Menthol: An alcohol produced from mint oils or prepared synthetically.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Antipruritics: Agents, usually topical, that relieve itching (pruritus).Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.TRPM Cation Channels: A subgroup of TRP cation channels named after melastatin protein. They have the TRP domain but lack ANKYRIN repeats. Enzyme domains in the C-terminus leads to them being called chanzymes.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Mentha piperita: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is the source of peppermint oil.Tobacco Products: Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Milk Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to milk (usually cow's milk) or milk products. MILK HYPERSENSITIVITY should be differentiated from LACTOSE INTOLERANCE, an intolerance to milk as a result of congenital deficiency of lactase.Thermoreceptors: Cellular receptors which mediate the sense of temperature. Thermoreceptors in vertebrates are mostly located under the skin. In mammals there are separate types of thermoreceptors for cold and for warmth and NOCICEPTORS which detect cold or heat extreme enough to cause pain.Thermosensing: The sensation of cold, heat, coolness, and warmth as detected by THERMORECEPTORS.Latex Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to products containing processed natural rubber latex such as rubber gloves, condoms, catheters, dental dams, balloons, and sporting equipment. Both T-cell mediated (HYPERSENSITIVITY, DELAYED) and IgE antibody-mediated (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE) allergic responses are possible. Delayed hypersensitivity results from exposure to antioxidants present in the rubber; immediate hypersensitivity results from exposure to a latex protein.Peanut Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to peanuts that is triggered by the immune system.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Drug Hypersensitivity: Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.Egg Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to eggs that is triggered by the immune system.Desensitization, Immunologic: Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Monoterpenes: Compounds with a core of 10 carbons generally formed via the mevalonate pathway from the combination of 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate and isopentenyl pyrophosphate. They are cyclized and oxidized in a variety of ways. Due to the low molecular weight many of them exist in the form of essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE).Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases. It was established in 1948.AcroleinRhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Thymol: A phenol obtained from thyme oil or other volatile oils used as a stabilizer in pharmaceutical preparations, and as an antiseptic (antibacterial or antifungal) agent. It was formerly used as a vermifuge.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.Nut Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to tree nuts that is triggered by the immune system.Arachis hypogaea: A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.Anaphylaxis: An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.Transient Receptor Potential Channels: A broad group of eukaryotic six-transmembrane cation channels that are classified by sequence homology because their functional involvement with SENSATION is varied. They have only weak voltage sensitivity and ion selectivity. They are named after a DROSOPHILA mutant that displayed transient receptor potentials in response to light. A 25-amino-acid motif containing a TRP box (EWKFAR) just C-terminal to S6 is found in TRPC, TRPV and TRPM subgroups. ANKYRIN repeats are found in TRPC, TRPV & TRPN subgroups. Some are functionally associated with TYROSINE KINASE or TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Pleasure: Sensation of enjoyment or gratification.Antigens, Plant: Substances found in PLANTS that have antigenic activity.Radioallergosorbent Test: An in vitro allergen radioimmunoassay in which allergens are coupled to an immunosorbent. The coupled allergens bind the IgE in the sera of patients which in turn binds radioisotope-labeled anti-IMMUNOGLOBULIN E antibodies.Antitussive Agents: Agents that suppress cough. They act centrally on the medullary cough center. EXPECTORANTS, also used in the treatment of cough, act locally.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Appetite Depressants: Agents that are used to suppress appetite.Naphthoquinones: Naphthalene rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Aminorex: An amphetamine-like anorectic agent. It may cause pulmonary hypertension.Metered Dose Inhalers: A small aerosol canister used to release a calibrated amount of medication for inhalation.Dry Powder Inhalers: A device that delivers medication to the lungs in the form of a dry powder.Nebulizers and Vaporizers: Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.Drug Overdose: Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Waxes: A plastic substance deposited by insects or obtained from plants. Waxes are esters of various fatty acids with higher, usually monohydric alcohols. The wax of pharmacy is principally yellow wax (beeswax), the material of which honeycomb is made. It consists chiefly of cerotic acid and myricin and is used in making ointments, cerates, etc. (Dorland, 27th ed)Copying Processes: Reproduction of data in a new location or other destination, leaving the source data unchanged, although the physical form of the result may differ from that of the source.PrintingPlant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Oils: Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Nasal Sprays: Pharmacologic agents delivered into the nostrils in the form of a mist or spray.
  • Menthol-based nose spray may give some temporary relief to the sinus pressure. (yahoo.com)
  • You can treat coughs due to colds , allergies , and sinus infections with a number of over-the-counter medicines. (healthline.com)
  • There are also claims that it can help relieve sinusitis and allergy-based sinus issues, which can contribute to coughs and mucus. (healthline.com)
  • Formulated with the aromatic power of menthol, the pump mist helps ease breathing and reduce sinus congestion and pressure. (bjs.com)
  • Furthermore, they soothe sore throats that result from having respiratory infections, allergies, or sinus discomforts. (newdirectionsaromatics.com)
  • This allergy which may have been "developed", or "triggered" by a traumatic surgery I had in October, may be the cause of the sinus issues, the headaches, and also the nausea/diarrhea/constipation problems that I have had for several days/weeks. (celiac.com)
  • Because of its versatility, it can be used over and over for a variety of purposes like allergies, nasal congestion, laryngitis, flu, coughs, or dry throats. (odemagazine.com)
  • In smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, more severe lung inflammation is associated with menthol cigarette smoking compared to non-menthol cigarette smoking. (frontiersin.org)
  • In this study, we tested the hypothesis that M-CS can induce more severe lung inflammation than Non-M-CS can via the additional action of menthol in M-CS on epithelial and lung TRPM8 in mice. (frontiersin.org)
  • If you're one of the estimated 60 million Americans who live with seasonal allergies (or allergic rhinitis), you know it's the little things, such as pollen or dust, that can make you feel miserable. (thenorthernlight.com)
  • If there is an infection where Synvexia ( lidocaine and menthol patch) will be used. (drugs.com)
  • This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch). (drugs.com)
  • You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) with all of your drugs and health problems. (drugs.com)
  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch). (drugs.com)
  • Do not use Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) for longer than you were told by your doctor. (drugs.com)
  • If Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) has been put in the mouth, call a doctor or poison control center right away. (drugs.com)
  • Use Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) as ordered by your doctor. (drugs.com)
  • Do not take Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) by mouth. (drugs.com)
  • Do not use if the pouch that holds Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) is torn, open, or not sealed all the way. (drugs.com)
  • Many times Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) is used on an as needed basis. (drugs.com)
  • Irritation where Synvexia (lidocaine and menthol patch) is used. (drugs.com)
  • What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Lidocaine and Menthol Patch? (drugs.com)
  • What are some things I need to know or do while I take Lidocaine and Menthol Patch? (drugs.com)
  • How is this medicine (Lidocaine and Menthol Patch) best taken? (drugs.com)
  • What are some other side effects of Lidocaine and Menthol Patch? (drugs.com)
  • Menthol is an activator of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8), which is also sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS). (frontiersin.org)
  • Menthol binds to transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 8 (TRPM8) 1 , 2 , 3 , 5 , 6 , 7 and thereby stimulates lacrimation via activation of cold-sensitive primary afferent neurons in the cornea. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Menthol is a volatile water-clear organic compound with the structure of a cyclic monoterpene that is incorporated into various consumer products including toothpaste, gum, and medicines such as proprietary eyedrops. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Specialty shampoos are available for people with dandruff, color-treated hair, gluten or wheat allergies, an interest in using an "all-natural", "organic", "botanical" or "plant-derived" product, and infants and young children ("baby shampoo" is less irritating). (wikipedia.org)
  • The organic compound Menthol occurs naturally within the Mentha arvensis botanical's secretory gland cells through the process of biosynthesis. (newdirectionsaromatics.com)
  • Its impact on the digestive system is considerable, and the base element of menthol in this tea is perhaps the most valuable part of its organic structure. (livetradingnews.com)