July 2001 - Volume 83 - Issue 7 : JBJS (journals.lww.com)
Bone Graft in Spinal Fusion Surgery
Bone Graft in Spinal Fusion Surgery (spineuniverse.com)
Clinical applications of allografts in foot and ankle surgery | SpringerLink
Clinical applications of allografts in foot and ankle surgery | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Allograft Reconstruction of ACL-Deficient Knee: Practice Essentials, Anatomy, Pathophysiology
Allograft Reconstruction of ACL-Deficient Knee: Practice Essentials, Anatomy, Pathophysiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
Serine Deprivation Enhances Antineoplastic Activity of Biguanides | Cancer Research
Serine Deprivation Enhances Antineoplastic Activity of Biguanides | Cancer Research (cancerres.aacrjournals.org)
ATM Deficiency Is Associated with Sensitivity to PARP1- and ATR Inhibitors in Lung Adenocarcinoma | Cancer Research
ATM Deficiency Is Associated with Sensitivity to PARP1- and ATR Inhibitors in Lung Adenocarcinoma | Cancer Research (cancerres.aacrjournals.org)
Alloantibodies in Relation to the Rejection of Skin Allografts in the Mouse | SpringerLink
Alloantibodies in Relation to the Rejection of Skin Allografts in the Mouse | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Single Dose rATG for Renal Allograft Rejection - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Single Dose rATG for Renal Allograft Rejection - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov (clinicaltrials.gov)
Reconstructive/Restorative Surgery Research Highlights - Brigham and Women's Hospital
Reconstructive/Restorative Surgery Research Highlights - Brigham and Women's Hospital (brighamandwomens.org)
Elbow Head Replacement Recovery Time | Livestrong.com
Elbow Head Replacement Recovery Time | Livestrong.com (livestrong.com)
CD20+ B Cells: The Other Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes | The Journal of Immunology
CD20+ B Cells: The Other Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes | The Journal of Immunology (jimmunol.org)
Allografts - definition of Allografts by The Free Dictionary
Allografts - definition of Allografts by The Free Dictionary (thefreedictionary.com)
Commensal bacteria drive endogenous transformation and tumour stem cell marker expression through a bystander effect | Gut
Commensal bacteria drive endogenous transformation and tumour stem cell marker expression through a bystander effect | Gut (gut.bmj.com)
Orthobiologics Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2018 - 2026 - MarketWatch
Orthobiologics Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2018 - 2026 - MarketWatch (marketwatch.com)
Management of Airway Stenosis in the Lung Allograft: Bronchoscopy Procedures | SpringerLink
Management of Airway Stenosis in the Lung Allograft: Bronchoscopy Procedures | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)