A plant family of the subclass ALISMATIDAE, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons) of aquatic plants. The flower parts are in threes with 3 green sepals and 3 white or yellow petals.
A plant genus of the family ALISMATACEAE that grows in salty marshes and is used for phytoremediation of oil spills. The unisexual flowers have 3 sepals and 3 petals. Members contain trifoliones (DITERPENES).
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The reproductive organs of plants.
A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A species of ascomycetous fungi of the family Sordariaceae, order SORDARIALES, much used in biochemical, genetic, and physiologic studies.
The segregation and degradation of damaged or unwanted cytoplasmic constituents by autophagic vacuoles (cytolysosomes) composed of LYSOSOMES containing cellular components in the process of digestion; it plays an important role in BIOLOGICAL METAMORPHOSIS of amphibians, in the removal of bone by osteoclasts, and in the degradation of normal cell components in nutritional deficiency states.
A mosquito-borne encephalitis caused by the Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE) occurring throughout Eastern Asia and Australia. The majority of infections occur in children and are subclinical or have features limited to transient fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges may occur and lead to transient or permanent neurologic deficits (including a POLIOMYELITIS-like presentation); SEIZURES; COMA; and death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p751; Lancet 1998 Apr 11;351(9109):1094-7)
Gymnosperms are a group of vascular plants whose seeds are not enclosed by a ripened ovary (fruit), in contrast to ANGIOSPERMS whose seeds are surrounded by an ovary wall. The seeds of many gymnosperms (literally, "naked seed") are borne in cones and are not visible. Taxonomists now recognize four distinct divisions of extant gymnospermous plants (CONIFEROPHYTA; CYCADOPHYTA; GINKGOPHYTA; and GNETOPHYTA).
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.

Essential oil from two populations of Echinodorus grandiflorus Micheli. (1/9)

Analysis by Gas Chromatography and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry of the essential oils obtained from leaves of Echinodorus grandiflorus ("Chapeu de couro") from two different populations (Big Leaves and Small Leaves), collected monthly between September 1998 and December 1999 revealed 17 components. Phytol was the major constituent for both populations. The main sesquiterpene representatives are (E)-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene and (E)-nerolidol.  (+info)

Stability and structure studies on alisol a 24-acetate. (2/9)

Alisol A 24-acetate is one of the main active triterpenoid compounds isolated from Rhizoma Alismatis, which is a famous Traditional Chinese Medicine, and has been determined for the quality control of this crude drug. In this study, alisol A 24-acetate was found to be unstable in solvents and its stability in different solvents was investigated in detail. The results showed that alisol A 24-acetate and 23-acetate inter-transformed in solvents and the transformation rate was more rapid in protic solvents than in aprotic solvents. Moreover, both alisol A 24-acetate and 23-acetate were deacetylated to yield alisol A when kept in methanol for a long time. This is the first report on the structural transformation between alisol A 24-acetate, alisol A 23-acetate and alisol A. In addition, the single crystal X-ray structure of alisol A 24-acetate and the NMR data of alisol A 23-acetate were also reported for the first time.  (+info)

Doassansiopsis caldesiae sp. nov. and Doassansiopsis tomasii: two remarkable smut fungi from Cameroon. (3/9)

Three recent collections of Doassansiopsis from western Cameroon are assessed taxonomically. Doassansiopsis caldesiae M. Piatek & Vanky is described as a new species from infected leaves of Caldesia reniformis (D. Don) Makino. Its diagnostic characters are flat, nonthickened sori with spore balls as blackish, slightly elevated dots, more or less globoid spores, conspicuous cortical sterile cells and parasitism on Caldesia reniformis of family Alismataceae. The species is compared to another Doassansiopsis species on host plants belonging to family Alismataceae. Doassansiopsis tomasii Vanky is described from two localities on Nymphaea nouchali Burm.f. var. caerulea (Savigny) Verdc. (Nymphaeaceae), which represents the first report of this smut from Cameroon and western Africa. Similarities between this species and Doassansiopsis nymphaeae (Syd. & P. Syd.) Thirum. and D. ticonis M. Piepenbr. are outlined and the global distribution of the three taxa is mapped. The species concept in the genus Doassansiopsis is discussed, and a key to all known species of the genus is provided.  (+info)

Field effectiveness of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) against Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Linnaeus) in ornamental ceramic containers with common aquatic plants. (4/9)

This study was undertaken to determine the impact of larvaciding using a Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis) formulation (VectoBac WG) against Aedes aegypti larvae in earthen jars containing aquatic plants. Aquatic plants commonly used for landscaping, Pistia stratiotes (L.) (Liliopsida: Araceae) and Sagittaria sp. (Liliopsida: Alismataceae) were placed inside earthen jars filled with 50 L tap water. All earthen jars were treated with Bti formulation at 8g/1000L. Untreated jars with and without aquatic plants were also set up as controls. Fifty laboratory-bred 2nd instar larvae were introduced into each earthen jar. All earthen jars were observed daily. Number of adults emerged was recorded and the larval mortality was calculated. The indicators of effectiveness of Bti for these studies were (i) residual activities of Bti, and (ii) larval mortality in earthen jars with or without aquatic plants. The treated earthen jars containing P. stratiotes and Sagittaria sp. showed significant residual larvicidal effect up to 7 weeks, in comparison to untreated control (p < 0.05). The larval mortality ranged from 77.34% - 100% for jars with aquatic plants vs 80.66% - 100% for jars without aquatic plant. Earthen jars treated with Bti without aquatic plants also exhibited significantly longer residual larvicidal activity of up to 10 weeks (p < 0.05). The larval mortality ranged from 12.66% - 100% for jars with aquatic plants vs 59.34% - 100% for jars without aquatic plant. Thus, earthen jars without aquatic plants exhibited longer residual larvicidal effect compared to those with aquatic plants. This study suggested that containers with aquatic plants for landscaping should be treated more frequently with Bti in view of the shortened residual activity.  (+info)

Reproductive toxicity of Echinodorus grandiflorus in pregnant rats. (5/9)

To evaluate the possible toxicity of the aqueous extract of Echinodorus grandiflorus in pregnant rats, animals were distributed in groups treated with 250, 500 and 1,000 mg/kg/day, by gavage, and a control group received saline solution. The treatment was carried out for 15 consecutive days, remaining during mating and until the 14(th) day of gestation. On the 15(th )day, pregnant animals were euthanized by exsanguination under anesthesia. A blood sample was destined to the hematological and biochemical analysis. The ovaries, liver, kidneys, spleen, and adrenal glands were removed and weighed. Liver, kidneys and spleen were processed for histopathological analysis. The number mated, cohabitated and pregnant rats were counted as well as the corpora lutea, implants, resorptions, and live and dead fetuses. Fetus body weight and placenta were measured. Treatment with 1,000 mg of extract caused anemia, leukocytosis, and an increase in AST and in cholesterol. The liver of animals treated with the two higher doses exhibited discrete inflammatory reaction, located mainly at the stroma which supports the portal space; in the kidneys of animals of T-500 and T-1000 groups there was an expressive decrease in the capsular space, and focal areas of vasodilatation and congestion, as well as a discrete hyalinization, and in the spleen of T-1000 group the red pulp presented excessive pigmentation suggestive of hemosiderin. There were no alterations in reproductive parameters, in fetus external morphology or in placenta weight. In conclusion, the extract causes maternal toxicity, though it does not alter the reproductive performance.  (+info)

Do mitochondria play a role in remodelling lace plant leaves during programmed cell death? (6/9)

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Structural variations among monocot emergent and amphibious species from lakes of the semi-arid region of Bahia, Brazil. (7/9)

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Seagrasses in tropical Australia, productive and abundant for decades decimated overnight. (8/9)

Seagrass ecosystems provide unique coastal habitats critical to the life cycle of many species. Seagrasses are a major store of organic carbon. While seagrasses are globally threatened and in decline, in Cairns Harbour, Queensland, on the tropical east coast of Australia, they have flourished. We assessed seagrass distribution in Cairns Harbour between 1953 and 2012 from historical aerial photographs, Google map satellite images, existing reports and our own surveys of their distribution. Seasonal seagrass physiology was assessed through gross primary production, respiration and photosynthetic characteristics of three seagrass species, Cymodocea serrulata, Thalassia hemprichii and Zostera muelleri. At the higher water temperatures of summer, respiration rates increased in all three species, as did their maximum rates of photosynthesis. All three seagrasses achieved maximum rates of photosynthesis at low tide and when they were exposed. For nearly six decades there was little change in seagrass distribution in Cairns Harbour. This was most likely because the seagrasses were able to achieve sufficient light for growth during intertidal and low tide periods. With historical data of seagrass distribution and measures of species production and respiration, could seagrass survival in a changing climate be predicted? Based on physiology, our results predicted the continued maintenance of the Cairns Harbour seagrasses, although one species was more susceptible to thermal disturbance. However, in 2011 an unforeseen episodic disturbance - Tropical Cyclone Yasi - and associated floods lead to the complete and catastrophic loss of all the seagrasses in Cairns Harbour.  (+info)

Alismataceae is a family of monocotyledonous plants, also known as the water-plantain or water-flag family. It includes around 170 species of aquatic and semi-aquatic herbaceous plants that are found in freshwater habitats worldwide. The plants typically have long, slender leaves that are often submerged in water, and small flowers that are arranged in spikes or umbels. Some well-known genera in this family include Alisma (water-plantain), Echinodorus ( Amazon sword plant), and Sagittaria (arrowhead).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sagittaria" is not a medical term. It is the genus name of a group of aquatic plants commonly known as arrowheads or sagittarias. These plants are often found in wetlands and are known for their arrow-shaped leaves. If you have any questions about a medical term, I would be happy to help with that instead.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Inflorescence is a term used in the field of botany, which includes the study of plants. However, I understand that you are asking for a medical definition. In the context of medicine, specifically in pathology, inflorescence may refer to the arrangement or growth pattern of lesions or neoplasms (abnormal growths) in a particular area of the body.

To provide a precise medical definition, I would need more context about how the term is being used. Nonetheless, based on the botanical definition, inflorescence refers to the cluster or arrangement of flowers on a stem or branch. It can take various forms, such as spikes, racemes, panicles, umbels, and corymbs, depending on the pattern in which flowers are arranged.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

Medical definitions of water generally describe it as a colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for all forms of life. It is a universal solvent, making it an excellent medium for transporting nutrients and waste products within the body. Water constitutes about 50-70% of an individual's body weight, depending on factors such as age, sex, and muscle mass.

In medical terms, water has several important functions in the human body:

1. Regulation of body temperature through perspiration and respiration.
2. Acting as a lubricant for joints and tissues.
3. Facilitating digestion by helping to break down food particles.
4. Transporting nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the body.
5. Helping to maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes.
6. Assisting in the regulation of various bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart rate.

Dehydration can occur when an individual does not consume enough water or loses too much fluid due to illness, exercise, or other factors. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Angiosperms, also known as flowering plants, are a group of plants that produce seeds enclosed within an ovary. The term "angiosperm" comes from the Greek words "angeion," meaning "case" or "capsule," and "sperma," meaning "seed." This group includes the majority of plant species, with over 300,000 known species.

Angiosperms are characterized by their reproductive structures, which consist of flowers. The flower contains male and female reproductive organs, including stamens (which produce pollen) and carpels (which contain the ovules). After fertilization, the ovule develops into a seed, while the ovary matures into a fruit, which provides protection and nutrition for the developing embryo.

Angiosperms are further divided into two main groups: monocots and eudicots. Monocots have one cotyledon or embryonic leaf, while eudicots have two. Examples of monocots include grasses, lilies, and orchids, while examples of eudicots include roses, sunflowers, and legumes.

Angiosperms are ecologically and economically important, providing food, shelter, and other resources for many organisms, including humans. They have evolved a wide range of adaptations to different environments, from the desert to the ocean floor, making them one of the most diverse and successful groups of plants on Earth.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

"Neurospora crassa" is not a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of biology. It refers to a type of filamentous fungus that belongs to the phylum Ascomycota. This organism is commonly found in the environment and has been widely used as a model system for studying various biological processes, including genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology.

"Neurospora crassa" has a characteristic red pigment that makes it easy to identify, and it reproduces sexually through the formation of specialized structures called ascocarps or "fruiting bodies." The fungus undergoes meiosis inside these structures, resulting in the production of ascospores, which are haploid spores that can germinate and form new individuals.

The genome of "Neurospora crassa" was one of the first fungal genomes to be sequenced, and it has served as an important tool for understanding fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic cells. However, because it is not a medical term, there is no official medical definition for "Neurospora crassa."

Autophagy is a fundamental cellular process that involves the degradation and recycling of damaged or unnecessary cellular components, such as proteins and organelles. The term "autophagy" comes from the Greek words "auto" meaning self and "phagy" meaning eating. It is a natural process that occurs in all types of cells and helps maintain cellular homeostasis by breaking down and recycling these components.

There are several different types of autophagy, including macroautophagy, microautophagy, and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Macroautophagy is the most well-known form and involves the formation of a double-membraned vesicle called an autophagosome, which engulfs the cellular component to be degraded. The autophagosome then fuses with a lysosome, an organelle containing enzymes that break down and recycle the contents of the autophagosome.

Autophagy plays important roles in various cellular processes, including adaptation to starvation, removal of damaged organelles, clearance of protein aggregates, and regulation of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in a number of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases.

Japanese encephalitis is a viral inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Culex mosquitoes, particularly in rural and agricultural areas. The majority of JE cases occur in children under the age of 15. Most people infected with JEV do not develop symptoms, but some may experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, and vomiting. In severe cases, JEV can cause high fever, neck stiffness, seizures, confusion, and coma. There is no specific treatment for Japanese encephalitis, and care is focused on managing symptoms and supporting the patient's overall health. Prevention measures include vaccination and avoiding mosquito bites in endemic areas.

Gymnosperms are a group of seed-producing plants that include conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes. The name "gymnosperm" comes from the Greek words "gymnos," meaning naked, and "sperma," meaning seed. This refers to the fact that the seeds of gymnosperms are not enclosed within an ovary or fruit, but are exposed on the surface of modified leaves called cones or strobili.

Gymnosperms are vascular plants, which means they have specialized tissues for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant. They are also heterosporous, meaning that they produce two types of spores: male microspores and female megaspores. The microspores develop into male gametophytes, which produce sperm cells, while the megaspores develop into female gametophytes, which produce egg cells.

Gymnosperms are an important group of plants that have been around for millions of years. They are adapted to a wide range of environments, from temperate forests to deserts and high mountain ranges. Many gymnosperms are evergreen, with needle-like or scale-like leaves that are able to resist drought and cold temperatures.

Conifers, which include trees such as pines, firs, spruces, and redwoods, are the most diverse and widespread group of gymnosperms. They are characterized by their woody cones and needle-shaped leaves. Cycads are another group of gymnosperms that are found in tropical and subtropical regions. They have large, stiff leaves and produce large seeds that are enclosed in a fleshy covering. Ginkgo is a unique gymnosperm that has been around for over 200 million years. It is a deciduous tree with fan-shaped leaves and large, naked seeds.

Gnetophytes are a small group of gymnosperms that include the ephedra, welwitschia, and gnetum. They have unique features such as vessels in their wood and motile sperm cells, which are not found in other gymnosperms.

Overall, gymnosperms are an important group of plants that have adapted to a wide range of environments and play a crucial role in many ecosystems.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Sky Meadows Nature Guide; accessed 2017-07-05 Neotropical Alismataceae Alismataceae in BoDD - Botanical Dermatology Database ... Media related to Alismataceae at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Alismataceae at Wikispecies (Webarchive template wayback ... Most Alismataceae are robust perennials, but some may be annual or perennial, depending on water conditions - they are normally ... The water-plantains (Alismataceae) are a family of flowering plants, comprising 20 genera (17 extant and 3 fossil) and 119 ...
Alismataceae, Alismataceae genera, Monotypic Alismatales genera, Flora of Africa, Dioecious plants, All stub articles, ... Among genera of the Alismataceae, it can be distinguished by not having a differentiated perianth (in Burnatia the petals are ... Burnatia is a genus in the family Alismataceae. It includes only one currently recognized species, Burnatia enneandra. It is ... "Alismataceae". Flowering Plants · Monocotyledons. pp. 11-18. doi:10.1007/978-3-662-03531-3_4. ISBN 978-3-642-08378-5. photo of ...
Alismataceae) types Lehtonen S and Myllys L. 2008. Cladistic analysis of Echinodorus (Alismataceae): simultaneous analysis of ... The Alismataceae. Flora Neotropica 64: 1-112. Stevens, W. D., C. Ulloa Ulloa, A. Pool & O. M. Montiel. 2001. Flora de Nicaragua ... Alismataceae. 6: 3-8. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. Universidad Nacional Autónoma ... Echinodorus, commonly known as burhead or Amazon sword,[citation needed] is a genus of plants in the family Alismataceae, ...
Alismataceae. 13: 7-20. In R. McVaugh (ed.) Flora Novo-Galiciana. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Hickman, J. C. 1993. ... Alismataceae Sagittaria latifolia Willd. Sp. Pl. iv. 409. Freedman, Robert Louis (1976). "Native North American Food ...
Alismataceae. In: Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica, B.E. Hammel, M.H. Grayum, C. Herrera & N. Zamora (eds.). Monographs in ... Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. ... The Alismataceae. Flora Neotropica 64: 1-112. K. Rataj in Petfish Monthly, December 1976. FishIndex Echinodorus (German text) E ... Echinodorus subalatus is a species of aquatic plants in the Alismataceae. It is native to Cuba, Mexico, Central America, Guyana ...
lappula (Alismataceae)". New Phytologist. 157 (2): 357-364. doi:10.1046/j.1469-8137.2003.00676.x. ISSN 1469-8137. PMID 33873632 ...
Alismataceae, Alismataceae genera, Oligocene plants, Miocene plants, Prehistoric angiosperm genera, All stub articles, ... Caldesia (Alismataceae)". American Journal of Botany. 84 (2): 239-252. doi:10.2307/2446086. JSTOR 2446086. PMID 21712204. v t e ...
Alismataceae, Alismataceae genera, Oligocene plants, Prehistoric angiosperm genera, Monotypic Alismatales genera, All stub ... Caldesia (Alismataceae)". American Journal of Botany. American Journal of Botany, Vol. 84, No. 2. 84 (2): 239-252. doi:10.2307/ ... Alismaticarpum alatum is a fossil species of aquatic plants in the family Alismataceae. It is a form taxon created for winged ...
Alismataceae Vent., nom. cons. Butomaceae Mirb., nom. cons. Hydrocharitaceae Juss., nom. cons. Scheuchzeriaceae F.Rudolphi, nom ...
lancifolia (Alismataceae)". American Journal of Botany. 85 (4): 513-520. doi:10.2307/2446435. JSTOR 2446435. PMID 21684934. ...
IPNI, Alismataceae, Type. POWO, Alismataceae. POWO, Alismataceae, Flora of Tropical East Africa. Christenhusz, Fay & Chase 2017 ...
Alismataceae, Posidoniaceae). However, modern phylogenetic studies demonstrate that Acorus is sister to all other monocots. ...
Alismataceae, Alismataceae genera, Freshwater plants, All stub articles, Alismatales stubs). ... Caldesia (Alismataceae)". American Journal of Botany. American Journal of Botany, Vol. 84, No. 2. 84 (2): 239-252. doi:10.2307/ ...
Alismataceae indet. Monocotyledoneae indet. List of fossiliferous stratigraphic units in Wyoming Paleontology in Wyoming ...
Alismataceae to Orchidaceae. Flora Europea. Vol. 5. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1159-1167. Greene, Stanley W. ( ...
1. Alismataceae to Orchidaceae). In Cullen, James; Knees, Sabina G.; Cubey, H. Suzanne Cubey (eds.). The European Garden Flora ... Volume 5, Alismataceae to Orchidaceae (monocotyledones). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0521201087. ...
... L.". In G. Davidse; M. Sousa Sánchez; A. O. Chater (eds.). Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. Flora Mesoamericana. Vol. 6. ...
Alismataceae to Orchidaceae. Flora Europaea. Vol. 5. Cambridge University Press. pp. 290-323. ISBN 978-0-521-15370-6. BSBI List ...
... is a species of plant in the Alismataceae family. It is native to northern South America (Venezuela, ... The Alismataceae. In: Organization for Flora Neotropica, ed., Flora Neotropica Monographs 64:29-31. "Echinodorus horizontalis ...
1994). The Alismataceae. Flora Neotropica 64: 1-112. (CS1 Spanish-language sources (es), Articles with short description, Short ... Alismataceae) en la Sierra Tarahumara, México". Anales del Instituto de Biología. Serie Botánica (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017- ...
The larvae feed on Hydrocharitaceae (Valisneria sp.), Rosaceae (Synnema sp.), Alismataceae (Echinodorus sp.), Potamogetonaceae ...
Alismataceae order 2. Hydrocharitales family 1. Hydrocharitaceae order 3. Aponogetonales family 1. Aponogetonaceae order 4. ...
Notes on Echinodorus (Alismataceae). Brittonia 38(4): 325-332. Rataj, K. 1978. Alismataceae of Brazil. Acta Amazonica 8(1, supl ... Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Fl. Mesoamer.. Universidad ... Echinodorus grandiflorus is a plant species in the Alismataceae. It is native to Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina, ...
The Alismataceae. Flora Neotropica 64: 1-112. Czerepanov, S. K. 1981. Sosudistye Rasteniia SSSR 509 pages. Nauka, Leningradskoe ...
Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. ...
1. Pteridophyta; Gymnospermae; Angiospermae - Alismataceae to Iridaceae. ISBN 0-521-24859-0. Snijman, D.A. & Victor, J.E. 2004 ...
Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. ...
Alismataceae to Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & AO Chater (eds.) Fl. Mesoamer .. National ...
Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. ...
Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. ...
Sky Meadows Nature Guide; accessed 2017-07-05 Neotropical Alismataceae Alismataceae in BoDD - Botanical Dermatology Database ... Media related to Alismataceae at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Alismataceae at Wikispecies (Webarchive template wayback ... Most Alismataceae are robust perennials, but some may be annual or perennial, depending on water conditions - they are normally ... The water-plantains (Alismataceae) are a family of flowering plants, comprising 20 genera (17 extant and 3 fossil) and 119 ...
Alismataceae. Alstroemeriaceae. Altingiaceae. Amaranthaceae. Amaryllidaceae s.l.. Anacardiaceae. Anemiaceae. Annonaceae. ... Alismataceae.. The Water-Plantain family has around 18 genera and 90 (80 to 120) species.. The mostly perennial herbs grow in ...
Alismataceae). It is used to treat various diseases, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, and urological diseases. ...
Alismataceae. EN. Fiche…. Delphinium ajacis L., 1753. Ranunculaceae. EN. Fiche…. Ephedra distachya subsp. helvetica (C.A.Mey.) ...
Alismataceae. Water Plantain Family. S. Alisma subcordatum. Water Plantain. S. Sagittaria latifolia. Arrowhead. ...
Reni is a well-known cultivar characterized by being easy to grow and amongst the smallest of the red Echinodorus, 15-40 cm tall and a roset from 15-25...
Alismataceae, oligophagous. Alisma lanceolatum, plantago-aquatica; Luronium natans; Sagittaria sagittifolia.. phenology. Larvae ...
Common Waterplantain (Alisma plantago-aquatica) is a monocot weed in the Alismataceae family. In Turkey this weed first evolved ...
Caldesia grandis is a species of monocot in the family Alismataceae (water-plantain family). ...
Subjects: 1809-1884 Alismataceae Botanical index Case, L. B Correspondence Engelmann, George, Letters Sagittaria ...
Systematika krytosymjenjakow po APG III je na kóncu lěta 2009 wuńdźena aktualizacija wot Angiosperm Phylogeny Group najprjedy w lěće 1998 (APG I) namjetana a w lěće 2003 předźěłana (APG II) systematika krytosymjenjakow. Porno předchadnikej, APG II, je so ličba njeplacěrowanych swójbow pomjeńšiła. Město toho je 14 nowych porjadow.[1] ...
Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i-xvi, 1-543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Fl. Mesoamer. Universidad ...
NZFlora Ford & Champion 2020 Alismataceae Ford, K.A.; Champion, P.D. 2020: Alismataceae. In: Wilton, A.D. (ed.) Flora of New ...
Alismataceae. Currently Accepted Name:. Sagittaria platyphylla (Engelm.) J.G. Sm. Herbarium Name Used:. Sagittaria platyphylla ...
কিছু ঘটনা কখনো কখনো গল্পকেও হার মানায়। কথাটি প্রকৃতির ক্ষেত্রে সবচেয়ে বেশি মিলে যায়। উদ্ভিদ ও প্রাণীদের আত্মরক্ষার কৌশলগুলোর প্রতি লক্ষ্য করলে বিস্মিত না হয়ে উপায় নেই। তেমনি উদ্ভিদ ও প্রাণীর জন্য মিথোজীবিতা খুবই গুরুত্বপূর্ণ কেননা কিছু কিছু প্রজাতি তাদের অস্তিত্ব টিকিয়ে রাখার জন্য এই প্রক্রিয়ায় পরস্পরের উপর নির্ভরশীল। এমনি এক পারস্পরিক মঙ্গলজনক সহাবস্থান করে আসছে Acacia ও Pseudomyrmex ...
Family: Alismataceae Determiner: James P. Riser (1/5/19) Collector: Mary Ann Feist, Brenda Molano-Flores, Chris Noll, Ken ...
Rubin is a time-tested Echinodorus cultivar, bred by Hans Barth (Dessau, Germany), known since 1993. This to 60 cm high, undemanding plant is recommendable for large tanks.
Alismataceae Flora of Tropical East Africa 31. Species which refer to this work. Note that the process of capturing references ...
Alismataceae. Determination. Sagittaria latifolia Willdenow. Determination Remarks. [is filed under name] [is Current name]. ...
Create a checklist by selecting either family and genus, distribution or a combination of the two. ...
World flora (Plants of the world flora) : Species_plural
Alismataceae. Municipality. Pisquid River. Country. Canada. Sagittaria latifolia - Sea View Sagittaria latifolia ...
ALISMATACEAE. Sagittaria platyphylla (Engelmann) J.G. Smith. clade: Graminea Group, Platyphylla Complex. Delta Arrowhead. Phen: ...
Alismataceae. Amaranthaceae. Amaryllidaceae. Anacardiaceae. Apidae. Apocynaceae. Aquifoliaceae. Araceae. Araliaceae. Arcidae. ...
ALISMATACEAE. Currently Accepted Name:. Sagittaria calycina Englem. Herbarium Name Used:. Sagittaria calycina Engelmann. ...
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We describe two new species of Symplocos (Symplocaceae) from the early Miocene Brandon Lignite Flora of Vermont, USA. The endocarps of Symplocos laevigata (Lesq.) comb. nov. are most similar in morphology and anatomy to those of the extant species S. tinctoria of southeastern North America and S....
  • Altogether, there are 17 extant genera and two fossil genera assigned to the Alismataceae: Several species, notably in the genus Sagittaria, have edible rhizomes, grown for both human food and animal fodder in southern and eastern Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common Waterplantain ( Alisma plantago-aquatica ) is a monocot weed in the Alismataceae family. (weedscience.org)
  • The water-plantains (Alismataceae) are a family of flowering plants, comprising 20 genera (17 extant and 3 fossil) and 119 species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caldesia grandis is a species of monocot in the family Alismataceae (water-plantain family). (nih.gov)
  • Under the APG III system, the Alismataceae includes three genera formerly members of the Limnocharitaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2009), "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III", Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 161 (2): 105-121, doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x Alismataceae Archived 2009-02-01 at the Wayback Machine in L. Watson and M.J. Dallwitz (1992 onwards). (wikipedia.org)

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