Alien Hand Syndrome: An apraxia characterized by the affected limb having involuntary, autonomous, and purposeful behaviors that are perceived as being controlled by an external force. Often the affected limb interferes with the actions of the normal limb. Symptoms develop from lesions in the CORPUS CALLOSUM or medial frontal cortex, stroke, infarction, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME, corticobasal degeneration).Dyskinesias: Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Tiapamil Hydrochloride: A phenylethylamine derivative that acts as a calcium antagonist showing hemodynamic effects in patients with acute myocardial infarction.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Dysarthria: Disorders of speech articulation caused by imperfect coordination of pharynx, larynx, tongue, or face muscles. This may result from CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; CEREBELLAR DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; BRAIN STEM diseases; or diseases of the corticobulbar tracts (see PYRAMIDAL TRACTS). The cortical language centers are intact in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p489)Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Lightning Injuries: Accidental injuries caused by brief high-voltage electrical discharges during thunderstorms. Cardiopulmonary arrest, coma and other neurologic symptoms, myocardial necrosis, and dermal burns are common. Prompt treatment of the acute sequelae, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is indicated for survival.Lightning: An abrupt high-current electric discharge that occurs in the ATMOSPHERE and that has a path length ranging from hundreds of feet to tens of miles. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Capgras Syndrome: A psychotic disorder characterized by the patient's belief that acquaintances or closely related persons have been replaced by doubles or imposters.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Sound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Dermatitis, Seborrheic: A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Keratosis, Seborrheic: Benign eccrine poromas that present as multiple oval, brown-to-black plaques, located mostly on the chest and back. The age of onset is usually in the fourth or fifth decade.Lichen Planus: An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.Malassezia: A mitosporic fungal genus that causes a variety of skin disorders. Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum orbiculare) causes TINEA VERSICOLOR.Skin DiseasesAcne Vulgaris: A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.Limbic Encephalitis: A paraneoplastic syndrome marked by degeneration of neurons in the LIMBIC SYSTEM. Clinical features include HALLUCINATIONS, loss of EPISODIC MEMORY; ANOSMIA; AGEUSIA; TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY; DEMENTIA; and affective disturbance (depression). Circulating anti-neuronal antibodies (e.g., anti-Hu; anti-Yo; anti-Ri; and anti-Ma2) and small cell lung carcinomas or testicular carcinoma are frequently associated with this syndrome.Huntington Disease: A familial disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by the onset of progressive CHOREA and DEMENTIA in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Common initial manifestations include paranoia; poor impulse control; DEPRESSION; HALLUCINATIONS; and DELUSIONS. Eventually intellectual impairment; loss of fine motor control; ATHETOSIS; and diffuse chorea involving axial and limb musculature develops, leading to a vegetative state within 10-15 years of disease onset. The juvenile variant has a more fulminant course including SEIZURES; ATAXIA; dementia; and chorea. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1060-4)Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Chorea: Involuntary, forcible, rapid, jerky movements that may be subtle or become confluent, markedly altering normal patterns of movement. Hypotonia and pendular reflexes are often associated. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of chorea as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as CHOREATIC DISORDERS. Chorea is also a frequent manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Paraneoplastic Syndromes, Nervous System: Degenerative or inflammatory conditions affecting the central or peripheral nervous system that develop in association with a systemic neoplasm without direct invasion by tumor. They may be associated with circulating antibodies that react with the affected neural tissue. (Intern Med 1996 Dec;35(12):925-9)Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Pedophilia: A sexual disorder occurring in a person 16 years or older and that is recurrent with intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors involving sexual activity with a prepubescent child (generally age 13 or younger). (from APA, DSM-IV, 1994).Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Erotica: Literary or artistic items having an erotic theme. It refers especially to books treating sexual love in a sensuous or voluptuous manner. (Webster, 3d ed)Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Anterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Branches of the anterior cerebral artery supply the CAUDATE NUCLEUS; INTERNAL CAPSULE; PUTAMEN; SEPTAL NUCLEI; GYRUS CINGULI; and surfaces of the FRONTAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE.Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY system, including branches such as Heubner's artery. These arteries supply blood to the medial and superior parts of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, Infarction in the anterior cerebral artery usually results in sensory and motor impairment in the lower body.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Financing, Construction: Funding resources and procedures for capital improvement or the construction of facilities.NebraskaVaginal Discharge: A common gynecologic disorder characterized by an abnormal, nonbloody discharge from the genital tract.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Whistleblowing: The reporting of observed or suspected PROFESSIONAL MISCONDUCT or incompetence to appropriate authorities or to the public.USSRNuclear Warfare: Warfare involving the use of NUCLEAR WEAPONS.War: Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.

Seizures in corticobasal degeneration: a case report. (1/8)

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Alien hand syndrome: neural correlates of movements without conscious will. (2/8)

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Acute infarct of the corpus callosum presenting as alien hand syndrome: evidence of diffusion weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography. (3/8)

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Posterior alien hand in a left-handed person. (4/8)

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Exaggerated object affordance and absent automatic inhibition in alien hand syndrome. (5/8)

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Stroke syndromes and clinical management. (6/8)

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The alien limb phenomenon. (7/8)

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The medial frontal-prefrontal network for altered awareness and control of action in corticobasal syndrome. (8/8)

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  • Demonstrate understanding of how ischemic damage to the brain can affect speech, sensory and motor control of body movements, and on rare occasions lead to alien hand syndrome. (buffalo.edu)
  • Group discussion is used to teach the post-stroke symptoms of hemiparesis (primarily in the lower extremity), dysphasia, and alien hand syndrome. (buffalo.edu)
  • Last summer I met 55-year-old Karen Byrne in New Jersey, who suffers from Alien Hand Syndrome. (neatorama.com)
  • Foreign Accent Syndrome is when someone suddenly changes their accent without warning. (toptenz.net)
  • Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that causes sudden changes in speech pattern, intonation and pronunciation so that the victim is perceived to speak with a "foreign" accent. (abovetopsecret.com)
  • The condition is also known as anarchic hand Symptoms: they could still sense that their hand is of normal and part of their body, but just provides a distinct behavior on its own without the control of its owner. (studymode.com)
  • According to the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, the symptoms of Ambras syndrome, as the condition is also called, include excessive hair growth all over the body, except on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. (livescience.com)
  • These episodes of lengthy sleep may be proceeded by flu-like symptoms and, when they're awake, people with this syndrome may exhibit various odd behaviors, including eating excessively, hallucinating or acting childishly. (livescience.com)
  • Strange Syndromes: Have You Been Experiencing Symptoms? (mysteriousuniverse.org)
  • Within seven and nine months from symptom onset, respectively, the clinical symptoms of frontal alien hand had resolved completely in both cases. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Group discussion is used to teach the post-stroke symptoms of hemiparesis (primarily in the lower extremity), dysphasia, and alien hand syndrome. (buffalo.edu)
  • Symptoms include uncontrolled rhythmic muscle contractions, decreased movement, muscle rigidity , impaired balance, alien hand syndrome or the inability to sense and control the movements of the hand, apraxia or the inability to control the movement of the limbs, and aphasia or the loss of speech. (wisegeek.com)
  • This cluster of symptoms is sometimes referred to as corticobasal syndrome (CBS) or corticobasal degeneration syndrome (CBDS), since definitive diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration is not possible while the patient is alive. (wisegeek.com)
  • Progeria also known as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome is the third rarest disease due to genetic disorder with symptoms of ageing at an early age. (toptenofcity.com)
  • Aura occurs in about one third of all migraine patients and includes mainly visual symptoms, but also aphasia, dyschromatopsia, prosopagnosia, ideational apraxia, alien hand syndrome and proper name anomia [ 3 ]. (termedia.pl)
  • Duane Retraction Syndrome, also known as stilling-turk-duane syndrome , is related to duane retraction syndrome 2 and duane retraction syndrome 1 , and has symptoms including ophthalmoparesis and ophthalmoplegia . (malacards.org)
  • When damage occurs to the corpus callosum-the data link between the brain's two hemispheres-the non-dominant hand can develop what seems to be an independent sense of purpose, groping around its environment and manipulating the objects it finds. (damninteresting.com)
  • One particularly unorthodox subtype of Alien Hand Syndrome can arise due to lesions on the corpus callosum, producing a phenomenon called intermanual conflict. (damninteresting.com)
  • At times, particularly in patients who have sustained damage to the corpus callosum that connects the two cerebral hemispheres, the hands appear to be acting in opposition to each other. (studymode.com)
  • The alien hand sign, or "main etrangere", was first described by Brion and Jedynak 1 as a combination of involuntary, seemingly purposeful, hand movements with denial of its ownership in three patients with corpus callosal tumours. (bmj.com)
  • The term "diagonistic dyspraxia" was coined earlier by Akelaitis 2 in a patient with a corpus callosotomy who developed transient, involuntary antagonistic movements of the non-dominant hand which interfered with attempted voluntary movements of the dominant hand. (bmj.com)
  • Subsequent reports of dominant alien hand sign as a presentation of anterior cerebral artery infarction involving both the corpus callosum and dominant medial frontal cortex, 4-11 led to the concept of two different kinds of alien hand, one "frontal" in the dominant hand and the other "callosal" in the non-dominant hand. (bmj.com)
  • Reversible splenial lesion syndrome is a condition which is radiologically characterized by reversible lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Episodes of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome come and go within a matter of minutes, and most people experience them at home. (toptenz.net)
  • It turns out Alex has Male pseudohermaphrodism, which is now called Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). (futurism.media)
  • Indeed, Bramwell applied this term to two different conditions: (a) right hemiplegia and aphasia in a left-hander and (b) left hemiplegia and aphasia in a right-handed individual. (hindawi.com)
  • Hécaen and Albert [ 7 ] suggested that the term "crossed aphasia" should be used only to refer to aphasia following right hemisphere pathology in a right-handed person, and this is how the term is currently used [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • This structural, lesion based, disconnectionist approach has been challenged recently by a strong association with corticobasal ganglionic degeneration 12 and two case reports of pathologically established Alzheimer's disease presenting with isolated alien hand. (bmj.com)
  • Hinter dem etwas befremdlichen Pseudonym Alien Hand Syndrome (benannt nach einer neurologischen Störung ) verbirgt sich der in Wien lebende oberösterreichische Multinstrumentalist Clemens Engert, der mit „Slumber" sein zweites Album vorlegt. (nicorola.de)
  • They will often dissociate themselves from the hand by personifying it-sometimes assigning it a name-and attribute its inexplicable movements to ghosts or gods. (damninteresting.com)
  • In alien hand syndrome the individual tends to display more sensory deficits as they dissociate themselves from the hand and its actions, frequently remarking on the hand's behaviour as if it does not belong to them. (blogspot.com)
  • I would like to ask the group if anyone has tried Low Dose Naltrexone for Restless Leg Syndrome. (medhelp.org)
  • The patient complained of a feeling of "strangeness" in relationship to the goal-directed movements of the left hand and insisted that "someone else" was moving the left hand, and that she was not moving it herself. (blogspot.com)
  • Here we found that this bilateral network was activated by VM with either hand (right or left), but with left prefrontal areas being more strongly implicated than right prefrontal areas and specifically associated with voluntary relative to alien movements of the left hand. (physicsforums.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to determine how regional involvement of the thalamus differs among Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal syndrome. (ajnr.org)
  • Nine patients with Parkinson disease, 5 with progressive supranuclear palsy, and 6 with corticobasal syndrome underwent 3T MR imaging along with 12 matched, asymptomatic volunteers by using a protocol that included volumetric T1 and diffusion tensor imaging. (ajnr.org)
  • Thalamic volume was smaller in the progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome groups compared with the Parkinson disease and control groups. (ajnr.org)
  • Reduced size and increased ADC disproportionately involve the lateral thalamus in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome, consistent with selective neurodegeneration and atrophy in this region. (ajnr.org)
  • A patient with alien hand syndrome experiences their limbs acting without their control. (futurism.media)
  • He describes patients who suffer from 'alien hand syndrome' where one hand might attack the patient's own throat, patients with frontal lobe damage who invent fantastic stories about their lives, paralyzed patients who reject and disown one of their limbs. (ovid.com)
  • People who have the rare skin disease called Werewolf syndrome have some features that may resemble those of the mythical creatures for which the condition is named. (livescience.com)
  • Alien hand syndrome is a condition where a person's hand seems to take on a mind of its own (a la Dr. Strangelove). (hypnosis101.com)
  • Patients retain all sense of feeling in the alien hand, but they often describe feelings of disassociation. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Anarchic hand is usually diagnosed as opposed to alien hand syndrome because it tends to be more associated with motor impairments as the patients acknowledge the hand as theirs but are frustrated by its unintended actions. (blogspot.com)
  • While there is no easy cure for this syndrome, patients can attend speech therapy, if they really want to go back to their original accents. (toptenz.net)
  • Patients who to go to physical therapy often walk with a cane, even if they don't really need one, simply to keep their alien hand occupied. (toptenz.net)
  • In two patients with pathologically established disease association with a progressive alien hand syndrome was the sole initial manifestation of the disease. (bmj.com)
  • We now report two patients with pathologically established Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who presented with alien hand complaints in the absence of clinically obvious dementia. (bmj.com)
  • believed that Lhermitte's experiments led the patients to perform the behaviors that they thought were expected of them as the researchers either placed the objects in the patients hands or enticed them to pick up the objects. (wikipedia.org)
  • PML occurs almost exclusively in patients with severe immune deficiency , most commonly among patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), but people on chronic immunosuppressive medications including chemotherapy are also at increased risk of PML, such as patients with transplants, Hodgkin's lymphoma , multiple sclerosis , psoriasis , and other autoimmune diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Members of the left or right fasciculus cuneatus terminates, functioning as a suppressive in an ordered set of alternatives is the preferred technique in patients with low serum levels, and higher level of toxic shock syndrome may develop during treatment with certain heritable traits in the same individual or in terms of events leading to diarrhoea due to resistant e. (bigsurlandtrust.org)
  • Genetic prion diseases constitute a continuum of clinical and pathologic manifestations broadly segregated into three principal phenotypes designated as familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and familial fatal insomnia (FFI). (nature.com)
  • Once we recognise the importance of keeping the hands busy, we can start to think about the reasons for this strange necessity. (theguardian.com)
  • Ambras syndrome is a genetic disease and is a dominant trait, and so if a child has one parent with this syndrome, the child may inherit it. (livescience.com)
  • This article describes the disease commonly known as Restless Legs Syndrome and why the name was changed to Willis-Ekbom Disease. (hubpages.com)
  • I have personally suffered with the disease formerly known as Restless Legs Syndrome and now known as Willis-Ekbom Disease since my earliest memories as a child. (hubpages.com)
  • I have published two other articles about Restless Legs Syndrome / Willis Ekbom Disease and invite you to read them as well. (hubpages.com)
  • The Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation, located in Rochester, Minnesota, recently announced its own name change to coincide with that of the disease. (hubpages.com)
  • Similar steps were taken when changing the name senile dementia to Alzheimer Disease and mongolism to Down Syndrome. (hubpages.com)
  • Over the past several years, Willis-Ekbom Disease / Restless Legs Syndrome has finally received much needed attention and is today recognized as the potentially serious disease that it has always been. (hubpages.com)
  • Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy and Linear Scleroderma En Coup de Sabre: A Spectrum of the Same Disease? (frontiersin.org)
  • Earlier it was highlighted that PHA and linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre" (ECDS) often coexisted ( 6 , 8 ), but some authors described PHA as a unique disease ( 9 - 11 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • for this reason, the term "corticobasal syndrome" is applied in lieu of CBD to convey the fact that disorders including Alzheimer disease, certain variants of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and prion disease can present similarly. (ajnr.org)
  • Sometimes referred to as Stone Man Syndrome, Fibro dysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a disease of the connective tissue causing mutation of the body. (toptenofcity.com)
  • They have sensation in the hand but lose the sense of "ownership. (hypnosis101.com)
  • A person with alien hand syndrome can feel normal sensation in the hand and leg, but believes that the hand, while still being a part of their body, behaves in a manner that is totally distinct from the sufferer's normal behavior. (studymode.com)
  • Bogen 3 further defined this entity in the non-dominant hand after surgical anterior callosotomy and used the term intermanual conflict. (bmj.com)