Allelopathy: The process by which organisms release chemical compounds known as ALLELOCHEMICALS which influence the physiology, growth, survival, colonization, and reproductive activities of other species usually located nearby.Echinochloa: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is grown mainly as a hay crop.Comfrey: Perennial herb Symphytum officinale, in the family Boraginaceae, used topically for wound healing. It contains ALLANTOIN, carotene, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE); GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, resin, SAPONINS; TANNINS; triterpenoids, VITAMIN B12, and ZINC. Comfrey also contains PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS and is hepatotoxic if ingested.Mucuna: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is the source of mucuna gum.Vicia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is widely used as ground cover and forage and known for the edible beans, VICIA FABA.Polygonum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE that is an ingredient of Shou-Wu-Pian, a Chinese herbal preparation (DRUGS, CHINESE HERBAL). The common name of black bindweed also refers to TAMUS or Fallopia (use POLYGONACEAE).Poa: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that contains the Poa p Ia allergen and allergen C KBGP.Geranium: A plant genus of the family GERANIACEAE. Geranium is also used as a common name for PELARGONIUM.Centaurea: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain 5-methyl-8-hydroxycoumarin. The common name of centaury is more often used for CENTAURIUMEutrophication: The enrichment of a terrestrial or aquatic ECOSYSTEM by the addition of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, that results in a superabundant growth of plants, ALGAE, or other primary producers. It can be a natural process or result from human activity such as agriculture runoff or sewage pollution. In aquatic ecosystems, an increase in the algae population is termed an algal bloom.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Pheromones: Chemical substances, excreted by an organism into the environment, that elicit behavioral or physiological responses from other organisms of the same species. Perception of these chemical signals may be olfactory or by contact.Lettuce: Any of the various plants of the genus Lactuca, especially L. sativa, cultivated for its edible leaves. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Rhizome: Root-like underground horizontal stem of plants that produces shoots above and roots below. Distinguished from true roots which don't have buds and nodes. Similar to true roots in being underground and thickened by storage deposits.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)EncyclopediasLarrea: A plant genus of the family ZYGOPHYLLACEAE. It is sometimes called chaparral but that is a generic word which is used with a number of other plants. Members contain NORDIHYDROGUAIARETIC ACID.Creosote: A greasy substance with a smoky odor and burned taste created by high temperature treatment of BEECH and other WOOD; COAL TAR; or resin of the CREOSOTE BUSH. It contains CRESOLS and POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS which are CARCINOGENS. It has been widely used as wood preservative and in PESTICIDES and had former use medicinally in DISINFECTANTS; LAXATIVES; and DERMATOLOGIC AGENTS.Frankia: Genus of BACTERIA in the family Frankiaceae. They are nitrogen-fixing root-nodule symbionts of many species of woody dicotyledonous plants.Artemisia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE with strong-smelling foliage. It is a source of SANTONIN and other cytotoxic TERPENES.Artemisia absinthium: A plant species of the genus ARTEMISIA, family ASTERACEAE that has been used in ABSINTHE. The oil contains neurotoxic 1-thujone and d-isothujone.Absinthe: An extract of absinthium and other bitter herbs, containing 60% alcohol. Prolonged ingestion causes nervousness, convulsions, trismus, amblyopia, optic neuritis, and mental deterioration. (Dorland, 27th ed)Artemisia annua: A plant species of the genus ARTEMISIA, family ASTERACEAE. It is the source of the antimalarial artemisinin (ANTIMALARIALS).IdahoNevadaSimarouba: A plant genus of the family SIMAROUBACEAE. Members produce quassinoids.Lolium: Common member of the Gramineae family used as cattle FODDER. It harbors several fungi and other parasites toxic to livestock and people and produces allergenic compounds, especially in its pollen. The most commonly seen varieties are L. perenne, L. multiflorum, and L. rigidum.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Herbicide Resistance: Diminished or failed response of PLANTS to HERBICIDES.Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Brassica rapa: A plant species cultivated for the seed used as animal feed and as a source of canola cooking oil.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.Weed Control: The prevention of growth and or spread of unwanted plants.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Sorbus: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Juglans: A plant genus of the family JUGLANDACEAE that provides the familiar walnut.Carya: A plant genus of the family JUGLANDACEAE that bears edible nuts.Juglandaceae: The walnut plant family of the order Juglandales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mainly temperate zone trees.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.

Allelopathy as an emergent, exploitable public good in the bloom-forming microalga Prymnesium parvum. (1/4)

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Gas exchange, growth, and defense responses of invasive Alliaria petiolata (Brassicaceae) and native Geum vernum (Rosaceae) to elevated atmospheric CO2 and warm spring temperatures. (2/4)

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Biodegradation of the allelopathic chemical m-tyrosine by Bacillus aquimaris SSC5 involves the homogentisate central pathway. (3/4)

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Allelopathic effects of litter Axonopus compressus against two weedy species and its persistence in soil. (4/4)

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Specialized metabolites in plants influence their interactions with other species, including herbivorous insects, which may adapt to tolerate defensive phytochemicals. The chemical arsenal of Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard, Brassicaceae) includes the glucosinolate sinigrin and alliarinoside, a hydroxynitrile glucoside with defensive properties to glucosinolate-adapted specialists. To further our understanding of the chemical ecology of A. petiolata, which is spreading invasively in North America, we investigated the metabolite profile and here report a novel natural product, petiolatamide, which is structurally related to sinigrin. In an extensive study of North American populations of A. petiolata, we demonstrate that genetic population differences as well as developmental regulation contribute to variation in the leaf content of petiolatamide, alliarinoside, sinigrin, and a related glycoside. We furthermore demonstrate widely different metabolic fates of these metabolites after ingestion in the
Though most introduced species do not survive, a select few are able to successfully colonize new habitats. Among these few successful invaders is garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), a biennial Eurasian forb that was introduced to the United States by early colonists. By 1886, the herb was found amidst native plant communities in Long Island and today has established notable distribution in thirty-seven U.S. states, five Canadian provinces, and parts of New Zealand. In its non-native range, garlic mustard has been shown to disrupt mycorrhizal associations of surrounding native plants, hindering growth and survival of its competitors through the production of toxic secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, defense proteins, alliarinoside, flavonoid glycosides, glucosinolates, and cyanide. Laboratory studies have suggested that garlic mustard decreases the abundance of entomopathogenic fungi, which serves as a natural control of arthropod populations. However, this pattern was not detected in a 15 site
The term allelopathy from the Greek-derived compounds allelo- and -pathy (meaning "mutual harm" or "suffering"), was first used in 1937 by the Austrian professor Hans Molisch in the book Der Einfluss einer Pflanze auf die andere - Allelopathie (The Effect of Plants on Each Other - Allelopathy) published in German.[3] He used the term to describe biochemical interactions by means of which a plant inhibits the growth of neighbouring plants.[4] In 1971, Whittaker and Feeny published a study in the journal Science, which defined allelochemicals as all chemical interactions among organisms.[3] In 1984, Elroy Leon Rice in his monograph on allelopathy enlarged the definition to include all direct positive or negative effects of a plant on another plant or on micro-organisms by the liberation of biochemicals into the natural environment.[5] Over the next ten years, the term was used by other researchers to describe broader chemical interactions between organisms, and by 1996 the International ...
CVC is a community-based environmental organization originally formed by an Act of provincial government and dedicated to conserving, restoring, developing and managing natural resources on a watershed basis.
A common edible plant (sometimes described as a weed) which can be eaten as cooked greens or as salad leaves. It has a variety of names - sauce-alone, Jack-by-the-hedge and so on - which indicates that it has been well-known to... more
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Known since ancient times, the phenomenon of allelopathy has recently received greater attention from researchers and farmers worldwide. Crop failures and low yields caused by the reseeding,...
Mitreola petiolata, Caribbean Miterwort. NameThatPlant.net currently features 3729 plants and 22,993 images. For many plants, the website displays maps showing physiographic provinces within the Carolinas and Georgia where the plant has been documented.
A natural process in which harmful or beneficial effects are caused by secondary metabolites that spread from a donor organism to a recipient and are produced by plants, algae, bacteria, and fungi. Allelopathy is a key ecological process and has ...
A natural process in which harmful or beneficial effects are caused by secondary metabolites that spread from a donor organism to a recipient and are produced by plants, algae, bacteria, and fungi. Allelopathy is a key ecological process and has ...
Duke, S.O., Baerson, S.R., Pan, Z., Kagan, I., Sanchez-Moreiras, A., Reigosa, M.J., Pedrol-Bonjoch, N., Schulz, M. 2005. Genomic Approaches to Understanding Allelochemical Modes of Action and Defenses Against Allelochemicals. Harper, J.D.I., An, M., Wu, H., Kent, J.H., Editors. Charles Sturts University, Wagga Wagga, Australia. Proceedings of the 4th World Congress on Allelopathy. P. 107-113 ...
Get information, facts, and pictures about Allelopathy at Encyclopedia.com. Make research projects and school reports about Allelopathy easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and dictionary.
International Seed Testing Association (1976). International rules for seed testing. Seed Science Technology 4, 1-180.. Li ST, Zhou JM and Wang HY (2002). Research surveys of allelopathy in plants. Chinese Journal of Eco-Agriculture 10, 68-70.. Montrose I (1845). Fairy rings. Gard. Chron. 5, 722.. Mo MH, Ma HM and Xiao QF (2004). Study of the allelopathic effects of the ethanol-soluble extracts of Lactarius hatsudake on Oryza sativa and Echinoloa crusgall. Acta Ecologica Sinica 24, 2951-2954.. Mao XL (1992). Investigation of mushrooms in Hongkong. Edible Fungi of China 11, 3-5. Peng SL, Wen J and Guo QF (2004). Mechanism and active variety of allelochemicals. Acta Botanic Sinica 46, 757-766.. Rice E L (1984). In Allelopathy. Orlando Florida (Academic Press Inc) (2nd ed), pp.119.. Sturz AV, Christie BR and Matheson BG (1998). Associaciation of bacterial endophyte populations from red clover and potato crops with popential for beneficial allelopathy. Can-j-microbiol 44, 162-167.. Willamson GB ...
OBJECTIVE: Removal of the invasive weed, Garlic Mustard, from Maybury State Park, Northville, MI. HISTORY: Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a member of the mustard family and is native to Europe. The leaves have a pungent garlic smell when crushed, hence its name. It is an invasive species in woodlots of the US and Canada. Garlic Mustard reproduces so prolifically that in a short period of time it will convert a diverse natural habitat into a monoculture consisting only of itself.. Garlic Mustard was brought into this country by the early European settlers. The plant was used for food and medicine in old world households. It is high in vitamins A and C and was very important to the diets of early settlers.. Garlic Mustard invades and replaces the native plant diversity and is not beneficial to wildlife. By out competing our native woodland wildflowers, large areas of Maybury State Park have been infested by this nuisance plant.. ACTION PLAN: There are several methods used to remove and ...
Above: The invasive Eurasian woodland plant Alliaria petiolata, more commonly known as garlic mustard, looking appropriately dramatic. Garlic mustard is most obvious in Northeastern woods around this time of year, when it is in full bloom. Photo by Flickr user Brian Hefele; published under Creative Commons license.Call it Conservation 2.0: Citizen science is getting more and more digitally connected all the time.Take iMapInvasives, an ambitious new project for mapping the spread of invasive species. iMapInvasives combines citizen reports from the field with larger databases maintained by state agencies and nonprofits, allowing backyard nature buffs to make real contributions to public scientific knowlege on invasives.
Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata If you have ventured out walking the woods this week, you may have noticed clusters of small…
Bartolucci, F. & Conti, F. 2013. Taxonomic notes on Geum micropetalum Gasp. and Geum heterocarpum Boiss. (Rosaceae) in Italy. Plant Biosystems 147(3): 806-811. DOI: 10.1080/11263504.2013.829886 Reference page ...
A rock and sand garden favorite, Prairie Smoke is one of the most distinctive and best loved prairie plants with pink feathery pink seedheads. Geum triflorum blooms in spring and spreads slowly by rhizome to form a low growing groundcover on well-drained soil.
An allelopathic organism is one that can produce chemicals that interfere with the growth of other organisms. While allelopathic...
Durante el otoño y la primavera de 1998 y 1999 se realizó un estudio en un predio de secano de la IX Región, para determinar la producción de carne bovina, producción y calidad de la MS, y grado de fijación simbiótica de N de las praderas naturalizadas de trébol subterráneo (Trifolium subterraneum L.) y de serradella amarilla (Ornithopus compressus L.). El diseño experimental usado fue de bloques completos al azar. Las producciones de MS de la pradera de trébol subterráneo fueron de 4.700 kg ha-1 en ambas temporadas y en serradela de 5.900 y 7.100 kg ha-1 para la primera y segunda temporada, respectivamente (P ,= 0,05). La composición química y fijación simbiótica en ambas praderas fueron similares (P , o = 0,05). Durante la primera temporada la ...
Although I had toyed with the idea of placenta encapsulation early on in my pregnancy with Phoebe I decided against it after my 12 week scan showed there were two foetuses in my womb… but only one had a heartbeat. As our lost twin remained visible at the 20 week scan I was advised by my midwife that it would eventually be reabsorbed and flattened from the pressure of the surviving twin to ultimately form part of my placenta (fetus compressus). I struggled with feelings of loss throughout my pregnancy and often felt quite freaked out by the idea of the deceased foetus still being inside me alongside my healthy baby girl. I found it hard to announce my pregnancy as my joy was always tinged with sadness and, in hindsight, I think I worried more about my surviving baby knowing that one baby had not made it ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Quantitative trait loci and molecular markers associated with wheat allelopathy. AU - Wu, Hanwen. AU - Pratley, James. AU - Ma, W. AU - Haig, Terrence. N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Theoretical and Applied Genetics: international journal of plant breeding research. ISSNs: 0040-5752; PY - 2003. Y1 - 2003. N2 - Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been examined for allelopathic potential against annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum). The bioassay technique, equal-compartment-agar-method, was employed to evaluate seedling allelopathy in a doubled-haploid (DH) population derived from cv Sunco (weakly allelopathic) and cv Tasman (strongly allelopathic). A significant difference in allelopathic activity was found among the DH lines, which inhibited the root length of ryegrass across a range from 23.7 to 88.3%. The phenotypic data showed that wheat allelopathic activity was distributed normally within this DH population and a substantial ...
Patrick E. McCullough, Jialin Yu, J. Scott McElroy, S. Chen, H. Zhang, Timothy L. Grey, and Mark A. Czarnota (2016) ALS-Resistant Annual Sedge (Cyperus compressus) Confirmed in Turfgrass. Weed Science: January-March 2016, Vol. 64, No. 1, pp. 33-41.. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors are widely used for POST control of sedges in turfgrass. A suspected resistant (R) biotype of annual sedge was collected from a bermudagrass turf in Georgia with a history of exclusive use of halosulfuron. Research was conducted to evaluate the resistance level of this biotype to halosulfuron, efficacy of ALS-inhibiting herbicides and other mechanisms of action for control, and the molecular and physiological basis for resistance. In greenhouse experiments, the halosulfuron rate required to reduce shoot biomass 50% in comparison with the nontreated at 8 wk after treatment (WAT) were 8 and , 1,120 g ai ha−1 for the S (susceptible) and R biotypes, respectively. Imazapic, sulfosulfuron, and trifloxysulfuron ...
Native: indigenous.. Non-native: introduced (intentionally or unintentionally); has become naturalized.. County documented: documented to exist in the county by evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). State documented: documented to exist in the state, but not documented to a county within the state. Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years).. Note: when native and non-native populations both exist in a county, only native status is shown on the map.. ...
The germination of seeds under field conditions is often influenced by the presence of other plants. This interference arises from allelopathy (Rice, 1984). Allelopathy is an important mechanism of plant mediated by the release of plant produced phytotoxins to the plant environment. Soil sickness problem in crop growing could also be attributed to the allelopathic effects or even the autotoxicity (Singh et al. 2002). The toxicity of allelochemicals released in the environment is the function of their concentration as well as age and metabolic stage of the donor-plant (Rice 1984; Wardle et al. 1993). Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is a perennial plant with succulent corm, belonging to Iridaceae family. Saffron is considered to be the most expensive spice in the world. The flower of saffron is a light purple, with thread-like reddish coloured stigma that is valued both as a spice and as a natural dye. Saffron is a perennial crop with longevity more than 12 years, but farmers have actually understood ...
Buy Allelopathy: A Physiological Process with Ecological Implications (9781402042799): NHBS - Edited By: Manuel J Reigosa, Nuria Pedrol and Luis Gonzalez, Springer-Verlag
  Allelopathy is a process in which secondary metabolites produced by plants, micro-organisms, viruses and fungi control growth and development of other biological systems. Some plants may beneficially or antagonistically affect other plants through allelochemical compounds which may be released directly or indirectly from live or dead parts and cause allelopathic and phytotoxic effects. In Kerman province of Iran, cultivating corn after winter wheat usually causes less growth and yield, hence, this study was conducted to estimate the effects of different concentrations of two native Iranian wheat (Alvand and Falat) straw extracts on germination, radicle growth, coleoptile length, plant height, leaf area (LA), wet weight (WW) and dry weight (DW) of two hybrid corn varieties (single cross 704 and 647). Results showed that the straw extracts had significant negative allelopathic effects on both corn varieties' growth furthermore based on the study results, we suggest that before corn
...PITTSBURGHToo much garlic mustard in your neighborhood forest? Actuall...A research team led by Susan Kalisz professor of evolutionary ecology...The study initiated in 2003 at the Trillium Trail Nature Reserve in F...Garlic mustard ( Alliaria petiolata ) is a plant native to Europe...,Excessive,deer,populations,hurt,native,plant,biodiversity,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Shinhwa Group is shown to be one of South Koreas largest conglomerates and is headed by the strictly arrogant Kang Hee-soo. Her son Gu Jun-pyo (Lee Min-ho) is the leader of F4, the most popular and powerful group of boys at the prestigious Shinhwa High School. Yoon Ji-Hu (Kim Hyun-Joong), So Yi-jung, and Song Woo-bin - Gu Jun-pyos friends and rich heirs in their own right - are all members of the group. When F4 bullies a boy to the verge of suicide, the poor but vivacious Geum Jan-di (Ku Hye-sun) saves his life and receives a swimming scholarship to attend the High School. Geum Jan-dis family runs a dry cleaning business and she lives in a small home with her parents, Geum Il-bong and Na Gong-joo, and her younger brother Geum Kang-san. Immediately, Geum Jan-di dislikes her wealthy classmates and is disgusted by the obsession surrounding the F4 boys. Irked by her strong-headed nature, Gu Jun-pyo singles out Geum Jan-di to bully but she stands up to him and he begins to fall in love with her. ...
You can see the original in this link : or as copied in the images below:. https://docs.neb-one.gc.ca/ll-eng/llisapi.dll/fetch/2000/90464/90552/548311/956726/2392873/2450810/2478758/2522888/Material_Safety_Data_Sheet_-_Diluted_Bitumen_-_A4A9D1.pdf?nodeid=2508614&vernum=-2. ALSO: The following link gives the Occupational and Health Guidelines for Benzene, a Potential Human Carcinogen. https://docs.neb-one.gc.ca/ll-eng/llisapi.dll/fetch/2000/90464/90552/548311/956726/2392873/2450810/2478758/2522888/Occupational_Safety_and_Health_Guideline_for_Benzene_-_A4A9D2.pdf?nodeid=2504533&vernum=-2. Below are copies of the MDS:. ...
...Humans do it chimpanzees do it cuckoos do it cheating to score a fr... There are cheaters out there that we didnt know of said William Dr...Driscoll isolated several strains of the species Prymnesium parvum... When those cheaters are cultured with their toxic counterparts the...,They,hunt,,they,kill,,they,cheat:,Single-celled,algae,shed,light,on,social,lives,of,microbes,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
COSEWIC. 2010. COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Eastern Mountain Avens Geum peckii in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. x + 33 pp.
The term Allelopathy as it applies to the area of reclamation can be defined as Influence of plants upon each other caused by products of metabolism, e.g., creosote bushes produce a toxic substance which inhibits the growth of other plants in the immediate vicinity. ...
Means in a column not sharing a common letter differ significantly by Fishers protected LSD at 5% probability level.. Data revealed that all intercropping treatments significantly reduced total weed dry weight over component sole crop of wheat sown by drill method (Table 1). Of all the intercropping treatments i.e. mixed cropping of wheat + canola appeared relatively more effective with 90% inhibition in total weed dry weight. While, other intercropping treatments like one row of wheat + one row of canola, two rows of wheat + two rows of canola and four rows of wheat + four rows of canola generally suppressed weed dry weight by 90, 85, and 86%, respectively. This weed control in wheat-canola intercropping systems might be due to either their shading effect/interference (allelopathy + competition) or better utilization of available resources than their component sole crops and Wanic et al. (2004) said that some species release allelopathic compounds which limit the occurrence of weeds, while ...
Leucojum aestivum, commonly called summer snowflake, blooms in mid-spring (late April), not in summer. It blooms several weeks after spring snowflake (Leucojum vernum) and usually goes dormant by summer. Dark grassy green leaves to 12" long and 1" wide form an upright, vase-shaped clump of foliage. Typically 2-5 (less frequently to 8) white, nodding, bell-shaped flowers appear at the top of naked hollow flower scapes (to 12-15" tall) in spring. Each flower has three similar looking sepals and petals (tepals) that are spotted at the tip with green ...
At our Laetitia Vineyard, the year was marked by an uncharacteristically dry spring with higher than normal night time temperatures. This resulted in a mid-February bud break-almost 3 weeks earlier when compared to 2012 and 2013. The warmer than usual spring temperatures accelerated shoot growth, bloom, fruit set and veraison. However, this changed during the […]. Read More. ...
The water from the Santissima spring is classified as a bicarbonate-sulphate-lime-alkaline-terrous water. It is used at the Terme di Chianciano spa facility for inhalations and aerosol therapy for adults and children, and for nasal douches. It is a hypothermal water (spring temperature, 24°C). It exerts
According to experts at American Family Childrens Hospital, warm spring temperatures and the end of school combine to send thousands of kids into backyards and onto playgrounds, where theyre breaking their bones at startling rates-on rollerblades, on bikes, playground equipment and trampolines.
In July 1999 when spring temperatures were examined, it was clear to me this season would be one in which BP would be a serious problem. I selected six Braeburn orchards from Tonasket to Pasco and used a treatment to induce BP in an effort to try and predict occurrence out of storage. Fruit were harvested the day of commercial harvest in each orchard and taken to the lab. At the lab, 300 fruit were immediately dipped for 2 minutes in a solution of ethrel (2000 ppm) and magnesium chloride (MgCl2, 1%), allowed to air dry, and held for 0, 2, and 4 weeks at 68 °F (ripening). The remaining 300 apples were untreated, and placed in regular storage at 33 °F for 8, 16, and 24 weeks. At 0, 2, and 4 weeks, fruit held at 68 °F were removed and the BP was assessed both by examining the fruit surface and cutting the fruit into 6 to 8 transverse slices. At 8, 16, and 24 weeks, fruit held at 33 °F was also removed and assessed for BP in the same manner. In this way, we hoped we could determine whether the ...
Tripathi, S.; Prakash, V.: Studies on Zingiberaceae of N.E. India: VI. A new distributional record of Curcuma petiolata Roxb. In: Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany Vol. 22 (no. 2), p. 468-470 (1998), ISSN 0250-9768, CODEN JETBDQ ...
Kawa Abdulkareem Ali, Pakhshan Mustafa Maulood Field Crops Dep., Agricultural College, Salahaddin University, Kurdistan Region, Iraq Biology, College of Science, Salahaddin University, Kurdistan Region, Iraq Key words: Allelopathy, growth parameters. Abstract Allelopathic potential of twelve local varieties of grapevine Vitis vinifera fruits: taefi; zareg-dohuok; Baetmuni; Black-manga; Sarqala-bakrajo; Awelka; Rash-merii; Mala-Hassan; Ashgar-basraha; Kamalii; Toli-mawelian and Shekh-nuraddin…
Geum urbanum is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 0.5 m (1ft 8in). It is hardy to zone (UK) 6 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from June to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Zoanthids, Leathers, allelopathy - 1/22/07 Hey you guys are amazing. ,Thank you for this, Kyle. Is greatly appreciated., My Question is about Zoas. My 30-gallon tank has been running for about 3 years and I just started coral maybe 3 months ago. ,Ok, I just started slowly with 2 small Acro frags and a small colony of green Zoas. ,Acroporids are typically considered among the harder to care for, especially for coral beginners., Everything was thriving the zoas looked amazing. I since purchased 2 more colonies of zoas and some leather. now its been 2 weeks and none of the Zoas will come out. ,Allelopathy from your leathers, too likely. Most leathers are quite noxious. Have a look here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/alcyoniids.htm and the linked files above., They just stay tightened up all day. I have a 15 gallon sump, 250W Metal halide lights, and a run of the mill protein skimmer. My tanks stats are 8.4 PH, 310 cal (I know its low but I have been adding in Kents calcium increaser 3 times a week and ...
Understanding the plankton dynamics can potentially help us take effective measures to settle the critical issue on how to keep plankton ecosystem balance. In this paper, a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton (NPZ) model is formulated to get insight into understanding the mechanism of plankton dynamics. To account for the harmful effect of the phytoplankton allelopathy, a prototype for a non-monotone response function is used to model zooplankton grazing, and nonlinear phytoplankton mortality is also included in the NPZ model. The main purpose of the paper is to analyze the complex dynamics of the NPZ model, particularly focus on understanding how the phytoplankton allelopathy and nonlinear phytoplankton mortality affect the plankton population dynamics. We first examine the existence of multiple equilibria and provide a detailed classification for the equilibria of the NPZ system, then stability and local bifurcation are also studied. Sufficient conditions for Hopf bifurcation, Bogdanov-Takens ...
A surgical apparatus for delivering a conductive fluid to a target site for ablating bodily tissue. The apparatus includes a tube fluidly connected to a source of conductive fluid. The tube defines a proximal portion, a distal portion and a central pathway. The central pathway extends from the proximal portion to the distal portion and is configured to direct flow of conductive fluid to the distal portion. The distal portion is configured for placement at a target site of bodily tissue and forms a helical slot. The helical slot is configured to allow flow of conductive fluid from the central pathway. Following delivery of the conductive fluid, an electrical current is applied to create a virtual electrode for ablating bodily tissue at the target site.
Foggy day and everywhere is far too damp to work outside. So, tunnel working day. Nice easy job, going through the plants in there and removing dead leaves etc. First one I picked up (Geum Abendsonne) had no roots and in the compost, a Vine weevil grub. Now this is not a surprise as they love Geums, but every plant in the tunnel was stood to its neck over night in strong Provado,so in theory that should have killed off any grubs.. So instead of a nice easy job, every plant in there has to be unpotted and checked. There are a lot of plants, for example over 400 baby Auriculas. They too are Vine weevil fodder.. Found grubs in five more Geums, but none in the Auriculas so far. Only a a thousand plants to go.. ...
Not exactly sure the best way to tackle this, but...as far as plants being allelopathic, many early successional, old-field type species grow fast and take up whatever sunlight they can get. Sunflowers probably fall into this group because they grow rather tall in short order. Usually those species do not invest so many resources into chemical competition because they are annuals. Their seeds are dispersed and take hold where ever there is plenty of light. Over time, the old field is taken over by taller, longer lived species which by the nature of their longer lifespan they have to be better competitors to keep their foothold. The competition can take multiple forms (growing very slowly in the understory and shooting up when a gap develops is one) including allelopathy. On the other hand, some plants have evolved to share resources with others of their own species and also with fungi. Its a crazy world and Mother Nature is always encouraging different strategies ...
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Geum quellyon Sweet, a perennial herb of the Rosaceae family, has been used in the traditional medicine of the Mapuche Amerindians of Chile to treat tooth neuralgia, gastric inflammation, prostatitis and to regulate menstruation, and for its diuretic and aphrodisiac properties. Although many benefits have been claimed for this plant, few scientific studies are available in the literature. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant activity of a methanolic extract of Geum quellyon roots. We also examined the anticancer action of this plant on Caco-2 (colon adenocarcinoma cells), DU-145 (androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells) human tumor cell lines. Our data showed that Geum quellyon extract, containing tannins, exhibits interesting antioxidant properties, expressed by its capacity to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and superoxide anion (O 2-), to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity, to chelate metals, and to protect plasmid DNA ...
Allelopathy via catechin[edit]. The roots of C. maculosa exude (-)-catechin.[12] This acts as an herbicide to inhibit ...
Elroy L. Rice (2013). Allelopathy. Academic Press. ISBN 1483267849. List of Penicillium species MycoBank Straininfo of ...
Lawrey, James D. (1994). "Lichen Allelopathy: A Review". In Inderjit; K. M. M. Dakshini; Frank A. Einhellig. Allelopathy. ...
I. Effects of genotypes, organs and biomass partitioning". Allelopathy Journal. 23 (1): 95-109. CS1 maint: Multiple names: ...
2004). Agriculture portal Agroecology Allelopathy Biological control Green manure Nitrogen cycle Nitrogen fixation Organic ... Allelopathy Journal. 8: 133-146. New Farm, The. Plans for no-till cover crop roller free for the downloading. [7] Patrick, W. H ... certain cover crops are known to suppress weeds through allelopathy (Creamer et al. 1996, Singh et al. 2003). This occurs when ...
In The Science of Allelopathy. Eds. A R Putnam and C S Tang. pp 171-188. John Wiley & Sons, New York "Allelopathy in black ... 15: 4. Willis, Rick J. (2007-10-12). The History of Allelopathy. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 9781402040931. Miller ... Soderquist, Charles J. (1973). "Juglone and allelopathy". Journal of Chemical Education. 50 (11): 782-3. Bibcode:1973JChEd..50 ...
Allelopathy Kochia scoparia. Archived January 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. USFS Fire Effects Information System. Bassia ...
Kohli, R.K. (2001). Allelopathy in agroecosystems. Journal of Crop Production 4(2), 208.. ...
Allelopathy is very difficult to observe in the field (with the exception of harmful algal blooms) because phycotoxin ... Allelopathy Antipredator adaptation Chemical defenses Chemical ecology Fish kill Harmful algal blooms Phytotoxin Plankton Plant ... Fistarol, GA; C Legrand; E Selander; C Hummert; W Stolte; E Graneli (2004). "Allelopathy in Alexandrium spp.: effect on a ... "Allelopathy in phytoplankton - biochemical, ecological and evolutionary aspects." Phycologia 42 (2003): 406-419. ROSEMEB: The ...
Willis, Rick (2007). The History of Allelopathy. p. 113. Quattrocchi, Umberto. CRC world dictionary of plant names. CRC Press. ... Burton made what is now recognised as one of the earliest recorded observations on soil allelopathy: "where different species ...
L.II.http://faculty.ucr.edu/~legneref/biotact/ch-66.htm] Willis, Rick J. (2007). The History of Allelopathy. Springer. p. 8. ...
Hoagland, Robert E.; Toxicity of tomatine and tomatidine on weeds, crops and phytopathogenetic fungi.; Allelopathy J 23.2, 2009 ...
Allelopathy Journal 20:2. Toji, T., et al. (2007). Antibacterial activity of Dicranopteris linearis under in vitro conditions. ...
"Allelopathy Journal 36.1 (2015).}} Elmerich, Claudine; Newton, William Edward (2007). Associative and endophytic nitrogen- ...
"Fourth World Congress on Allelopathy". The Regional Institute Ltd. Retrieved 18 July 2015. "Callistemon citrinus". Plants for a ...
Experimental approaches to test allelopathy: A case study using the invader Sapium sebiferum. Allelopathy Journal 22:1-13. Horn ...
Allelopathy in Ecological Agriculture and Forestry. Springer. pp. 101-11. doi:10.1007/978-94-011-4173-4_7. ISBN 978-94-010-5817 ... Fourth World Congress on Allelopathy. The Regional Institute Ltd. Knudsen CG, Lee DL, Michaely WJ, Chin HL, Nguyen NH, Rusay RJ ...
Hierro, J.L.; R.M. Callaway (2003). "Allelopathy and exotic plant invasion". Plant and Soil. 256 (1): 29-39. doi:10.1023/A: ...
AllelopathyEdit. The brilliant red autumn color of some species of maple is created by processes separate from those in ...
AllelopathyEdit. Black walnut is allelopathic, as it excretes chemicals into its environment that harm competition. While many ...
"Premiere: Laurel's 'Allelopathy' Mixtape Is Otherworldly'". Complex Magazine. Retrieved 2 April 2015. "Laurel on iTunes". ...
"Allelochemicals in plants." Allelopathy in Sustainable Agriculture and Forestry. Springer New York, 2008. 63-104. Mappes, ...
This is known as positive allelopathy. Hydrological factors, such as pH levels, the conductivity of the water, dissolved gases ...
Allelopathy usually results in uniform distributions, and its potential to suppress weeds is being researched. Farming and ... Allelopathy can have beneficial, harmful, or neutral effects on surrounding organisms. Some allelochemicals even have selective ... This is an example of allelopathy, which is the release of chemicals from plant parts by leaching, root exudation, ... ISBN 0-7637-5345-9. Fergusen, J.J; Rathinasabapathi, B (2003). "Allelopathy: How Plants Suppress Other Plants". Retrieved 2009- ...
... certain cover crops are known to suppress weeds through allelopathy.[25][26] This occurs when certain biochemical cover crop ...
Allelopathy is a very realistic method to control weed spread. There has been increasing interest in research on plant ... In the light of the above, allelopathy seems to be the most practical method of weed control as it fulfils the criteria of eco- ... Uludag, A.; Uremis, I.; Arslan, M.; Gozcu, D. Allelopathy studies in weed science in Turkey-a review. J. Plant Dis. Prot. 2006 ... Chon, S.-U.; Nelson, C. Allelopathy in Compositae plants. A review. Agron. Sustain. Dev. 2010, 30, 349-358. [Google Scholar] [ ...
The word allelopathy derives from two separate words. They are allelon which means of each other, and pathos which means to ... This unit on Allelopathy is inquiry based. The labs and field trips are hands-on and all of the activities require constant ... The best way to study allelopathy is to find signs of it occurring in nature. It is impossible to see the toxins at work, but ... What are some beneficial implications of allelopathy? How can these be used for the betterment of the planet?. ...
Black walnut allelopathy: current state of the science. In: Chemical Ecology of Plants: Allelopathy in aquatic and terrestrial ... Stress and allelopathy. In: Allelopathy, from Molecules to Ecosystems, M.J. Reigosa and N. Pedrol, Eds. Science Publishers, ... Varietal improvement in rice allelopathy. Allelopathy Journal, 22: 379-384. *^ Cornes, D. 2005. Callisto: a very successful ... Many invasive plant species interfere with native plants through allelopathy.[19][20] A famous case of purported allelopathy is ...
general description about the allelopathy and allelochemistry with respect to agroforestry. Also, includes methods to study the ... 2nd AFRICA - INTERNATIONAL ALLELOPATHY CONGRESS Topics 1. Allelopathy in sustainable and organic agriculture 2. Allelopathy in ... Allelopathy * 1. Presented by Gajendra C.V * 2. Allelopathy - Meaning and definition • Coined by Hans molisch (1937), In Greek ... Molecular biology and genetics of allelopathy 6. Physiology and biochemistry of allelopathy 7. Allelopathy mechanisms and ...
Allelopathy as expressed by Helianthus annuus and its role in old-field succession. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 95: 432-448.CrossRef ... Allelopathy in the first stages of secondary succession on the piedmont of New Jersey. Am. J. Bot. 63: 1015-1023.CrossRefGoogle ... Allelopathy as a factor in ecological process. Vegetatio 18: 348-357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Allelopathy among some British grassland species. J. Ecol. 63: 727-737.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
... LOGAND logand at msdos.montpellier.inra.fr Fri Jul 29 07:07:10 EST 1994 *Previous message: Morus ...
Weed Warfare: Investigating Allelopathy: Year IV main content.. Weed Warfare: Investigating Allelopathy: Year IV Part of the ... My work with allelopathy began in 2010. In my sixth and seventh grade years, I investigated the effect of Lantana camara on ... Weed Warfare: Investigating Allelopathy: Year IV Part of the Young Naturalist Awards Curriculum Collection ... Bezuidenhout, S.R. "Allelopathy as a Possible Cause for Crop Yield Reductions." Department of Agriculture and Environmental ...
Make research projects and school reports about Allelopathy easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... The Science of Allelopathy. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1986.. Rice, Elroy L. Allelopathy, 2nd ed. Orlando, FL: Academic Press ... Allelopathy. Allelopathy describes those situations and events where chemicals produced by higher plants, algae, fungi, or ... Allelopathy: Organisms, Processes, and Applications. Washington, DC: American Chemical Society, 1995.. Putnam, Alan R., and ...
Activity and allelopathy of soil of flavone O-glycosides from rice. J. Agric. Food Chem. 55:6007-6012.PubMedCrossRefGoogle ... Allelopathy and its role in agriculture. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 11:43-56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Utilization of allelopathy for weed management in agroecosystems. Agron. J. 88:860-866.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Potential of allelopathy and allelochemicals for weed management, pp. 209-256, in H. P. Singh, D. R. Batish, and R. K. Kohli ( ...
TeachMeFinance.com - explain Allelopathy. Allelopathy The term Allelopathy as it applies to the area of reclamation can be ...
We investigate coral-macroalgal phase shift in presence of macroalgal allelopathy and microbial infection on corals by means of ... Macroalgal allelopathy in the emergence of coral diseases. Joydeb Bhattacharyya 1, and Samares Pal 1,, ... Macroalgal allelopathy in the emergence of coral diseases. Discrete & Continuous Dynamical Systems - B, 2017, 22 (3) : 741-762 ... R. M. Bonaldo and M. E. Hay, Seaweed-coral interactions: Variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential ...
Allelopathy and the Science of Companion Planting. By E. Vinje. How ryegrass and other allelopathic plants can cut weeds and ... But science is beginning to take a serious look at one form of companion planting known as allelopathy. Scientists have ... But resistance to the possibilities of allelopathy has mostly waned (though we can imagine that some of the larger herbicide ...
Artemisia, allelopathy, tannins.. September 16, 2016 - 09:02 -- Pierre Lutgen. Allelopathy related to Artemisia plants has ... Allelopathy can also be used as environmentally friendly method for weed control. The herbibicidal and fungicidal effect of ... The results showed that the aqueous extract of the stems and leaves of Artemisia annua, had the strongest allelopathy on test ... 2005, 25,, 1025-1028). By means of bioassay in laboratory and field, a Chinese team studied the allelopathy of 18 kinds of ...
Japans largest platform for academic e-journals: J-STAGE is a full text database for reviewed academic papers published by Japanese societies
Allelopathy: Working those bad neighbors. By Lynette L.Walther , Dec 01, 2017 ... It is called allelopathy. But after a closer look at this botanical reaction, we realize we can use this interaction to benefit ... The site goes on to list some allelopathy examples, such as black walnut, which is notorious for its allelopathic effects on ... The more we understand interactions like allelopathy, the better we can garden. That means we can garden smarter, not harder. ...
... allelopathy) in a natural system in its entirety? Despite a large amount of existing literature on allelopathy, why are ... ecologists still skeptical about the existence of allelopathy in nature? (3) Why are there only scarce data on aquatic ... why are ecologists still skeptical about the existence of allelopathy in nature? (3) Why are there only scarce data on aquatic ... by allelochemicals (i.e., allelopathy) in a natural system in its entirety? Despite a large amount of existing literature on ...
Importance of Allelopathy as Peudo-Mixotrophy for the Dynamics and Diversity of Phytoplankton , IntechOpen, Published on: 2015- ... Importance of Allelopathy as Peudo-Mixotrophy for the Dynamics and Diversity of Phytoplankton. By Roy Shovonlal DOI: 10.5772/ ...
Our results suggest that nonallelopathic traits may be sufficient to explain fescue invasion, with allelopathy likely emerging ... 2011) Field-based effects of allelopathy in invaded tallgrass prairie. Botany 89(4): 227-234. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/b11-009 ...
... *Monica ... Allelopathy potential of Aesculus hippocastanum extracts assessed by phytobiological test method using Zea mays. Environmental ... Allelopathy is accomplished through chemical inhibition of species towards each other, being an antagonistic phenomenon. ...
Allelopathy in Agroecosystems offers fresh hope. It provides an in-depth understanding of allelopathy-the mysterious, complex ... Allelopathy in Agroecosystems explains how these interactions can make soil sick, especially in intensively cropped areas. ... Allelopathy in Agroecosystems offers an abundance of scientific data on this revolutionary new concept. It offers incalculable ... research presented here will help you understand the complexities of this invisible yet potent force in agriculture.Allelopathy ...
Allelopathy. Last Updated on Thu, 26 Oct 2017 , Weed Management Increasing attention has been given to the role and potential ... In the case of crop-weed interactions, absolute evidence of the occurrence of allelopathy in the field is difficult to obtain, ... Incorporating allelopathy into natural and agricultural management systems may reduce the use of herbicides, fungicides, ... It is therefore questionable whether allelopathy management per se would ever represent a consistently effective weed ...
Sat, 05 Aug 2017 , Allelopathy Chemistry Several SM have been used by mankind for thousands of years22,27 as dyes (e.g., indigo ... Fri, 27 Jan 2017 , Allelopathy Chemistry We have 32.5 billion acres of land in the world. Only 24 or 8 billion acres is ... Sun, 09 Jul 2017 , Allelopathy Chemistry Earlier, we analyzed oat roots after BOA incubation of seedlings for at least 24 h and ... Thu, 21 Jan 2016 , Allelopathy Chemistry In addition to toxic and repellent properties, lupin alkaloids have a number of ...
Allelopathy via catechin[edit]. The roots of C. maculosa exude (-)-catechin.[12] This acts as an herbicide to inhibit ...
The Second European Allelopathy Symposium, "Allelopathy from understanding to application", was held June 3-5, 2004 in Pulawy, ... Abstracts have been published in the Proceedings of the Second European Allelopathy Symposium, "Allelopathy from understanding ... Session 3. Allelopathy in natural and agro-systems. Narwal S. S. (India): Allelopathic weed suppression of Brassica accessions ... Fujii Y. (Japan): Allelopathy of invader plants and isolation of allelochemicals. Mac as F. A. (Spain): Lipinskis rule of five ...
The term allelopathy is not part of the dictionary prepared by the Royal Spanish Academy (RAE). Its use, however, is frequent ... Allelopathy can be negative (when the consequences it generates are harmful to the receptor) or positive (if its effects bring ... Knowing how allelopathy works can therefore help preserve crops. Due to the allelopathic characteristics of each species, ... Among the many advantages attributed to the use of allelopathy is the fact that it can help to understand how even allelopathic ...
  • In 1984, Elroy Leon Rice in his monograph on allelopathy enlarged the definition to include all direct positive or negative effects of a plant on another plant or on micro-organisms by the liberation of biochemicals into the natural environment . (wikipedia.org)
  • I had learned about allelopathy, a sort of natural herbicide that plants produce. (amnh.org)
  • But resistance to the possibilities of allelopathy has mostly waned (though we can imagine that some of the larger herbicide companies might still be resistant) as more studies are conducted. (planetnatural.com)
  • Among the many advantages attributed to the use of allelopathy is the fact that it can help to understand how even allelopathic agents can lead to herbicide function. (sportingology.com)
  • Professor Pratley took up an academic position at Wagga Wagga Agricultural College (now Charles Sturt University) in 1972 and since then has taught courses in agronomy and related areas and has published widely in conservation farming, weed management, herbicide resistance and allelopathy. (edu.au)
  • Increasing attention has been given to the role and potential of allelopathy as a management strategy for crop protection against weeds and other pests. (medicinalplantsarchive.us)
  • The earliest recorded observations of weed and crop allelopathy were made by none other than Theophrastus (300 BC) and Pliny II (1 AD). (regional.org.au)
  • Genetic variation and 'proxy' traits involved in both crop competition as well as allelopathy have been reported. (edu.au)
  • 1999). Recently, crop allelopathy research also includes identification of the responsible chemicals for the observed weed suppression (Rimando et al. (regional.org.au)
  • Crop allelopathy: Enhancement through biotechnology (B.E. Scheffler et al. ). (elsevier.com)
  • Unlike competition for a resource, the central principle in allelopathy arises from the fact that plants and microorganisms collectively produce thousands of chemicals, and many of these chemicals are released from the producing organism by leaching, exudation , volatilization , or decomposition processes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • While the word "allelopathy" was first used in the 1930s, the phenomenon that it describes was suggested by natural philosophers more than two thousand years ago as they observed that some plants did not grow well near other kinds of plants. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Allelopathy related to Artemisia plants has already been described 100 years ago (Bode, H. R. 1939. (malariaworld.org)
  • More recent papers suggest that the allelopathy of Artemisia plants might be related to tannins. (malariaworld.org)
  • By means of bioassay in laboratory and field, a Chinese team studied the allelopathy of 18 kinds of plants in Gansu Province on the seedlings of wheat, cucumber and radish. (malariaworld.org)
  • The results showed that the aqueous extract of the stems and leaves of Artemisia annua, had the strongest allelopathy on test receptor plants. (malariaworld.org)
  • The reason is allelopathy, plant chemicals that inhibit the growth of other plants. (villagesoup.com)
  • According to the Gardening Solutions website of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida, "Allelopathy is the word that describes the chemical methods one plant uses to benefit or harm other plants growing in the area. (villagesoup.com)
  • The site goes on to list some allelopathy examples, such as black walnut, which is notorious for its allelopathic effects on the plants around it. (villagesoup.com)
  • The links between plants are usually regulated through allelopathy. (sportingology.com)
  • These results suggest that allelopathy increases the nutrient availability in the soil because of the decrease in absorption by plants. (qxmd.com)
  • Allelopathy is the term used when a plant releases a toxin to suppress the growth of nearby plants. (sciencelearn.org.nz)
  • Which Plants can Resist Walnut Tree Allelopathy? (education.com)
  • When plants release chemicals that harm or suppress other plants, it's called allelopathy, which is a term for complex and subtle chemical warfare between plants. (inforum.com)
  • Allelopathy is a biological phenomenon by which an organism produces one or more biochemicals that influence the germination, growth, survival, and reproduction of other organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allelopathy: Organisms, Processes, and Applications. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Allelopathy is also found in other organisms (e.g., antibiotics may be produced by fungi to inhibit competing bacteria, when the term 'antibiosis' may be used). (encyclopedia.com)
  • We investigate coral-macroalgal phase shift in presence of macroalgal allelopathy and microbial infection on corals by means of an eco-epidemiological model under the assumption that the transmission of infection is mediated by the pathogens shed by infectious corals and under the influence of macroalgae in the environment. (aimsciences.org)
  • Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite (SSRs) markers identified two major QTLs on chromosome 2B associated with wheat allelopathy. (edu.au)
  • allelopathy The release into the environment by an organism of a chemical substance that acts as a germination or growth inhibitor to another organism. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The 78 scientists from 11 European countries and from Australia, Canada, Mexico, Japan and the USA who attended the meeting discussed the latest achievements and new directions in allelopathy research. (pulawy.pl)
  • Since the allelopathy is a new field of science, hence, there is less awareness among the Agricultural scientists about the scope of allelopathy in Agricultural and Biosciences. (allelopathyjournal.org)
  • Likewise it is also true for Agricultural scientists, who do not know the fundamentals of Allelopathy. (allelopathyjournal.org)
  • Allelopathy is not universally accepted among ecologists . (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite a large amount of existing literature on allelopathy, why are ecologists still skeptical about the existence of allelopathy in nature? (foyles.co.uk)
  • The authors from Botany/Biosciences/ Life Sciences etc are not aware about the Applied Aspects of Allelopathy in Agricultural sciences, thus, they are unable to plan studies on the applied aspects. (allelopathyjournal.org)
  • Incorporating allelopathy into natural and agricultural management systems may reduce the use of herbicides, fungicides, nematicides, and insecticides, cause less pollution and diminish autotoxicity hazards. (medicinalplantsarchive.us)